On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on May 13 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 13 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 13

  • Cincinnati Reds LF Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading basketball scorer in 1945-46) socked two homers against the St. Louis Cardinals in the opener of a 1951 twinbill.

  • OF-1B Beau Bell (Texas A&M two-year letterman in early 1930s) traded by the St. Louis Browns to the Detroit Tigers in a 10-player deal in 1939.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers RHP Ownie Carroll (Holy Cross letterman in 1922), in the midst of winning five straight decisions, didn't allow an earned run in a 10-inning, 1-1 tie against the Cincinnati Reds in 1933.

  • OF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) purchased from the Detroit Tigers by the Chicago White Sox in 1959.

  • RF Hoot Evers (starter for Illinois in 1939-40) traded by the Cleveland Indians to the Baltimore Orioles in 1956.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers RF Joe Ferguson (played in 1967 NCAA playoffs with Pacific) smacked a homer in his third consecutive contest against the Montreal Expos in 1979.

  • Boston Red Sox rookie RHP Boo Ferriss (Mississippi State letterman in 1941) set an A.L. record for scoreless innings at the start of a MLB career by reaching 22 shutout frames before allowing a tally in 1945. Ferriss struck out Detroit Tigers 1B Rudy York four times - all on called third strikes in an 8-2 win in the opener of a doubleheader.

  • St. Louis Cardinals SS Charlie Gelbert (scored at least 125 points each of last three seasons in late 1920s for Lebanon Valley PA) contributed four hits in an 8-7 victory against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1932.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates SS Dick Groat (two-time All-American with Duke in 1950-51 and 1951-52 when finishing among nation's top five scorers each season) went 6-for-6 (including three doubles) in an 8-2 triumph over the Milwaukee Braves in 1960.

  • In 1984, 3B Wayne Gross (led Cal Poly Pomona in assists in 1974-75) knocked in all of the Baltimore Orioles' runs in a 5-1 win against his former team (the Oakland Athletics).

  • Chicago Cubs RF Harvey Hendrick (Vanderbilt letterman in 1918) banged out four hits in a 7-5 victory against the Philadelphia Phillies in the opener of a 1933 doubleheader.

  • Cleveland Indians 1B Doug Howard (second-team All-WAC choice for Brigham Young in 1968-69 and 1969-70) delivered a career-high three hits against the Boston Red Sox in 1976.

  • New York Yankees LF Charlie Keller (three-year letterman with Maryland from 1934-35 through 1936-37) clobbered two homers against the St. Louis Browns in 1947.

  • C Cal Neeman (Illinois Wesleyan's leading scorer in 1947-48 and 1948-49) traded by the Chicago Cubs to the Philadelphia Phillies in a four-player swap in 1960.

  • Philadelphia Phillies RHP Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) yielded a lead-off HR before retiring the next 27 Cincinnati Reds batters to prevail, 8-1, in 1954.

  • Baltimore Orioles LF Larry Sheets (All-ODAC selection in 1981-82 and 1982-83 with Eastern Mennonite VA) socked two homers against the Kansas City Royals in 1987.

  • In 1940, Cincinnati Reds 3B Billy Werber (first Duke All-American in 1929-30) became the only player to hit four consecutive doubles in a game in each league (8-8 tie with the St. Louis Cardinals).

  • In the midst of an eight-game hitting streak, Chicago Cubs RF Bob Will (all-league athlete was captain for Mankato State MN in 1954-55) supplied three hits against the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1961.

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on May 12 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 12 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 12

  • In 1984, Seattle Mariners RHP Jim Beattie (Dartmouth's top rebounder in 1974-75 when selected basketball team MVP and honorable mention All-Ivy League) registered his second shutout in last four starts.

  • Baltimore Orioles CF Al Bumbry (Virginia State's runner-up in scoring with 16.7 ppg as a freshman in 1964-65) suffered a broken leg sliding into second base, missing most of the remainder of the 1978 season.

  • Milwaukee Braves RHP Gene Conley (All-Pacific Coast Conference first-team selection led the North Division in scoring as a Washington State sophomore in 1949-50) toiled 12 innings in prevailing, 2-1, ending the Dodgers' streak from the start of the 1955 season of 25 consecutive contests where they led at some point in the game. It was one of five straight wins for Conley during the month following a setback when he went 11 1/3 innings at Brooklyn.

  • CF Billy Cowan (Utah letterman from 1957-58 through 1959-60 was co-captain of NCAA playoff team as senior) rapped a game-winning, two-run single in the bottom of the ninth inning to give the California Angels a 6-5 win against the Boston Red Sox in 1970.

  • In 1940, Cincinnati Reds CF Harry Craft (four-sport letterman with Mississippi College in early 1930s) contributed three hits in a game against the St. Louis Cardinals for the second straight day.

  • In 1930, Philadelphia Athletics RHP George Earnshaw (Swarthmore PA participant in 1922) committed three balks and Cleveland Indians counterpart Milt Shoffner had five balks (three in the third inning).

  • Los Angeles Dodgers RF Joe Ferguson (played in 1967 NCAA playoffs with Pacific) jacked a homer in his third consecutive contest against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1976.

  • St. Louis Cardinals 2B Frankie Frisch (Fordham captain) supplied four hits against the Brooklyn Robins in 1929.

  • LHP Johnny Gee (sixth-leading scorer in Big Ten Conference for Michigan's 16-4 team in 1936-37) purchased from the Pittsburgh Pirates by the New York Giants in 1944.

  • Boston Red Sox LF Dick Gernert (Temple letterman in 1948-49 when averaging 2.7 ppg) contributed two homers and six RBI but it wasn't enough to prevent a 12-9 reversal against the Washington Senators in 1956.

  • St. Louis Cardinals RHP Bob Gibson (Creighton's leading scorer in 1955-56 and 1956-57) struck out the side on nine pitches in the seventh inning against the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1969.

  • After seven scoreless relief appearances, Philadelphia Phillies RHP Dallas Green (Delaware's runner-up in scoring and rebounding in 1954-55) made his first start of 1963 campaign. The next year, Green yielded his only run covering first eight relief stints of 1964.

  • Washington Senators 3B Chuck Hinton (played multiple sports for Shaw NC before serving two years in U.S. Army in mid-1950s) hammered a homer for the Nats' lone safety in the nightcap of a 1963 twin bill at Boston.

  • New York Mets 1B Gil Hodges (played for Oakland City IN in 1947 and 1948) hit a ninth-inning, game-ending HR in the nightcap of a 1962 doubleheader. Teammate Hobie Landrith did the same thing in the opener against the Milwaukee Braves.

  • Baltimore Orioles RHP Ben McDonald (started six games as a 6-6 freshman for Louisiana State in 1986-87) squared off against 6-10 Randy Johnson of the Seattle Mariners in 1991 in the tallest starting pitching matchup in MLB history.

  • St. Louis Cardinals rookie CF Wally Moon (averaged 4.3 ppg with Texas A&M in 1948-49 and 1949-50) notched his second five-hit game and scored five runs in a 13-5 pounding of the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1954.

  • SS Billy Werber (first Duke All-American in 1929-30) purchased from the New York Yankees by the Boston Red Sox in 1933.

  • Boston Braves 3B Chuck Workman (two-time All-MIAA first-five selection was leading scorer when Central Missouri won inaugural NAIA Tournament in 1937) slugged a homer in his third consecutive contest in 1945.

  • LHP Tom Zachary (Guilford NC letterman in 1916) awarded on waivers from the New York Yankees to the Boston Braves in 1930.

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on May 11 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 11 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 11

  • Cincinnati Reds LF Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading basketball scorer in 1945-46) cracked two homers against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1952.

  • St. Louis Browns RF Beau Bell (two-year letterman for Texas A&M in early 1930s) went 4-for-4 in a 7-5 win against the Washington Senators in 1937.

  • OF-1B Bruce Bochte (starting forward for Santa Clara's 1970 NCAA playoff team) traded by the California Angels to the Cleveland Indians in 1977.

  • Cleveland Indians SS Lou Boudreau (leading scorer for Illinois' 1937 Big Ten Conference co-champion) went 4-for-4 against the Philadelphia Athletics in 1950.

  • Hall of Fame C Rick Ferrell (Guilford NC player in mid-1920s) traded by the St. Louis Browns to the Boston Red Sox in 1933.

  • Detroit Tigers 1B Hank Greenberg (enrolled at NYU on hoop scholarship in 1929 but attended college only one semester) socked a homer in his third consecutive contest in 1935.

  • Frank Howard (two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection when he led Ohio State in scoring and rebounding in 1956-57 and 1957-58) hammered two homers for the Washington Senators but they weren't enough to prevent a 6-5 defeat at Seattle in 1969.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers LHP Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54), continuing his comeback from a circulatory ailment in his left index finger, hurled a no-hitter against the San Francisco Giants in 1963.

  • INF Vance Law (averaged 6.8 ppg for Brigham Young from 1974-75 through 1976-77) contributed a 10th-inning squeeze bunt to give the Chicago Cubs a 1-0 victory against the San Diego Padres in 1988.

  • OF Danny Litwhiler (member of JV squad with Bloomsburg PA three years in mid-1930s) traded by the Boston Braves to the Cincinnati Reds in 1948.

  • Washington Senators OF Don Lock (led Wichita State in field-goal percentage in 1956-57 and 1957-58 under coach Ralph Miller) banged out four hits against the California Angels in 1966.

  • New York Yankees SS Gene Michael (led Kent State in scoring with 14 ppg in 1957-58) generated his fifth two-hit outing in first seven games of the month in 1973.

  • Boston Red Sox 1B Ed Morgan (Tulane letterman from 1923-24 through 1925-26) manufactured four hits against the Cleveland Indians in 1934.

  • Philadelphia Phillies rookie LF Ted Savage (led Lincoln MO in scoring average in 1955-56) stroked four hits against the Chicago Cubs in 1962. Nine years later, Savage was traded by the Milwaukee Brewers to the Kansas City Royals in 1971.

  • RF Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972), citing a no-trade clause in his contract with the New York Yankees, refused to report to the Angels after being traded in 1990. Five days later, he accepted the deal.

  • RF Randy Winn (Santa Clara backcourtmate of eventual two-time NBA Most Valuable Player Steve Nash in 1993-94) whacked a two-out, two-run homer in the ninth inning to give Tampa Bay a 6-4 victory over the Baltimore Orioles in 2002, snapping the Devil Rays' 15-game losing streak.

All-Conference Drought: Rutgers in Knightmare Rut in Three Leagues

Rutgers, loser in last 15 contests against Big Ten Conference opponents, might need to visit its archives and bring Dick Vitale back as a recruiter. The Scarlet Knights have fallen on hard times and are the nation's only NCAA Division I school not to have an all-conference choice in the previous nine seasons. Vitale helped lure diploma-less coach Eddie Jordan to Piscataway before the Scarlet Knights reached the 1976 Final Four.

Rutgers, failing to secure an all-league choice since Quincy Douby in 2005-06, has been blanked in three different alliances during the dry spell. The Knights' arrival gives the Big Ten Conference additional Nebraska/Northwestern/Penn State mediocrity - a famine-relief trio combining for three NCAA playoff victories in the previous 60 years (all by Nittany Lions).

Five struggling schools - Louisiana-Monroe (Sun Belt), Pepperdine (WCC), Sacramento State (Big Sky), Southern Illinois (Missouri Valley) and Texas Tech (Big 12) - left this dubious category in 2013-14. Rutgers, eliminated by Louisville by 61 points in the AAC Tournament two seasons ago, is joined by DePaul and Samford on the following list of schools enduring honor droughts having no all-league picks at least the past seven seasons:

School Conference(s) Last All-League Selection
DePaul Big East Sr. G Draelon Burns in 2007-08 (2nd team)
Rutgers Big East/American Athletic/Big Ten Jr. G Quincy Douby in 2005-06 (1st team)
Samford Ohio Valley Sr. C Travis Peterson in 2007-08 (2nd team)

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on May 10 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 10 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 10

  • Baltimore Orioles 2B Jerry Adair (one of Oklahoma State's top three basketball scorers in 1956-57 and 1957-58 while ranking among nation's top 12 free-throw shooters each season) jacked two homers against the Minnesota Twins in 1961.

  • Cleveland Indians RHP Jim Bibby (Fayetteville State NC backup player and brother of UCLA All-American Henry Bibby) hurled a 1-0 shutout against the Milwaukee Brewers in the opener of a 1977 doubleheader.

  • Cleveland Indians SS Lou Boudreau (leading scorer for Illinois' 1937 Big Ten Conference co-champion) banged out two hits in six straight games in 1942.

  • 1B Donn Clendenon (four-sport letterman with Morehouse GA) went hitless in his first 18 at-bats with the St. Louis Cardinals until stroking two safeties against the Houston Astros in 1972.

  • Philadelphia Athletics C Mickey Cochrane (five-sport athlete with Boston University) collected four hits against the St. Louis Browns in 1928.

  • St. Louis Cardinals RF Grant Dunlap (Pacific letterman in 1942-43 and 1946-47) hammered a pinch-hit homer against the Cincinnati Reds in 1953. The circuit clout was Dunlap's lone MLB round-tripper.

  • Brooklyn Robins 2B Jake Flowers (member of 1923 "Flying Pentagon" championship squad for Washington College MD) contributed four hits against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1930.

  • 1B-OF Dick Gernert (letterman with Temple in 1948-49 when he averaged 2.7 ppg) traded by the Detroit Tigers to the Cincinnati Reds in 1961.

  • The first MLB shutout suppolied by Kansas City Athletics RHP Dick Hall (averaged 13.5 ppg from 1948-49 through 1950-51 with Swarthmore PA Southern Division champions in Middle Atlantic States Conference), 10-0 against the Baltimore Orioles, was one of three complete-game triumphs for him this month in 1960.

  • Utilityman Chuck Harmon (freshman starter was Toledo's second-leading scorer for 1943 NIT runner-up) traded by the St. Louis Cardinals to the Philadelphia Phillies in 1957.

  • Milwaukee Braves SS Johnny Logan (played for Binghamton in 1948-49) went 4-for-4 with five RBI in a 10-5 win against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1957.

  • Boston Red Sox OF Rip Repulski (started a few games for St. Cloud State MN) ripped a grand slam against the Chicago White Sox in 1960.

  • 1B Howie Schultz (Hamline MN product played and coached professional basketball) purchased from the Brooklyn Dodgers by the Philadelphia Phillies for $50,000 in 1947.

  • 3B John Werhas (led Southern California in scoring average in 1958-59 and 1959-60) traded by the Los Angeles Dodgers to the California Angels for OF and fellow USC product Len Gabrielson in 1967.

Kansas Closing In on UCLA For Most Regular-Season League Titles in Row

Kansas, if things pan out as expected regarding frontcourt replacements to complement Perry Ellis, could continue closing in on UCLA for most consecutive regular-season conference championships. Despite the early departure to the NBA of freshmen Cliff Alexander and Kelly Oubre Jr., the Jayhawks are expected to continue their sterling Big 12 Conference track record under coach Bill Self while surviving the loss of 15 undergraduates in the last nine NBA drafts - 2007 (Julian Wright), 2008 (Darrell Arthur, Mario Chalmers and Brandon Rush), 2010 (Cole Aldrich and Xavier Henry), 2011 (Marcus Morris, Markieff Morris and Josh Selby), 2012 (Thomas Robinson), 2013 (Ben McLemore), 2014 (Joel Embiid and Andrew Wiggins) and 2015 (Alexander and Oubre).

UCLA's streak of 13 straight undisputed league titles from 1967 through 1979, divided among three coaches, is considered one of the foremost achievements in NCAA history. Kansas' regular-season league losses in the last 11 seasons came against Baylor (one), Iowa State (three), Kansas State (five), Missouri (four), Oklahoma (three), Oklahoma State (five), Texas (four), Texas A&M (one), Texas Christian (one), Texas Tech (three) and West Virginia (two). None of the Jayhawks' last 10 teams had a player average more than 20 points per game. Following is a summary of the seven schools to secure at least eight straight regular-season league titles:

UCLA (13 in Pacific-8/10; 171-15 league record from 1966-67 through 1978-79)

Season League Mark Scoring Leader Rebounding Leader Coaches Overall Mark
1966-67 14-0 Lew Alcindor (29 ppg) Lew Alcindor (15.5 rpg) John Wooden 30-0
1967-68 14-0 Lew Alcindor (26.2) Lew Alcindor (16.5) John Wooden 29-1
1968-69 13-1 Lew Alcindor (24) Lew Alcindor (14.6) John Wooden 29-1
1969-70 12-2 Sidney Wicks (18.6) Sidney Wicks (11.9) John Wooden 28-2
1970-71 14-0 Sidney Wicks (21.3) Sidney Wicks (12.8) John Wooden 29-1
1971-72 14-0 Bill Walton (21.1) Bill Walton (15.5) John Wooden 30-0
1972-73 14-0 Bill Walton (20.4) Bill Walton (16.9) John Wooden 30-0
1973-74 12-2 Bill Walton (19.3) Bill Walton (14.7) John Wooden 26-4
1974-75 12-2 David Meyers (18.3) David Meyers (7.9) John Wooden 28-3
1975-76 12-2 Richard Washington (20.1) Marques Johnson (9.4) Gene Bartow 27-5
1976-77 11-3 Marques Johnson (21.4) Marques Johnson (11.1) Gene Bartow 24-5
1977-78 14-0 David Greenwood (17.5) David Greenwood (11.4) Gary Cunningham 25-3
1978-79 15-3 David Greenwood (19.9) David Greenwood (10.3) Gary Cunningham 25-5

Kansas (11 in Big 12; 152-32 from 2004-05 through 2014-15)

Season League Mark Scoring Leader Rebounding Leader Coach Overall Mark
2004-05 12-4 Wayne Simien (20.3) Wayne Simien (11) Bill Self 23-7
2005-06 13-3 Brandon Rush (13.5) Brandon Rush (5.9) Bill Self 25-8
2006-07 14-2 Brandon Rush (13.8) Julian Wright (7.8) Bill Self 33-5
2007-08 13-3 Brandon Rush (13.3) Darnell Jackson (6.7) Bill Self 37-3
2008-09 14-2 Sherron Collins (18.9) Cole Aldrich (11.1) Bill Self 27-8
2009-10 15-1 Sherron Collins (15.5) Cole Aldrich (9.8) Bill Self 33-3
2010-11 14-2 Marcus Morris (17.2) Markieff Morris (8.3) Bill Self 35-3
2011-12 16-2 Thomas Robinson (17.7) Thomas Robinson (11.9) Bill Self 32-7
2012-13 14-4 Ben McLemore (15.9) Jeff Withey (8.5) Bill Self 31-6
2013-14 14-4 Andrew Wiggins (17.1) Joel Embiid (8.1) Bill Self 25-10
2014-15 13-5 Perry Ellis (13.8) Perry Ellis (6.9) Bill Self 27-9

NOTE: Kansas tied Oklahoma in 2004-05, Texas in 2005-06 and 2007-08 and Kansas State in 2012-13.

Connecticut (10 in Yankee; 71-8 from 1950-51 through 1959-60)

Season League Mark Scoring Leader Rebounding Leader Coach Overall Mark
1950-51 6-1 Vin Yokabaskas (15.5) William Ebel (9) Hugh Greer 22-4
1951-52 6-1 Vin Yokabaskas (16.8) Burr Carlson (14.5) Hugh Greer 20-7
1952-53 5-1 Art Quimby (16.7) Art Quimby (20.5) Hugh Greer 17-4
1953-54 7-0 Art Quimby (16.3) Art Quimby (22.6) Hugh Greer 23-3
1954-55 7-0 Art Quimby (23.2) Art Quimby (24.4) Hugh Greer 20-5
1955-56 6-1 Gordon Ruddy (16.6) unavailable Hugh Greer 17-11
1956-57 8-0 Bob Osborne (15.6) Al Cooper (11.8) Hugh Greer 17-8
1957-58 10-0 Jack Rose (13) Al Cooper (11) Hugh Greer 17-10
1958-59 8-2 Jack Rose (16) Ed Martin (12.1) Hugh Greer 17-7
1959-60 8-2 John Pipczynski (15.2) Walt Griffin (11.5) Hugh Greer 17-9

UNLV (10 in PCAA/Big West; 165-13 from 1982-83 through 1991-92)

Season League Mark Scoring Leader Rebounding Leader Coach Overall Mark
1982-83 15-1 Sidney Green (22.1) Sidney Green (11.9) Jerry Tarkanian 28-3
1983-84 16-2 Richie Adams (12.7) Richie Adams (6.7) Jerry Tarkanian 29-6
1984-85 17-1 Richie Adams (15.8) Richie Adams (7.9) Jerry Tarkanian 28-4
1985-86 16-2 Anthony Jones (18) Armon Gilliam (8.5) Jerry Tarkanian 33-5
1986-87 18-0 Armon Gilliam (23.2) Armon Gilliam (9.3) Jerry Tarkanian 37-2
1987-88 15-3 Gerald Paddio (19.4) Jarvis Basnight (6.9) Jerry Tarkanian 28-6
1988-89 16-2 David Butler (15.4) Stacey Augmon (7.4) Jerry Tarkanian 29-8
1989-90 16-2 Larry Johnson (20.6) Larry Johnson (11.4) Jerry Tarkanian 35-5
1990-91 18-0 Larry Johnson (22.7) Larry Johnson (10.9) Jerry Tarkanian 34-1
1991-92 18-0 J.R. Rider (20.7) Elmore Spencer (8.1) Jerry Tarkanian 26-2

NOTE: UNLV tied New Mexico State in 1989-90.

Idaho State (eight in Rocky Mountain; 76-4 from 1952-53 through 1959-60)

Season League Mark Scoring Leader Rebounding Leader Coach Overall Mark
1952-53 10-0 Les Roh (16.6) unavailable Steve Belko 18-7
1953-54 9-1 Les Roh (17.1) unavailable Steve Belko 22-5
1954-55 9-1 Les Roh (21.7) unavailable Steve Belko 18-8
1955-56 9-1 Les Roh (20.8) unavailable Steve Belko 18-8
1956-57 12-0 Jim Rodgers (15) Jack Allain (12.5) John Grayson 25-4
1957-58 10-0 Lloyd Harris (14.7) LeRoy Bacher (9) John Grayson 22-6
1958-59 9-1 Jim Rodgers (17.4) Homer Watkins (11.6) John Grayson 21-7
1959-60 8-0 Myrl Goodwin (16.4) unavailable John Evans 21-5

Kentucky (eight in SEC; 82-3 from 1944-45 through 1951-52)

Season League Mark Scoring Leader Rebounding Leader Coach Overall Mark
1944-45 4-1 Jack Tingle (11.7) unavailable Adolph Rupp 22-4
1945-46 6-0 Jack Parkinson (11.3) unavailable Adolph Rupp 28-2
1946-47 11-0 Ralph Beard (10.9) unavailable Adolph Rupp 34-3
1947-48 9-0 Alex Groza (12.5) unavailable Adolph Rupp 36-3
1948-49 13-0 Alex Groza (20.5) unavailable Adolph Rupp 32-2
1949-50 11-2 Bill Spivey (19.3) unavailable Adolph Rupp 25-5
1950-51 14-0 Bill Spivey (19.2) Bill Spivey (17.2) Adolph Rupp 32-2
1951-52 14-0 Cliff Hagan (21.6) Cliff Hagan (16.5) Adolph Rupp 29-3

NOTES: Kentucky tied Tennessee in 1944-45 and Louisiana State in 1945-46. . . . UK did not field a team in 1952-53 before tying LSU in 1953-54 and winning outright in 1954-55.

Long Beach State (eight in PCAA; 75-13 from 1969-70 through 1976-77)

Season League Mark Scoring Leader Rebounding Leader Coaches Overall Mark
1969-70 10-0 George Trapp (16.3) Sam Robinson (7.8) Jerry Tarkanian 23-5
1970-71 10-0 Ed Ratleff (19.9) George Trapp (11) Jerry Tarkanian 24-5
1971-72 10-2 Ed Ratleff (21.4) Nate Stephens (10.3) Jerry Tarkanian 25-4
1972-73 10-2 Ed Ratleff (22.8) Leonard Gray (9.3) Jerry Tarkanian 26-3
1973-74 12-0 Clifton Pondexter (15.6) Clifton Pondexter (8.6) Lute Olson 24-2
1974-75 8-2 Rich Johnson (17.8) Bob Gross (8.5) Dwight Jones 19-7
1975-76 6-4 Anthony McGee (14.8) Clarence Ruffen (7.4) Dwight Jones 14-12
1976-77 9-3 Lloyd McMillian (15.8) Lloyd McMillian (7.9) Dwight Jones 21-8

NOTE: Long Beach State tied Cal State Fullerton in 1975-76 and San Diego State in 1976-77.

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on May 9 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 9 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 9

  • Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading basketball scorer in 1945-46) clobbered two homers against the Chicago Cubs in 1961.

  • In his final game with the California Angels, DH Bruce Bochte (starting forward for Santa Clara's NCAA playoff team in 1969-70) collected four hits in a 5-3 win against the Kansas City Royals in 1977.

  • New York Giants 2B Andy Cohen (Alabama letterman in 1924 and 1925) cracked a leadoff homer but they wound up losing to the Pittsburgh Pirates, 3-2, in 1929.

  • Houston Astros LHP Danny Coombs (Seton Hall's third-leading scorer and rebounder as sophomore in 1961-62) tossed his lone MLB shutout (two-hitter against the Montreal Expos in 1970).

  • St. Louis Cardinals CF Taylor Douthit (California letterman from 1922 through 1924) stroked four hits against the Boston Braves in 1930.

  • Hall of Fame C Rick Ferrell (played for Guilford NC in mid-1920s) traded by the St. Louis Browns to the Boston Red Sox in 1933.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates 3B Lee Handley (Bradley letterman from 1932-33 through 1934-35) banged out four hits against the Boston Braves in 1938.

  • Cleveland Indians 1B Mike Hargrove (Northwestern Oklahoma State letterman) supplied five RBI against the Oakland Athletics in 1982.

  • Atlanta Braves RF David Justice (led Thomas More KY in assists in 1984-85) collected two homers and five RBI against the Colorado Rockies in 1993.

  • St. Louis Cardinals CF Lynn King (All-Missouri Valley Conference second-team selection with Drake from 1928-29 through 1930-31) collected a career-high three hits against the Chicago Cubs in 1936.

  • C Cal Neeman (Illinois Wesleyan's leading scorer in 1947-48 and 1948-49) purchased from the Philadelphia Phillies by the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1962.

  • INF-OF Mel Roach (averaged 9.3 ppg in 1952-53 in Virginia's final season prior to helping form ACC) traded by the Milwaukee Braves to the Chicago Cubs for OF-INF Frank Thomas in 1961.

  • In his first game outside of New York City, Brooklyn Dodgers 1B Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in Pacific Coast Conference both of his seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) collected two hits and scored two runs in a 6-5 loss at Philadelphia in 1947.

  • RHP Sonny Siebert (team-high 16.7 ppg for Missouri in 1957-58 as All-Big Eight Conference second-team selection) homered for the Cleveland Indians in the nightcap of a 1965 doubleheader against the Boston Red Sox.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers LHP Eric Stults (played for 1999 NAIA D-II Tournament runner-up and 2000 NCCAA Tournament titlist with Bethel IN) fired a four-hit shutout against the San Francisco Giants in 2009.

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on May 8 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 8 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 8

  • Jerry Adair (one of Oklahoma State's three leading basketball scorers in 1956-57 and 1957-58 while ranking among the nation's top 12 free-throw shooters each season) committed an eighth-inning miscue for the Baltimore Orioles against the Detroit Tigers in 1965, ending his MLB-record streaks for consecutive errorless games by a 2B (89) and consecutive chances handled without an error (438).

  • San Diego Padres RHP Mike Adams (played for Texas A&M-Kingsville in 1996-97) notched his fourth hold in nine days but was scored upon for the first time in last 16 relief appearances in 2011.

  • Philadelphia Phillies CF Ethan Allen (Cincinnati letterman in 1924-25 and 1925-26) supplied five RBI in a 13-6 triumph against the Chicago Cubs in 1934.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers C Ferrell Anderson (Kansas letterman in 1936-37 and 1937-38) furnished four hits in an 8-5 win against the Cincinnati Reds in 1946.

  • LF Bob Cerv (ranked fourth on Nebraska's career scoring list in 1949-50 when finishing his career) acquired from the Los Angeles Angels by the New York Yankees in 1961 for his third tour of duty in pinstripes.

  • Philadelphia Athletics C Mickey Cochrane (five-sport athlete with Boston University) collected three doubles against the Cleveland Indians in 1932.

  • Cincinnati Reds 1B George Crowe (four-year letterman from 1939-40 through 1942-43 for Indiana Central after becoming first high school player named state's Mr. Basketball) clobbered two homers in a 7-6 victory against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1957.

  • In 1948, Cleveland Indians RF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) whacked the longest home run at Washington's Griffith Stadium since Babe Ruth in 1922.

  • St. Louis Cardinals CF Taylor Douthit (California letterman from 1922 through 1924) contributed four hits against the Boston Braves in the first of six straight outings with multiple safeties in 1929.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates SS Dick Groat (two-time All-American with Duke in 1950-51 and 1951-52 when finishing among nation's top five scorers each season) provided three hits in each game of a 1955 doubleheader split against the New York Giants.

  • Philadelphia Phillies 1B Harvey Hendrick (Vanderbilt letterman in 1918) went 4-for-4 against the Chicago Cubs in 1934.

  • RHP Jay Hook (Northwestern's third-leading scorer with 10.7 ppg as a sophomore in 1955-56) traded by the New York Mets to the Milwaukee Braves in 1964.

  • Atlanta Braves 2B Davey Johnson (averaged 1.7 ppg for Texas A&M in 1961-62) delivered two homers and five RBI against the New York Mets in 1973.

  • LF "Sweet" Lou Johnson (Kentucky State teammate of legendary HBCU coach Davey Whitney averaged 5.7 ppg and 2 rpg in 1951-52) traded by the Milwaukee Braves with cash to the Detroit Tigers in 1963.

  • Chicago White Sox RHP Bob Keegan (Bucknell letterman in 1941-42 and 1942-43) yielded three homers to Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame OF Ted Williams in a 4-1 defeat in 1957.

  • Detroit Tigers SS Harvey Kuenn (played briefly for Wisconsin in 1951-52 after competing on JV squad previous season) registered his second four-hit outing in a six-game span in 1956.

  • Chicago Cubs 3B Vance Law (averaged 6.8 ppg for Brigham Young from 1974-75 through 1976-77) went 3-for-3 with six RBI against the San Francisco Giants in 1988.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates SS Johnny Logan (played for Binghamton in 1948-49) hit safely as a pinch-hitter for the third straight time in 1963.

  • Chicago Cubs CF Jerry Martin (1971 Southern Conference MVP after he was Furman's runner-up in scoring the previous season) stroked four hits against the Cincinnati Reds in 1979.

  • Baltimore Orioles RHP Ben McDonald (started six times as freshman forward for LSU in 1986-87 under coach Dale Brown) won his first seven starts in 1994.

  • Boston Red Sox 2B Marv Olson (All-Iowa Conference selection in 1929-30 with Luther IA) manufactured four hits in a 7-5 win against the St. Louis Browns in 1932.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers C-OF Don Padgett (freshman in 1934 excelled in multiple sports for Lenoir-Rhyne NC) smacked a decisive three-run pinch homer in an 8-5 win against the Cincinnati Reds in 1946.

Training Ground: LA Tech and VCU Join List of Schools Losing Six Coaches

The departure of Michael White to Florida enabled Louisiana Tech to join the list of schools losing at least six head coaches over the years to other major colleges or the NBA. VCU also joined the group this year when Shaka Smart aligned with Texas.

LA Tech lost four mentors in a 16-year span from 1974 to 1989. Incredibly, Tulsa lost four coaches in a seven-year period from 1995 to 2001. The following list shows Idaho (11 years from 1983, Princeton (12 years from 2000 to 2011) to 1993), Murray State (14 years from 1985 to 1998), New Orleans (14 years from 1994 to 2007) and Penn (15 years from 1971 to 1985) losing four coaches in comparable short spans:

Idaho (7) - Dave MacMillan (left for Minnesota/1927), Dave Strack (Michigan/1960), Joe Cipriano (Nebraska/1963), Don Monson (Oregon/1983), Tim Floyd (New Orleans/1988), Kermit Davis (Texas A&M/1990), Larry Eustachy (Utah State/1993)

Kansas State (7) - Jack Gardner (Utah/1953), Tex Winter (Washington/1968), Cotton Fitzsimmons (Phoenix Suns/1970), Lon Kruger (Florida/1990), Dana Altman (Creighton/1994), Bob Huggins (West Virginia/2008), Frank Martin (South Carolina/2012)

Montana (7) - Jud Heathcote (Michigan State/1976), Jim Brandenburg (Wyoming/1978), Mike Montgomery (Stanford/1986), Stew Morrill (Colorado State/1991), Pat Kennedy (Towson/2004), Larry Krystkowiak (assistant with Milwaukee Bucks/2006), Wayne Tinkle (Oregon State/2014)

Penn (7) - Howie Dallmar (Stanford/1954), Jack McCloskey (Wake Forest/1966), Dick Harter (Oregon/1971), Chuck Daly (assistant with Philadelphia 76ers/1977), Bob Weinhauer (Arizona State/1982), Craig Littlepage (Rutgers/1985), Fran Dunphy (Temple/2006)

Tulsa (7) - Ken Hayes (New Mexico State/1975), Nolan Richardson Jr. (Arkansas/1985), Tubby Smith (Georgia/1995), Steve Robinson (Florida State/1997), Bill Self (Illinois/2000), Buzz Peterson (Tennessee/2001), Danny Manning (Wake Forest/2014)

Clemson (6) - Doc Stewart (Texas/1923), Press Maravich (North Carolina State/1962), Bill C. Foster (Miami FL/1984), Cliff Ellis (Auburn/1994), Rick Barnes (Texas/1998), Oliver Purnell (DePaul/2010)

Dartmouth (6) - Ozzie Cowles (Michigan/1946), Dave Gavitt (Providence/1969), George Blaney (Holy Cross/1972), Gary Walters (Providence/1979), Reggie Minton (Air Force/1984), Paul Cormier (Fairfield/1991)

Louisiana Tech (6) - Scotty Robertson (New Orleans Jazz/1974), J.D. Barnett (Virginia Commonwealth/1979), Andy Russo (Washington/1985), Tommy Joe Eagles (Auburn/1989), Jim Wooldridge (assistant with Chicago Bulls/1998), Michael White (Florida/2015)

Marquette (6) - Tex Winter (Kansas State/1953), Rick Majerus (assistant with Milwaukee Bucks/1986), Kevin O'Neill (Tennessee/1994), Mike Deane (Lamar/1999), Tom Crean (Indiana/2008), Buzz Williams (Virginia Tech/2014)

Murray State (6) - Ron Greene (Indiana State/1985), Steve Newton (South Carolina/1991), Scott Edgar (Duquesne/1995), Mark Gottfried (Alabama/1998), Mick Cronin (Cincinnati/2006), Billy Kennedy (Texas A&M/2011)

New Orleans (6) - Ron Greene (Mississippi State/1977), Benny Dees (Wyoming/1987), Tim Floyd (Iowa State/1994), Tic Price (Memphis/1997), Monte Towe (assistant with North Carolina State/2006), Buzz Williams (Marquette/2007)

Princeton (6) - Butch van Breda Kolff (Los Angeles Lakers/1967), Pete Carril (assistant with Sacramento Kings/1996), Bill Carmody (Northwestern/2000), John Thompson III (Georgetown/2004), Joe Scott (Denver/2007), Sydney Johnson (Fairfield/2011)

Virginia Commonwealth (6) - Dana Kirk (Memphis State/1979), J.D. Barnett (Tulsa/1985), Mike Pollio (Eastern Kentucky/1989), Jeff Capel III (Oklahoma/2006), Anthony Grant (Alabama/2009), Shaka Smart (Texas/2015)

Xavier (6) - Ned Wulk (Arizona State/1957), Bob Staak (Wake Forest/1985), Pete Gillen (Providence/1994), Skip Prosser (Wake Forest/2001), Thad Matta (Ohio State/2004), Sean Miller (Arizona/2009)

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on May 7 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 7 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 7

  • Baltimore Orioles DH Al Bumbry (Virginia State's runner-up in basketball scoring with 16.7 ppg as freshman in 1964-65) provided four hits for the second time in a four-game span in 1975.

  • INF-OF Harvey Hendrick (Vanderbilt letterman in 1918) traded by the Brooklyn Robins to the Cincinnati Reds in 1931.

  • LF David Justice (led Thomas More KY in assists in 1984-85) jacked two homers while going 4-for-4 to help the Cleveland Indians erase a 9-1 deficit and defeat the Tampa Devil Rays, 20-11, in 1999. The next year, Justice provided three extra-base hits and five RBI against the Toronto Blue Jays in 2000.

  • In 1946, Philadelphia Athletics 1B Bruce Konopka (Southern California letterman in 1940-41) collected his third extra-base pinch-hit the first week of the month.

  • Detroit Tigers SS Harvey Kuenn (played briefly for Wisconsin in 1951-52 after competing on JV squad previous season) contributed four hits against the Chicago White Sox in 1955.

  • 1B Ed Morgan (Tulane letterman from 1923-24 through 1925-26) hit safely in first 14 starts of the 1934 campaign with the Boston Red Sox before he was blanked by the Detroit Tigers.

  • RHP Jack Ogden (competed with Swarthmore PA in 1918) traded by the Cincinnati Reds with Leo Durocher to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1933.

  • RHP Hal Schumacher (played for St. Lawrence NY) combined with New York Giants teammate Carl Hubbell to toss back-to-back shutouts in a 1932 doubleheader against the Cincinnati Reds.

  • Cleveland Indians rookie 3B Freddy Spurgeon (played for Kalamazoo MI in 1921-22) went 4-for-4 against the Chicago White Sox in 1925.

  • Chicago White Sox LHP Matt Thornton (averaged 5.8 ppg and 2.4 rpg for Grand Valley State MI from 1995-96 through 1997-98) fanned five Toronto Blue Jays in two innings as he went unscored upon in 10 relief appearances during the month in 2010.

  • 1B-OF Preston Ward (second-leading scorer for Southwest Missouri State in 1946-47 and 1948-49) tripled after three teammates walked to spur the Brooklyn Dodgers to a 9-5 victory at Chicago in 1948.

  • New York Giants 1B Bill White (played two years with Hiram OH in early 1950s) homered in his first MLB at-bat in 1956 (against the St. Louis Cardinals).

Beginner's Luck? Ex-Hofstra Hoopster Brant Alyea Homered on 1st MLB Pitch

How many Eddie Rosarios were former college basketball players before making it on the diamond? Rosario (Minnesota Twins) became the 117th MLB player hitting a homer in his first at-bat (29th on initial pitch he faced). Among the five ex-college hoopsters homering in first at-bat on the following chronological list, Hofstra's Brant Alyea appears to be the only one to go deep on the the initial MLB pitch he faced:

Ex-Hoopster College First MLB Team Date Opponent Yielding HR
Ace Parker Duke Philadelphia Phillies 4-30-37 Boston Red Sox
Ted Tappe Washington State Cincinnati Reds 9-14-50 Brooklyn Dodgers
Wally Moon Texas A&M St. Louis Cardinals 4-13-54 Chicago Cubs
Bill White Hiram (Ohio) New York Giants 5-7-56 St. Louis Cardinals
Brant Alyea* Hofstra Washington Senators 9-12-65 California Angels

*Hit homer on first MLB pitch he faced.

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on May 6 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 6 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 6

  • Hall of Fame C Mickey Cochrane (Boston University basketball player in early 1920s) clobbered his first MLB homer with the Philadelphia Athletics in 1925.

  • Boston Red Sox rookie RHP Boo Ferriss (Mississippi State letterman in 1941) hurled his second straight shutout in 1945, whitewashing the New York Yankees, 5-0.

  • New York Giants 2B Frankie Frisch (Fordham captain) furnished four hits against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1924.

  • RF Jim Gleeson (NAIA Hall of Famer was an all-league player for Rockhurst MO in early 1930s) traded by the Cincinnati Reds to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1942.

  • Detroit Tigers LF Hank Greenberg (enrolled at NYU on hoop scholarship in 1929 but attended college only one semester) contributed three extra-base hits in a 6-4 victory against the New York Yankees in 1940.

  • Cleveland Indians 1B Mike Hargrove (Northwestern Oklahoma State letterman) collected three doubles against the Chicago White Sox in 1983.

  • Milwaukee Braves SS Johnny Logan (played for Binghamton in 1948-49) supplied at least three hits for the third consecutive contest in 1959.

  • In 1968, San Francisco Giants RHP Lindy McDaniel (played for Oklahoma's 1954-55 freshman squad) established a N.L. record with his 225th consecutive errorless game.

  • New York Yankees LF Bud Metheny (William & Mary letterman from 1935-36 through 1937-38) stroked four hits in a 4-3 win against the Boston Red Sox in 1944.

  • In 1967, 1B Cotton Nash (three-time All-American averaged 22.7 ppg and 12.3 rpg for Kentucky from 1961-62 through 1963-64) traded by the California Angels with cash to the Chicago White Sox for 1B Bill "Moose" Skowron (scored 18 points in eight games for Purdue in 1949-50).

  • A two-out, seventh-inning single by CF Jim Northrup (second-leading scorer and third-leading rebounder for Alma MI in 1958-59) was the Detroit Tigers' lone safety when they were blanked, 4-0, by Dave Leonard of the Baltimore Orioles in 1968.

  • LF Rip Repulski (started a few games for St. Cloud State MN) traded by the Los Angeles Dodgers to the Boston Red Sox in 1960.

  • Cincinnati Reds 1B Champ Summers (led SIUE in scoring in 1969-70 after doing same with Nicholls State in 1964-65) went 4-for-4 and chipped in with five RBI against the Houston Astros in the opener of a 1979 doubleheader.

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on May 5 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 5 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 5

  • Los Angeles Angels 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading basketball scorer in 1945-46) launched two homers against the Kansas City Royals in 1964.

  • Chicago White Sox SS Bosey Berger (Maryland's first All-American led Southern Conference in scoring in league competition in 1930-31) banged out four hits against the Philadelphia Athletics in 1938.

  • Seattle Mariners 1B Bruce Bochte (starting forward for Santa Clara's NCAA playoff team in 1969-70) contributed four hits against the Boston Red Sox in 1979.

  • In 1943, New York Giants LF Vic Bradford (Alabama letterman in 1937) supplied his lone MLB hit with a single against the Boston Braves.

  • 2B Marv Breeding (played for Samford in mid-1950s) traded by the Atlanta Braves to the San Francisco Giants in 1966.

  • Boston Braves SS Dick Culler (#9 jersey retired by High Point for Little All-American in 1935 and 1936) went 5-for-6 in a 1945 doubleheader against the New York Giants.

  • After two shaky starts in 1951, Pittsburgh Pirates RHP Con Dempsey (played for San Francisco during Golden Age of athletics on Hilltop) tossed two shutout innings of relief against the New York Giants in his third and final MLB appearance.

  • RHP George Earnshaw (competed for Swarthmore PA in 1922) ignited a 17-game winning streak for the Philadelphia Athletics in 1931 with a 4-1 triumph over the Boston Red Sox.

  • St. Louis Browns C Rick Ferrell (played forward for Guilford NC before graduating in 1928) furnished four hits for the second time in a three-game span in 1931.

  • Oakland Athletics 3B Wayne Gross (led Cal Poly Pomona in assists in 1974-75) went 4-for-4, including three extra-base hits, in a 6-2 win against the Detroit Tigers in 1981.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers 1B Gil Hodges (played for Oakland City IN in 1947 and 1948) homered twice against the Cincinnati Reds in 1951.

  • Atlanta Braves RF David Justice (led Thomas More KY in assists in 1984-85) smacked two homers against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1996.

  • St. Louis Browns LHP Ernie Koob (Western Michigan letterman in 1914) hurled a no-hitter against the Chicago White Sox in 1917.

  • OF Don Lock (led Wichita State in field-goal percentage in 1956-57 and 1957-58) traded by the Philadelphia Phillies to the Boston Red Sox in 1969.

  • In a twinbill sweep of the Philadelphia Phillies, St. Louis Cardinals LF Wally Moon (averaged 4.3 ppg with Texas A&M in 1948-49 and 1949-50) began a 24-game hitting streak, the longest of the 1957 season in the N.L.

  • 1B-OF Norm Siebern (member of Southwest Missouri State's back-to-back NAIA Tournament titlists in 1952 and 1953) scored five runs for the Kansas City Athletics in an 18-6 romp over the Cleveland Indians in the opener of a doubleheader in 1962.

  • Detroit Tigers SS Ken Szotkiewicz (Georgia Southern letterman in 1966-67) supplied career highs of two hits and two RBI against the Minnesota Twins in 1970.

  • San Diego Padres OF Will Venable (All-Ivy League first-team selection as junior and second-team choice as senior averaged 9.3 ppg under Princeton coach John Thompson III from 2001-02 through 2004-05) stroked a game-winning, two-run single in the bottom of the 12th inning in a 6-5 win against the Kansas City Royals in 2014.

You're Billy the Kidding Me: Donovan Never Named National Coach of Year

"It is better to be looked over than overlooked." - Mae West

It doesn't seem possible, but Billy Donovan is bound for the NBA's Oklahoma City Thunder without ever earning acclaim as national coach of the year by a major award. The former New England athlete (Providence) didn't deflate balls, but was shunned despite becoming Florida's all-time winningest mentor and directing the Gators to back-to-back NCAA Tournament titles (2006 and 2007).

Maryland named its court after Gary Williams, the school's all-time winningest coach who guided the Terrapins to the 2002 NCAA title during a span when he became the only mentor ever to defeat the nation's top-ranked team in four straight seasons (2000-01 through 2003-04). Surprisingly, Williams never was courted as national coach of the year by one of the major awards, joining Donovan and other NCAA championship coaches such as Denny Crum, Joe B. Hall, Don Haskins, Rollie Massimino and Jim Valvano "shorted" by this dubious distinction.

Does this blemish exist because of envious fellow coaches or is the Brady Punch-obsessed media in dire need of brain scans while focusing more on deflated Patriot balls than inflated Clinton Crime Family wallets? A total of 16 individuals received acclaim as national COY despite never reaching an NCAA playoff regional final - Rod Barnes, Tony Bennett, Perry Clark, Jim Crews, Keno Davis, Matt Doherty, Cliff Ellis, Eddie Fogler, Frank Haith, Leonard Hamilton, Marv Harshman, Todd Lickliter, George Raveling, Al Skinner, Charlie Spoonhour and Dick Versace. Following is an alphabetical list of high-profile retired or non-DI coaches joining Donovan who never received one of the five major national coach of the year awards since 1955 despite their significant achievements:

Dave Bliss - Compiled a total of 14 20-win seasons with three different schools.

Dale Brown - Led LSU to 15 consecutive postseason tournaments (1979 through 1993) en route to becoming the second-winningest coach in SEC history at the time (behind Adolph Rupp) in both overall and SEC games.

Vic Bubas - Guided Duke to NCAA Tournament Final Four appearances three times in a four-year span from 1963 through 1966.

Pete Carril - Never incurred a losing record in 29 seasons with Princeton from 1968 through 1996.

Gale Catlett - Went his first 23 seasons without a losing record with Cincinnati and West Virginia; participated in nine consecutive national postseason tournaments in the 1980s.

Denny Crum - Won 15 regular-season conference championships in the Missouri Valley and Metro in his first 23 seasons with Louisville; only coach to twice win conference and NCAA tournaments in the same year (1980 and 1986).

Don DeVoe - Compiled a total of 12 20-win seasons with three different schools.

Don Donoher - One of first 10 coaches to take his first three teams to the NCAA playoffs guided his first seven Dayton clubs to national postseason competition; posted double digits in victories all 25 seasons.

Lefty Driesell - One of only three different coaches to guide four different schools to the NCAA playoffs; captured conference tournament titles in four different leagues; only coach to win more than 100 games for four different schools en route to total of 786 victories; had 14 final Top 20 rankings.

Hugh Durham - One of only three coaches in NCAA history to win at least 225 games for two Division I schools, directing both Florida State and Georgia to the Final Four.

Bill C. Foster - Only six losing records in 25 seasons at the Division I level with UNC Charlotte, Clemson, Miami (FL) and Virginia Tech.

Jack Gardner - Only coach to direct two different schools to the Final Four at least twice apiece.

Pete Gillen - Remarkable run with Xavier (winning five Midwestern Collegiate Conference Tournament titles in six-year span from 1986 through 1991) before posting 20-win seasons with Providence in the Big East and Virginia in the ACC.

Joe B. Hall - Averaged 23 victories annually in 13 seasons with Kentucky, reaching championship game in either NCAA Tournament or NIT three times in a four-year span from 1975 through 1978.

Don Haskins - Captured four Western Athletic Conference Tournament championships with Texas-El Paso in a seven-year span from 1984 through 1990 while winning more than 20 games each of those seasons; compiled a total of 17 20-win campaigns.

Lou Henson - Compiled only one losing record in his last 22 years with Illinois and New Mexico State; finished in first division of the Big Ten Conference nine straight seasons.

Terry Holland - Averaged 20 victories annually in 21 seasons with Davidson and Virginia.

Harry Litwack - Finished third with Temple in three consecutive national postseason tournaments (1956 and 1958 in NCAA and 1957 in NIT). Posted only one losing record in 21 seasons with the Owls through 1973.

Rollie Massimino - Averaged more than 20 victories annually in the 1980s; participated in 14 consecutive national postseason tournaments with Villanova and UNLV before coaching at small-school level in Florida.

Ray Mears - Finished lower than third place in SEC standings with Tennessee just once in his final 14 seasons from 1964 through 1977.

Shelby Metcalf - Averaged 18.6 victories annually with Texas A&M in an 18-year span from 1971-72 through 1988-89.

Eldon Miller - Won more than 20 games with three different DI schools (Western Michigan, Ohio State and Northern Iowa).

Joe Mullaney - Reached the 20-win plateau nine straight seasons from 1958-59 through 1966-67, directing Providence to the NIT semifinals four times in the first five years of that stretch; won more than two-thirds of his games with the Friars decided by fewer than five points.

C.M. Newton - Posted at least 22 victories with Alabama six times in the last seven seasons of the 1970s.

Dave Odom - Won 20 or more games 10 times in a 14-year span from 1992-93 through 2005-06 with Wake Forest and South Carolina.

Ted Owens - Finished first or second in Big Eight Conference standings each of his first seven seasons with Kansas from 1965 through 1971.

Tom Penders - Won at least 20 games with three different schools (Rhode Island, Texas and George Washington) a total of 10 times in a 13-year span from 1987 through 1999 before winning more than 20 games three times in six seasons with Houston.

Jack Ramsay - Worst record in 11 seasons with St. Joseph's was an 18-10 mark.

Wimp Sanderson - Won five SEC Tournament titles with Alabama, including three in a row from 1989 through 1991.

Fred Schaus - Won Southern Conference Tournament championships each of his six seasons with West Virginia from 1955 through 1960 before posting winning records in Big Ten competition all six years with Purdue.

Roy Skinner - Compiled only one losing record in 16 seasons with Vanderbilt.

Billy Tubbs - Directed Oklahoma to 12 consecutive 20-win seasons, a Big Eight Conference best; took the Sooners to national postseason play his last 13 years with them before moving on to TCU and Lamar.

Jim Valvano - Guided Iona to a school-record 29 victories in 1979-80 before winning at least 18 games each of his last nine seasons with North Carolina State from 1982 through 1990.

Gary Williams - All-time winningest coach for Maryland directed 13 teams to Top 20 finishes in final polls, including a couple of them with Boston College.

Ned Wulk - All-time winningest coach for Arizona State finished atop conference standings in six of his first seven seasons with the Sun Devils.

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on May 4 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 4 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 4

  • Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading basketball scorer in 1945-46) cracked a grand slam in the bottom of the 10th inning of a 10-6 triumph against the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1961.

  • Chicago Cubs 1B Larry Biittner (runner-up in scoring and rebounding for Buena Vista IA in 1966-67) banged out four hits against the Cincinnati Reds in the nightcap of a 1980 doubleheader.

  • Oakland Athletics 3B Wayne Gross (led Cal Poly Pomona in assists in 1974-75) contributed two homers and five RBI in an 11-5 win against the New York Yankees in 1979.

  • In the midst of a career-high 23-game hitting streak in 1980, Cleveland Indians 1B Mike Hargrove (Northwestern Oklahoma State letterman) supplied at least one RBI in his eighth consecutive contest.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers 1B Gil Hodges (played for Oakland City IN in 1947 and 1948) went 4-for-4, including two homers and two doubles, against the Milwaukee Braves in 1959.

  • In 1927, New York Giants RHP Mul Holland (Virginia letterman from 1923-24 through 1926-27) posted his lone MLB victory.

  • Milwaukee Braves SS Johnny Logan (played for Binghamton in 1948-49) logged three doubles in a 9-4 win against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1953.

  • St. Louis Browns LHP Joe Ostrowski (leading scorer in 1942-43 for Scranton PA) tossed his second complete-game victory in as many starts in 1950.

  • Atlanta Braves RHP Ron Reed (Notre Dame's leading rebounder in 1963-64 and 1964-65) incurred the defeat in a 20-inning marathon against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1973.

  • RHP Sonny Siebert (team-high 16.7 ppg for Missouri in 1957-58 as All-Big Eight Conference second-team selection) shipped by the Boston Red Sox to the Texas Rangers as part of a conditional deal in 1973.

  • RHP Lee Smith (averaged 3.4 ppg and 1.9 rpg with Northwestern State in 1976-77) traded by the Boston Red Sox to the St. Louis Cardinals for OF Tom Brunansky in 1990.

  • Cleveland Indians 2B Freddy Spurgeon (played for Kalamazoo MI in 1921-22) supplied four hits and four RBI against the St. Louis Browns in 1926.

  • Detroit Tigers 2B Gary Sutherland (averaged 7.4 ppg with USC in 1963-64) stroked four hits against the Minnesota Twins in 1976.

Curry Favor: Ex-Davidson Dynamo Not First Mid-Major Mistake by NBA Execs

Golden State guard Stephen Curry, anointed NBA Most Valuable Player this season before shattering the league's record for most three-pointers in a single playoff and guiding the Warriors to their first NBA Finals appearance in 40 years, neither is too small nor too fragile. What is too small and fragile are the minds of any genius who overlooked the Davidson All-American for significantly inferior performers as a high school recruit and those who subsequently bypassed him in a similar fashion in the NBA draft. Knuckleheads offended by Curry's dynamo daughter at a post-game press conference podium should save their angst for those individuals on a basketball payroll despite shunning Curry - occasionally including colleagues.

In retrospect, it defies belief ESPN "expert" Seth Greenberg boasted the gall to patronize Virginia Tech All-American Dell Curry's son by offering a spot on the Hokies' roster as a walk-on before the Minnesota Timberwolves picked long-forgotten Jonny Flynn one slot ahead of the incomparable Curry in 2009. In other words, Greenberg and the Timberwolves are the only individual and pro team capable of stopping Curry. Of course, Loyola (Md.) is the only college capable of containing Curry, holding the nation's top point producer scoreless in 2008-09.

In a previous non-sexist straightforward generation when fifty-something Hannah Storm also dressed like a teenager, Stockton-to-Malone could have been a hallmark of the Washington Bullets/Wizards rather than the Utah Jazz if there were more astute judgments made in 1984 and 1985 between mid-major and SEC/ACC players. Smug egghead prosecutors seeking face time appealing to low-information voters by indicting hard-working policemen probably would have more stature probing low-intelligence individuals previously laying an egg bypassing workmanlike Curry. Following is an alphabetical list of mid-major standouts selected behind players from current power conference members before they became league MVP such as Curry, Finals MVP, appeared in five or more All-Star Games or all-time Top 10 in assists, blocked shots, rebounds or steals:

Mid-Major Standout (Pick Overall) College Year Players From Current Power League Member Chosen Ahead of Him in Draft
Tiny Archibald (19) Texas-El Paso 1970 Jim Ard (Cincinnati)/Gary Freeman (Oregon State)/Al Henry (Wisconsin)/Mike Price (Illinois)/John Vallely (UCLA)
Maurice Cheeks (36) West Texas State 1978 Marty Byrnes (Syracuse)/Harry Davis (Florida State)/Jack Givens (Kentucky)/Butch Lee (Marquette)/Wayne Radford (Indiana)/Raymond Townsend (UCLA)/Rick Wilson (Louisville)
Larry Costello (12) Niagara 1954 Ed Kalafat (Minnesota)/Bob Mattick (Oklahoma State)/Dick Rosenthal (Notre Dame)
Stephen Curry (7) Davidson 2009 Jonny Flynn (Syracuse)/Hasheem Thabeet (Connecticut)
Joe Dumars (18) McNeese State 1985 Uwe Blab (Indiana)/Kenny Green (Wake Forest)/Keith Lee (Memphis State)
Wayne Embry (23) Miami (Ohio) 1958 Pete Brennan (North Carolina)/Archie Dees (Indiana)/Roy DeWitz (Kansas State)/Vern Hatton (Kentucky)/Frank Howard (Ohio State)/John Nacincik (Maryland)/Joe Quigg (North Carolina)/Lamar Sharrar (West Virginia)
Walt Frazier (5) Southern Illinois 1967 Sonny Dove (St. John's)
Hal Greer (14) Marshall 1958 Pete Brennan (North Carolina)/Archie Dees (Indiana)/Vern Hatton (Kentucky)/Joe Quigg (North Carolina)/Lamar Sharrar (West Virginia)
Richie Guerin (17) Iona 1954 Dick Farley (Indiana)/Ed Kalafat (Minnesota)/Bob Mattick (Oklahoma State)/Dick Rosenthal (Notre Dame)
Dennis Johnson (29) Pepperdine 1976 Bob Carrington (Boston College)/Norm Cook (Kansas)/Jacky Dorsey (Georgia)/Scott Lloyd (Arizona State)/Willie Smith (Missouri)/Chuckie Williams (Kansas State)
Gus Johnson (11) Idaho 1963 Art Heyman (Duke)/Tom Hoover (Villanova)/Tom Thacker (Cincinnati)/Gerry Ward (Boston College)
Sam Jones (8) North Carolina Central 1957 George BonSalle (Illinois)/Lennie Rosenbluth (North Carolina)/Win Wilfong (Memphis State)
Rudy LaRusso (12) Dartmouth 1959 Don Goldstein (Louisville)/John Richter (North Carolina State)/Joe Ruklick (Northwestern)
Karl Malone (13) Louisiana Tech 1985 Kenny Green (Wake Forest)/Keith Lee (Memphis State)
Cedric "Cornbread" Maxwell (12) UNC Charlotte 1977 Tom LaGarde (North Carolina)
Steve Nash (15) Santa Clara 1996 Todd Fuller (North Carolina State)
Willis Reed (10) Grambling 1964 Gary Bradds (Ohio State)/George Wilson (Cincinnati)
John Stockton (16) Gonzaga 1984 Lancaster Gordon (Louisville)/Terence Stansbury (Temple)/Melvin Turpin (Kentucky)
Nate Thurmond (4) Bowling Green 1963 Art Heyman (Duke)/Tom Thacker (Cincinnati)
Chet Walker (14) Bradley 1962 Paul Hogue (Cincinnati)/John Rudometkin (Southern California)

NOTE: Drafts in 1958, 1959, 1962, 1963 and 1964 included territorial picks.

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on May 3 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 3 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 3

  • In 1977, Chicago Cubs RHP Ray Burris (basketball-baseball standout in Southwestern Oklahoma State Hall of Fame) fired a five-hit shutout against the Houston Astros for his first of five victories in the month.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates 1B Donn Clendenon (four-sport letterman with Morehouse GA) cracked two-run homers in the 8th and 12th innings in a 5-4 win against the Cincinnati Reds in 1966.

  • Detroit Tigers C Mickey Cochrane (five-sport athlete with Boston University) collected four hits, including three for extra bases, against the Chicago White Sox in 1937.

  • Boston Red Sox LF Hoot Evers (Illinois starter in 1939-40) scored four runs against the St. Louis Browns in the opener of a 1953 doubleheader.

  • Washington Senators C Rick Ferrell (played forward for Guilford NC before graduating in 1928) registered four hits against the St. Louis Browns in 1939.

  • First triumph in 1982 campaign for Baltimore Orioles LHP Mike Flanagan (averaged 13.9 ppg for UMass' freshman squad in 1971-72) was a three-hit shutout against the Seattle Mariners. Seven years later with the Toronto Blue Jays, Flanagan provided the final whitewash of his 18-year career (four-hitter against the Oakland Athletics in 1989).

  • INF Jake Flowers (member of 1923 "Flying Pentagon" championship squad for Washington College MD) traded by the St. Louis Cardinals to the Brooklyn Robins in 1927.

  • LHP Steve Hamilton (Morehead State's leading scorer and rebounder in 1956-57 and 1957-58) traded by the Cleveland Indians to the Washington Senators in 1962.

  • Teammates OF Irv Noren (player of year for California junior college state champion Pasadena City in 1945) and INF Tommie Upton (led Southeast Missouri State in scoring three years last half of 1940s and was school's career scoring leader upon graduation; while serving in military, he was All-EIBL first-team selection with Penn in 1945-46) traded by the Washington Senators to the New York Yankees for promising OF Jackie Jensen and three other players in 1952. Upton never played for the Yanks.

  • RHP Steve Roser (center for Clarkson NY before passing up senior season after signing professional baseball contract in 1940) purchased from the New York Yankees by the Boston Braves in 1946.

  • RHP Rollie Sheldon (third-leading scorer as a sophomore for Connecticut's 1960 NCAA Tournament team) traded by the New York Yankees to the Kansas City Athletics in 1965.

  • Chicago Cubs SS Roy Smalley Jr. (one of top scorers in 1942-43 and 1943-44 for Drury MO) went 4-for-4 against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1950.

Professional Grade: Donovan Seeks to Duplicate Larry Brown's NBA Success

Will Billy Donovan, who directed Florida to back-to-back NCAA Tournament titles in 2006 and 2007, find out it's a star-crossed crossing over from college to the NBA (Oklahoma City Thunder)? Just ask Dick Vitale if it takes more than a fresh or "pretty" face to make a successful transition. Only four NBA coaches boast tenures of five or more seasons. Brad Stevens, who guided Butler to back-to-back NCAA playoff championship games in 2010 and 2011, was swept this year with the Boston Celtics in his first NBA playoff series.

SMU's Larry Brown, one of the first six men to be hired by an NBA team after winning an NCAA championship, is the only one in this category to compile a winning NBA playoff record. Three other coaches directed teams to the NCAA Final Four and the NBA championship series - Jack Ramsay (St. Joseph's 1961 and Portland Trail Blazers 1977), Fred Schaus (West Virginia 1959 and the Los Angeles Lakers 1962), 1963, 1965, 1966) and Butch van Breda Kolff (Princeton 1965 and the Lakers 1968, 1969). Neither Ramsay (8-11) nor Schaus (6-7) finished their collegiate coaching careers with winning NCAA playoff records, however.

Only Phil Jackson and Pat Riley coached in and won more NBA playoff games than Brown. Following is an alphabetical list summarizing the NBA careers of Brown and 16 additional individuals who aligned with NBA franchises as head coaches after guiding a college team to the Final Four:

Coach NCAA Final Four Team(s) NBA Years Regular-Season Playoff Record
Larry Brown UCLA '80/Kansas '86 & '88 27 1,098-904 100-93
John Calipari Massachusetts '96/Memphis '08/Kentucky '11, '12, '14 & '15 3 72-112 0-3
P.J. Carlesimo Seton Hall '89 9 239-315 6-13
*Bob Feerick Santa Clara '52 2 63-74 0-2
Ed Jucker Cincinnati '61, '62 & '63 2 80-84 0-0
Doggie Julian Holy Cross '47 & '48 2 47-81 0-0
Lon Kruger Florida '94 3 69-122 0-0
Frank McGuire St. John's '52/North Carolina '57 1 49-31 6-6
Mike Montgomery Stanford '98 2 68-96 0-0
Harold Olsen Ohio State '39, '44, '45 & '46 3 95-63 7-11
Rick Pitino PC '87/Kentucky '93, '96 & '97/Louisville '05 & '12 6 192-220 6-7
Jack Ramsay St. Joseph's '61 21 864-783 44-58
Fred Schaus West Virginia '59 7 315-245 23-38
Brad Stevens Butler '10 & '11 2 65-99 0-4
Jerry Tarkanian UNLV '77, '87, '90 & '91 1 9-11 0-0
Butch van Breda Kolff Princeton '65 9 266-253 21-12
Tex Winter Kansas State '58 & '64 2 51-78 0-0

*Feerick's NBA record includes one season with the Washington Capitols (1949-50) before he was named coach at Santa Clara.

NOTES: Jucker (Rollins), Julian (Dartmouth), Kruger (UNLV and Oklahoma), McGuire (South Carolina), Olsen (Northwestern), Pitino (Kentucky and Louisville), Schaus (Purdue), Tarkanian (Fresno State), van Breda Kolff (Lafayette and Hofstra) and Winter (Northwestern and Long Beach State) returned to college as head coaches after their stints in the NBA. . . . Ken Loeffler was coach of the St. Louis Bombers and Providence Steamrollers for three seasons (1946-47 through 1948-49) before directing La Salle to back-to-back Final Fours (1954 champion and 1955 runner-up). . . . Phil Woolpert, coach of San Francisco's back-to-back NCAA champions (1955 and 1956), coached the San Francisco Saints for one season in the old American Basketball League.

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on May 2 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 2 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 2

  • Chicago Cubs 2B Glenn Beckert (three-year letterman for Allegheny PA) contributed three extra-base hits against the Atlanta Braves in 1972.

  • Baltimore Orioles CF Al Bumbry (Virginia State's runner-up in scoring with 16.7 ppg as freshman in 1964-65) stroked four hits against the Seattle Mariners in 1979.

  • Chicago Cubs CF Billy Cowan (co-captain of Utah's 1970 NCAA playoff team) knocked in five runs against the Houston Colt .45s in 1964.

  • Cincinnati Reds 1B George Crowe (four-year letterman from 1939-40 through 1942-43 for Indiana Central after becoming the first high school player named the state's "Mr. Basketball") drove in six runs in a 7-3 victory at St. Louis in 1958.

  • Boston Red Sox C Gene Desautels (Holy Cross letterman in 1929 and 1930) went 4-for-4 against the Philadelphia Athletics in 1938.

  • After winning four straight starts in April, Florida Marlins LHP Mark Hendrickson (two-time All-Pacific-10 Conference selection paced Washington State four straight seasons in rebounding 1992-93 through 1995-96) earned the triumph in a 6-4 verdict over the San Diego Padres in 2008.

  • New York Yankees rookie LF Charlie Keller (three-year letterman with Maryland from 1934-35 through 1936-37) scored four runs and chipped in with six RBI against the Detroit Tigers in 1939.

  • INF Buddy Myer (letterman for Mississippi State in 1923-24) traded by the Washington Senators to the Boston Red Sox in 1927.

  • 3B Graig Nettles (shot 87.8% from free-throw line for San Diego State in 1963-64) swatted a grand slam for the Atlanta Braves in a 12-4 victory over the Houston Astros in 1987.

  • Philadelphia Phillies RHP Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) struck out 13 Chicago Cubs in a 4-2 triumph in 1957. No Philly infielder had an assist in the contest.

  • In 1958, Boston Red Sox RHP Dave Sisler (All-Ivy League second-team selection for Princeton's first NCAA Tournament team in 1952) fired his lone MLB shutout (against the Detroit Tigers). The next year, Sisler was traded by the Red Sox to the Tigers on this date.

Ex-College Hoopster Tracking Undeniable Thug UBL Remains in Shadows

Do you want to be our hero? Last year, Fox News carried a riveting two-part program featuring Navy SEAL Team 6 member Robert O'Neill (senior chief petty officer is recipient of two Silver and five Bronze Stars) as "The Man Who Killed Usama Bin Laden." Amid focusing on the fourth anniversary ridding Planet Earth of UBL, it seems we should also be celebrating authentic courage from the college basketball ranks stemming from an individual instrumental in tracking the terrorist down. But the selfless ex-athlete from a Midwest university hasn't "come out of the closet" for security reasons and might be underground with a fake identification unless, of course, ax-grinding Left Coast Sen. Dianne Feinstein rats him out amid another of her vendettas.

In the documentation about dispatching UBL to hell (equivalent status even if satisfying 72 virgins is what transpired), the White House unveiled a photograph of President Barack Obama and his Cabinet inside the Situation Room, watching the daring commando raid unfold on May 1, 2011. But POTUS (JV player for Occidental CA) apparently wasn't the tallest ex-college hoopster in the room. Standing just outside the frame of that famous pic was an anonymous Central Intelligence Agency officer ("CIA John") who pursued UBL as a dogmatic deputy chief and reportedly was also influential as one of the principal proponents of drone deterrence. Two days after the world's most-wanted man was transformed into marine treat when dumped into the North Arabian Sea, "CIA John" accompanied then CIA Director Leon Panetta to Capitol Hill, where the Senate Intelligence Committee received a full briefing on the mission.

According to AP accounts at the time, the meticulous senior intelligence analyst was the first individual to put in writing that a legitimate CIA lead had been assembled on possibly locating UBL. He spearheaded the collection of clues for nearly 10 years, leading the agency to a fortified compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan, and its epic counter-terrorism success. Our freedom-loving nation is eternally grateful that his manhunt accuracy as a deep-cover agent in pinpointing UBL's whereabouts stood in stark contrast to his free-throw marksmanship as a deep-bench player (barely over 30%) as a member of multiple NCAA playoff teams.

Sy Hersh muckraking notwithstanding, box-office hit "Zero Dark Thirty" was an inspiring movie focusing on a young female CIA operative allegedly also from flyover country. She exhibited her tenacity, dedication and courage in primarily monitoring a vital courier for al-Qaeda's upper brass. According to Esquire, the shooter who killed UBL (subsequently acknowledged as Butte MT native O'Neill) gave the magazine out of his gun as a souvenir to bloodhound "Maya." While the film doesn't do justice to the male super spy, the patriot is likely to defer anyway to the concept "there is no 'I' in team." Naturally, Langley issued a perfunctory "no comment" because concern exists about publishing his name and running biographical details might make him a target for retribution.

Over the decades, there have been other notable "Secret Agent Men" in the CIA who were former college hoopsters. In fact, a Final Four player isn't required to hit a decisive basket or be selected Most Outstanding Player to be a hero. He doesn't even need to participate on the court. Bob Ames, a member of the Tom Gola-led La Salle teams in 1954 (national champion) and 1955 (runner-up to San Francisco), never got off the bench at the Final Four those two years although he was the only La Salle player to hit more than three-fourths of his free throws the season the Explorers won the NCAA title.

"Our coach, Ken Loeffler, only used seven guys, and Bob was the eighth man," said Frank Blatcher, a starter for the Explorers each season and their leading scorer with a total of 42 points at the Final Four on the championship team. "He had the talent. He just never got a chance to show it."

Ames, a pre-law major who scored a total of eight points in three NCAA playoff games in 1955, did have an opportunity to show his ability in another more vital endeavor, however. He joined the CIA and worked his way up the chain of command to become the Director of the CIA's Office of Analysis of the Near East and South Asia. "The Spy Who Loved Basketball" worked closely with both the Carter and Reagan administrations.

Regrettably, Ames was killed in Beirut in 1983. A truck loaded with TNT on a suicide mission rammed into the facility where Ames was staying while serving as a liaison trying to allay contacts among the Lebanese, Syrians and Israelis in hopes of calming the escalating discord.

"Here was a guy that turned out to have had a greater influence on our lives than just about any 1,000 other basketball players you can name," Blatcher said. "It just shows you that you don't have to be a star to accomplish something." Something like becoming a genuine American hero.

Elsewhere, the CIA's deputy director under George Bush in 1976 was Hank Knoche, the leading scorer in the Mountain States (Big Seven) Conference with 16.4 points per game for Colorado's 1946 NCAA Tournament team. Knoche, the father of former American University coach Chris Knoche, reputedly was the first player selected in the NBA's first college draft in 1947 after enrolling at Washington and Jefferson (Pa.) to play on a 16-4 team with two of his brothers. But he never appeared in the then-fledgling league, which doesn't have any official draft records prior to 1949. The franchise that selected him, the Pittsburgh Ironmen, folded shortly after the draft, and his rights reverted to the New York Knicks.

"I didn't know I was the first No. 1 pick until a writer from Atlanta called me for a story," Knoche said. "An NBA historian had informed him of my alleged status."

The elder Knoche, who went to live in the Denver area, chose not to play in an uncertain situation for little money. "I never received any contact from the Ironmen," he said. "The Knicks sent a contract offer in the mail, but it was for just $3,500 and that's if I made the team (many NBA standouts earn five times that amount every quarter).

"I chose to play industrial basketball, where I remember playing six times one year against seven-footer Bob Kurland (Oklahoma State three-time first-team All-American who never played in the NBA). That wasn't much fun going against Kurland because I was just a 6-4 center."

Knoche was recalled to the military during the Korean War, where he was assigned to intelligence work for the Navy and later embarked on a civilian career leading to a job with the CIA.

Another former college hoopster who carved out a CIA career was Pete Sivess, a center for Dickinson PA in 1935-36 before compiling a 7-11 record as a righthanded pitcher with the Philadelphia Phillies in three years from 1936 through 1938. While Moe Berg is the most famous MLB player linked with the CIA, his career as a spy pales in comparison to baseball contemporary Sivess, who is credited with defining CIA policy for handling Eastern Bloc defectors. During the height of the Cold War, Sivess conducted a "first haven" on Maryland's Eastern Shore where defectors were shipped to be debriefed. Probably the highest-profile spy Sivess monitored was "notorious double agent" Nicholas Shadrin, who died on a trip to Vienna in 1975 in a kidnapping attempt by Moscow's counterspies.

In the shadowy world of the CIA, no precise clues exist as to whether a basketball background for "CIA John" contributed to helping POTUS develop a comfort-zone bond with him similar to other ex-college hoopsters in his inner circle - Secretary of Education Arne Duncan (Harvard), departing Attorney General Eric Holder (Columbia), former "body man" Reggie Love (Duke) and former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Mike Mullen (Navy). But it isn't ridiculous to suggest there might not have been a second inauguration for President Obama if he didn't trust "CIA John."

A vital hurdle approving the raid came when the SEAL Squadron leader briefed Mullen on merits of the mission. According to O'Neill's anonymous interview with Esquire, Vice Admiral William McRaven, head of Joint Special Ops Command, compared the raid and its fighters to the basketball movie Hoosiers in a final briefing with the participants in Operation Neptune's Spear.

A pithy precept occasionally surfaces in basketball trash talking that "some talk a good game and some play a good game." Depending upon your point of view, Time's Person of the Year in 2011 and each subsequent year could have been "CIA John." Surely, ex-Time managing editor Rick Stengel, a backup for Pete Carril-coached Princeton in the mid-1970s, would have encouraged co-workers to give "CIA John" special consideration after the White House acknowledged him and his colleagues as "unbelievably competent professionals."

Deserved or not, other ex-college hoopsters may get the bulk of the glory ranging from taking credit for UBL's demise to some searing social issue actually paling in comparison. When, if ever, will our nation get the opportunity to pay homage to a genuine hoop hero comparable to Ames, Knoche and Sivess? Heaven only knows we need an authentic hero these days to offset riots in major U.S. cities, a lawless West Wing supported by ideologically-driven lame-stream media plus collegiate academic scandals and athletes treating women as bad as Sharia-Law zealot Islamic radicals. But at the moment, the stirring tale will simply be "The Greatest Hoop Story Never Fully Told."

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on May 1 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 1 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 1

  • Seattle Mariners RHP Jim Beattie (Dartmouth's top rebounder in 1974-75 when selected basketball team MVP and honorable mention All-Ivy League) hurled a four-hit shutout against the Boston Red Sox in 1985.

  • After teammate Bill Parsons walked the first three Oakland A's batters, RHP Jim Colborn (Whittier CA in mid-1960s before studying for master's at Edinburgh where he was All-Scotland in basketball) came in and pitched a complete-game 4-3 victory for the Milwaukee Brewers in 1973.

  • California Angels RHP Eddie Fisher (played for Oklahoma's 1954-55 freshman squad) permitted his lone earned run in first 12 relief appearances in the 1970 campaign.

  • St. Louis Cardinals 2B Frankie Frisch (Fordham captain) furnished three extra-base hits and four RBI against the Cincinnati Reds in 1927.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates 3B Lee Handley (Bradley letterman from 1932-33 through 1934-35) banged out four hits against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1941.

  • Cleveland Indians LF David Justice (led Thomas More KY in assists in 1984-85) delivered two homers against the Oakland Athletics in 1997.

  • New York Yankees LF Charlie Keller (three-year letterman with Maryland from 1934-35 through 1936-37) collected seven RBI against the St. Louis Browns in 1941.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates SS Johnny Logan (played for Binghamton in 1948-49) went 4-for-4 in a 4-2 loss against the San Francisco Giants in 1962.

  • 3B Billy Werber (first Duke hoop All-American in 1929-30) contributed a homer and double for the Cincinnati Reds during their eight-run fourth inning in 1940 when they defeated the Brooklyn Dodgers, 9-2.

  • A seventh-inning single by Boston Red Sox C Sammy White (All-PCC Northern Division first-five selection for Washington in 1947-48 and 1948-49) represented the only hit Hall of Fame P Bob Feller yielded in a 2-0 win for the Cleveland Indians in the opener of a doubleheader in 1955. It was Feller's MLB-record 12th one-hitter.

  • INF Dib Williams (played for Hendrix AR in mid-1920s) purchased from the Philadelphia Athletics by the Boston Red Sox in 1935.

College Basketball's Longstanding Impact on Opening Round of NFL Draft

Historically, the first 15 NFL drafts from 1936 through 1950 had a former college basketball regular selected among the top 10 picks. Four of the top six choices and five of the top 11 in the 1957 draft were ex-college hoopsters. To our knowledge, none of them featured the excess baggage of Jameis "Crab Legs" Winston, who is also a versatile athlete but in baseball.

Back in 1963 when men were men before all of the draft-day crying/kissing and diversity sensitivity training (#BringBackOurMen), five of the top 22 picks, including four from schools that have always been or subsequently became members of the Big Ten Conference, were in the same category. Following is an alphabetical list of NFL first-round draft choices who played varsity college basketball for a current NCAA Division I university:

First-Round Choice Pos. College Selected in Draft By NFL Pick Overall
Neill Armstrong OE-DB Oklahoma A&M Philadelphia Eagles 8th in 1947
Doug Atkins DE Tennessee Cleveland Browns 11th in 1953
Terry Baker QB-RB Oregon State Los Angeles Rams 1st in 1963
Sammy Baugh QB Texas Christian Boston Redskins 6th in 1937
*Hub Bechtol E Texas Tech/Texas Pittsburgh Steelers 5th in 1947
Johnny Bright RB Drake Philadelphia Eagles 5th in 1952
Jim Brown RB Syracuse Cleveland Browns 6th in 1957
Bob Carey WR Michigan State Los Angeles Rams 13th in 1952
Fred Carr LB Texas Western Green Bay Packers 5th in 1968
Shante Carver DE Arizona State Dallas Cowboys 23rd in 1994
Lynn Chandnois HB Michigan State Pittsburgh Steelers 8th in 1950
George Connor OL-DT-LB Notre Dame New York Giants 5th in 1946
Olie Cordill HB Rice Cleveland Browns 5th in 1940
Ernie Davis HB Syracuse Washington Redskins 1st in 1962
Glenn Davis HB Army Detroit Lions 2nd in 1947
Len Dawson QB Purdue Pittsburgh Steelers 5th in 1957
Mike Ditka TE Pittsburgh Chicago Bears 5th in 1961
Rickey Dudley TE Ohio State Oakland Raiders 9th in 1996
Ray Evans TB-DB Kansas Chicago Bears 9th in 1944
James Francis LB Baylor Cincinnati Bengals 12th in 1990
Reuben Gant TE Oklahoma State Buffalo Bills 18th in 1974
Tony Gonzalez TE California Kansas City Chiefs 13th in 1996
Otto Graham QB Northwestern Detroit Lions 4th in 1944
Harry "Bud" Grant E Minnesota Philadelphia Eagles 14th in 1950
Bob Griese QB Purdue Miami Dolphins 4th in 1967
Kevin Hardy DL Notre Dame New Orleans Saints 7th in 1968
Tom Harmon HB-DB Michigan Chicago Bears 1st in 1941
Todd Heap TE Arizona State Baltimore Ravens 31st in 2001
King Hill QB Rice Chicago Cardinals 1st as bonus pick in 1958
Elroy "Crazy Legs" Hirsch OE Michigan Cleveland Rams 5th in 1945
DeAndre Hopkins WR Clemson Houston Texans 27th in 2013
Paul Hornung RB Notre Dame Green Bay Packers 1st as bonus pick in 1957
Jack Jenkins FB-LB Vanderbilt Washington Redskins 10th in 1943
Ed "Too Tall" Jones DL Tennessee State Dallas Cowboys 1st in 1974
Matt Jones E Arkansas Jacksonville Jaquars 21st in 2005
Billy Kilmer QB UCLA San Francisco 49ers 11th in 1961
Ron Kramer WR Michigan Green Bay Packers 4th in 1957
Johnny Lattner HB Notre Dame Pittsburgh Steelers 7th in 1954
Bobby Layne QB Texas Chicago Bears 3rd in 1948
Ronnie Lott DB Southern California San Francisco 49ers 8th in 1981
Johnny Lujack QB Notre Dame Chicago Bears 4th in 1946
Don Lund FB-LB Michigan Chicago Bears 7th in 1945
Bob MacLeod B Dartmouth Brooklyn Dodgers 5th in 1939
Jim McDonald B Ohio State Philadelphia Eagles 2nd in 1938
Banks McFadden HB Clemson Brooklyn Dodgers 3rd in 1940
Rich McGeorge TE Elon Green Bay Packers 16th in 1970
Donovan McNabb QB Syracuse Philadelphia Eagles 2nd in 1999
R.W. McQuarters CB Oklahoma State San Francisco 49ers 28th in 1998
Leonard Mitchell DE Houston Philadelphia Eagles 27th in 1981
Mack Mitchell DE Houston Cleveland Browns 5th in 1975
Julius Peppers DE North Carolina Carolina Panthers 2nd in 2002
Pat Richter TE Wisconsin Washington Redskins 7th in 1962
Andre Rison WR Michigan State Indianapolis Colts 22nd in 1989
Jack Robbins QB Arkansas Chicago Cardinals 5th in 1938
Reggie Rogers DL Washington Detroit Lions 7th in 1987
Art Schlichter QB Ohio State Baltimore Colts 4th in 1982
Del Shofner E Baylor Los Angeles Rams 11th in 1957
Norm Snead QB Wake Forest Washington Redskins 2nd in 1961
Joe Stydahar T West Virginia Chicago Bears 6th in 1936
Doak Walker HB-DB Southern Methodist New York Bulldogs 3rd in 1949
Byron "Whizzer" White B Colorado Pittsburgh Steelers 4th in 1938
Alfred Williams DE Colorado Cincinnati Bengals 18th in 1991
Jack Wilson HB Baylor Cleveland Browns 2nd in 1942
Kendall Wright WR Baylor Tennessee Titans 20th in 2012

