On This Date: Ex-College Hoopsters Score Big in September MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only four percent of active MLB players earned college diplomas.

Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a September calendar involving such versatile athletes:

SEPTEMBER
30 - P Mike Barlow (Syracuse substitute from 1967-68 through 1969-70) shipped by the St. Louis Cardinals to the Houston Astros in 1975 to complete an earlier deal. . . . Roger Craig (forward with North Carolina State's 1949-50 freshman basketball team) fired as manager of the San Diego Padres in 1979. . . . In 1975, 1B-OF Doug Howard (All-WAC second-team selection with Brigham Young in 1968-69 and 1969-70) shipped by the St. Louis Cardinals to the Cleveland Indians to complete an earlier deal. . . . OF-1B Frank Howard (two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection when leading Ohio State in scoring and rebounding in 1956-57 and 1957-58) hit a homer against the New York Yankees in the Senators' final game in Washington in 1971. . . . OF Irv Noren (player of the year for California junior college state champion Pasadena City in 1945) purchased from the Brooklyn Dodgers by the Washington Senators for $50,000 in 1949. . . . Setting the stage for a 1951 playoff with the New York Giants, INF Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in PCC both of his seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) ripped an upper-deck homer in the 14th inning off Philadelphia Phillies Hall of Fame P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47), giving the Brooklyn Dodgers a 9-8 victory. Five years later, New York Giants rookie 1B Bill White (played two years with Hiram, OH, in early 1950s) whacked two homers off Roberts. . . . Philadelphia Phillies OF Cy Williams (Notre Dame forward in 1909-10) contributed two homers in a 6-4 win against the Brooklyn Robins in 1923.
29 - 3B Gene Freese (captain of 1952 NAIA Tournament team for West Liberty WV) traded by the St. Louis Cardinals to the Philadelphia Phillies for player-manager Solly Hemus in 1958. . . . Mike Hargrove (Northwestern Oklahoma State letterman) fired as manager of the Baltimore Orioles in 2003. . . . In 1966, Los Angeles Dodgers P Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) became the first MLB hurler in the 20th Century to achieve a third 300-strikeout season. . . . Washington Senators 2B Buddy Myer (Mississippi State letterman in 1923-24) went 4-for-5 against the Philadelphia Athletics to win the 1935 A.L. batting championship (.349). . . . Kansas City Royals P Dennis Rasmussen (sixth-man for Creighton averaged 5.1 ppg in three seasons from 1977-78 through 1979-80) hurled a one-hit shutout against the California Angels in 1992. . . . P Preacher Roe (played for Harding, AR, in late 1930s) purchased from the St. Louis Cardinals by the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1943. . . . Birdie Tebbetts (played for Providence in 1932) named manager of the Cincinnati Reds in 1953.
28 - St. Louis Cardinals 2B Frankie Frisch (Fordham captain) provided his second extra-inning steal of home plate in 1928. . . . LF Lou Johnson (Kentucky State teammate of legendary HBCU coach Davey Whitney averaged 5.7 ppg and 2 rpg in 1951-52) slugged a 12th-inning homer to give the Los Angeles Dodgers a 2-1 victory against the Cincinnati Reds in 1965. . . . In a City Series duel, Chicago White Sox P Ted Lyons (two-time All-SWC first-team selection for Baylor in early 1920s) blanked the Cubs on three hits in only 1 hour and 18 minutes in 1942. The 41-year-old Lyons then departed to enlist as a private in the Marine Corps for military service during World War II. . . . P Bill McCahan (three-year Duke letterman named to All-Southern Conference Tournament team in 1942) traded by Philadelphia Athletics to Brooklyn Dodgers in 1949. . . . In 1952, Philadelphia Phillies P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) registered his 28th victory (7-4 over New York Giants) with his 30th complete game. . . . In 1938, C Birdie Tebbetts (played for Providence in 1932) blasted a grand slam (10th such homer of the season for the Detroit Tigers). . . . San Diego Padres OF Will Venable (All-Ivy League first-team selection as a junior and second-team shoice as a senior averaged 9.3 ppg under Princeton coach John Thompson III from 2001-02 through 2004-05) whacked his first MLB grand slam (against the Chicago Cubs in 2011). . . . St. Louis Cardinals 1B Bill White (played two years with Hiram, OH, in early 1950s) contributed four hits in a 9-1 triumph against the San Francisco Giants in 1965.
27 - In 1983, P Jim Beattie (Dartmouth's top rebounder in 1974-75 when he was selected team MVP and honorable mention All-Ivy League) hurled the first one-hitter in Seattle Mariners history. . . . Lefthander Danny Coombs (Seton Hall's third-leading scorer and rebounder as a sophomore in 1961-62) made his MLB debut in 1963 as a reliever for the Houston Colt .45s, who started nine rookies including 1B Rusty Staub, 2B Joe Morgan and C Jerry Grote. . . . Baltimore Orioles reliever Dick Hall (averaged 11.9 ppg in 1948-49, 13.4 in 1949-50 and 15.4 in 1950-51 for Swarthmore's Southern Division champions in Middle Atlantic States Conference) became the first pitcher in 51 years to end a season with more victories (10) than walks (6 in 61 innings). . . . C Tom Haller (backup forward for Illinois in 1956-57 and 1957-58 under coach Harry Combes) whacked a pair of homers to spark the San Francisco Giants to an 8-4 triumph against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1965. . . . Danny Litwhiler (member of JV squad with Bloomsburg, PA, three years in the mid-1930s) completed his 151st errorless game for the Philadelphia Phillies in 1942. He was the first OF to avoid an error the entire season. . . . Winning P Gary Peters (played for Grove City, PA, in mid-1950s) pounded a three-run homer in a 10-1 victory against the Washington Senators as the Boston Red Sox reached the 200-homer plateau for the first time in franchise history.
26 - Intended as a sacrifice, Hall of Fame C Rick Ferrell (played for Guilford, NC, in mid-1920s) contributed a bunt single in 1941 that was the only hit for the St. Louis Browns against Cleveland Indians P Bob Feller. . . . Baltimore Orioles P Mike Flanagan (averaged 13.9 ppg for Massachusetts' 15-1 freshman squad in 1971-72) had his no-hit bid end with two outs in the ninth inning against the Cleveland Indians in 1978. . . . In 1954, 1B Gil Hodges (played for Oakland City, IN, in 1947 and 1948) hammered his 25th homer at Ebbets Field (a new Brooklyn Dodgers single-season record). He also finished the year with a MLB-high 18 sacrifice flies. . . . Philadelphia Phillies P Jim Konstanty (Syracuse player in late 1930s) made his 71st relief appearance of the 1950 campaign. It was a MLB record (subsequently broken). . . . St. Louis Cardinals CF Wally Moon (averaged 4.3 ppg with Texas A&M in 1948-49 and 1949-50) capped off his 1954 Rookie of the Year season with an 11th-inning, two-run homer at Milwaukee. . . . P Nels Potter (leading scorer during two years he attended Mount Morris, IL, in early 1930s) purchased from the Boston Braves by the Cincinnati Reds in 1949. . . . In 1951, Brooklyn Dodgers INF Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in PCC both of his seasons for UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) annoyed the Boston Braves by stealing home with a 13-3 lead in the eighth inning.
25 - Los Angeles Dodgers P Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) tossed a shutout against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1965, raising his season strikeout total of 356. . . . In his only MLB pitching appearance, New York Giants OF Hank Lieber (played for Arizona in 1931) hurled a complete game in a 9-1 setback against the Philadelphia Phillies in the nightcap of a 1942 doubleheader. Teammate Hal Schumacher (played for St. Lawrence, NY, in early 1930s) earned the win in the opener, 6-3. . . . Philadelphia Phillies P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) registered his 28th victory in 1952, completing his 30th game in 37 starts.
24 - New York Mets manager Gil Hodges (played for Oakland City, IN, in 1947 and 1948) suffered a heart attack during a 1968 game against the Atlanta Braves. . . . In 1957, Brooklyn Dodgers P Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) appeared in relief in the final game at Ebbets Field. Koufax got a chance to go to the plate and struck out for the 12th time in as many at-bats this season. . . . P Hal Schumacher (played for St. Lawrence, NY, in early 1930s) drove in the winning run in the 10th inning of a doubleheader against the Boston Bees as the New York Giants clinched the 1936 N.L. pennant. . . . In 1992, Toronto Blue Jays DH-RF Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) became the first 40-year-old in MLB history to knock in 100 runs in a season when he stroked a two-run double off Baltimore Orioles P Ben McDonald (started six games as a 6-6 freshman forward for Louisiana State in 1986-87). . . . New York Yankees P Tom Zachary (Guilford, NC, letterman in 1916) posted his 12th victory in as many decisions in 1929. No hurler will have a better season without losing a game.
23 - Brooklyn Dodgers P Roger Craig (forward with North Carolina State's 1949-50 freshman team) hurled his fourth shutout in 1959 (5-0 against the St. Louis Cardinals). . . . Cleveland Indians Of Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) hit a grand slam against the Detroit Tigers in 1950. . . . San Francisco Giants P Atlee Hammaker (averaged 5.3 ppg as a freshman in 1976-77 and 4.9 as a sophomore in 1977-78 under East Tennessee State coach Sonny Smith), matching Los Angeles Dodgers P Orel Hershiser in zeroes the first seven innings, yielded a homer in the eighth as Hershiser extended his streak of consecutive shutout frames to 49 in 1988. . . . C Cal Neeman (Illinois Wesleyan's leading scorer in 1947-48 and 1948-49) clubbed a 10th-inning homer to give the Chicago Cubs a 9-8 triumph against the San Francisco Giants in 1959. . . . Brooklyn Dodgers P Preacher Roe (played for Harding, AR, in late 1930s) improved his record to 22-2 in 1951 with a 6-3 decision over the Philadelphia Phillies. . . . 2B Wayne Terwilliger (two-year letterman for Western Michigan in late 1940s) awarded on waivers from the Brooklyn Dodgers to the Washington Senators in 1952.
22 - Rookie CF George Altman (appeared in 1953 and 1954 NAIA Tournament with Tennessee State) whacked a ninth-inning, two-run homer to give the Chicago Cubs a 5-4 triumph against the San Francisco Giants in 1959. . . . In 1965, 2B Frank Bolling (averaged 7.3 ppg for Spring Hill, AL, in 1950-51) blasted a grand slam off Los Angeles Dodgers P Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman basketball squad in 1953-54) as the Braves end their 13-year stint in Milwaukee. . . . A.L. