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Welcome to CollegeHoopedia.com! This tell-it-like-it-is treasure trove of facts, statistical analysis and edgy opinion is unique because it catalogs the matchless performances of uncommon participants. Much of this dig-deep information you can't find anywhere else among banal boosterism and vacuous coverage offered by sports-bar herd animals couldn't have been assembled without securing take-no-prisoners input from a vigorous variety of old-school basketball resources and passionate fans. We offer a hearty thank-you for visiting this politically-incorrect salient site and seeking to enhance your contemporary and historical perspectives of college hoops plus possibly know more about us as a fiercely independent voice you can trust. We devoutly study the sport and will be chafed to the point of enemies-list snarky whenever our ideals are threatened by stuck-on-stupid presstitutes never having an intimate relationship with the entire truth. Unflinchingly amid a pathetic PC cultural cleansing right out of Nation magazine's style-book, there will be no unmasking mercy on any facts-allergic or cowardly echo-chamber wastes of perfectly good oxygen we believe are violating the game's integrity. Some inquisitive and acerbic individual needs to robustly and unapologetically exhibit intestinal fortitude expressing utter contempt for chronically-clueless gasbags ritualistically dwelling on what they "feel" you want to read and hear rather than distributing facts you need to "know." If beer-goggle donning media types are persistent annoyance, click here if you want to follow our incisive information and unvarnished truth on Twitter. We reject the simplistic church of group-think hierarchy among pedestrian pundits embracing sacred-cow conformity comparable to many of the embellishing follow-the-pack national and lazy local media lemmings predictably trivializing verifiable truth and contrary creativity. Unabashedly, we aspire to be a combative and visionary three-dimensional "player" - respecting life lessons from the past, portraying the present with pithy and prickly posturing plus keeping a keen eye for "teaching moments" in the future. Knowledge is power and sunlight is the best disinfectant! If necessary in combating intellect inequality, let words be your weapons.

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopers Make Their Mark on June 25 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopers had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Former Missouri State hoopers Mark Bailey and Norm Siebern hit two homers as MLB rookies on this date. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a June 25 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

JUNE 25

  • Oakland A's rookie RHP Mark Acre (played basketball in 1990 NCAA Tournament with New Mexico State) earned his third relief victory in 11 days in 1994.

  • Houston Astros rookie C Mark Bailey (Southwest Missouri State rebounding and field-goal shooting leader in 1980-81) blasted two homers in an 8-5 win against the Atlanta Braves in 1984.

  • Baltimore Orioles rookie LF Al Bumbry (Virginia State's runner-up in scoring with 16.7 ppg as freshman in 1964-65) banged out five hits and scored the go-ahead run in the top of the 12th inning of a 4-3 victory against the Milwaukee Brewers in 1973.

  • New York Giants 2B Andy Cohen (Alabama hoops letterman in 1924 and 1925) contributed four hits and scored three runs in a 12-4 triumph against the Philadelphia Phillies in the opener of a 1928 doubleheader.

  • Chicago White Sox 3B Gene Freese (West Liberty WV hoops captain of 1952 NAIA Tournament team) manufactured four hits against the Boston Red Sox in a 1960 game.

  • New York Giants 2B Frankie Frisch (Fordham hoops captain) collected four hits, four runs and three stolen bases against the Philadelphia Phillies in the nightcap of a 1921 twinbill. Eleven years later with the St. Louis Cardinals, Frisch furnished four hits against the Chicago Cubs in a 1932 contest.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers 1B Gil Hodges (hooper for St. Joseph's IN in 1943 and Oakland City IN in 1947 and 1948) went for the cycle (including two homers) in a 17-10 triumph at Pittsburgh in 1949.

  • Philadelphia Phillies CF Don Lock (led Wichita State in field-goal percentage in 1956-57 and 1957-58 under coach Ralph Miller) went 6-for-8, homering in both ends of a 1967 twinbill sweep against the St. Louis Cardinals.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates SS Johnny Logan (Binghamton hooper in 1948-49) went 4-for-4 in a 5-4 loss against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1963.

  • Rookie RF Bill Nicholson (two-year hoops guard for Washington College MD in mid-1930s) purchased from the Washington Senators by the Chicago Cubs for $35,000 in 1939.

  • Montreal Expos RHP Steve Renko (averaged 9.9 ppg and 5.8 rpg as Kansas sophomore in 1963-64) tossed a one-hit shutout against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1974.

  • Baltimore Orioles DH Larry Sheets (All-ODAC hoops selection in 1981-82 and 1982-83 with Eastern Mennonite VA) hammered two homers against the California Angels in a 1989 contest.

  • New York Yankees rookie LF Norm Siebern (member of Southwest Missouri State squads capturing back-to-back NAIA Tournament hoop titles in 1952 and 1953) socked two homers against the Kansas City Athletics in a 1956 game.

  • In 1995, RHP Lee Smith (averaged 3.4 ppg and 1.9 rpg with Northwestern State in 1976-77) posted a save in 19 straight relief appearances and was scoreless in his first 20 outings for the California Angels.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers LHP Eric Stults (hooper for 1999 NAIA D-II Tournament runner-up and 2000 NCCAA Tournament titlist with Bethel IN) fired a four-hit shutout against the Chicago White Sox in 2008.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates rookie LHP Bob Veale (scored 1,160 points with Benedictine KS from 1955-56 through 1957-58) didn't allow a run in his first 17 relief appearances in 1963.

  • New York Yankees RF Dave Winfield (starting forward for Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) stroked five singles and chipped in with four RBI against the Detroit Tigers in 1984. It was one of three five-hit games for Winfield this month, tying a mark set by legendary Ty Cobb. Two years earlier in 1982 as a LF, Winfield went 4-for-4 against the Cleveland Indians. In 1980 as a San Diego Padres RF, Winfield knocked in five runs in a 7-3 win against the San Francisco Giants.

One and Done: First 10 U.S. Selections in 2017 NBA Draft Were Freshmen

The newcomers are the latest not to give themselves sufficient time at the college level to amass one-for-the-books or one-for-the-ages career records. Markelle Fultz (Washington) was the ninth freshman in the last 11 years to become the first overall choice in the NBA draft. But be careful out there with any focus on freshman fascination! Greg Oden, the first pick in the 2007 NBA draft, scored a grand total of 30 playoff points in three injury-plagued campaigns compared to Kevin Durant, the second selection in the 2007 draft, scoring at least 30 points in all five contests of 2017 NBA Finals.

Incredibly, all of coach John Calipari's 25 frosh defectors (4 with Memphis and 21 with Kentucky) became first-round picks in the NBA draft after three Wildcats were chosen among the first 14 selections this season. An all-time record 16 first-round choices this year are among the following alphabetical list of 136 freshmen, only 26 hanging around long enough to become an All-American (five in 2017), leaving universities since troubled Dontonio Wingfield became the first major-college "one 'n done" frosh upon departing from Cincinnati in 1994:

Freshman Draftee Pos. College NBA Team Drafted By Year Round Overall Pick
Shareef Abdur-Rahim F-C California Vancouver Grizzlies 1996 1st 3rd
Steven Adams F Pittsburgh Oklahoma City Thunder 2013 1st 12th
Edrice "Bam" Adebayo F Kentucky Miami Heat 2017 1st 14th
Jarrett Allen C Texas Brooklyn Nets 2017 1st 22nd
Ike Anigbogu C UCLA Indiana Pacers 2017 2nd 47th
Carmelo Anthony F Syracuse Denver Nuggets 2003 1st 3rd
Trevor Ariza F UCLA New York Knicks 2004 2nd 43rd
Lonzo Ball G UCLA Los Angeles Lakers 2017 1st 2nd
Jerryd Bayless G Arizona Indiana Pacers 2008 1st 11th
Bradley Beal G-F Florida Washington Wizards 2012 1st 3rd
Malik Beasley G Florida State Denver Nuggets 2016 1st 19th
Michael Beasley F Kansas State Miami Heat 2008 1st 2nd
Anthony Bennett F UNLV Cleveland Cavaliers 2013 1st 1st
Eric Bledsoe G Kentucky Oklahoma City Thunder 2010 1st 18th
Devin Booker G Kentucky Phoenix Suns 2015 1st 13th
Chris Bosh F Georgia Tech Toronto Raptors 2003 1st 4th
Avery Bradley G Texas Boston Celtics 2010 1st 19th
Tony Bradley C North Carolina Los Angeles Lakers 2017 1st 28th
Jaylen Brown F California Boston Celtics 2016 1st 3rd
Marquese Chriss F Washington Sacramento Kings 2016 1st 8th
Zach Collins F-C Gonzaga Sacramento Kings 2017 1st 10th
Mike Conley Jr. G Ohio State Memphis Grizzlies 2007 1st 4th
Daequan Cook G Ohio State Philadelphia 76ers 2007 1st 21st
Omar Cook G St. John's Orlando Magic 2001 2nd 32nd
Jamal Crawford G Michigan Cleveland Cavaliers 2000 1st 8th
Javaris Crittenton G Georgia Tech Los Angeles Lakers 2007 1st 19th
Anthony Davis C Kentucky New Orleans Hornets 2012 1st 1st
Deyonta Davis F-C Michigan State Boston Celtics 2016 2nd 31st
Ricky Davis F Iowa Charlotte Hornets 1998 1st 21st
Luol Deng F Duke Phoenix Suns 2004 1st 7th
DeMar DeRozan F Southern California Toronto Raptors 2009 1st 9th
Cheick Diallo F-C Kansas Los Angeles Clippers 2016 2nd 33rd
Andre Drummond C Connecticut Detroit Pistons 2012 1st 9th
Kevin Durant F Texas Seattle SuperSonics 2007 1st 2nd
Henry Ellenson F Marquette Detroit Pistons 2016 1st 18th
Joel Embiid C Kansas Philadelphia 76ers 2014 1st 3rd
Tyler Ennis G Syracuse Phoenix Suns 2014 1st 18th
Tyreke Evans G Memphis Sacramento Kings 2009 1st 4th
Derrick Favors F Georgia Tech New Jersey Nets 2010 1st 3rd
Alton Ford F Houston Phoenix Suns 2001 2nd 51st
De'Aaron Fox G Kentucky Sacramento Kings 2017 1st 5th
Markelle Fultz G Washington Philadelphia 76ers 2017 1st 1st
Keith "Tiny" Gallon C Oklahoma Milwaukee Bucks 2010 2nd 47th
Harry Giles C Duke Portland Trail Blazers 2017 1st 20th
Dion Glover G Georgia Tech Atlanta Hawks 1999 1st 20th
Archie Goodwin G-F Kentucky Oklahoma City Thunder 2013 1st 29th
Aaron Gordon F Arizona Orlando Magic 2014 1st 4th
Eric Gordon G Indiana Los Angeles Clippers 2008 1st 7th
Donte Greene F Syracuse Memphis Grizzlies 2008 1st 28th
Eddie Griffin F Seton Hall New Jersey Nets 2001 1st 7th
Maurice Harkless F St. John's Philadelphia 76ers 2012 1st 15th
Tobias Harris F Tennessee Charlotte Bobcats 2011 1st 19th
Donnell Harvey F Florida New York Knicks 2000 1st 22nd
Spencer Hawes C Washington Sacramento Kings 2007 1st 10th
Xavier Henry G Kansas Memphis Grizzlies 2010 1st 12th
J.J. Hickson F North Carolina State Cleveland Cavaliers 2008 1st 19th
Jrue Holiday G UCLA Philadelphia 76ers 2009 1st 17th
Larry Hughes G Saint Louis Philadelphia 76ers 1998 1st 8th
Kris Humphries F Minnesota Utah Jazz 2004 1st 14th
Brandon Ingram F Duke Los Angeles Lakers 2016 1st 2nd
Jonathan Isaac F-C Florida State Orlando Magic 2017 1st 6th
Frank Jackson G Duke Charlotte Hornets 2017 2nd 31st
Josh Jackson G-F Kansas Phoenix Suns 2017 1st 4th
Grant Jerrett F Arizona Portland Trail Blazers 2013 2nd 40th
DerMarr Johnson G Cincinnati Atlanta Hawks 2000 1st 6th
Stanley Johnson G Arizona Detroit Pistons 2015 1st 8th
Tyus Jones G Duke Cleveland Cavaliers 2015 1st 24th
DeAndre Jordan C Texas A&M Los Angeles Clippers 2008 2nd 35th
Cory Joseph G Texas San Antonio Spurs 2011 1st 29th
Michael Kidd-Gilchrist F Kentucky Charlotte Bobcats 2012 1st 2nd
Brandon Knight G Kentucky Detroit Pistons 2011 1st 8th
Kosta Koufos C Ohio State Utah Jazz 2008 1st 23rd
Skal Labissiere F-C Kentucky Phoenix Suns 2016 1st 28th
Zach LaVine G UCLA Minnesota Timberwolves 2014 1st 13th
TJ Leaf F UCLA Indiana Pacers 2017 1st 18th
Ricky Ledo G Providence Milwaukee Bucks 2013 2nd 43rd
Kevon Looney F UCLA Golden State Warriors 2015 1st 30th
Kevin Love F UCLA Memphis Grizzlies 2008 1st 5th
Trey Lyles F Kentucky Utah Jazz 2015 1st 12th
Corey Maggette F Duke Seattle SuperSonics 1999 1st 13th
Stephon Marbury G Georgia Tech Milwaukee Bucks 1996 1st 4th
Lauri Markkanen F Arizona Minnesota Timberwolves 2017 1st 7th
O.J. Mayo G Southern California Minnesota Timberwolves 2008 1st 3rd
Chris McCullough F Syracuse New Jersey Nets 2015 1st 29th
Ben McLemore G-F Kansas Sacramento Kings 2013 1st 7th
Quincy Miller F Baylor Denver Nuggets 2012 2nd 38th
Malik Monk G Kentucky Charlotte Hornets 2017 1st 11th
Shabazz Muhammad G UCLA Utah Jazz 2013 1st 14th
B.J. Mullens C Ohio State Dallas Mavericks 2009 1st 24th
Dejounte Murray G Washington San Antonio Spurs 2016 1st 29th
Jamal Murray G Kentucky Denver Nuggets 2016 1st 7th
Nerlens Noel C Kentucky New Orleans Pelicans 2013 1st 6th
Greg Oden C Ohio State Portland Trail Blazers 2007 1st 1st
Jahlil Okafor C Duke Philadelphia 76ers 2015 1st 3rd
Daniel Orton C-F Kentucky Orlando Magic 2010 1st 29th
Kelly Oubre F Kansas Atlanta Hawks 2015 1st 15th
Jabari Parker F Duke Milwaukee Bucks 2014 1st 2nd
Justin Patton C Creighton Chicago Bulls 2017 1st 16th
Julius Randle F Kentucky Los Angeles Lakers 2014 1st 7th
Anthony Randolph F Louisiana State Golden State Warriors 2008 1st 14th
Zach Randolph C Michigan State Portland Trail Blazers 2001 1st 19th
Malachi Richardson G Syracuse Charlotte Hornets 2016 1st 22nd
Austin Rivers G Duke New Orleans Hornets 2012 1st 10th
Derrick Rose G Memphis Chicago Bulls 2008 1st 1st
D'Angelo Russell G Ohio State Los Angeles Lakers 2015 1st 2nd
Jamal Sampson F-C California Utah Jazz 2002 2nd 47th
Josh Selby G Kansas Memphis Grizzlies 2011 2nd 49th
Ben Simmons F Louisiana State Philadelphia 76ers 2016 1st 1st
Dennis Smith Jr. G North Carolina State Dallas Mavericks 2017 1st 9th
Lance Stephenson F Cincinnati Indiana Pacers 2010 2nd 40th
Diamond Stone C Maryland New Orleans Pelicans 2016 2nd 40th
Jayson Tatum F Duke Boston Celtics 2017 1st 3rd
Marquis Teague G Kentucky Chicago Bulls 2012 1st 29th
Tim Thomas F Villanova New Jersey Nets 1997 1st 7th
Tyrus Thomas F Louisiana State Portland Trail Blazers 2006 1st 4th
Tristan Thompson F Texas Cleveland Cavaliers 2011 1st 4th
Karl-Anthony Towns C Kentucky Minnesota Timberwolves 2015 1st 1st
Myles Turner C Texas Indiana Pacers 2015 1st 11th
Rashad Vaughn G UNLV Milwaukee Bucks 2015 1st 17th
Noah Vonleh F Indiana Charlotte Bobcats 2014 1st 9th
Dajuan Wagner G Memphis Cleveland Cavaliers 2002 1st 6th
Bill Walker F Kansas State Washington Wizards 2008 2nd 47th
John Wall G Kentucky Washington Wizards 2010 1st 1st
Gerald Wallace F Alabama Sacramento Kings 2001 1st 25th
Rodney White F Charlotte Detroit Pistons 2001 1st 9th
Hassan Whiteside C Marshall Sacramento Kings 2010 2nd 33rd
Andrew Wiggins G-F Kansas Cleveland Cavaliers 2014 1st 1st
Marvin Williams F North Carolina Atlanta Hawks 2005 1st 2nd
Shawne Williams F Memphis Indiana Pacers 2006 1st 17th
Dontonio Wingfield F Cincinnati Seattle SuperSonics 1994 2nd 37th
Justice Winslow G-F Duke Miami Heat 2015 1st 10th
Brandan Wright F North Carolina Charlotte Hornets 2007 1st 8th
Tony Wroten Jr. G Washington Memphis Grizzlies 2012 1st 25th
James Young G-F Kentucky Boston Celtics 2014 1st 17th
Thaddeus Young F Georgia Tech Philadelphia 76ers 2007 1st 12th
Stephen Zimmerman F UNLV Orlando Magic 2016 2nd 41st

NOTE: Manute Bol (DII Bridgeport in 1985) and Shawn Kemp (JC Trinity Valley in 1989) were the first two non-NCAA DI players selected as freshmen. Ledo did not play with PC for academic reasons.

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopers Make Their Mark on June 24 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopers had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Former Morehead State hoopers Steve Hamilton and Denny Doyle made MLB news on this date. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a June 24 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

JUNE 24

  • INF-OF Leo Burke (averaged 9.2 ppg for Virginia Tech basketball teams in 1952-53 and 1953-54) traded by the St. Louis Cardinals to the Chicago Cubs for knuckle-ball reliever Barney Schultz in 1963.

  • Detroit Tigers RHP Ownie Carroll (Holy Cross hoops letterman in 1922), hurling his second shutout, allowed a total of four earned runs in his first eight victories of the 1928 campaign en route to leading the team with 16 triumphs.

  • Boston Braves SS Dick Culler (#9 jersey retired by High Point for Little All-American in 1935 and 1936) went 6-for-7 in a 1945 doubleheader split against the Brooklyn Dodgers.

  • Philadelphia Phillies 2B Denny Doyle (averaged 2.7 ppg for Morehead State in 1962-63) delivered his third three-hit outing in a 12-game span in 1972.

  • 1B Walt Dropo (Connecticut's first hooper ever to average 20 points in single season with 21.7 ppg in 1942-43) awarded on waivers from the Chicago White Sox to the Cincinnati Reds in 1958.

  • Houston Astros C Joe Ferguson (hooper in 1967 NCAA playoffs with Pacific) walked five times, including three intentional bases on balls, against the San Diego Padres in a 1978 game.

  • RHP Eddie Fisher (hooper for Oklahoma's 1954-55 freshman squad) surrendered his only run in first 12 relief appearances with the Baltimore Orioles in 1966.

  • New York Giants 2B Frankie Frisch (Fordham hoops captain) went 5-for-5 and scored four runs against the Philadelphia Phillies in the opener of a 1926 doubleheader.

  • St. Louis Cardinals RHP Bob Gibson (Creighton's leading scorer and rebounder in 1955-56 and 1956-57) ended a personal five-game losing streak with his final of 56 career shutouts (four-hitter against Pittsburgh Pirates in nightcap of 1974 twinbill).

  • New York Yankees LHP Steve Hamilton (Morehead State's leading scorer and rebounder in 1956-57 and 1957-58) struck out Cleveland Indians 1B Tony Horton with a couple of "Folly Floaters" as a reliever in the nightcap of a 1970 doubleheader.

  • Philadelphia Athletics 1B Tom Hamilton (member of Texas' 1947 Final Four team was SWC's leading scorer in league competition in 1949-50) supplied a career-high two hits in a 6-3 setback against the Detroit Tigers in 1953.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers 1B Gil Hodges (hooper for St. Joseph's IN in 1943 and Oakland City IN in 1947 and 1948) homered three times in a 1951 doubleheader against the Pittsburgh Pirates. Seven years later, Hodges hammered a round-tripper in both ends of a 1958 twinbill sweep of the Cincinnati Reds.

  • In 1944, Cincinnati Reds rookie RHP Jim Konstanty (member of 1937-38 and 1938-39 Syracuse hoop teams) tossed a shutout in his second MLB start (1-0 against Chicago Cubs).

  • In 1958, New York Yankees INF Jerry Lumpe (member of Southwest Missouri State's 1952 NAIA Tournament championship hoops team) smacked his first MLB homer (at Chicago off Early Wynn of White Sox).

  • New York Yankees RF Bud Metheny (William & Mary hoops letterman from 1935-36 through 1937-38) amassed two homers and six RBI in a 13-5 win against the Philadelphia Athletics in the opener of a 1945 twinbill.

  • Detroit Tigers RF Jim Northrup (second-leading scorer and third-leading rebounder for Alma MI in 1958-59) powered a grand slam in back-to-back innings (fifth and sixth) against the Cleveland Indians in 1968.

  • Cincinnati Reds LHP Eppa Rixey (Virginia hoops letterman in 1911-12 and 1913-14) went into the eighth inning with a perfect game but wound up losing to the Pittsburgh Pirates, 4-3, in 1924.

  • In 1947, Brooklyn Dodgers 1B Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in PCC both of his seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) swiped home in the fifth inning against the Pittsburgh Pirates. It was the first of 19 times in Robinson's career he pilfered home. The next year, he went 7-for-9 in a 1948 doubleheader sweep of the Pirates.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers LHP Preacher Roe (Harding AR hooper in late 1930s) twirled a shutout against the St. Louis Cardinals in the opener of a 1952 twinbill, giving him 30 victories in his last 33 decisions going back to the end of the 1950 campaign.

  • New York Giants C Wes Westrum (hooper for Bemidji State MN one season before serving in military) contributed a career game, hitting three homers plus a triple and scoring five runs in a 12-2 triumph against the Cincinnati Reds in 1950.

  • In 1991, California Angels RF-DH Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) went 5-for-5 with three extra-base hits against the Kansas City Royals to become the oldest player in MLB history to go for the cycle (39).

Better Early Than Never: 28 Undergrad NBA Picks for UK in Last Eight Years

With three selections among the top 14 picks this year, Kentucky has a stunning 28 undergraduates selected in the NBA draft in the last eight seasons under coach John Calipari. The remainder of the SEC supplied 18 such selections during that span. As a further means of comparison, in-state rival Louisville had only eight such undergrads in the last 47 years after Montrezl Harrell, Chinanu Onuaku and Donovan Mitchell bolted early for the pros the past three campaigns.

UK is expected to increase its lead over runner-up North Carolina in this "defector" category in 2018 when the Wildcats should have multiple players leave school with eligibility remaining for the ninth straight season to declare for the NBA draft. It is debatable whether the undergrads should have returned to school for additional seasoning or even attended college in the first place. The following list of 13 schools have had at least a dozen defectors since the introduction of hardship cases in 1971:

Kentucky (36) - Tom Payne (1971), Rex Chapman (1988), Jamal Mashburn (1993), Antoine Walker (1996), Ron Mercer (1997), Nazr Mohammed (1998), Rajon Rondo (2006), Jodie Meeks (2009), Eric Bledsoe (2010), DeMarcus Cousins (2010), Daniel Orton (2010), Patrick Patterson (2010), John Wall (2010), Brandon Knight (2011), DeAndre Liggins (2011), Anthony Davis (2012), Terrence Jones (2012), Michael Kidd-Gilchrist (2012), Doron Lamb (2012), Marquis Teague (2012), Archie Goodwin (2013), Nerlens Noel (2013), Julius Randle (2014), James Young (2014), Devin Booker (2015), Willie Cauley-Stein (2015), Andrew Harrison (2015), Dakari Johnson (2015), Trey Lyles (2015), Karl-Anthony Towns (2015), Skal Labissiere (2016), Jamal Murray (2016), Tyler Ulis (2016), Bam Adebayo (2017), De'Aaron Fox (2017), Malik Monk (2017)

North Carolina (26) - Bob McAdoo (1972), James Worthy (1982), Michael Jordan (1984), J.R. Reid (1989), Jerry Stackhouse (1995), Rasheed Wallace (1995), Jeff McInnis (1996), Antawn Jamison (1998), Vince Carter (1998), Joseph Forte (2001), Raymond Felton (2005), Sean May (2005), Rashad McCants (2005), Marvin Williams (2005), Brandan Wright (2007), Wayne Ellington (2009), Ty Lawson (2009), Ed Davis (2010), Harrison Barnes (2012), John Henson (2012), Kendall Marshall (2012), Reggie Bullock (2013), P.J. Hairston (2014), J.P. Tokoto (2015), Tony Bradley (2017), Justin Jackson (2017)

UCLA (23) - Richard Washington (1976), Stuart Gray (1984), Tracy Murray (1992), Jelani McCoy (1998), Baron Davis (1999), Jerome Moiso (2000), Trevor Ariza (2004), Jordan Farmar (2006), Arron Afflalo (2007), Kevin Love (2008), Luc Mbah a Moute (2008), Russell Westbrook (2008), Jrue Holiday (2009), Tyler Honeycutt (2011), Malcolm Lee (2011), Shabazz Muhammad (2013), Jordan Adams (2014), Kyle Anderson (2014), Zach LaVine (2014), Kevon Looney (2015), Ike Anigbogu (2017), Lonzo Ball (2017), TJ Leaf (2017)

Duke (21) - William Avery (1999), Elton Brand (1999), Corey Maggette (1999), Carlos Boozer (2002), Mike Dunleavy Jr. (2002), Jay Williams (2002), Luol Deng (2004), Josh McRoberts (2007), Gerald Henderson (2009), Kyrie Irving (2011), Austin Rivers (2012), Rodney Hood (2014), Jabari Parker (2014), Tyus Jones (2015), Jahlil Okafor (2015), Justise Winslow (2015), Brandon Ingram (2016), Harry Giles (2017), Frank Jackson (2017), Luke Kennard (2017), Jayson Tatum (2017)

Kansas (20) - Norm Cook (1976), Darrin Hancock (1994), Paul Pierce (1998), Drew Gooden (2002), Julian Wright (2007), Darrell Arthur (2008), Mario Chalmers (2008), Brandon Rush (2008), Cole Aldrich (2010), Xavier Henry (2010), Marcus Morris (2011), Markieff Morris (2011), Josh Shelby (2011), Thomas Robinson (2012), Ben McLemore (2013), Joel Embiid (2014), Andrew Wiggins (2014), Kelly Oubre (2015), Cheick Diallo (2016), Josh Jackson (2017)

Louisiana State (18) - DeWayne Scales (1980), Jerry Reynolds (1985), John Williams (1986), Chris Jackson (1990), Stanley Roberts (1991), Shaquille O'Neal (1992), Ronnie Henderson (1996), Randy Livingston (1996), Stromile Swift (2000), Brandon Bass (2005), Tyrus Thomas (2006), Glen Davis (2007), Anthony Randolph (2008), Justin Hamilton (2012), Johnny O'Bryant (2014), Jarell Martin (2015), Jordan Mickey (2015), Ben Simmons (2016)

Arizona (17) - Eric Money (1974), Coniel Norman (1974), Brian Williams (1991), Mike Bibby (1998), Gilbert Arenas (2001), Richard Jefferson (2001), Michael Wright (2001), Andre Iguodala (2004), Marcus Williams (2006), Jerryd Bayless (2008), Derrick Williams (2011), Grant Jerrett (2013), Aaron Gordon (2014), Nick Johnson (2014), Rondae Hollis-Jefferson (2015), Stanley Johnson (2015), Lauri Markkanen (2017)

Connecticut (17) - Donyell Marshall (1994), Ray Allen (1996), Richard Hamilton (1999), Khalid El-Amin (2000), Caron Butler (2002), Ben Gordon (2004), Emeka Okafor (2004), Charlie Villanueva (2005), Josh Boone (2006), Rudy Gay (2006), Marcus Williams (2006), Hasheem Thabeet (2009), Kemba Walker (2011), Andre Drummond (2012), Jeremy Lamb (2012), DeAndre Daniels (2014), Daniel Hamilton (2016)

Michigan (16) - Campy Russell (1974), Tim McCormick (1984), Sean Higgins (1990), Chris Webber (1993), Jalen Rose (1994), Juwan Howard (1994), Maurice Taylor (1997), Robert Traylor (1998), Jamal Crawford (2000), Darius Morris (2011), Trey Burke (2013), Tim Hardaway Jr. (2013), Mitch McGary (2014), Glenn Robinson III (2014), Nik Stauskas (2014), D.J. Wilson (2017)

Syracuse (14) - Pearl Washington (1986), Billy Owens (1991), Carmelo Anthony (2003), Donte Greene (2008), Johnny Flynn (2009), Wesley Johnson (2010), Fab Melo (2012), Dion Waiters (2012), Michael Carter-Williams (2013), Tyler Ennis (2014), Jerami Grant (2014), Chris McCullough (2015), Malachi Richardson (2016), Tyler Lydon (2017)

Texas (14) - LaSalle Thompson (1982), Chris Mihm (2000), T.J. Ford (2003), LaMarcus Aldridge (2006), Daniel Gibson (2006), P.J. Tucker (2006), Kevin Durant (2007), D.J. Augustin (2008), Avery Bradley (2010), Jordan Hamilton (2011), Cory Joseph (2011), Tristan Thompson (2011), Myles Turner (2015), Jarrett Allen (2017)

Memphis (13) - Larry Kenon (1973), William Bedford (1986), Vincent Askew (1987), Sylvester Gray (1988), Penny Hardaway (1993), David Vaughn III (1995), Lorenzen Wright (1996), Dajuan Wagner (2002), Shawne Williams (2006), Chris Douglas-Roberts (2008), Derrick Rose (2008), Elliot Williams (2010), Will Barton (2012)

Ohio State (12) - Clark Kellogg (1982), Jim Jackson (1992), Michael Redd (2000), Mike Conley Jr. (2007), Daequan Cook (2007), Greg Oden (2007), Kosta Koufos (2008), B.J. Mullens (2009), Evan Turner (2010), Jared Sullinger (2012), Deshaun Thomas (2013), D'Angelo Russell (2015)

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopers Make Their Mark on June 23 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopers had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a June 23 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

JUNE 23

  • Pittsburgh Pirates RF Clyde Barnhart (played basketball for Shippensburg PA predecessor Cumberland Valley State Normal School prior to World War I) went 4-for-4 against the Cincinnati Reds in a 1923 game.

  • St. Louis Browns RF Beau Bell (two-year hoops letterman for Texas A&M in early 1930s) banged out four hits in a 6-3 win against the New York Yankees in 1937.

  • In 1975, Chicago Cubs RHP Ray Burris (two-sport standout in Southwestern Oklahoma State Hall of Fame) tossed his first MLB shutout (against Montreal Expos).

  • Cincinnati Reds 1B George Crowe (four-year letterman from 1939-40 through 1942-43 for Indiana Central after becoming first high school player named state's Mr. Basketball) went 4-for-4 with four RBI in a 5-3 victory against the Pittsburgh Pirates in the opener of a 1957 doubleheader.

  • SS Alvin Dark (hoops letterman for LSU and USL during World War II) traded by the Philadelphia Phillies to the Milwaukee Braves in 1960.

  • OF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA hoops titlist), retired from the Cleveland Indians, joined P Don Newcombe in 1962 as the first former MLB players to compete for a Japanese team. Doby's season batting average overseas will be a modest .225.

  • 1B Walt Dropo (Connecticut's first player ever to average 20 points in season with 21.7 ppg in 1942-43) and C Sammy White (All-PCC Northern Division first-five selection for Washington in 1947-48 and 1948-49) each homered when 12 consecutive Boston Red Sox players reached base in an 11-run, fourth-inning outburst at Detroit in 1952. Seven years later, Dropo was traded by the Cincinnati Reds to the Baltimore Orioles in 1959.

  • San Francisco Giants 1B Darrell Evans (member of Jerry Tarkanian-coached Pasadena City CA club winning 1967 state community college crown) homered in both ends of a 1976 doubleheader sweep against the San Diego Padres.

  • INF Howard Freigau (Ohio Wesleyan hooper) purchased from the Brooklyn Robins by the Boston Braves in 1928.

  • St. Louis Cardinals SS Charlie Gelbert (scored at least 125 points each of last three seasons in late 1920s for Lebanon Valley PA) went 5-for-5 against the Boston Braves in a 1930 game.

  • New York Mets OF Jimmy Piersall celebrated by running around the bases backwards in 1963 after the free spirit pounded the 100th homer of his MLB career and only one in the N.L. The round-tripper was yielded by Philadelphia Phillies RHP Dallas Green (Delaware's second-leading scorer and rebounder in 1954-55).

  • Cleveland Indians rookie 2B Jack Hammond (four-year hoops letterman for Colgate from 1909-10 through 1912-13) supplied a career-high three hits against the Chicago White Sox in the nightcap of a 1915 doubleheader.

  • Boston Red Sox rookie RHP Herb Hash (three-year letterman averaged 6.4 ppg as junior center for Richmond's undefeated team in 1934-35) hurled his lone MLB shutout (2-0 against Cleveland Indians in 1940).

  • Chicago Cubs INF-OF Harvey Hendrick (Vanderbilt hoops letterman in 1918) hammered a game-winning, pinch-hit grand slam in the 10th inning against the Philadelphia Phillies in the opener of a 1933 doubleheader.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers 1B Gil Hodges (hooper for St. Joseph's IN in 1943 and Oakland City IN in 1947 and 1948) homered twice against the Cincinnati Reds in a 1956 contest.

  • LHP Bill Krueger (led WCAC in free-throw percentage as Portland freshman in 1975-76) traded by the Oakland Athletics to the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1987.

  • In the midst of hitting safely in six of first eight contests with the Minnesota Twins in 1983, CF Rusty Kuntz (played J.C. hoops for Cuesta CA) led off the game against his original team (Chicago White Sox) with first MLB homer.

  • OF Sam Mele (NYU's leading scorer in 1943 NCAA playoffs) purchased from the Boston Red Sox by the Cincinnati Reds in 1955. Six years later, Mele became manager of the Minnesota Twins.

  • Boston Red Sox 1B Ed Morgan (Tulane hoops letterman from 1923-24 through 1925-26) collected three hits and scored four runs in a 10-2 win against the Chicago White Sox in 1934.

  • Jim Riggleman (two-year hoops letterman for Frostburg State MD averaged 7.2 ppg in early 1970s) resigned as Washington Nationals manager in 2011 on the heels of them winning 11 of 12 games when the franchise failed to give him a contract extension.

  • LHP Garry Roggenburk (Dayton scoring leader from 1959-60 through 1961-62 grabbed school-record 32 rebounds in third varsity game en route to pacing Flyers in rebounding his first two years) purchased from the Boston Red Sox by the Seattle Pilots in 1969.

  • Boston Red Sox 3B Jim Tabor (Alabama hoops letterman in 1936-37) blasted two homers against the Cleveland Indians in the nightcap of a 1940 twinbill.

Bruised Egos: All-Americans Frequently Have Been Bypassed in NBA Draft

Baylor All-American Johnathan Motley wasn't among the chosen few in this year's NBA draft. Of course, the NBA is a difficult nut to crack. Although he was an NCAA consensus second-team All-American, there was no guarantee he would be selected in 2017; primarily because of the emphasis on international players. Thus he took a crash-to-earth course at the school of hard knocks along with the following undrafted undergrads: James Blackmon (Indiana), Antonio Blakeney (Louisiana State), Isaiah Briscoe (Kentucky), Chance Comanche (Arizona), PJ Dozier (South Carolina), Isaac Humphries (Kentucky), Jaylen Johnson (Louisville), Eric Mika (Brigham Young), L.J. Peak (Georgetown), Xavier Rathan-Mayes (Florida State), Devin Robinson (Florida), Kobi Simmons (Arizona) and Melo Trimble (Maryland).

What were they thinking? Motley became the 10th NCAA consensus All-American to go undrafted in an eight-season span. Do you need any more evidence that the quality of play at the collegiate level has diminished in recent years? The NBA draft was reduced to seven rounds in 1985, three rounds in 1988 and to its present two rounds in 1989. Centers Bill Spivey of Kentucky and Sherman White of LIU, All-Americans in the early 1950s, went undrafted by the NBA allegedly because of possible repercussions stemming from a game-fixing scandal. A total of 32 All-Americans, five in 2011, have gone undrafted by the NBA thus far in the 21st Century.

Seven years ago, Sherron Collins (Kansas) and Scottie Reynolds (Villanova) became the initial NCAA consensus first-team All-Americans not to be selected in the NBA draft. They're not a motley crew, but following is an alphabetical list of All-Americans who weren't selected in an NBA draft:

Undrafted All-American Pos. School A-A Year(s)
Charlie Bell G Michigan State 2001
Melvin Booker G Missouri 1994**
Joe Capua G Wyoming 1956
Sherron Collins G Kansas 2009** and 2010*
Erwin Dudley F-C Alabama 2002
Melvin Ejim F Iowa State 2014**
Perry Ellis F Kansas 2016
C.J. Fair F Syracuse 2014**
Yogi Ferrell G Indiana 2016
Jason Gardner G Arizona 2002 and 2003**
Ben Hansbrough G Notre Dame 2011**
Udonis Haslem C Florida 2001 and 2002
Bobby Joe Hill G Texas Western 1966
Terrell "Tu" Holloway G Xavier 2011
Kevin Houston G Army 1987
Keith "Mister" Jennings G East Tennessee State 1991**
Kevin Jones F West Virginia 2012**
Sean Kilpatrick G Cincinnati 2014**
Brandin Knight G Pittsburgh 2002
Byron Larkin G Xavier 1988
Chris Lofton G Tennessee 2007** and 2008**
John Lucas III G Oklahoma State 2004
Billy McCaffrey G Vanderbilt 1993**
Jerel McNeal G Marquette 2009
Johnathan Motley F Baylor 2017
DeMarcus Nelson G-F Duke 2008
Kevin Pittsnogle F West Virginia 2006
Mike Pratt F Kentucky 1974
Hollis Price G Oklahoma 2003**
Jacob Pullen G Kansas State 2011
Allan Ray G Villanova 2006**
Dexter Reed G Memphis State 1977
Scottie Reynolds G Villanova 2010*
Bill Ridley G Illinois 1956
Juan "Pepe" Sanchez G Temple 2000
Jon Scheyer G Duke 2010**
Shea Seals F-G Tulsa 1997
Ron Slay F Tennessee 2003
Charles E. Smith G Georgetown 1989
Jordan Taylor G Wisconsin 2011
Seth Tuttle F-C Northern Iowa 2015**
Jarrod Uthoff F Iowa 2016
Fred VanVleet G Wichita State 2016
Scottie Wilbekin G Florida 2014
Max Williams G Southern Methodist 1960
Kyle Wiltjer F Gonzaga 2016
Andre Woolridge G Iowa 1997

*NCAA consensus first-team All-American.
**NCAA consensus second-team All-American.
NOTE: Bell, Booker, Collins, Ferrell, Hansbrough, Haslem, Jennings, Jones, Kilpatrick, Lucas, McNeal, Ray, Sanchez, Smith, VanVleet and Wiltjer went on to play in the NBA after signing as free agents. Pratt played in the ABA.

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopers Make Their Mark on June 22 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopers had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Former Guilford NC hoopers Rick Ferrell and Tom Zachary had significant MLB games on this date. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a June 22 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

JUNE 22

  • San Diego Padres RHP Mike Adams (played basketball for Texas A&M-Kingsville in 1996-97) surrendered his only run (against Tampa Bay Rays) in a span of 20 relief appearances from mid-May to early July in 2010.

  • Philadelphia Phillies 1B-LF Harry Anderson (averaged 7.7 ppg and 8.9 rpg for West Chester PA in 1951-52) homered in both ends of a 1958 doubleheader against the San Francisco Giants.

  • Cleveland Indians SS Lou Boudreau (leading scorer for Illinois' 1937 Big Ten Conference co-champion) banged out four hits against the Boston Red Sox in a 1940 contest.

  • OF Billy Cowan (hoops co-captain for Utah's 1960 NCAA playoff team) traded by the Chicago Cubs to the Philadelphia Phillies in 1966.

  • Cleveland Indians OF Larry Doby (reserve hoops guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) homered in both ends of a 1953 doubleheader against the Washington Senators.

  • St. Louis Browns C Rick Ferrell (forward for Guilford NC before graduating in 1928) furnished four hits and four RBI against the New York Yankees in a 1931 game.

  • San Francisco Giants RHP Eddie Fisher (hooper for Oklahoma's 1954-55 freshman squad) won his MLB debut by allowing only three hits and one run in seven innings in a 4-1 victory against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1959.

  • St. Louis Cardinals 2B Frankie Frisch (Fordham hoops captain) stroked three extra-base hits against the Philadelphia Phillies in a 1933 outing. The next year, Frisch went 5-for-5 against the Brooklyn Dodgers in a 1934 contest.

  • SS Dick Groat (NCAA unanimous first-team All-American for Duke in 1951-52 when national runner-up in scoring) purchased from the Philadelphia Phillies by the San Francisco Giants in 1967.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers C Tom Haller (backup forward for Illinois in 1956-57 and 1957-58 under coach Harry Combes) collected four hits against the Cincinnati Reds in a 1969 contest.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates 3B Lee Handley (Bradley hoops letterman from 1932-33 through 1934-35) provided four hits against the New York Giants in a 1939 game.

  • In 2003, LHP Mark Hendrickson (two-time All-Pacific-10 Conference selection paced Washington State four straight seasons in rebounding from 1992-93 through 1995-96) became the first Toronto Blue Jays hurler to hit a home run (against Montreal Expos).

  • In the midst of a career-high 11-game hitting streak, Chicago Cubs 2B Jerry Kindall (averaged 6.9 ppg for Minnesota as junior in 1955-56) contributed two doubles against the Philadelphia Phillies in a 1960 contest.

  • Setting a new record for a night game, Los Angeles Dodgers LHP Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman hoops squad in 1953-54) fanned 16 Philadelphia Phillies in a 6-2 triumph in 1959.

  • RHP Dave Leonhard (averaged 4.8 ppg with Johns Hopkins MD in 1961-62), joining the Baltimore Orioles on a weekend leave from the National Guard, tossed a three-hit shutout against the Cleveland Indians in the nightcap of a 1969 doubleheader.

  • Cincinnati Reds CF Greasy Neale (hooper graduated from West Virginia Wesleyan College in 1915) provided three hits in both ends of a 1918 twinbill split against the St. Louis Cardinals.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates rookie 2B Johnny O'Brien (consensus All-American second-team choice as junior and consensus first-team selection as senior averaged 25.8 ppg for Seattle from 1950-51 through 1952-53) manufactured back-to-back three-hit outings to cap off a nine-game hitting streak in 1953.

  • In 1971, Atlanta Braves RHP Ron Reed (Notre Dame's leading rebounder in 1963-64 and 1964-65) spun a three-hit shutout against the Montreal Expos, igniting a streak where he permitted more than two earned runs only once in a span of nine starts to early August.

  • In 1944, Pittsburgh Pirates INF Al Rubeling (Towson hooper in early 1930s) ripped his second pinch-hit homer in a four-game span.

  • In 1982, St. Louis Cardinals RHP John Stuper (two-time all-conference junior college hooper in mid-1970s for Butler County PA) surrendered Pete Rose's 3,772nd career hit. The third-inning double moved Rose past Hank Aaron into second place on MLB's all-time list.

  • Chicago White Sox RF Evar Swanson (five-position hooper for Knox IL) collected four hits against the Boston Red Sox in a 1934 game.

  • Toronto Blue Jays DH Dave Winfield (starting forward for Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) knocked in five runs in a 1992 outing against the Texas Rangers.

  • In 1969, Chicago White Sox rookie RHP Billy Wynne (one of prime Pfeiffer NC hoopers in mid-1960s) hurled his lone MLB shutout (1-0 against California Angels).

  • Washington Senators LHP Tom Zachary (Guilford NC hoops letterman in 1916) notched his first of eight consecutive complete games in 1920.

Caught in Draft: Total of 13 Active DI Head Coaches Were First-Round Picks

A striking number of NCAA Division I coaches probably will be a mite more interested in the NBA draft this week than their counterparts because they were selected themselves. Following is an alphabetical list of the 33 active DI mentors chosen in an NBA draft (including 21 in first or second round):

Division I Coach Current School NBA Team Draft Year Round
Steve Alford UCLA Dallas Mavericks 1987 2nd
Tommy Amaker Harvard Seattle SuperSonics 1987 3rd
Tony Bennett Virginia Charlotte Hornets 1992 2nd
Johnny Dawkins UCF San Antonio Spurs 1986 1st
Jamie Dixon Texas Christian Washington Bullets 1987 7th
Juan Dixon Coppin State Washington Wizards 2002 1st
Bryce Drew Vanderbilt Houston Rockets 1998 1st
Mike Dunleavy Sr. Tulane Philadelphia 76ers 1976 6th
Patrick Ewing Georgetown New York Knicks 1985 1st
Steve Henson Texas-San Antonio Milwaukee Bucks 1990 2nd
Bobby Hurley Jr. Arizona State Sacramento Kings 1993 1st
Lewis Jackson Alabama State Golden State Warriors 1984 3rd
Jeff Jones Old Dominion Indiana Pacers 1982 4th
Lon Kruger Oklahoma Atlanta Hawks 1974 9th
Larry Krystkowiak Utah Chicago Bulls 1986 2nd
Jim Larranaga Miami (Fla.) Detroit Pistons 1971 6th
Jim Les UC Davis Atlanta Hawks 1986 3rd
Dan Majerle Grand Canyon Phoenix Suns 1988 1st
Danny Manning Wake Forest Los Angeles Clippers 1988 1st
Donnie Marsh Alabama A&M Atlanta Hawks 1979 3rd
Donyell Marshall Central Connecticut State Minnesota Timberwolves 1994 1st
Cuonzo Martin Missouri Atlanta Hawks 1995 2nd
Mike McConathy Northwestern State Chicago Bulls 1977 4th
Chris Mullin St. John's Golden State Warriors 1985 1st
Fran O'Hanlon Lafayette Philadelphia 76ers 1970 8th
Scott Padgett Samford Utah Jazz 1999 1st
Mark Pope Utah Valley Indiana Pacers 1996 2nd
Terry Porter Portland Portland Trail Blazers 1985 1st
Mark Price Charlotte Dallas Mavericks 1986 2nd
Al Skinner Kennesaw State Boston Celtics 1974 9th
Damon Stoudamire Pacific Toronto Raptors 1995 1st
Reggie Theus Cal State Northridge Chicago Bulls 1978 1st
Corey Williams Stetson Chicago Bulls 1992 2nd

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopers Make Their Mark on June 21 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Former Alabama hoopers Riggs Stephenson (Chicago Cubs) and Jim Tabor (Boston Red Sox) had significant MLB outings on this date. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a June 21 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

JUNE 21

  • Pittsburgh Pirates 3B Clyde Barnhart (played basketball for Shippensburg PA predecessor Cumberland Valley State Normal School prior to World War I) and LF Carson Bigbee (hoops letterman with his brother on Oregon's squad in 1915) combined for nine hits against the Brooklyn Robins in a 1922 contest.

  • Detroit Tigers 1B Tony Clark (San Diego State's leading scorer in WAC games in 1991-92) collected five RBI against the Boston Red Sox in a 1997 outing. Two years later, Clark cracked three extra-base hits against the Oakland Athletics in a 1999 contest.

  • Chicago Cubs 3B Alvin Dark (hoops letterman for Louisiana State and Louisiana-Lafayette in mid-1940s) posted his third four-hit outing in a five-game span in 1958.

  • After registering five saves in less than a month, Cincinnati Reds LHP Joe Gibbon (two-time All-SEC forward for Ole Miss was nation's second-leading scorer as senior in 1956-57) notched his 11th straight scoreless relief appearance.

  • RHP Walt Huntzinger (All-EIBL second-five selection in 1921-22 with Penn) awarded on waivers from the St. Louis Cardinals to the Chicago Cubs in 1926.

  • OF Rusty Kuntz (J.C. hooper for Cuesta CA) traded by the Chicago White Sox to the Minnesota Twins in 1983.

  • Washington Senators CF Don Lock (led Wichita State in field-goal percentage in 1956-57 and 1957-58 under coach Ralph Miller) smashed two homers against the Kansas City Athletics in the opener of a 1964 doubleheader.

  • Chicago White Sox RHP Ted Lyons (two-time All-SWC first-team selection for Baylor in early 1920s) notched his 250th career win in 1942. Lyons finished the season hurling complete games in all 20 starts, led the A.L. with a 2.10 ERA, and then entered the U.S. Marine Corps at age 42.

  • Washington Senators rookie CF Irv Noren (hoops player of year for California community college state champion Pasadena City in 1945) knocked in five runs against the Detroit Tigers in a 1950 contest.

  • Detroit Tigers RF Jim Northrup (second-leading scorer and third-leading rebounder for Alma MI in 1958-59) amassed two homers and five RBI against the Cleveland Indians in the nightcap of a 1970 twinbill.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers LHP Preacher Roe (Harding AR hooper in late 1930s) won his first 10 decisions in 1951.

  • New York Yankees 3B Red Rolfe (played hoops briefly with Dartmouth in 1927-28 and 1929-30) provided five hits against the Detroit Tigers in a 1940 outing.

  • As a pinch-hitter, New York Mets C John Stephenson (scored 1,361 points for William Carey MS in early 1960s) was the final out of P Jim Bunning's perfect game for the Philadelphia Phillies in 1964.

  • Chicago Cubs LF Riggs Stephenson (Alabama hoops letterman in 1920) supplied four hits against the Philadelphia Phillies in a 1932 contest.

  • Boston Red Sox 3B Jim Tabor (Alabama hoops letterman in 1936-37) knocked in five runs in a 1941 outing against the St. Louis Browns.

  • In 1973, San Diego Padres rookie LF Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) whacked his first of 465 MLB homers (off Ken Forsch of Houston Astros).

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopers Make Their Mark on June 20 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopers had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Former small-college hoopers Dick Siebert (Concordia-St. Paul MN/Minnesota) and Bobby Winkles (Illinois Wesleyan/Arizona State) guided major universities to College World Series championships on this date in the 1960s. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a June 20 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

JUNE 20

  • Boston Red Sox 1B Dale Alexander (starting basketball center in mid-1920s for Milligan TN) contributed four hits in a 9-5 win against the Cleveland Indians in 1933.

  • LF Howie Bedell (averaged 3.5 ppg and 3.5 rpg for West Chester PA in 1955-56) traded by the Milwaukee Braves to the St. Louis Cardinals for P Bobby Tiefenauer in 1963.

  • Montreal Expos RHP Ray Burris (two-sport standout in Southwestern Oklahoma State Hall of Fame) tossed a three-hit shutout against the Philadelpia Phillies in 1983.

  • RHP Bob Chlupsa (led Manhattan in rebounding in 1965-66 and 1966-67) traded by the St. Louis Cardinals to the San Diego Padres in 1972.

  • 1B Tony Clark (San Diego State's leading scorer in WAC games in 1991-92) clobbered two of Detroit's team-record eight homers in the Tigers' 18-6 victory against the Toronto Blue Jays in 2000.

  • Hall of Fame C Mickey Cochrane (Boston University hooper in early 1920s) collected four of the Philadelphia Athletics' 26 hits in an 18-11 decision over the Chicago White Sox in 1932.

  • Lone MLB triumph for RHP Paul Edmondson (averaged 12.4 ppg and 6.6 rpg with Cal State Northridge from 1962-63 through 1964-65) came in his debut in 1969 when hurling a two-hitter for the Chicago White Sox against the California Angels.

  • Detroit Tigers rookie 1B Hank Greenberg (enrolled at NYU on hoops scholarship in 1929 but attended college only one semester) went 4-for-4 against the Philadelphia Athletics in a 1933 contest.

  • RHP Ed Halicki (NAIA All-American third-team choice in 1971-72 when leading Monmouth in scoring with 21 ppg after setting school single-game rebounding record with 40 the previous season) awarded on waivers from the San Francisco Giants to the California Angels in 1980.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers 1B Gil Hodges (hooper for St. Joseph's IN in 1943 and Oakland City IN in 1947 and 1948) homered twice against the Cincinnati Reds in a 1959 game.

  • New York Yankees LF Charlie Keller (three-year hoops letterman with Maryland from 1934-35 through 1936-37) homered in his fourth consecutive contest in 1941. Two years later, Keller connected for a circuit clout in both ends of a 1943 twinbill split against the Washington Senators.

  • San Francisco Giants OF Harvey Kuenn (played hoops briefly for Wisconsin in 1951-52 after competing on JV squad previous season) collected five hits against the St. Louis Cardinals in a 1964 contest.

  • Chicago Cubs RF Bill Nicholson (Washington College MD hoops guard for two years in mid-1930s) smacked two homers against the St. Louis Cardinals in the opener of a 1943 doubleheader.

  • In 1961 outing, Baltimore Orioles rookie RF Earl Robinson (three-time All-PCC second-team selection for California under coach Pete Newell from 1955-56 through 1957-58) ripped first MLB homer, which was among his three hits against the Minnesota Twins.

  • New York Yankees 3B Red Rolfe (Dartmouth hooper in 1927-28 and 1929-30) registered three extra-base hits against the Chicago White Sox in a 1939 game.

  • Baltimore Orioles 1B Norm Siebern (member of Southwest Missouri State squads capturing back-to-back NAIA Tournament hoops titles in 1952 and 1953) stroked three extra-base hits and scored four runs against the Washington Senators in a 1965 game.

  • Eleven-year MLB 1B Dick Siebert (Concordia-St. Paul MN hooper in 1929 and 1930) coached Minnesota to his second of three College World Series championships with the Gophers by outlasting Southern California, 2-1, in 10 innings in 1960.

  • Chicago Cubs SS Roy Smalley Jr. (one of top scorers for Drury MO in 1942-43 and 1943-44) supplied three extra-base hits off Johnny Sain in a 4-3 triumph against the Boston Braves in a 1950 contest.

  • RHP Lee Smith (averaged 3.4 ppg and 1.9 rpg with Northwestern State in 1976-77) preserved the California Angels' 3-2 verdict over the Kansas City Royals in 1995, setting a MLB mark with his 18th save in 18 opportunities (record subsequently broken).

  • Boston Red Sox 3B Jim Tabor (Alabama hoops letterman in 1936-37) jacked two homers against the Philadelphia Athletics in the opener of a 1943 twinbill.

  • Former MLB manager Bobby Winkles (All-College Conference of Illinois first-team selection led Illinois Wesleyan in scoring with 12 ppg as senior in 1950-51) coached Arizona State to his third of three College World Series championships with the Sun Devils by trouncing Tulsa, 10-1, in 1969.

Men For All Seasons: Hoopers Dominated Formative Seasons of CWS

Long before the ping was the electronic thing, college cagers brought their electrifying Hoop Dreams to the Field of Dreams. For instance, Lowell "Lefty" Davis averaged 19.3 ppg as an All-ACC second-team selection before the lefthander hurled a shutout in the NCAA College World Series for 1955 baseball champion Wake Forest. The next year, hoops regular Jerry Kindall hit for the cycle with eventual kingpin Minnesota against Ole Miss before eventually coaching Arizona to three CWS titles in an 11-year span (1976-80-86).

Among the eventual big leaguers selected to an All-CWS Team after also competing as college hoopers were Sonny Siebert (Missouri in 1958), Bob Garibaldi (Santa Clara in 1962), Gary Holman (Southern California in 1963), Bill Davis (Minnesota in 1964), Gary Sutherland (Southern California in 1964), Dave Winfield (Minnesota in 1973), Lyle Mouton (Louisiana State in 1990 and 1991) and Ryan Minor (Oklahoma in 1994). Siebert, a 12-year MLB pitcher, also played 1B for Mizzou, hitting three triples in six postseason games for CWS runner-up. Mouton smacked two homers for eventual champion LSU in 1991 CWS opener against Florida.

Three of the first four individuals earning the NCAA College World Series Most Outstanding Player award were also basketball players for the school. Following are athletic achievement summaries during the school year in question for this trio plus versatile performers Garibaldi and Winfield in the ultimate hoops regular/CWS MOP category:

Year CWS MOP College Pos. School Year Summary for Multi-Sport Athlete
1949 Tom Hamilton Texas 1B #2 scorer for 17-7 hoops team before contributing home run and four RBI in CWS title-game victory against Wake Forest
1950 Ray Van Cleef Rutgers OF averaged 2.8 ppg for 13-15 hoops team before going 7-for-9 in first two CWS outings for eventual 3rd-place finisher
1952 Jim O'Neill Holy Cross P averaged 6.2 ppg for 24-4 NIT participant before 6-5 righthander tossed three CWS complete-game wins, striking out nine in championship contest
1962 Bob Garibaldi Santa Clara P #2 scorer/rebounder for 19-6 hoops team before workhorse fanned 38 batters while appearing in five of six CWS games (27 2/3 innings after hurling eight frames in relief in 15-inning final-game loss against Michigan)
1973 Dave Winfield Minnesota OF-P averaged 10.5 ppg and 6.1 rpg for 21-5 hoops team before eventual HOF outfielder fanned 29 batters in two pitching starts (14 vs. Oklahoma and 15 vs. USC) with club tying for third-place finish; in perhaps the most amazing game in CWS history, Winfield allowed only an infield single through eight innings before defending champion Trojans erased 7-0 deficit with eight runs in ninth frame

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopers Make Their Mark on June 19 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopers had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a June 19 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

JUNE 19

  • Detroit Tigers 1B Dale Alexander (starting basketball center in mid-1920s for Milligan TN) had a 29-game hitting streak snapped by the New York Yankees in 1932. Two years later, Alexander was with the Boston Red Sox when he went 4-for-4 against the Cleveland Indians in the opener of a doubleheader.

  • Cleveland Indians RHP Jim Bibby (Fayetteville State NC backup hooper and brother of UCLA All-American Henry Bibby) tossed a four-hit shutout against the Detroit Tigers in the nightcap of a 1977 twinbill.

  • Chicago Cubs 1B Larry Biittner (runner-up in scoring and rebounding for Buena Vista IA in 1966-67) went 4-for-4 in the nightcap of a 1976 doubleheader against the Atlanta Braves.

  • New York Mets 1B Donn Clendenon (four-sport letterman with Morehouse GA) contributed three extra-base hits against the Philadelphia Phillies in a 1971 game.

  • New York Giants OF Hoot Evers (starter for Illinois in 1939-40) climaxed a four-run, ninth-inning rally with a pinch-hit homer against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1954.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers C Joe Ferguson (hooper in 1967 NCAA playoffs with Pacific) provided a game-winning, pinch homer in the bottom of the 10th inning in a 5-3 win against the Montreal Expos in 1980.

  • 3B Gene Freese (hoops captain of 1952 NAIA Tournament team for West Liberty WV) went 7-for-8, sparking the Cincinnati Reds to a 1961 twinbill sweep of the Philadelphia Phillies.

  • Nine-year MLB INF Jerry Kindall (averaged 6.9 ppg for Minnesota as junior in 1955-56) coached Arizona to his first of three College World Series championships with the Wildcats by upending Eastern Michigan, 7-1, in 1976.

  • Washington Senators 2B Buddy Myer (Mississippi State hoops letterman in 1923-24) notched at least three hits for the fourth time in six-game span in 1935.

  • San Diego Padres 3B Graig Nettles (shot 87.8% from free-throw line for San Diego State in 1963-64) smacked two homers against the San Francisco Giants in a 1986 outing.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers LF Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in Pacific Coast Conference both of his seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) ripped two homers against the Chicago Cubs in a 1954 contest.

  • Baltimore Orioles RHP Tim Stoddard (starting forward opposite All-American David Thompson for North Carolina State's 1974 NCAA champion) yielded his only run in an 11-game stretch of relief appearances in 1979.

  • Detroit Tigers C Birdie Tebbetts (Providence hooper in 1932) manufactured three hits for the third time in a four-game span in 1940.

  • St. Louis Cardinals RHP Ray Washburn (led Whitworth WA in scoring when named All-Evergreen Conference in 1958-59 and 1959-60) hurled a two-hit shutout against the Philadelphia Phillies in the opener of a 1966 doubleheader.

  • St. Louis Cardinals 1B Bill White (two-year hooper for Hiram OH in early 1950s) knocked in five runs in a 1963 contest against the New York Mets.

Father's Way: Ranking Premier Dad/Son Combinations Attending Same School

An old adage portends "the apple doesn't fall far from the tree." A challenging dynamic exists when playing for the same school where your dad was a standout. Whether or not it's a fair sampling (majority of dads are better), comparing the following father-son duos might provide a window depicting when the quality of play was superior.

Marques Johnson was the third-leading scorer and fourth-leading rebounder for UCLA's 1975 NCAA champion and son Kris was a backup freshman for the Bruins' 1995 titlist. They are the only father-son duo to capture NCAA crowns for the same institution, propelling them atop the list of premier father-son combinations. There is something in the family DNA for the following all-time Top 75 father-son tandems making the most impact for same major university factoring in how long they attended school:

Rank Family School Father's College Career Summary Son's College Career Summary
1. Johnson UCLA Marques, the national player of the year as a senior, averaged 14.4 ppg and 7.8 rpg from 1973-74 through 1976-77. Kris averaged 11.6 ppg and 3.7 rpg from 1994-95 through 1997-98.
2. Marble Iowa Roy, a three-time All-Big Ten Conference selection and the Hawkeyes' all-time leading scorer (2,116 points), averaged 15.8 ppg and 5 rpg from 1985-86 through 1988-89. Roy Devyn averaged 12 ppg, 3.5 rpg, 2.7 apg and 1.3 spg from 2010-11 through 2013-14, ranking among the school's all-time top seven in points, rebounds, assists and steals.
3. Burtt Iona Steve Sr., a two-time MAAC MVP, became the school's all-time leading scorer with 2,534 points by finishing among nation's top 17 scorers each of his last three seasons from 1981-82 through 1983-84. Steve Jr., a three-time All-MAAC selection, is school runner-up with 2,034 points from 2002-03 through 2005-06, finishing seventh in country in scoring as a senior.
4. Payton Oregon State Gary Sr., an NCAA unanimous first-team All-American as a senior in 1989-90, averaged 18.1 ppg and 7.8 apg in his four-year career with Beavers. Gary II, a juco recruit, emerged as Pac-12 Conference POY candidate in 2015-16.
5. Paxson Dayton James, a starter for two NIT runner-up teams, averaged 10.9 ppg and 7.6 rpg in three seasons in mid-1950s. Jim, an All-American as a senior, averaged 18 ppg and 4.5 rpg from 1975-76 through 1978-79.
6. Perry Holy Cross Ronnie Sr. averaged 13.6 ppg from 1951-52 through 1953-54. Ronnie Jr., a three-time All-American, averaged 23.2 ppg and 3.9 apg while shooting 88.5% at free-throw line from 1976-77 through 1979-80.
7. Hosket Ohio State Wilmer Clemens was named to third five on College Humor Magazine A-A in 1932-33 when he was fourth-leading scorer in Big Ten (8 ppg) as member of league co-champion. Bill, a member of the U.S. Olympic squad after appearing in Final Four as a senior, averaged 19.5 ppg and 12.3 rpg in three seasons from 1965-66 through 1967-68.
8. Haws Brigham Young Marty, an All-WAC first-team selection as a senior when leading the Cougars in scoring with 18.5 ppg, averaged 10.9 ppg and 4.1 apg from 1986-87 through 1989-90. Tyler averaged 19.6 ppg and 4.3 rpg, ranking among the nation's top seven scorers his final three seasons (2012-13 through 2014-15).
9. Rautins Syracuse Leo, who led the Orangemen in rebounds and assists as a senior when he was an All-Big East Conference third-team selection, averaged 12.1 ppg, 6.3 rpg and 5 apg from 1980-81 through 1982-83 after transferring from Minnesota. Andy, an All-Big East second-team selection as a senior, averaged 8.8 ppg, 2.6 rpg, 2.7 apg and 1.4 spg from 2005-06 through 2009-10.
10. Brewer Arkansas Ron, an All-American as a senior for a 1978 Final Four team, averaged 15.8 ppg and 3.3 rpg after one season at JC level. Ronnie, a two-time All-SEC selection, averaged 15.7 ppg and 5 rpg from 2003-04 through 2005-06 before declaring early for NBA draft.
11. Robinzine DePaul William Sr. averaged 15.3 ppg in 1954-55 and 1955-56. William Jr. averaged 16.6 ppg and 11.4 rpg from 1972-73 through 1974-75, including team highs of 19.4 ppg and 13.5 rpg as a senior.
12. Young Houston Michael, an All-American as a senior, was top scorer for back-to-back Final Four teams featuring Akeem Olajuwon (1983 and 1984), averaging 18.6 ppg over final two years. Joseph averaged 14.8 ppg, 3.5 rpg and 2.4 apg in 2011-12 and 2012-13 with UH before transferring to Oregon.
13. Warren North Carolina State Tony Sr. averaged 9.3 ppg and 4.3 rpg from 1976-77 through 1978-79 under coach Norm Sloan, leading Wolfpack in field-goal percentage as junior. Tony "T.J." Jr. was an All-American and ACC Player of the Year as sophomore in 2013-14 before declaring early for NBA draft.
14. Price Oklahoma Dennis averaged 10.9 ppg from 1957-58 through 1959-60. Brent averaged 18 ppg and 5.8 apg for the Sooners in 1990-91 and 1991-92 after transferring from South Carolina.
15. Hummer Princeton Edward, a Final Four teammate of All-American Bill Bradley before becoming an All-Ivy League second-team selection, averaged 10.2 ppg and 7 rpg from 1964-65 through 1966-67. Ian, a three-time All-Ivy League selection, averaged 13.2 ppg and 5.9 rpg from 2009-10 through 2012-13.
16. Cox San Francisco Chubby, setting stage for first father-son tandem to both be two-time all-conference selection for same school in same league, averaged team-high 5.4 apg in each of his final two seasons in 1976-77 and 1977-78. John averaged 15.8 ppg and 4.2 rpg from 2001-02 through 2004-05, leading the WCC in scoring as a senior.
17. Evans Oklahoma Eddie averaged 11.9 ppg from 1960-61 through 1962-63, including a team-high 16.4 ppg as a senior. Terry averaged 11.1 ppg and 5.3 apg from 1989-90 through 1992-93, setting school records in assists (628) and three-point field goals (259).
18. Raivio Portland Rick, a three-time All-WCAC selection who led the Pilots in FG% all four seasons, finished as their all-time leading rebounder (910/9.4 rpg) while averaging 17.2 ppg before becoming 1980 fifth-round draft choice by L.A. Lakers. Nik, a J.C. recruit, was an All-WCC selection as a junior in 2008-09 when he averaged 16 ppg and 6.5 rpg before heading overseas to play professionally after concluding his college career with 14.3 ppg and 5.3 rpg.
19. Temple Louisiana State Collis Jr., the first African-American varsity player in LSU history in 1971-72, averaged 10.1 ppg and 8.1 rpg in three seasons, ranking second in SEC in rebounding (11.1 rpg) and seventh in field-goal shooting (54.9%) as a senior. Collis III averaged 10.2 ppg from 1999-00 through 2002-03, including career-high 14.3 ppg as sophomore when he scored 30 points in regular-season finale at Tennessee. Garrett was defensive whiz for 2006 Final Four club before becoming an All-SEC second-team pick as senior in 2008-09.
20. Valentine Michigan State Carlton was the Spartans' leading scorer and rebounder as senior in 1987-88, finishing his career with 8.5 ppg and 4.1 rpg. Denzel averaged 9.2 ppg, 5.5 rpg and 3.6 apg for NCAA playoff teams from 2013 through 2015 before emerging as a leading national POY candidate in 2016.
21. Ainge Brigham Young Danny, a three-time All-American who averaged 20.9 ppg, was named national player of the year as senior in 1980-81. Austin posted personal season highs of 9.5 ppg and 4.1 apg as sophomore in 2004-05 en route to career marks of 6.6 ppg and 3.5 apg.
22. Mayes Florida State Tharon averaged 16.4 ppg from 1987-88 through 1989-90. Stepson Xavier Rathan-Mayes averaged 14.9 ppg as academic RS freshman in 2014-15, including game when he scored 30 points in final 4:38 against Miami (Fla.). Also averaged scoring in double figures each of next two campaigns.
23. Guokas St. Joseph's Matt Sr. was tallest player and an original member of the famed "Mighty Mites" who asserted themselves in the Philly Big Five by winning 54 of 71 games in the late 1930s. Matt Jr. averaged 15.4 ppg and 4.6 rpg for the Hawks in 1964-65 and 1965-66 after transferring from Miami (Fla.).
24. Komives Bowling Green Howard averaged 25.8 ppg from 1961-62 through 1963-64, leading nation in scoring as senior All-American with 36.7 ppg. Shane averaged 10.6 ppg from 1992-93 through 1995-96, including career-high 14.3 ppg as sophomore.
25. Childress Wake Forest Randolph, an All-American as a senior, averaged 18.4 ppg and 3.9 apg from 1990-91 through 1994-95. Brandon averaged 6.2 ppg, 2.2 rpg and 2.3 apg as freshman in 2016-17.
26. Coffey Minnesota Richard averaged 8.2 ppg and 8.3 rpg from 1986-87 through 1989-90. Amir averaged 12.2 ppg, 3.8 rpg, 3.3 apg and 1.3 spg as freshman in 2016-17.
27. Ellis San Francisco Joe, a three-time All-WCAC first-team selection from 1963-64 through 1965-66, averaged 13.5 ppg and 8.9 rpg. Kevin averaged 9.1 ppg and 3 rpg his final two seasons in 1988-89 and 1989-90.
28. Springer Iona Gary Sr., a three-time All-MAAC selection, averaged 15.4 ppg and 8.4 rpg from 1980-81 through 1983-84. Gary Jr., an All-MAAC third-team selection as a senior in 2008-09, averaged 7.6 ppg and 5.2 rpg.
29. Becker Arizona State Art, a two-time All-WAC selection, averaged 15.7 ppg and 9 rpg from 1961-62 through 1963-64, ranks among school career leaders in rebound average, FG% (52.4) and FT% (79.7). Teammate of Joe Caldwell had two games with more than 20 points and 20 rebounds as a junior when leading team with 11.2 rpg. Mark averaged 8.8 ppg and 4.8 rpg from 1986-87 through 1989-90, leading team in rebounding as a sophomore with 5.5 per game.
30. Henry Kansas Carl, an OCU transfer, averaged 17.1 ppg and 6.4 rpg in 1982-83 and 1983-84 as a two-time All-Big Eight Conference selection. Xavier, an All-Big 12 Conference Rookie Team choice, averaged 13.4 ppg and 4.4 rpg as freshman in 2009-10 before leaving school early for NBA draft.
31. Frederick South Carolina Zam Sr. led nation in scoring as a senior in 1980-81 with 28.9 ppg to finish career with 13.7 ppg. Zam II, an All-SEC second-team selection as a senior, averaged 15.1 ppg with the Gamecocks in 2007-08 and 2008-09 after transferring from Georgia Tech.
32. Kornet Vanderbilt Frank, an All-SEC second-team selection as senior, averaged 8.8 ppg and 4.5 rpg from 1985-86 through 1988-89 before playing couple of seasons in NBA. Luke, one of the top outside shooters for a seven-footer, contributed a triple-double in game against Auburn.
33. Gatens Iowa Mike averaged 3.3 ppg and 2.2 rpg from 1973-74 through 1975-76. Matt was named to Big Ten Conference All-Freshman Team in 2008-09 before leading Hawkeyes in scoring his final three seasons.
34. Cline Wake Forest Herb, a two-time All-Southern Conference selection, was team scoring and rebounding leader from 1939-40 through 1941-42. Mark averaged 10.7 ppg and 3.8 rpg while shooting 81.7% at the FT line from 1983-84 through 1986-87.
35. Payne Iowa Tom was leading the Hawkeyes in scoring and rebounding at end of first semester of junior season (1956-57) when declared academically ineligible. Michael averaged 9.6 ppg and 7.3 rpg from 1981-82 through 1984-85, pacing team in rebounding his first two seasons.
36. Simmons Evansville Marty, an Indiana transfer, averaged 24.3 ppg, 6.8 rpg and 3.8 apg as two-time All-MCC first-team selection in 1986-87 and 1987-88. Blake has averaged 7.4 ppg and 2.5 apg from 2013-14 through 2015-16.
37. Gordon Liberty Eric Sr. averaged 14.1 ppg and 2.8 rpg from 1981-82 through 1983-84, averaged team-high 18.1 ppg as senior. Evan averaged 13.2 ppg and 3.5 rpg in 2009-10 and 2010-11 before transferring to Arizona State and subsequently Indiana.
38. Howard Brigham Young Orin was a multi-sport Hall of Famer for the school in the 1920s. Doug, a second-team All-WAC selection as a junior in 1968-69 (15.4 ppg, 4 rpg, 85.3 FT%) and senior in 1969-70 (18.2 ppg, 5.2 rpg, 85.3 FT%) led Cougars in scoring his last two years.
39. Butler Richmond Jeff, a transfer from Robert Morris (Pa.) when it was a junior college, led UR in scoring and rebounding in 1975-76 and 1976-77, averaging 15.2 ppg and 9.6 rpg. Ryan, a starter much of stint from 2006-07 through 2009-10, finished his career fifth in total steals and three-pointers, averaging 6.6 ppg and 2.8 rpg.
40. Stephens Purdue Everette averaged 8.8 ppg and 4 apg from 1984-85 through 1987-88. Kendall led Boilermakers in three-pointers as freshman and sophomore, averaging 7.8 ppg in three seasons from 2013-14 through 2015-16.
41. Ewing Georgetown Patrick Sr., the national player of the year as a senior, averaged 15.3 ppg and 9.2 rpg from 1981-82 through 1984-85. Patrick Jr. averaged 5.1 ppg and 3.1 rpg with the Hoyas in 2006-07 and 2007-08 after transferring from Indiana.
42. Stockton Gonzaga John, MVP of the WCAC as a senior, averaged 12.5 ppg and 5.2 apg from 1980-81 through 1983-84. David averaged 4.6 ppg and 2.9 apg for four NCAA playoff teams from 2010-11 through 2013-14.
43. Mimlitz St. Louis Jack, a two-time All-Missouri Valley Conference selection, averaged 14.2 ppg from 1955-56 through 1957-58. Ted averaged 7 ppg for SLU in 1985-86 and 1986-87 after transferring from Missouri.
44. McKie South Carolina BJ, a three-time All-SEC first-team selection, remains school's all-time leading scorer with 2,119 points from 1995-96 through 1998-99. Justin, a backup guard, averaged 4.2 ppg from 2013-14 through 2016-17.
45. Webster/Newman Mississippi State Horatio Webster averaged 16.6 ppg and 6.3 rpg in 1996-97 and 1997-98. Malik Newman averaged 11.3 ppg, 2.8 rpg and 2.2 apg as freshman in 2015-16 before transferring to Kansas.
46. Morningstar Kansas Roger, runner-up in scoring for a Final Four squad, averaged 11.7 ppg and 4.8 rpg in 1973-74 and 1974-75 after transferring from junior college. Brady averaged 5.6 ppg, 2.3 rpg and 2.6 apg from 2006-07 through 2010-11.
47. Shepherd Butler Bill Sr. averaged 5.9 ppg in 1947-48 and 6.6 ppg in 1948-49. Billy Jr., who scored 49 points in a game at Arizona as a junior, averaged 24.1 ppg from 1969-70 through 1971-72 (career-low senior mark of 19.3 ppg while contributing team-high 5.8 apg).
48. Fife Michigan Dan averaged 12.6 ppg and 4.9 rpg from 1968-69 through 1970-71. Dugan, a backup on the last Fab Five Final Four team, averaged 4.6 ppg and 2 rpg from 1992-93 through 1995-96.
49. Suttle Pepperdine Dane Sr., co-MVP of the WCAC as senior, averaged 16.2 ppg from 1979-80 through 1982-83 before playing briefly in NBA. Dane Jr. averaged 5.6 ppg from 2009-10 through 2011-12.
50. Rose Houston Lynden, a J.C. recruit who became co-captain of 1982 Final Four squad, averaged 7.5 ppg and 3.3 apg. Between stints with Baylor and BYU, L.J. averaged 9 ppg and 5.3 apg for UH in 2013-14 and 2014-15.
51. Wilkins Illinois State Jeff averaged 16.4 ppg and 9.8 rpg from 1974-75 through 1976-77, leading team in scoring, rebounding and FG% as a senior before becoming an NBA second-round draft choice. John, a J.C. transfer, averaged 7.1 ppg and 3.8 rpg from 2010-11 through 2012-13.
52. Sims Louisiana State Wayne averaged 9.5 ppg and 5.2 rpg from 1987-88 through 1990-91 as teammate of Chris Jackson and Shaquille O'Neal. Wayde averaged 6.8 ppg and 3.9 rpg as freshman in 2016-17.
53. Dozier South Carolina Perry averaged 2.5 ppg from 1985-86 through 1987-88. PJ, USC's top freshman recruit in 2015-16, was instrumental in helping the Gamecocks reach the 2017 Final Four. Averaged 9.7 ppg, 3.6 rpg, 2.4 apg and 1.3 spg in his two seasons.
54. Jones Houston Dwight Sr., an All-American, averaged 17.6 ppg and 13.7 rpg in 1971-72 and 1972-73. Dwight II averaged 3.4 ppg and 1.3 rpg in 2002-03 and 2004-05.
55. Whitehead Louisville Eddie averaged 5.8 ppg and 5.2 rpg from 1963-64 through 1965-66, finishing runner-up in rebounding behind All-American Wes Unseld as a senior. Luke averaged 9.1 ppg and 3.8 rpg from 2000-01 through 2003-04, including NCAA playoff squads his final two seasons (leading rebounder and runner-up in scoring as senior).
56. Mills Kentucky Terry averaged 6.7 ppg for three NCAA Tournament teams from 1968-69 through 1970-71. Cameron, who averaged 4.3 ppg from 1994-95 through 1996-97, led UK in three-point FG% as a junior when he averaged 11.8 ppg in the NCAA playoffs.
57. Sutton Oklahoma State Eddie averaged 6.6 ppg and 2.6 rpg while shooting 82.1% from free-throw line in the late 1950s. Sean, pacing the Pokes in assists and three-point shooting both seasons, averaged 11 ppg, 2.5 rpg and 4.4 apg in 1990-91 and 1991-92 for two NCAA playoff teams after transferring from UK.
58. Melchionni Duke Gary averaged 10.4 ppg and 2.7 rpg from 1970-71 through 1972-73. Lee averaged 4.5 ppg and 2.2 rpg while shooting 35.9% from beyond the arc from 2002-03 through 2005-06.
59. Altenberger Illinois Bill averaged 7.7 ppg from 1954-55 through 1956-57. Doug averaged 9.6 ppg from 1982-83 through 1986-87, including 13.6 ppg as a senior when he was an All-Big Ten third-team selection.
60. Selvig Montana Doug, a teammate of Larry Krystkowiak under coach Mike Montgomery, averaged 9.8 ppg, 3.9 rpg and 3.5 apg the first half of 1980s. Derek averaged 7.3 ppg, 4.8 rpg and 2.2 apg from 2008-09 through 2011-12.
61. McElwain Stanford Les played in early 1930s. Mal averaged 10.9 ppg and 6.3 rpg as a three-year starting forward in late 1960s.
62. Urzetta St. Bonaventure Sam, who led the nation in FT% as a sophomore and senior, averaged 6.2 ppg from 1946-47 through 1949-50. Nick averaged 8.7 ppg in late 1970s.
63. Vopicka Illinois James was second-leading scorer in 1935-36 and a starter on 1936-37 club tying for Big Ten title. Jim averaged 5.7 ppg in 1963-64 and 3.8 ppg in 1964-65.
64. Christensen Brigham Young Harold, a member of 1951 NIT championship team, averaged 7.8 ppg and 4.4 rpg before he was chosen by the Minneapolis Lakers in 1953 NBA draft. Todd averaged 5.8 ppg in 1995-96, 1998-99 and 1999-00.
65. Parkinson Purdue Bruce, an All-Big Ten first-team selection as a junior, averaged 10.9 ppg and 4.3 rpg from 1972-73 through 1976-77. Austin averaged 2.2 ppg and 3.2 apg from 2000-01 through 2003-04.
66. Hall Vanderbilt Jerry Don averaged 6.3 ppg and 1.7 rpg from 1960-61 through 1962-63. Dan, who led Vandy in rebounding as a sophomore, averaged 7.1 ppg and 4.7 rpg in 1989-90 and from 1991-92 through 1993-94.
67. Chatman Brigham Young Jeff remains one of BYU's all-time top 10 scorers after averaging 14.9 ppg and 4.7 rpg from 1984-85 through 1987-88. Jordan was averaging 2.6 ppg as a freshman in 2015-16.
68. Boyd Southern California Bob was an All-PCC South Division first-team selection in 1951-52 before coaching his alma mater. Bill averaged 2.9 ppg and 1.5 rpg from 1972-73 through 1975-76 (missed 1974-75 because of broken foot).
69. Grant Clemson Harvey averaged 5.1 ppg and 4.5 rpg in 1984-85 before transferring to Oklahoma, where he became an All-American. Jerari averaged 6.7 ppg and 4.3 rpg from 2007-08 through 2010-11.
70. Hammink Louisiana State Geert, an All-SEC center as senior, averaged 6.5 ppg and 4.8 rpg from 1988-89 through 1992-93. Shane averaged 1.6 ppg and 1.4 rpg in 2012-13 and 2013-14 before transferring to Valparaiso.
71. Kessler Georgia Chad averaged 6.3 ppg and 3.3 rpg from 1983-84 through 1986-87 en route to becoming fifth-round NBA draft choice. Houston averaged 2.1 ppg and 2.8 rpg as junior in 2015-16 after playing sparingly his first two seasons.
72. Lindsey Baylor Dennis averaged 7.5 ppg from 1987-88 through 1991-92. Jake averaged 3.3 ppg and 2.3 apg in 2015-16 and 2016-17.
73. Craig Brigham Young Robert, a member of 1951 NIT titlist, averaged 3.5 ppg in 1949-50 and 1950-51. Steve, a teammate of All-American Danny Ainge, averaged 7.2 ppg and 2.5 rpg in 1975-76 and from 1978-79 through 1980-81.
74. Lawrence Miami (Fla.) Anthony Sr. averaged averaged 5.3 ppg and 3.9 rpg in 1991-92 and 1992-93. Anthony Jr. averaged 5.4 ppg and 2.7 rpg in 2015-16 and 2016-17.
75. Nixon Brigham Young Kevin averaged 9.5 ppg and 3.1 rpg in 1991-92 and 1992-93. Dalton averaged 2.1 ppg as freshman in 2014-15.

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopers Make Their Mark on June 18 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopers had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Three former MLB players or manager who played college hoops - Marty Karow (Ohio State), Dick Siebert (Minnesota) and Bobby Winkles (Arizona State) - coached schools to College World Series championships on this date in a four-year span in the mid-1960s. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a June 18 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

JUNE 18

  • Philadelphia Phillies rookie LF Harry Anderson (averaged 7.7 ppg and 8.9 rpg for West Chester PA basketball squad in 1951-52) provided the game-winning hit with a fifth-inning grand slam in a 7-6 win against the Chicago Cubs in 1957.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates RF Clyde Barnhart (hooper for Shippensburg PA predecessor Cumberland Valley State Normal School prior to World War I) contributed five RBI against the Boston Braves in a 1923 game.

  • Cincinnati Reds rookie RF Frankie Baumholtz (MVP in 1941 NIT and first player in Ohio University history to score 1,000 points in a career) collected four hits and 1B Babe Young (Fordham letterman in 1935-36) contributed a pair of three-run homers to support teammate Ewell Blackwell's no-hitter against the Boston Braves in 1947.

  • Cincinnati Reds 3B Gene Freese (West Liberty WV hoops captain of 1952 NAIA Tournament team) collected seven hits in a 1961 doubleheader sweep of the Philadelphia Phillies.

  • Chicago White Sox RHP Jim Geddes (averaged 2.7 ppg for Ohio State from 1967-68 through 1969-70 under coach Fred Taylor) held the California Angels hitless for 4 2/3 innings but walked six in his 1973 debut. In his next appearance, Geddes held the Texas Rangers scoreless in 4 1/3 innings in the opener of a July 4 doubleheader.

  • 1B Dick Gernert (Temple hoops letterman in 1948-49) whacked the only homer for the Boston Red Sox while tallying 17 runs in the seventh inning of a 23-3 rout of the Detroit Tigers in 1953. C Sammy White (All-PCC Northern Division first-five selection for Washington in 1947-48 and 1948-49) tied a MLB single-inning record by scoring three runs during the explosive frame. White finished the fray with four hits and four runs scored.

  • Brooklyn Robins 3B Wally Gilbert (hoops captain played for Valparaiso from 1918-19 through 1920-21) went 4-for-4 and scored three runs in an 8-7 win against the New York Giants in the opener of a 1929 doubleheader.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates 1B Hank Greenberg (enrolled at NYU on hoops scholarship in 1929 but attended college only one semester) whacked two homers against the New York Giants in a 1947 contest.

  • In 1963, San Francisco Giants C Tom Haller (backup forward for Illinois in 1956-57 and 1957-58 under coach Harry Combes) homered in his third consecutive contest.

  • Cleveland Indians RHP Oral Hildebrand (Butler hoops All-American in 1928-29 and 1929-30) hurled back-to-back shutouts in 1933, giving him five whitewash performances in less than a two-month span. Four years later with the St. Louis Browns, Hildebrand hurled a two-hit shutout against the Washington Senators in 1937.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers 1B Gil Hodges (hooper for St. Joseph's IN in 1943 and Oakland City IN in 1947 and 1948) homered twice against the Chicago Cubs in a 1954 game.

  • Former Boston Red Sox INF Marty Karow (Ohio State hoops letterman in 1925) coached his alma mater to 1966 College World Series championship by defeating Oklahoma State, 8-2.

  • In 1962, Los Angeles Dodgers LHP Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman hoops squad in 1953-54) outdueled St. Louis Cardinals RHP Bob Gibson (Creighton's leading scorer and rebounder in 1955-56 and 1956-57). It marked the third time Koufax won a game, 1-0, on a Tommy Davis homer.

  • Chicago Cubs LF Hank Leiber (Arizona hooper in 1931) smacked two homers against the Brooklyn Dodgers in a 1941 contest.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers 2B Davey Lopes (NAIA All-District 15 selection for Iowa Wesleyan averaged 16.9 ppg as freshman in 1964-65 and 12.1 ppg as sophomore in 1965-66 before transferring with his coach to Washburn KS) stole four bases against the Montreal Expos in a 1978 game.

  • Chicago Cubs RF Bill Nicholson (Washington College MD hoops guard for two years in mid-1930s) smashed two homers against the Cincinnati Reds in the nightcap of a 1944 twinbill.

  • Spoiling the MLB debut of Hall of Fame RHP Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47), the Pittsburgh Pirates edged the Philadelphia Phillies, 2-0, in 1948.

  • Eleven-year MLB 1B Dick Siebert (Concordia-St. Paul MN hooper in 1929 and 1930) coached Minnesota to his third of three College World Series championships with the Gophers by defeating Missouri, 5-1, in 1964.

  • Arizona Diamondbacks rookie 2B Junior Spivey (redshirted his only semester at Northwestern Oklahoma State on hoops scholarship before transferring to KS junior college) stroked five hits in a 14-5 thrashing of the Houston Astros in 2001.

  • In 1986, San Diego Padres RHP Tim Stoddard (starting forward opposite All-American David Thompson for North Carolina State's 1974 NCAA champion) slugged his first and only MLB homer. He appeared in another 128 games but never had another at-bat.

  • Cincinnati Reds 3B Billy Werber (first Duke hoops All-American in 1929-30) went 5-for-5 against the Boston Braves in the opener of a 1939 doubleheader.

  • Former MLB manager Bobby Winkles (All-College Conference of Illinois first-team selection led Illinois Wesleyan in scoring with 12 ppg as senior in 1950-51) coached Arizona State to his second of three College World Series championships with the Sun Devils by humbling Houston, 11-2, in 1967.

Hoops Legacy: Celebrating Three Generations of Wall-to-Wall Basketball

"It is much easier to become a father than to be one." - Letters to My Son: Reflections on Becoming a Man

A thorough check of an athlete's pedigree often is illuminating. Undeniably, it is also much easier to talk about becoming a prominent player than putting in the man hours necessary to earn your spurs and have an impact at a single university like the Guokas clan at Saint Joseph's. Matt Sr. and Matt Jr. went on to become the first father-son tandem to win NBA championships as players before Matt III competed four seasons with the Hawks from 1988-89 through 1991-92.

St. Joe's also supplied Vince Kempton, the only Hawks player to make more than 50% of his field goals in both of their Final Four games in 1961. He is the father of former NBA center Tim Kempton Sr., a starter for Notre Dame squads averaging 21 victories annually in the mid-1980s, and grandfather of Tim Kempton Jr., who could become a three-time Patriot League MVP for Lehigh.

Gifted by having a father and grandfather with hoop credentials is not a prerequisite for becoming a competent basketball player. Although some observers might think the last couple of generations in the following hoop families were groomed from birth, on-court excellence is earned not inherited.

Hoosier Hysteria's passion can't be denied when considering Indiana families including All-Americans Steve Alford, Eric Montross and Jack Parkinson plus significant DI contributors with last names like Dakich, Neal, Plumlee, Shepherd and Trice. In deference to Father's Day weekend, following is an alphabetical list of the most accomplished father-son-grandson basketball combinations with at least one of them playing for or coaching a school from a power conference or in national postseason competition:

Grandfather/Father Father/Son Grandson(s)/Son(s)
Sam Alford (Franklin IN '64) Steve Alford (Indiana '87) Kory Alford (UCLA '16) and Bryce Alford (UCLA '17)
Cleophus Banks (Southern LA '64) Roman Banks (Northwestern State '92 Tre'lun Banks (Southern LA '17)
Gary Bradds (Ohio State '64) David Bradds (Dayton '91) Evan Bradds (Belmont '17)
Tom Dakich (Bowling Green State '56) Dan Dakich (Indiana '85) Andrew Dakich (Michigan '17)
Lewis D'Antoni (Concord WV '37) Dan D'Antoni (Marshall '69) Nick D'Antoni (William & Mary '05)
Don Gatens (Notre Dame '46) Mike Gatens (Iowa '76) Matt Gatens (Iowa '12)
Matt Guokas Sr. (St. Joseph's '38) Matt Guokas Jr. (St. Joseph's '66) Matt Guokas III (St. Joseph's '92)
Bill Hosket Sr. (Ohio State '33) Bill Hosket Jr. (Ohio State '68) Brad Hosket (Ohio State '00)
Lake Kelly (Georgia Tech '56) Brian Kelly (Morehead State '86) Drew Kelly (Morehead State '14)
Vince Kempton (St. Joseph's '61) Tim Kempton Sr. (Notre Dame '86) Tim Kempton Jr. (Lehigh '17)
Press Maravich (Davis & Elkins WV '41) Pete Maravich (Louisiana State '70) Jaeson Maravich (Alabama, McNeese State and William Carey MS '04) and Josh Maravich (Louisiana State '05)
Johnny McConathy (Northwestern State '51) Mike McConathy (Louisiana Tech '77) Michael McConathy (Northwestern State '10) and Logan McConathy (Northwestern State '11)
Stan Neal (Ball State '65) Craig Neal (Georgia Tech '88) Cullen Neal (New Mexico '17)
Jack Parkinson (Kentucky '48) Bruce Parkinson (Purdue '77) Austin Parkinson (Purdue '04)
Don Parsons (Rutgers '50) Gary Parsons (Rollins FL '77) Chandler Parsons (Florida '11)
Pearl Pollard (Brigham Young '59) Alan Pollard (Southern California '89) Josh Pollard (Utah Valley '19)
Pearl Pollard (Brigham Young '59) Neal Pollard (San Diego State/Utah State) Nate Pollard (Rice/Chaminade '18)
Dennis Price (Oklahoma '60) Mark Price (Georgia Tech '86) Judson Price (Charlotte '18)
Albert Schultz (Michigan Tech '44) Perky Plumlee (Tennessee Tech '83) Miles Plumlee (Duke '12), Mason Plumlee (Duke '13) and Marshall Plumlee (Duke '16)
Bill Reigel (Duquesne/Duke '53/McNeese State '56) Ernie Reigel (Davidson '80) Will Reigel (Davidson '12)
Danny Schultz (Tennessee '64) Danny Schultz (Tennessee Tech '84) Dan Schultz (Tennessee '08)
Bill Shepherd Sr. (Butler '49) Billy Shepherd Jr. (Butler '72) Scott Shepherd (Florida State '96) and Jeff Shepherd (Huntington IN '99)
John Townsend (Michigan '38) Scott Montross (Michigan '68) Eric Montross (North Carolina '94)
Bob Pritchett (Old Dominion '68) Travis Trice Sr. (Butler '95) Travis Trice Jr. (Michigan State '15)

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopers Make Their Mark on June 17 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopers had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a June 17 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

JUNE 17

  • Milwaukee Brewers rookie RHP Mike Adams (played basketball for Texas A&M-Kingsville in 1996-97) scored upon for the only time in his first 14 MLB relief appearances in 2004.

  • Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading scorer in 1945-46) swatted two homers in a 5-4 win against the Brooklyn Dodgers in the opener of a 1956 twinbill.

  • Eleven-year A.L. INF Jack Barry (Holy Cross hoops letterman in 1908) coached his alma mater to the 1952 College World Series championship by defeating Missouri, 8-4.

  • Detroit Tigers 1B Tony Clark (San Diego State's leading scorer in WAC games in 1991-92) clobbered two homers against the Minnesota Twins in a 1998 contest.

  • New York Giants SS Alvin Dark (hoops letterman for LSU and USL during World War II) and C Wes Westrum (hooper for Bemidji State MN one season before serving in military during WWII) each collected four hits in a 1951 game against the Philadelphia Phillies.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates INF Gene Freese (West Liberty WV hoops captain of 1952 NAIA Tournament team) went 4-for-4 against the Milwaukee Braves in a 1957 outing.

  • Boston Red Sox 1B Dick Gernert (Temple hoops letterman in 1948-49) walloped two homers in a 17-1 romp over the Detroit Tigers in 1953.

  • San Diego Padres RF Tony Gwynn (All-WAC second-team selection with San Diego State in 1979-80 and 1980-81) went 4-for-4 against the Houston Astros in a 1989 game.

  • San Francisco Giants LHP Atlee Hammaker (averaged 5.3 ppg as freshman in 1976-77 and 4.9 ppg as sophomore in 1977-78 under East Tennessee State coach Sonny Smith) tossed a four-hit shutout against the Cincinnati Reds in 1985.

  • Boston Braves 1B Buddy Hassett (hooper for Manhattan teams winning school-record 17 consecutive games in 1930 and 1931) banged out three hits in both ends of a 1940 doubleheader sweep against the Pittsburgh Pirates.

  • Rookie RHP Wynn Hawkins (all-time leading scorer for Baldwin-Wallace OH upon graduation in 1957) yielded Boston Red Sox Hall of Famer Ted Williams' 500th home run (fourth player in MLB history to reach that plateau) at Cleveland in 1960.

  • In 1965, Chicago Cubs RHP Bobby Humphreys (four-year hoops letterman graduated from Hampden-Sydney VA in 1958) yielded his only run in last 11 relief appearances of the month.

  • Chicago White Sox C Duane Josephson (Northern Iowa scoring leader in 1962-63 and 1963-64 under coach Norm Stewart) went 4-for-4 and scored three runs in a 6-3 triumph against the New York Yankees in 1970.

  • Chicago Cubs SS Don Kessinger (three-time All-SEC selection for Ole Miss from 1961-62 through 1963-64 while finishing among nation's top 45 scorers each year) went 6-for-6 in a 10-inning, 7-6 victory against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1971.

  • Milwaukee Brewers OF Joe Lahoud (hoops letterman in mid-1960s for New Haven CT) contributed a grand slam en route to six RBI in a 15-5 rout of the Chicago White Sox in 1973.

  • New York Giants CF Hank Leiber (Arizona hooper in 1931) logged four hits and five RBI against the St. Louis Cardinals in a 1938 contest.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates 1B Gary Redus (J.C. hooper for Athens AL and father of Centenary/South Alabama guard) provided three extra-base hits against the San Diego Padres in a 1991 outing.

  • Starting RHP Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) scored the winning run in the 15th inning to give the Philadelphia Phillies a 3-2 decision over the St. Louis Cardinals in 1954.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers 1B Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in Pacific Coast Conference both of his seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) left 13 runners stranded in a 1951 doubleheader against the Boston Braves. Three years later as a LF, Robinson provided two doubles and two homers against the Milwaukee Braves in a 1954 game.

  • Kansas City Athletics 1B Norm Siebern (member of Southwest Missouri hoop squads capturing back-to-back NAIA Tournament titles in 1952 and 1953) smashed two homers against the Minnesota Twins in a 1962 contest.

  • Cleveland Indians RHP Sonny Siebert (team-high 16.7 ppg for Missouri in 1957-58 as All-Big Eight Conference second-team selection) fanned 15 Washington Senators batters in hurling a three-hit shutout in 1965.

  • C John Stephenson (scored 1,361 points for William Carey MS in early 1960s) shipped from the New York Mets to the Chicago Cubs in 1967 as the player to be designated, completing an earlier deal that month.

  • Boston Red Sox 3B Billy Werber (first Duke hoops All-American in 1929-30) banged out three hits in both ends of a 1934 twinbill sweep of the St. Louis Browns.

Back to Old Stomping Grounds: LaVall Jordan Returns to Butler Coaching Roots

LaVall Jordan, an assistant for two Big Ten Conference schools a total of nine seasons before guiding Milwaukee last year, returned to his alma mater (Butler) as head coach after commencing his coaching career as an aide with the Bulldogs for three campaigns. Jordan isn't the only coach to make a good first impression before moving on to another school. He joins the following alphabetical list of active head coaches at a school where they previously served as an assistant before being hired as bench boss after toiling elsewhere:

Active Coach Current School Years as Assistant for Same College Before Working Elsewhere
Bacari Alexander Detroit 2001-02 through 2006-07 under Perry Watson
Mike Anderson Arkansas 1985-86 through 2001-02 under Nolan Richardson
Chris Beard Texas Tech 2001-02 through 2010-11 under Bob Knight and Pat Knight
Glenn Braica St. Francis (N.Y.) 1989-90 through 2003-04 under Ron Ganulin
Mike Brennan American University 2007-08 and 2008-09 under Jeff Jones
Tim Craft Gardner-Webb 2003-04 through 2006-07 under Rick Scruggs
Mick Cronin Cincinnati 1996-97 through 2000-01 under Bob Huggins
Nathan Davis Bucknell 2003-04 through 2007-08 under Pat Flannery
Steve Donahue Penn 1990-91 through 1999-00 under Fran Dunphy
Mike Dunlap Loyola Marymount 1980-81 through 1984-85 under Ed Goorjian
Jim Engles Columbia 2003-04 through 2007-08 under Joe Jones
Bill Evans Idaho State 1984-85 under Wayne Ballard
Tim Floyd Texas-El Paso 1977-78 through 1985-86 under Don Haskins
Dana Ford Tennessee State 2009-10 and 2010-11 under John Cooper
John Gallagher Hartford 2006-07 and 2007-08 under Dan Leibovitz
Eran Ganot Hawaii 2006-07 through 2009-10 under Riley Wallace and Bob Nash
Bob Huggins West Virginia 1977-78 under Joedy Gardner
George Ivory Arkansas-Pine Bluff 2002-03 through 2005-06 under Van Holt
James Jones Yale 1995-96 and 1996-97 under Dick Kuchen
LaVall Jordan Butler 2004-05 through 2006-07 under Todd Lickliter
Billy Kennedy Texas A&M 1990-91 under Kermit Davis Jr.
Greg Lansing Indiana State 1995-96 through 1998-99 under Sherman Dillard and Royce Waltman
Mike Martin Brown 2005-06 under Glen Miller
Steve Masiello Manhattan 2001-02 through 2004-05 under Bobby Gonzalez
Bob McKillop Davidson 1978-79 under Eddie Biedenbach
Marvin Menzies UNLV 2004-05 under Lon Kruger
Barret Peery Portland State 2002-03 under Heath Schroyer
Mike Rhoades Virginia Commonwealth 2009-10 through 2013-14 under Shaka Smart
Keith Richard Louisiana-Monroe 1984-85, 1985-86 and 1989-90 through 1993-94 under Mike Vining
Kareem Richardson UMKC 2007-08 under Matt Brown
Louis Rowe James Madison 2007-08 through 2011-12 under Dean Keener and Matt Brady
Bill Self Kansas 1985-86 under Larry Brown
Dave Simmons McNeese State 1987-88 through 1993-94 under Steve Welch
Marty Simmons Evansville 1997-98 through 2001-02 under Jim Crews
Roy Williams North Carolina 1978-79 through 1987-88 under Dean Smith
Billy Wright Western Illinois 2008-09 through 2012-13 under Jim Molinari
Jay Wright Villanova 1987-88 through 1991-92 under Rollie Massimino

NOTES: Alexander, Cronin, Dunlap, Huggins, Jordan, Martin, Richard, Rowe, M. Simmons and Williams graduated from the school where they are currently coaching. . . . Lansing returned to Indiana State as an assistant for four seasons until he was promoted in 2010-11.

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopers Make Their Mark on June 16 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopers had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a June 16 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

JUNE 16

  • Philadelphia Phillies LF Ethan Allen (Cincinnati basketball letterman in 1924-25 and 1925-26) contributed four hits in an 8-3 win against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1934.

  • In the midst of a 17-game hitting streak, St. Louis Cardinals RF George Altman (appeared in 1953 and 1954 NAIA Tournament with Tennessee State) went 5-for-7 in a 1963 doubleheader split against the Pittsburgh Pirates.

  • C Ferrell Anderson (Kansas hoops letterman in 1936-37 and 1937-38) purchased from the Philadelphia Phillies by the St. Louis Browns in 1951.

  • In the midst of a career-high 15-game hitting streak, Chicago Cubs LF Larry Biittner (runner-up in scoring and rebounding for Buena Vista IA in 1966-67) had four safeties in a 13-inning, 7-6 win against the Houston Astros in 1978.

  • Detroit Tigers 1B Tony Clark (San Diego State's leading scorer in WAC games in 1991-92) homered in his fourth consecutive contest in 2001.

  • Hitting an anemic .128 entering the contest, Detroit Tigers LF Hoot Evers (Illinois hoops starter in 1939-40) started a streak of seven straight multiple-hit games in 1951.

  • Boston Red Sox rookie RHP Boo Ferriss (Mississippi State hoops letterman in 1941) lost against the New York Yankees, 3-2, in 1945 after starting his career with eight victories (four of them shutouts).

  • Ten-year MLB RHP Ray "Pick" Fisher (Michigan "class" hooper) coached his alma mater to the 1953 College World Series championship by defeating Texas, 7-5.

  • New York Giants INF Frankie Frisch (Fordham hoops captain) collected five hits against the Chicago Cubs in a 1921 contest. Fourteen years later with the St. Louis Cardinals, Frisch furnished four hits against the Giants in a 1935 outing.

  • Baltimore Orioles 3B Wayne Gross (Cal Poly Pomona assists leader in 1974-75) whacked two homers for the second time in first 13 games of the month in 1985.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates 3B Lee Handley (Bradley hoops letterman from 1932-33 through 1934-35) banged out three hits in both ends of a 1946 doubleheader split against the Philadelphia Phillies.

  • 1B Gary Holman (USC hoops letterman in 1962-63) hammered a two-run homer for the Trojans in a 5-2 victory against Arizona in the 1963 CWS national championship game.

  • Philadelphia Phillies RHP Andy Karl (Manhattan hoops letterman from 1933 through 1935) surrendered his first run after blanking opponents in previous eight relief appearances in 1946.

  • Light-hitting INF Jerry Kindall (averaged 6.9 ppg for Minnesota in 1955-56) connected for a game-winning two-run homer in the ninth inning to give the Cleveland Indians a 10-9 win over the New York Yankees in 1962.

  • New York Giants CF Hank Leiber (Arizona hooper in 1931) launched two homers against the St. Louis Cardinals in a 1935 contest.

  • Seven-year MLB OF Don Lund (Michigan hoops starter in 1943-44 and 1944-45) coached his alma mater to 1962 College World Series championship by outlasting Santa Clara, 5-4, in 15 innings.

  • Cleveland Indians rookie 3B Ed Morgan (Tulane hoops letterman from 1923-24 through 1925-26) stroked four extra-base hits in a 9-2 win against the Philadelphia Athletics in 1928.

  • Cleveland Indians 3B Graig Nettles (shot 87.8% from free-throw line for San Diego State in 1963-64) went 5-for-5 as leadoff hitter against the Minnesota Twins in a 1971 contest.

  • Detroit Tigers OF Jim Northrup (second-leading scorer and third-leading rebounder for Alma MI in 1958-59) provided three extra-base hits against the Boston Red Sox in a 1966 outing.

  • New York Yankees 3B Red Rolfe (played hoops briefly with Dartmouth in 1927-28 and 1929-30) smacked three doubles against the St. Louis Browns in the opener of a 1940 twinbill.

  • New York Yankees RF Dave Winfield (starting forward for Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) whacked two homers against the Baltimore Orioles in a 1987 game.

  • Seattle Mariners RHP Chris Young (All-Ivy League first-team selection as Princeton's leading scorer and rebounder in 1999-00) hurled six shutout frames against the San Diego Padres in the first of his six straight starts allowing fewer hits than innings pitched in 2014. The next year with the Kansas City Royals, Young didn't allow an earned run for the fifth time in his first eight starts in the 2015 campaign.

Pitino Place: Pompous Pilot Slick Rick Should Have Title Tattoo Removed

Whether or not vacating a national title is in the offing, a normal cut-and-paste NCAA Committee of Infractions summary can cure insomnia. But not Louisville's ethical flunking-out report card including unusually harsh descriptive phrases such as "disgraceful and repugnant. . . . threatened and seriously undermined integrity. . . . deep betrayal of trust." Upon closely reading the latest COI report from pages 24 through 29, it's abundantly clear UL's program has a dignity shelf life barely lasting 15 seconds while aspiring to convince everyone their show-them-a-good-time hookers were not very expensive. The Cardinals' sordid stance leaves the white suit coach Rick Pitino occasionally dons a drunk-on-power symbol for anything but purity.

There was little doubt an earlier self-imposed one-year postseason competition ban and future scholarship/recruiting reductions (a/k/a preemptive plea bargain) implied the Cardinals faced more significant sanctions down the road such as NCAA prohibiting appealing Pitino from wearing said white suit or being forced to have his commemorative title tattoo removed. Looking on the bright side, at least UL's upper brass didn't don Mexican garb for the "trick-or-treat" meeting with NCAA Infractions Committee and doesn't seem to buy stock into dimwitted deflection tactics blaming book publishing company owned by Indiana's largest-ever donor with law school named after him. However, it still seems probable Pitino will have an opportunity to cowardly boycott or conduct a Cam Newton-like walkout, departing hand gesture or not, at any final victim-hood press briefing regarding Strippergate sanctions.

Amid full-figure female fallout from fact-filled tell-all tale (Breaking Cardinal Rules), pretentious Pitino said: “There's only one good thing about being 63 (now older) – you don't care what people think anymore.” The reprehensible regaling all sounded vaguely familiar. After all, it seems as if thin-skinned Pompous Pilot didn't care when he was in his 50s (restaurant affair with staffer's soon-to-be spouse), 40s (quit in mid-season after lured by $50 million to try to become reincarnation of Red Auerbach rather than next Adolph Rupp), 30s (BU Revue) and 20s (Hawaii infractions)?

Essentially, a tawdry timeline stems from philosophy of do as I say; not as I do. One of Pitino's books lecturing everyone else discusses how the past can haunt you. As an assistant at Hawaii, Pitino was implicated in eight of 64 violations leading to the Rainbows' two-year probation stint in the late 1970s. Nonetheless, the narcissist didn't care upon setting foot in Kentucky years ago as his one-day contract stump speech unfolded prior to incessant recycling. Was there any Pitino-linked symbolism when probation-bound Hawaii earned a berth in the NCAA playoffs while UL was banished?

“I think it's a positive because I know exactly what can go on the wrong way,” Pitino smugly self-assessed about suspect hoop activities in the Paradise of the Pacific shortly before he was hired by UK in the late 1980s. “There's no one in this business with more integrity (than me). It didn't happen in Hawaii as far as I'm concerned. I didn't make any mistakes, I don't care what anybody says. I'm not going to comment on it anymore because I don't have to.”

Need more I-don't-give-a-rip integrity? The alternate-reality program wallowed in self-absorption when Louisville failed to care about providing anything but a lame spin-tour remark stemming from an inquiry regarding an anecdote in the incisive book Raw Recruits written by dying-breed respected journalists Alexander Wolff and Armen Keteyian (more on media later). With apologies to “dictator” Dick Vitale's personal library, Season on the Brink (written by John Feinstein) and Raw Recruits rank 1-2 or vice versa as the all-time most compelling behind-the-scenes books on college basketball. After a big win for Pitino-coached Boston University at Rhode Island in the early 1980s, Raw Recruits alleged he rewarded the Terriers by having their bus stop at a jiggle joint on the way back to campus and hand out dollar bills to players so they might tuck them into G-strings.

Thirty years later, a ridiculous red-light district response from condescending UL about the book's sewer snippet was the famished BU brigade innocently walked in to get food, presumably thinking neon lights and all were essentials for a lively restaurant, but promptly bailed with hands covering their eyes. How many times have you heard about a booby bar being confused with fast food unless it is difficult to differentiate between excessive makeup on a Dancin' Girl and same for Ronald McDonald? Of course, there's not much happy-deal difference between unwrapped buns “having a good day” at the Golden Arches and gold jewelry near strategic arches on naked bodies. Maybe the classy New England establishment was simply a topless diner for roadie academic tutors, unbeknownst to coach, keeping GPA (Great Party Atmosphere) of squad members up by cramming for anatomy class on trek home.

Dwelling a little more on distinguishing between day-of-reckoning dignity and depravity, how low can you sink when self-proclaimed Elvis Presley (ex-UL All-American Terrence “Why Would I Pay Anybody for Anything” Williams) was a credibility reference for Hookergate scoring considering his checkered past? It may be the equivalent of Pitino vouching for former UK guard Richie "He Can Do No Wrong" Farmer when he ran afoul of the law.

Here is what genuinely "doesn't make any sense at all" for someone who is kind of a big deal. Pitino, boasting a master-puppeteer reputation, has a penchant for "can't-find-one-person" pap not knowing what the hell is going on around him even if it is a relatively minor thing such as six-year UL assistant coach Steve Masiello failing to complete requirements for a diploma during and after his ex-Knicks ball-boy playing for him at UK before immersed in an academic controversy as Manhattan's coach.

Understandably, the contrived Sgt. “I know nothing” Schultz routine regarding the "we have a different way we recruit" rot really has gotten old. One of Pitino's books also honed in on when it's best not to delegate. Pitino, saying he was “still trying to understand the motive,” treats his former player/assistant coach Andre McGee as if aspiring to explain a Shakespearean production ("Et tu, Brutus?"). Actually, it would be helpful to know when fall-guy target McGee was first exposed to this scurrilous stagecraft before dormitory operation director was thrown under the intellectually-and-morally bankrupt bus. The bluster bus is driven by "over-monitoring" Pitino, who said: "We have the most compliant coaches in the NCAA, no matter what you hear." We presume his assessment includes former graduate assistant Brandon Williams, who failed to cooperate in the NCAA's probe. If relevant at all, did we hear if this commendable credential predated McGee as a player and/or coach or kicked in after McGee departed for UMKC and subsequently working as a driver for car service Uber? Pitino proclaimed he delegated the monitoring of McGee's activities to his upper-level assistant coaches. However, the "compliant" aides interviewed by the NCAA were unaware of this duty. Wow! The Sgt. Schultz virus spreads fast.

Do Pitino's longstanding don't-care comments credibly pass a sincere threshold to where the nation should deluge him with speedy-recovery well wishes to help mend his broken heart? As most ardent hoop observers are aware, the BU rock-star sojourn wasn't the only time he mistook a restaurant for adult entertainment. Amplifying on the toxic topic via common sense, it is inconceivable to accept no-compulsion premise there was nothing abnormal maneuvering from normal sensual behavior to chance stop-on-a-dime meeting with extortion-bound stranger on an upscale restaurant table. Just wondering, but did the fine-diner owner leave keys thinking the hangers-on were going to sweep the floor and clean the dishes exercising 15 seconds of shame? Perhaps they were waiting on UL football coach Bobby Petrino and hoop sage Bo Ryan to compare notes about exploits on and off the court.

Seems as if there was lack of credibility everywhere one turned. In the wake of such boorish behavior, should we bother to contemplate what went on to relieve stress at higher-stakes citadels such as New York (Knicks) and college cage capital (Lexington, KY)? It almost makes a Client 9-curious individual want to enlist the services of a PI to rummage through little black book of whomever the Manhattan Madam happened to be in late 1980s before conducting survey of coeds attending UK the first half of 1990s about any love lodge or perhaps big and blue van featuring tinted windows. First step learning about "good times" equipment might be giving amnesia antidote or truth serum to gatekeeper/chauffeur. Winston Bennett, an assistant under Pitino with UK and the Boston Celtics, may also be able to offer some insight based on the former All-SEC second-team selection admitting he "slept with 90 women a month" despite stature as the ultimate NBA scrub.

What transpired at UL is precisely why a control freak orchestrated construction of a basketball dormitory (named for his brother-in-law who tragically died in 9/11 attack) to monitor his roster and keep them from becoming salacious scholars. Instead, what repeatedly resulted was a classic example of lack of institutional control frequently manipulating minors. So what if Pitino wasn't the whore-dorm booking agent or could pass a lie-detector test on a well-crafted question skirting the predatory activity. Doesn't his pact with UL have provision about “diligently supervise compliance of assistant coaches and any other employees for which he is administratively responsible”?

“I'm totally saddened to the point of disbelief over the incidents,” Pitino said during one of his incredible sulks. “We've built a very strong culture here of discipline and doing the right things.” You've got to be kidding! If so, did a single well-disciplined student-athlete exhibit sufficient strength to do the right thing, go to him and describe detestable culture infecting Club Minardi? If not, why are his family-atmosphere players more loyal to a subordinate than head coach? Pleading with the Hoop Gods, please don't eventually put public through the traditional "plausible-deniability" focus on disgruntled former "employees" defense.

Whether or not it was a byproduct of culture or karma, the Pitino brand a couple of years ago also faced a sex-lies-and-videotape scandal involving his son's recruits at Minnesota, which featured more suspended players than Big Ten Conference victories. Any video that year involving Gopher players, on or off hardwood, probably is filth and should be erased. Amid the disturbing credibility gap, it's probably time to shift gears and sarcastically add to the sad state of affairs with the following pointless plot lines for entertaining episodes on HBO's soon-to-be-announced Pitino Place show:

  • Jilted Karen, after escaping confinement by having sex with prison security guard boasting slick black hair, undergoes race-and-name change becoming Katina and trying to extort main character Slick Rick again before going on the cover of Vanity Fair and “earning” some sort of ESPY courage award for her copious copulation commentary.
  • In a what-might-have-been dream, Slick Rick learns in a confession booth about an innocent baby boy named Rowe Vee Wade if Catholic principles really meant more than abortion creating new definition for “health care” money. Rowe Vee Wade would have been a blue-chip playmaking prospect who played for half-brother and averaged more assists per game in college career than his look-alike estranged father (5.6 apg). Upon waking up from Rip Van Winkle slumber and media-hailed three-point shooting at summer Seniors Tournament in Florida, Slick Rick decides to become a sperm donor to try to clone Mr. Nifty Jr. (donor's college nickname).
  • Slick Rick groupie Vinny, moonlighting as an NCAA enforcement agent, taught boss to hold the tail during horse breeding and told tales about anything dealing with human breeding. But the aloof horse owner already was a thoroughbred Breeders' Cup Secretariat wannabee and only had eyes for what was under some of those gaudy race-track hats. Vinny, who was actually a double agent, eventually spilled his good-times guts to authorities when he was supposed to be conducting opposition research on rival Coach Pay-pal Cal including going through trash in Memphis trying to unearth any Slick Rick-like transgressions or rookie salary-cap violations he could possibly find to help prevent ninth defeat in last 10 confrontations.
  • Slick Rick blames Sick “You Better Put Some Ice On It” Willie for infecting him with some unnamed pants-dropping defect in front of stranger after shaking Bubba's cigar-stained hand before introducing President Stainmaker, still basking in the glow of an Arkansas title, at a campaign rally on the eve of the 1996 election. Finishing “expensive” speech on humility to Wall Street executives and meeting filing deadline for book on success, he had to take a rain check regarding cheerleader-recruiting/saxophone-lesson trip with Shrillary's Secret Weapon and equally frail contemptible Clintonista cronies to “Orgy Island.” Bubba's backup plan to reconnect with Slick was to become his boss as school Prez insofar as he has vast experience in such an overpaid category via $16.46 million over five years as honorary chancellor of Laureate University.
  • Intervention for Slick Rick unfolds to stop drinking bourbon named after him. Becoming delusional as much as Kanye is in debt, he claimed his new Kanye West/adidas shoes helped him win a dunking contest as college freshman decades ago against varsity standout Julius Erving in 1970-71 before Dr. J became a professional basketball highlight reel. Boasting super-human strength capable of reeling in mammoth marlin, Slick Rick claimed he won a home-run derby against Mike Flanagan in 1971-72 when the eventual 18-year MLB pitcher averaged 13.9 ppg for the same school's frosh squad. In a bizarre rant by Slick Rick after pain killer wore off from getting a title tattoo, the egomaniac thought he should receive Bill Cosby's Presidential Medal of Freedom if award is stripped from the widely-condemned comic. Meanwhile, Kanye ($53 million in debt) makes guest star appearance begging Taylor Swift for 53 cents for his "Famous" ideas so he can impress fashionable Kim by having more "rep" cred than 50 Cent with music endorsement by Slick Rick linked to any affiliated dorm dance.

All silly-season sarcasm aside, the bottom-line drivel is what do you expect from a program where the coach can't control himself? Prior to his passing away, Louisville's most famous native, Muhammad Ali, issued his support while trying to recall which of his offspring went with which mother and delusional AD Tom Jurich, apparently an abortion advocate, said Pitino “has a perfect track record.” We presume Jurich's perfection testimonial isn't hampered by Parkinson's and includes Pitino settling for more than $2,500 to get rid of evidence. Maybe some of these unprincipled folks would show a shred of humanity if a female member of their immediate family was affected.

Just like the majority of scandals, follow the money trail of a plot that may have had its genesis in a Barbershop sequel of sorts. Whatever the amount spent by McGee for physical activity by saving gas money moving party venue closer to home, it's virtually impossible to believe the bank-bundled funds came entirely from his personal account. Pitino, responding as if he was kneed in the groin by some unknown assailant, had Olympian gall telling McGee “to step up” after skating around issue crying “Why?” way more than truly-aggrieved Nancy Kerrigan.

Of course, the most disgusting “why” involved fathers/guardians tagging along for a recruiting ride to LarryFlyntVille when not busy helping prospects with their studies. In employing a perverted version of father-son bonding, why was there the incentive way horsing around driving it homeboy rather than “a dolt” just having fond memory of playing horse against his boy in the family driveway. What would the party-planner incentive be if the recruit actually helped UL reach a Final Four?

Pitino, who said bump-and-grind allegations made him “sick to my stomach,” can always cure chronic tummy tumult via some dessert delicacy at his favorite upscale restaurant. Actually, frequent health references simply raise suspicion about his mid-season walking-out-through-the-door “flight” to Cleveland Clinic in 2003-04 three years after the "wounded tiger" quit the Celtics because Larry Bird, Kevin McHale and Robert Parish weren't walking back through their door.

An inalienable right exists to be stupid like Apple protecting phone of Islamic terrorist, but we saw the outline of a clever problem-solving act just when problem-child guard Chris Jones was dismissed. You've got the comedy-relief brains of a doorknob if you believed Louisville's shedding of a little light via a door-opening salvo explaining life-without-Jones stemmed primarily from a 9 p.m. curfew violation. It's unclear whether Pitino, exhibiting a theatrical flop reminiscent of Jones' chin-rubbing charade in a match-up with cross-state rival Kentucky, includes himself in refuting any bad acting.

Jones, described by Pitino as “type of guy who always has his hands in the cookie jar,” dropped out of school to defend himself as rigorously as the ACC's leader in steals average defended opponents. Wouldn't you like an insider to drop some knowledge regarding the rigorous classes the scholar took and stack them up against North Carolina's no-show way or the intellectually-stimulating spring-semester coursework for the one-and-done crowd? Depending upon your perspective, didn't the culture Pitino portrayed “steal” a scholarship from perhaps an authentic student-athlete? Some viewers may want to be assured they can't catch a STD from TV and seek to promptly take a shower after watching UL these days.

The shameless local and national media covering UL also are to blame, but they had a laser-like fixation on touchy-feely timing of ban rather than incalculable more vital issues such as academic integrity and power-structure lack of accountability of coaching staffs for revenue-producing sports. There should be a one-year ban on reading or watching the presstitutes because of their failure to live up to news-gathering obligations by allowing an Escort Queen to “(hard)cover” the program better than they did. How in the name of Edmund R. Murrow did Katina discern more about what was going on than Pitino, university officials and a seemingly enabling press stripped naked by her firsthand research?

Pitino claimed he didn't read Powell's expose but said “people will do anything for money.” Does the same assessment apply to Sextino regarding his series of what now seem like tainted hypocritical volumes (Success is a Choice, How to Add Value to Every Minute of Your Life, Lead to Succeed, Rebound Rules, etc.)? Taking the power of positive thinking to an extreme, he has had additional exposure to a couple of bullet points in his 10-step plan – thriving on pressure and learning from adversity.

Collateral damage caught in the middle of mess created by others, do you think chattel-graduate transfers Damion Lee (Drexel) and Trey Lewis (Cleveland State) were credibly “recruited” with emphasis on prospect of participating in NCAA playoffs? Lee said: "If we buy into the system and what coach Pitino preaches, then we can be successful." Standing O from UL fans notwithstanding, the betrayed duo "tabled" by Preacher Pitino's program should have sued the system - coaching staff and school - for fraud after enduring the pressure connected to this adversity. Mercenaries Lee and Lewis were wronged, but they triggered the wrongdoing and suffered the consequences by wrongly choosing to attend UL.

Meanwhile, self-described “soldier-in-this-army” Pitino asked: “If I resign, would people feel better about it?” Answer: Well, yes, if anyone credible amid the Get-Your-Fill-in-the-Ville debris remains boasting a moral compass rather than emphasizing morale-building comp-a__. Securing generous dose of humility upon receiving relatively modest five-game suspension, author Pitino can take an adult education refresher course ruminating on his own following words in "The One-Day Contract":

  • "The egotistical coach, the arrogant athlete, they are stereotypes that too often ring true."
  • "The longer I live and the more I experience, the more I believe that humility is the quality essential to sustained success, and a lack of it is the major stumbling block for those who find success for a time, then lose it."
  • "There's no question when you coach at Kentucky, you fall into a trap of thinking you're much better than you really are, because of the adulation and attention. It is constant and seems to come in a never-ending supply. I did not know it in the midst of it, but that arrogance, that thinking of yourself as the best, is one of the biggest reasons successful people stumble and fail."
  • "The consequences of not learning humility can be tragic. If we don't always see these consequences in our own lives, we should be able to recognize them all around us. Not learning humility is, for one, an expensive lesson."
  • "Self-aggrandizement, alienation of friends, family, or teammates, a tragic tendency to overestimate one's talent that leads to overreaching, they all are traits of people who lack humility. This also is a story that is not new. The ancient Greeks had a word for this very situation: hubris."
  • "The same cycle (of self-destruction) can be seen in many fields. The list of those for whom humility not only might have saved a fortune, but their future, is long and star-studded."
  • "The decadent lifestyle, the entourages, the unrealistic expectation of stature and longevity - all this leads to poor choices and reckless decision making."
  • "With humility, you are better able to enjoy and understand success, and you are better able to examine and handle failure."
  • "Humble people always handle adversity so much better because they understand who they are. So many come to disappointing ends and wonder why it happened. Most often, it was a lack of humility, leading to arrogance, leading to the mistakes they made. They think they are more significant than they are and it makes them gamble with their lives and their professions. Then, when things go wrong, they lash out and blame others. Arrogant people spread around their failure with blame."
  • "Not only is humility the key to finding lasting success, but it is the key to lasting happiness. Go back through history, literature, spiritual books, and this cycle is repeated throughout generations and cultures: arrogance, fall, acceptance, humility, healing. We're no different from people who came before us. I can't state enough how important a lesson this is to learn, and the importance of learning it before life forces you to."

Any observer with a moral compass has lost faith in Pitino and whatever he stood for the past 35 years. The NCAA going out of its high-and-mighty way to embrace "disgraceful and repugnant" characterization should force some important self-reflection somewhere in red-faced Louisville. Just stay out of upscale restaurant when striving to relieve stress.

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopers Make Their Mark on June 15 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Darrell Evans, a former J.C. hooper for Hall of Fame coach Jerry Tarkanian, owned this date in MLB games with the Atlanta Braves, San Francisco Giants and Detroit Tigers. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a June 15 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

JUNE 15

  • Los Angeles Angels 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading basketball scorer in 1945-46) homered in his fourth consecutive contest in 1964.

  • LF-1B Harry Anderson (averaged 7.7 ppg and 8.9 rpg for West Chester PA in 1951-52) traded by the Philadelphia Phillies to the Cincinnati Reds in 1960.

  • LF Morrie Arnovich (Wisconsin-Superior hooper in early 1930s) traded by the Philadelphia Phillies to the Cincinnati Reds in 1940.

  • OF Frankie Baumholtz (MVP in 1941 NIT and first player in Ohio University history to score 1,000 points in career) traded by the Cincinnati Reds to the Chicago Cubs in 1949.

  • In 1935, Cleveland Indians 2B Bosey Berger (Maryland's first hoops All-American led Southern Conference in scoring in league competition in 1930-31) provided two extra-base hits, triggering a 16-game hitting streak.

  • Cleveland Indians SS Lou Boudreau (leading scorer for Illinois' 1937 Big Ten Conference co-champion) supplied three extra-base hits against the St. Louis Browns in 1945. Two years later in the midst of his career-high 19-game hitting streak, Boudreau doubled in fourth consecutive contest in 1947.

  • 1B Donn Clendenon (four-sport letterman for Morehouse GA) traded by the Montreal Expos to the New York Mets in 1969. Four years earlier with the Pittsburgh Pirates, Clendenon hammered two homers against the St. Louis Cardinals in a 1965 outing.

  • Philadelphia Athletics C Mickey Cochrane (Boston University hooper in early 1920s) manufactured four hits against the Detroit Tigers in a 1930 contest.

  • Cleveland Indians RHP Vince Colbert (averaged 14.3 ppg and 7.3 rpg for East Carolina in 1966-67 and 1967-68) tossed a five-hit shutout against the California Angels in 1972.

  • Boston Red Sox RHP Gene Conley (All-PCC first-team selection led North Division in scoring in 1949-50 as Washington State sophomore) fired a six-hit shutout against the Detroit Tigers in 1962.

  • In 1931, the St. Louis Cardinals, in a move making room for Pepper Martin, traded CF Taylor Douthit (California hoops letterman from 1922 through 1924) to the Cincinnati Reds for OF Wally Roettger (Illinois hoops letterman in 1921-22 and 1922-23) in a swap one day after Douthit stroked seven straight hits in a doubleheader sweep over the Philadelphia Phillies.

  • San Francisco Giants 1B Darrell Evans (member of Jerry Tarkanian-coached Pasadena City CA club winning 1967 state community college crown) socked three homers for six RBI in a 7-1 triumph against the Houston Astros in 1983. Two years later in a 1985 outing with the Detroit Tigers, Evans went 5-for-5 against the New York Yankees. In 1973 as an Atlanta Braves 3B, Evans homered in his third consecutive contest.

  • Detroit Tigers OF Hoot Evers (hoops starter for Illinois in 1939-40) had his 19-game hitting streak snapped by the Philadelphia Athletics in 1950.

  • C-OF Joe Ferguson (hooper for Pacific's 1967 NCAA playoff team) traded by the Los Angeles Dodgers to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1976.

  • Boston Red Sox rookie RHP Boo Ferriss (Mississippi State hoops letterman in 1941) toiled 14 innings to improve his mark to 9-1 in 1945.

  • INF Jake Flowers (hooper for 1923 "Flying Pentagon" championship squad for Washington College MD) awarded on waivers from the Brooklyn Robins to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1931.

  • Boston Red Sox rookie 1B Dick Gernert (Temple hoops letterman in 1948-49 when averaging 2.7 ppg) launched a decisive homer in a 3-2 triumph against the Chicago White Sox in the nightcap of a 1952 twinbill.

  • Cleveland Indians 1B Mike Hargrove (Northwestern Oklahoma State hoops letterman) stroked three doubles against the Minnesota Twins in a 1980 game.

  • 1B Gary Holle (Siena's scoring and rebounding leader in 1974-75 and 1975-76) traded by the Texas Rangers to the Chicago White Sox in 1979.

  • Atlanta Braves RF David Justice (Thomas More KY assists leader in 1984-85) jacked two homers against the Colorado Rockies in a 1994 contest.

  • In 1969, Chicago Cubs SS Don Kessinger (three-time All-SEC selection for Ole Miss from 1961-62 through 1963-64 while finishing among the nation's top 45 scorers each year) established a N.L. record with his 54th consecutive errorless game to start a season.

  • Cleveland Indians 1B Ray Knode (hooper for Maryland in 1918-19) contributed four hits against the Philadelphia Athletics in a 1925 outing.

  • OF Joe Lahoud (New Haven CT hoops letterman in mid-1960s) purchased from the California Angels by the Texas Rangers in 1976.

  • SS Johnny Logan (Binghamton hooper in 1948-49) traded by the Milwaukee Braves to the Pittsburgh Pirates for OF Gino Cimoli in 1961.

  • Oakland Athletics 2B Davey Lopes (NAIA All-District 15 selection for Iowa Wesleyan averaged 16.9 ppg as freshman in 1964-65 and 12.1 ppg as sophomore in 1965-66 before transferring with his coach to Washburn KS) collected three extra-base hits and seven RBI against the Toronto Blue Jays in a 1983 contest.

  • Chicago White Sox RHP Ted Lyons (two-time All-SWC first-team selection for Baylor in early 1920s) notched his ninth straight complete-game victory in 1927. Lyons' two-run triple in the eighth inning broke a 4-4 deadlock against the Philadelphia Athletics.

  • OF Bake McBride (averaged 12.7 ppg and 8.1 rpg in 21 games with Westminster MO in 1968-69 and 1969-70) traded by the St. Louis Cardinals to the Philadelphia Phillies in 1977. McBride went on to hit .339 the remainder of the season for Philly.

  • Chicago White Sox RF Danny Moeller (captain of Millikin IL hoops squad in 1905-06) delivered four hits against the Cleveland Indians in a 1914 game.

  • Chicago Cubs RF Bill Nicholson (Washington College MD hoops guard for two years in mid-1930s) stroked two triples against the Boston Braves in a 1940 contest.

  • INF Johnny O'Brien (two-time All-American with Seattle was first college player to crack 1,000-point plateau in a single season when scoring 1,051 in 37 games in 1951-52) traded by the Pittsburgh Pirates with 3B Gene Freese (hoops captain of 1952 NAIA Tournament team for West Liberty WV) to the St. Louis Cardinals for SS Dick Schofield and cash in 1958.

  • LHP Joe Ostrowski (led Scranton in scoring with 15.1 ppg in 1942-43) traded by the St. Louis Browns to the New York Yankees in 1950.

  • RHP Steve Renko (averaged 9.9 ppg and 5.8 rpg as Kansas sophomore in 1963-64) traded by the New York Mets to the Montreal Expos in 1969.

  • Detroit Tigers RHP Jeff Robinson (two-time NAIA All-District 3 honoree in early 1980s left Azusa Pacific CA as school's No. 9 all-time scorer) won his seventh straight decision with a five-hit shutout against the Baltimore Orioles in 1988.

  • Minnesota Twins rookie LHP Garry Roggenburk (Dayton scoring leader all three seasons from 1959-60 through 1961-62 grabbed school-record 32 rebounds in his third varsity game en route to pacing Flyers in rebounding first two years) lost his first MLB start in 1963 after going scoreless in previous eight outings as a reliever.

  • OF Richie Scheinblum (averaged 6.1 ppg and 3.6 rpg in 1962-63 and 1963-64 with LIU-C.W. Post) traded by the Cincinnati Reds to the California Angels for two players to be designated in 1973.

  • RHP Don Schwall (All-Big Seven Conference second-team selection as sophomore in 1956-57 when leading Oklahoma in rebounding) traded by the Pittsburgh Pirates to the Atlanta Braves for P Billy O'Dell in 1966.

  • In 1959, Detroit Tigers RHP Dave Sisler (All-Ivy League second-team selection for Princeton's first NCAA Tournament team in 1952) posted his fourth save in as many relief appearances in a nine-day span.

  • 2B Wayne Terwilliger (two-year letterman for Western Michigan averaged 5.6 ppg in his final season in 1947-48) traded by the Chicago Cubs to the Brooklyn Dodgers in an eight-player swap in 1951.

  • 1B-OF Preston Ward (second-leading scorer for Southwest Missouri State in 1946-47 and 1948-49) traded by the Cleveland Indians to the Kansas City Athletics in 1958.

  • C Sammy White (All-PCC Northern Division first-five selection for Washington in 1947-48) purchased from the Boston Red Sox by the Milwaukee Braves in 1961.

Familiar Surroundings: LaVall Jordan Returns to Alma Mater as Butler's Coach

Hiring by a power-conference member with NCAA playoff potential out of the Big East didn't appear to be on the horizon. But LaVall Jordan, a former small forward and assistant coach for Butler, returned to his alma mater as head coach following one sub-par season guiding Milwaukee to a last-place finish in the Horizon League.

A total of 21 NCAA Division I coaches in the past five years were put in charge of their alma mater's basketball fortunes. Roy Williams of 2017 NCAA champion North Carolina is among the following alphabetical list of active head coaches serving as bench boss of their alma mater:

Active Coach Alma Mater 1st Year
Bacari Alexander Detroit '99 2016-17
Rodney Billups Denver '05 2016-17
Jim Boeheim Syracuse '66 1976-77
Jamion Christian Mount St. Mary's '04 2012-13
Mick Cronin Cincinnati '96 2006-07
Scott Cross Texas-Arlington '98 2006-07
Dan D'Antoni Marshall '70 2014-15
Travis DeCuire Montana '94 2014-15
Jamie Dixon Texas Christian '87 2016-17
Mike Dunlap Loyola Marymount '80 2014-15
Patrick Ewing Georgetown '85 2017-18
Anthony Grant Dayton '87 2017-18
Mitch Henderson Princeton '98 2011-12
Michael Huger Bowling Green '93 2015-16
Bob Huggins West Virginia '77 2007-08
Lewis Jackson Alabama State '84 2005-06
LaVall Jordan Butler '01 2017-18
Brian Katz Sacramento State '80 2008-09
Rob Krimmel Saint Francis (PA) '00 2012-13
Chris Mack Xavier '92 2009-10
Mike Martin Brown '04 2012-13
Nick McDevitt UNC Asheville '01 2013-14
LeVelle Moton North Carolina Central '96 2009-10
Dan Muller Illinois State '98 2012-13
Chris Mullin St. John's '85 2015-16
Kevin Ollie Connecticut '95 2012-13
Matt Painter Purdue '93 2005-06
Russ Pennell Central Arkansas '84 2014-15
Keith Richard Louisiana-Monroe '82 2010-11
David Richman North Dakota State '02 2014-15
Louis Rowe James Madison '95 2016-17
Marty Simmons Evansville '88 2007-08
Lamont Smith San Diego '99 2015-16
Roy Williams North Carolina '72 2003-04
Marty Wilson Pepperdine '89 2011-12

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopers Make Their Mark on June 14 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a June 14 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

JUNE 14

  • LF Babe Barna (West Virginia basketball letterman in 1936 and 1937) traded by the New York Giants to the Boston Red Sox in 1943.

  • Philadelphia Athletics SS Jack Barry (Holy Cross hoops letterman in 1908) banged out four hits against the Chicago White Sox in a 1914 contest.

  • Cleveland Indians SS Lou Boudreau (leading scorer for Illinois' 1937 Big Ten Conference co-champion) went 5-for-5 against the Detroit Tigers in the nightcap of a 1944 twinbill.

  • Philadelphia Athletics C Mickey Cochrane (Boston University hooper in early 1920s) collected three extra-base hits and four RBI against the Cleveland Indians in a 1928 game.

  • SS Alvin Dark (hoops letterman for LSU and USL during World War II) traded with three additional players by the New York Giants in 1956 to the St. Louis Cardinals for future Hall of Fame 2B Red Schoendienst and three players.

  • In his final games with the St. Louis Cardinals, CF Taylor Douthit (California hoops letterman from 1922 through 1924) went 7-for-8 in a 1931 doubleheader sweep of the Philadelphia Phillies before he was traded to the Cincinnati Reds.

  • 2B Denny Doyle (averaged 2.7 ppg for Morehead State in 1962-63) traded by the California Angels to the Boston Red Sox in 1975.

  • Boston Red Sox LF Dick Gernert (Temple hoops letterman in 1948-49 when averaging 2.7 ppg) delivered three hits and three runs for the second outing in a row against the Cleveland Indians in 1956.

  • 1B Mike Hargrove (Northwestern Oklahoma State hoops letterman) traded by the San Diego Padres to the Cleveland Indians in 1979.

  • Boston Bees 1B-OF Buddy Hassett (hooper for Manhattan teams winning school-record 17 consecutive games in 1930 and 1931) fouled out late in a game against the Chicago Cubs after hitting safely in 10 straight at-bats over three contests in 1940.

  • New York Yankees LF Charlie Keller (three-year hoops letterman with Maryland from 1934-35 through 1936-37) went 4-for-4 with two homers against the St. Louis Browns in a 1940 outing.

  • The Detroit Tigers scored on New York Yankees RHP Jim Konstanty (member of 1937-38 and 1938-39 Syracuse hoops teams) for the only time in his first 13 relief appearances of the month in 1955.

  • In 1986, Toronto Blue Jays pinch-hitter Rick Leach (averaged 15.5 ppg for Michigan's JV squad in 1975-76) ripped a two-run homer off Detroit Tigers RHP Jack Morris.

  • First MLB homer for RF Lyle Mouton (starter in LSU's backcourt with All-American Chris Jackson on 1989 NCAA playoff team) came as a pinch-hitter with the Chicago White Sox off Oakland Athletics reliever Rick Honeycutt in 1995.

  • New York Yankees LF Irv Noren (player of year for California community college state Pasadena City in 1945) pounded two homers against the Detroit Tigers in a 1955 game.

  • RHP Roy Parmelee (hoops letterman for Eastern Michigan in 1924-25 and 1925-26) purchased from the Philadelphia Athletics by the Boston Red Sox in 1939.

  • C Hugh Poland (Western Kentucky hoops letterman from 1931-32 through 1933-34) traded by the Philadelphia Phillies to the Cincinnati Reds in 1947.

  • New York Giants RHP Hal Schumacher (St. Lawrence NY hooper in early 1930s) hurled a five-hit shutout against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1936.

  • Cincinnati Reds closer Jeff Shaw (freshman hoops guard for 31-5 Rio Grande OH team participating in 1985 NAIA Tournament), entering the game with an 0.97 ERA, yielded five runs on seven hits in the ninth and 10th innings as the Houston Astros rallied to win, 6-3, in 1998.

  • Eleven-year MLB 1B Dick Siebert (Concordia-St. Paul MN hooper in 1929 and 1930) coached Minnesota to his first of three College World Series championships with the Gophers by drubbing Arizona, 12-1, in 1956.

  • Chicago Cubs LF Riggs Stephenson (Alabama hoops letterman in 1920) whacked two homers in a 9-7 victory against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1926.

  • San Diego Padres LHP Eric Stults (hooper for 1999 NAIA D-II Tournament runner-up and 2000 NCCAA Tournament titlist with Bethel IN) fired a two-hit complete game in a 2-1 triumph against the Arizona Diamondbacks in 2013.

  • Boston Red Sox 3B Billy Werber (first Duke hoops All-American in 1929-30) amassed two homers and five RBI in a 1935 game against the Detroit Tigers.

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopers Make Their Mark on June 13 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopers had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a June 13 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

JUNE 13

  • 2B Jerry Adair (one of Oklahoma State's three leading basketball scorers in 1956-57 and 1957-58 while ranking among the nation's top 12 free-throw shooters each season) traded by the Baltimore Orioles to the Chicago White Sox in 1966.

  • 1B Dale Alexander (starting hoops center in mid-1920s for Milligan TN) traded by the Detroit Tigers to the Boston Red Sox in 1932.

  • RHP Jim Bibby (Fayetteville State NC backup hooper and brother of UCLA All-American Henry Bibby) traded by the Texas Rangers to the Cleveland Indians in 1975.

  • Philadelphia Athletics C Mickey Cochrane (Boston University hooper in early 1920s) manufactured three hits and four RBI for the second time in a four-game span in 1927. Two years later, Cochrane contributed four hits against the Cleveland Indians in a 1929 contest.

  • 1B Darrell Evans (member of Jerry Tarkanian-coached Pasadena City CA club winning 1967 state community college crown) traded by the Atlanta Braves to the San Francisco Giants in 1976.

  • St. Louis Browns C Rick Ferrell (played forward for Guilford NC before graduating in 1928) went 3-for-3, including his lone homer in first 216 MLB games, and added four RBI in a 5-4 win against the Washington Senators in 1930.

  • RHP Eddie Fisher (hooper for Oklahoma's 1954-55 freshman squad) traded by the Chicago White Sox to the Baltimore Orioles in 1966.

  • Kansas City Royals rookie RHP Rich Gale (led New Hampshire with 7.2 rpg in 1975-76) hurled a one-hit shutout against the Texas Rangers in 1978.

  • In 1962, Los Angeles Dodgers LHP Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman hoops squad in 1953-54) whacked his first MLB homer (off fellow Hall of Fame lefthander Warren Spahn of Milwaukee Braves). Koufax went on to collect one more career round-tripper.

  • St. Louis Cardinals LF Danny Litwhiler (member of JV hoops squad with Bloomsburg PA in mid-1930s) logged three doubles against the Chicago Cubs in a 1944 outing.

  • Milwaukee Braves SS Johnny Logan (Binghamton hooper in 1948-49) contributed five RBI in a 12-5 win against the San Francisco Giants in 1960.

  • In 1979, Los Angeles Dodgers 2B Davey Lopes (NAIA All-District 15 selection for Iowa Wesleyan averaged 16.9 ppg as freshman in 1964-65 and 12.1 ppg as sophomore in 1965-66 before transferring with his coach to Washburn KS) hammered a homer in the fifth game of his last seven contests.

  • Philadelphia Phillies 1B Tony Lupien (Harvard hoops captain in 1938-39) lashed two triples among his four hits against the Boston Braves in the nightcap of a 1944 doubleheader.

  • A grand slam by rookie CF Jerry Martin (1971 Southern Conference MVP after being Furman's runner-up in scoring in previous season) propelled the Philadelphia Phillies to a 5-1 triumph against the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1975.

  • New York Giants RHP Christy Mathewson (Bucknell hooper at turn of 20th Century) fired a no-hitter against Chicago in a 1-0 win in 1905.

  • OF Sam Mele (NYU's leading scorer in 1943 NCAA playoffs) traded by the Boston Red Sox to the Washington Senators in 1949.

  • New York Yankees SS Gene Michael (Kent State's leading scorer with 14 ppg in 1957-58) pulled hidden-ball trick for the first of two times in a six-week span in 1970.

  • St. Louis Cardinals LF Rip Repulski (started several hoops games for St. Cloud State MN) stroked two hits in each game of a 1954 doubleheader sweep against the Pittsburgh Pirates, triggering a streak of 10 consecutive contests with two or more safeties.

  • Philadelphia Phillies Hall of Fame RHP Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) yielded three consecutive triples to INF Danny O'Connell of the Milwaukee Braves in 1956.

  • Boston Red Sox RHP Don Schwall (All-Big Seven Conference second-team selection led Oklahoma in rebounding in 1956-57) tossed a two-hit shutout against the Baltimore Orioles in 1962.

  • Cincinnati Reds RHP Jeff Shaw (freshman guard for Rio Grande OH squad compiling 31-5 record and reaching second round of 1985 NAIA Tournament) notched his 19th consecutive relief appearance without yielding an earned run in 1998.

  • RHP Rollie Sheldon (third-leading scorer as a sophomore for Connecticut's 1960 NCAA Tournament team) traded by the Kansas City Athletics to the Boston Red Sox in a six-player swap in 1966.

  • INF Gary Sutherland (Southern California's fifth-leading scorer in 1963-64 when averaging 7.4 ppg) purchased from the Montreal Expos by the Houston Astros in 1972.

  • St. Louis Browns rookie SS Herb Upton (All-EIBL first-team selection with Penn in 1945-46 before pacing Southeast Missouri State in scoring three years last half of 1940s and finishing as SEMO's career scoring leader) provided two triples in a 6-1 win against the Washington Senators in the nightcap of a 1950 doubleheader.

  • Boston Red Sox 3B Billy Werber (first Duke All-American in 1929-30) knocked in five runs in a 1934 outing against the Detroit Tigers.

  • New York Yankees RF Dave Winfield (starting forward for Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) contributed three extra-base hits in a 1984 game against the Boston Red Sox.

CWS Coaching Hoop Scoop: Take Them (Cagers) Out of Arena to Ball Game

Florida State's Mike Martin, reaching the College World Series for first time since 2012, has the possibility of becoming the latest former college basketball player to coach a school to a CWS championship. One of the all-time five winningest college baseball coaches, he boasts the highest winning percentage among NCAA Division I mentors, winning almost three-fourths of his games. Martin has guided the Seminoles to the CWS a total of 16 times (1980-86-87-89-91-92-94-95-96-98-99-00-08-10-12-17), played basketball for Wingate (NC) in the mid-1960s before the institution became a four-year school. One of his junior college hoop teammates was Morris "Mo" McHone, who went on to coach the San Antonio Spurs in 1983-84. Martin coached basketball for Tallahassee (Fla.) Community College in the early 1970s.

FSU advanced to a Super Regional for the 16th time in 19 seasons - the most for any school since the format was introduced. Martin, national runner-up in 1986 and 1999, isn't the only revered coach frustrated by not capturing a national title. Richard "Itchy" Jones, who averaged 8.9 ppg for Southern Illinois' basketball squad in 1956-57, established a baseball dynasty in 21-year coaching career at his alma mater before accepting a similar position with the Illini in Champaign in 1991. Jones compiled a 1,240-752-6 record before retiring in 2005. In 1971, his second year at Southern Illinois, Jones guided the Salukis to within one game of the national title, finishing second at the CWS. In 1974 and 1977, Jones brought SIU back to the CWS, placing third both times. Buoyed by more than 20 eventual major leaguers, he became the 18th coach in NCAA Division I history to win 1,000 games.

Stanford's Everett Dean, compiling a 3-0 basketball tournament record in 1942, is the only unbeaten coach in NCAA playoff history. He is also the only NCAA basketball championship coach to win a CWS baseball game for the same school as a coach (1953). Four former college cagers who eventually played or managed at the MLB level - Dick Siebert (2 with Minnesota), Don Lund (Michigan), Bobby Winkles (3 with Arizona State) and Marty Karow (Ohio State) - combined to capture a total of seven CWS championships in the 1960s. Following is an alphabetical list of previous ex-college hoopers who went the extra step and reached the milestone of coaching a CWS titlist:

JOHN "JACK" BARRY, Holy Cross
Infielder, primarily a shortstop, hit .243 with the Philadelphia Athletics and Boston Red Sox in 11 A.L. seasons from 1908 through 1919. Ranked fifth in the league in RBI in 1913 with 85 for the Athletics as a key component of Connie Mack's first dynasty. Participated in five World Series, four with the champion, in a six-year span from 1910 through 1915. Compiled a 90-62 managerial record with the Red Sox in 1917 before winning more than 80% of his games coaching his alma mater for 40 years (including capturing the 1952 College World Series). The 5-9 Barry was a basketball letterman for the Crusaders in 1908.

SAM BARRY, Wisconsin
Basketball Hall of Famer coached USC's 1948 baseball titlist. He is the Trojans' all-time winningest basketball coach.

RAY "PICK" FISHER, Middlebury (VT)
Righthander compiled a 100-94 record and 2.82 ERA with the New York Yankees and Cincinnati Reds in 10 years from 1910 through 1920. Ranked among the A.L. top 10 in ERA and complete games in back-to-back seasons (1914 and 1915). Started one World Series game for the Reds against the Chicago White Sox in 1919. Won 14 Big Ten Conference championships as baseball coach at Michigan for 38 years until the late 1950s (including 1953 College World Series title). Became a spring training pitching instructor for the Detroit Tigers after being blacklisted for almost 40 years because of salary disputes with Cincinnati's owners. Fisher played "class" basketball (1910 graduate) before becoming his alma mater's first full-time salaried member of the Physical Education Department.

MARTIN KAROW, Ohio State
Coach of his alma mater's 1966 College World Series winner after the Buckeyes finished runner-up the previous year. He was a basketball letterman in 1925 before the infielder went 2-for-10 in six games for the Boston Red Sox in 1927.

JERRY KINDALL, Minnesota
Infielder hit .213 in nine seasons (1956 through 1958 and 1960 through 1965) with the Chicago Cubs, Cleveland Indians and Minnesota Twins. Baseball coach at Arizona for more than 20 years, leading the Wildcats to three College World Series titles (1976, 1980 and 1986). He is the only player to hit for the cycle in the College World Series at Omaha (against Ole Miss on June 11, 1956). Kindall is the only individual to play for and coach CWS champions. The 6-2 1/2, 175-pounder played two seasons of varsity basketball for Minnesota under coach Ozzie Cowles, averaging 1.4 ppg as a sophomore in 1954-55 and 6.9 ppg as a junior in 1955-56. Excerpt from school guide: "Exceptionally quick reflexes and a good eye are his main attributes although he also has tremendous spring making him a good rebounder."

DON LUND, Michigan
Outfielder hit .240 in a seven-year career (1945, 1947 through 1949 and 1952 through 1954) with the Brooklyn Dodgers, St. Louis Browns and Detroit Tigers. His only season as a regular was 1953 when he was the Tigers' right fielder. Coached baseball at his alma mater, winning the national championship in 1962, before running the Tigers' farm system until 1970. First-round selection as a fullback/linebacker by the Chicago Bears in the 1945 NFL draft. Rejected $100 a game offer from the Bears and never played pro football. He was a 6-0, 200-pound starting guard as a junior for the Wolverines' basketball team and starting center as a senior. Averaged 4.4 ppg in 46 outings. In his history of Michigan basketball, Jeff Mortimer wrote of the school's World War II squads: "Lund, rejected for military service because of a trick knee, was the mainstay of these teams." Following his playing career, he served as baseball coach for his alma mater (won 1962 College World Series), farm system director for the Tigers and associate athletic director at his alma mater.

DICK SIEBERT, Concordia-St. Paul (Minn.)
Lefthanded first baseman hit .282 with the Brooklyn Dodgers, St. Louis Cardinals and Philadelphia Athletics in 11 years in 1932 and from 1936 through 1945. All-Star in 1943 finished among the top Seven in the A.L. in batting average in 1941 and 1944. Minnesota's baseball coach for 31 years (753-361-8 record from 1948 through 1978) captured three CWS titles in a nine-year span from 1956 through 1964. His son, Paul, pitched with the Houston Astros, San Diego Padres and New York Mets for five years from 1974 to 1978. Siebert played two years of college basketball in 1929 and 1930. The March 1929 issue of the Concordia Comet mentions that, "Lefty Siebert, despite having never touched a basketball before enrolling at Concordia, was almost as good a basketball player as he was a baseball player."

JOHN "HI" SIMMONS, Northeast Missouri State
Missouri's all-time winningest baseball coach (481-284 record in 34 years) captured the 1954 NCAA title in one of his six College World Series appearances. One of his winning pitchers at the CWS was Norm Stewart, who went on to become Mizzou's all-time winningest basketball coach. School's baseball stadium is named after Simmons. All-conference center was senior captain of 1927-28 basketball squad.

BOBBY WINKLES, Illinois Wesleyan
Coached Arizona State to College World Series titles in 1965, 1967 and 1969 before managing the California Angels in 1973 and through the first 74 games of 1974 (170-213 major league record). Reggie Jackson, Rick Monday and Sal Bando were among the more than 20 future major leaguers he coached at ASU. Winkles led Illinois Wesleyan in scoring as a senior in 1950-51 (12 ppg). The 5-9, 170-pound guard was a first-team selection in the College Conference of Illinois.

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