*Bechtol played in the AAFC, where he was a second-round pick (9th overall).

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on April 30 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is an April 30 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

APRIL 30

  • California Angels 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading basketball scorer in 1945-46) contributed four hits against the Boston Red Sox in 1966.

  • Detroit Tigers 1B Dale Alexander (starting center for Milligan TN in mid-1920s) supplied his sixth straight multiple-hit game and 10th in last 17 contests to finish the first month of the 1931 season with a .519 batting average.

  • Philadelphia Phillies CF Ethan Allen (Cincinnati letterman in 1924-25 and 1925-26) went 4-for-4 in a 5-4 win against the Boston Braves in 1934.

  • San Diego Padres RF Tony Gwynn (All-WAC second-team selection with San Diego State in 1979-80 and 1980-81) went 5-for-5 against the New York Mets in 1993 before adding four safeties against the Mets the next day.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers 1B Gil Hodges (played for Oakland City IN in 1947 and 1948) homered in fifth of last seven games of the month in 1958.

  • Washington Senators LF Frank Howard (two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection in 1956-57 and 1957-58 when leading Ohio State in scoring and rebounding) closed out the month by homering in three consecutive contests against the Milwaukee Brewers in 1970.

  • Baltimore Orioles rookie 2B Davey Johnson (averaged 1.7 ppg with Texas A&M in 1961-62) jacked two homers against the Detroit Tigers in 1966. Twelve years later with the Philadelphia Phillies, Johnson whacked a pinch grand slam against the San Diego Padres in 1978.

  • Detroit Tigers SS Harvey Kuenn (played briefly for Wisconsin in 1951-52 after competing on JV squad previous season) went 5-for-5 against the Washington Senators in 1955.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers 2B Davey Lopes (NAIA All-District 15 selection for Iowa Wesleyan averaged 16.9 ppg as freshman in 1964-65 and 12.1 ppg as sophomore in 1965-66) stole four bases against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1978.

  • In 1937, Philadelphia Athletics INF Clarence "Ace" Parker (Duke letterman in 1935-36) became the first A.L. player to hit a pinch-hit homer in his MLB debut (against Wes Ferrell of the Boston Red Sox).

  • 1B Jack Phillips (leading scorer for 14-1 Clarkson NY in 1942-43) traded by the Detroit Tigers to the Boston Red Sox in 1957.

  • RF Richie Scheinblum (averaged 6.1 ppg and 3.6 rpg for C.W. Post NY in 1962-63 and 1963-64) traded by the California Angels to the Kansas City Royals in 1974.

  • SS Roy Smalley Jr. (one of top scorers for Drury MO in 1942-43 and 1943-44) purchased from the Milwaukee Braves by the Philadelphia Phillies in 1955.

  • RF Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972), who was on base at least once in every game this month, tied a MLB record for RBI in April with 29 for the New York Yankees in 1988.

Space For Destroying Riotous Myth Regarding Kentucky's Historical Standing

Presstitutes making extemporaneous comments at the Final Four often were knowingly inappropriate Clintonesque or as confused as Bruce Jenner after trying to cope an extended period with Hollyweird's contemptible Kardashian clan. But now there probably has been ample time since the end of the season for proper reflection and "to have a conversation" on the historical significance of Kentucky's 38-1 club. In other words, it is time to "give space for those who wish to destroy" riotous myth about UK's 2014-15 edition warranting inclusion among the premier teams in NCAA history.

In the aftermath of amateurish analysis by mess media, the goal here is to attempt to yield a mite more credibility to a topic than POTUS' premature pollution via petty proffering regarding another choir boy, agitator-enabling bozo stand-down let-thugs-loot Baltimore mayor, sweeping-statement activist prosecutor catering to reparations devotees, monumental misfit Michael Moore seeking to disarm all police or studious Ray "Dancin' On Their Graves" Lewis and Carmelo "Snitches Get Stitches" Anthony imploring scholarly youth to refrain from violence. Don't want to get political savant Ashley Judd or "misguided young and old people" upset, but there was as much evidence of Kentucky deserving acclaim as an NCAA all-time Top 10 squad as support from no-show spectators during Orioles home game at Camden Yards on second day of riots-related curfew.

Was any college hoop pundit saying anything remotely the same about Wichita State a year earlier when the Shockers also entered the NCAA playoffs with an undefeated record? After all, the Missouri Valley Conference probably was as competent two campaigns ago as the quality exhibited by the SEC this past season. Moreover, have any of the clueless commentators heard of NCAA title titans such as Lew Alcindor (UCLA), Patrick Ewing (Georgetown), Stacey Augmon and Larry Johnson (UNLV), Jordan/Perkins/Worthy (North Carolina), Jerry Lucas and John Havlicek (Ohio State), Bill Russell and K.C. Jones (San Francisco), David Thompson (North Carolina State) and Bill Walton (UCLA)? Analysts should study all-time best recruiting classes before stepping out on a thin limb with their misinformed greatest-of-all-time proclamations comparable in authenticity to over-hyped Mayweather/Pacquiao "Dancin' With the Stars."

In a "one-and-done" era when the caliber of play has subsided so dramatically, the Wildcats weren't even the best team in the last four or six years of their illustrious program. Celebrated center Anthony Davis, the premier player for a national champion in 2012, is light years removed from any of UK's frontcourt players this season. Ditto John Wall in the backcourt in 2009-10. In fact, Big Blue Nation probably has boasted a better team every decade post-WWII. Consider the following talent over the years emanating from Lexington making it nearly impossible for this year's UK squad to crack the school's all-time Top 10 let alone a national all-time Top 10:

Season Record Multiple UK Standouts
1948-49 32-2 Alex Groza/Ralph Beard/Wallace Jones/Cliff Barker/Dale Barnstable
1953-54 25-0 Cliff Hagan/Frank Ramsey/Lou Tsioropoulos
1965-66 27-2 Pat Riley/Louie Dampier/Thad Jaracz/Larry Conley/Tommy Kron
1969-70 26-2 Dan Issel/Mike Pratt/Tom Parker/Larry Steele
1977-78 30-2 Jack Givens/Rick Robey/Kyle Macy/James Lee/Mike Phillips
1983-84 29-5 Melvin Turpin/Kenny Walker/Sam Bowie/Jim Master/Winston Bennett
1995-96 34-2 Tony Delk/Antoine Walker/Walter McCarty/Derek Anderson/Ron Mercer
2009-10 35-3 John Wall/DeMarcus Cousins/Patrick Patterson/Eric Bledsoe
2011-12 38-2 Anthony Davis/Michael Kidd-Gilchrist/Terrence Jones

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on April 29 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is an April 29 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

APRIL 29

  • In 1953, Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (LSU's leading basketball scorer in 1945-46) hit a homer into the center-field bleachers against the New York Giants at the Polo Grounds, a feat that had never been done before and would only be achieved twice more (by Hank Aaron and Lou Brock).

  • Detroit Tigers rookie 1B Dale Alexander (starting center for Milligan TN in mid-1920s) hit safely in his first 12 MLB games in 1929 before he was held hitless by the St. Louis Browns.

  • Cleveland Indians SS Lou Boudreau (leading scorer for Illinois' 1937 Big Ten Conference co-champion) banged out four hits against the St. Louis Browns in 1948.

  • CF Taylor Douthit (California letterman from 1922 through 1924) awarded on waivers from the Cincinnati Reds to the Chicago Cubs in 1933.

  • In 1930, Pittsburgh Pirates LHP Ralph Erickson (played for Idaho State in mid-1920s) won his lone MLB decision.

  • Houston Astros C Joe Ferguson (played in 1967 NCAA playoffs with Pacific) pounded two homers against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1977.

  • Brooklyn Robins 2B Jake Flowers (member of 1923 "Flying Pentagon" championship squad for Washington College MD) provided four hits, including three doubles, in a 19-15 win against the New York Giants in 1930. It was one of five games that month where he had at least three safeties.

  • Oakland Athletics rookie 3B Wayne Gross (led Cal Poly Pomona in assists in 1974-75) whacked two homers against the Boston Red Sox in 1977.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers 1B Frank Howard (two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection in 1956-57 and 1957-58 when leading Ohio State in scoring and rebounding) collected two homers and six RBI against the Chicago Cubs in 1961.

  • Detroit Tigers rookie CF Lynn Jones (averaged 10.4 ppg for Thiel PA from 1970-71 through 1973-74) finished his first month with a .389 batting average after notching fourth straight two-hit game in 1979.

  • Toronto Blue Jays P Dave Lemanczyk (averaged 4.5 ppg and 3.5 rpg for Hartwick NY teams compiling 51-21 record from 1969-70 through 1971-72) sustained his fifth setback of the month in as many starts in 1978.

  • RHP Roger Mason (multiple-year letterman for Saginaw Valley State MI in late 1970s) purchased from the Philadelphia Phillies by the New York Mets in 1994.

  • 2B Dutch Meyer (letterman for TCU in 1934-35 and 1935-36) traded by the Detroit Tigers to the Cleveland Indians in 1945.

  • In a 17-inning marathon where both starting pitchers went the distance, St. Louis Cardinals RHP Roy Parmelee (Eastern Michigan letterman in 1924-25 and 1925-26) outdueled New York Giants Hall of Famer Carl Hubbell, 2-1, in 1936.

  • Washington Senators C Les Peden (Texas A&M letterman in 1941-42 and 1942-43) provided his lone MLB homer (against the Chicago White Sox in 1953).

  • Cleveland tied a MLB record by winning its first 10 games of the 1966 campaign before the Indians lost, 4-1, to Chicago White Sox LHP Gary Peters (played for Grove City PA in mid-1950s).

  • In 1975, LF Champ Summers (team-high scoring averages of 15.7 ppg for Nicholls State in 1964-65 and 22.5 ppg for SIUE in 1969-70) shipped by the Oakland Athletics to the Chicago Cubs to complete a deal made earlier in the month.

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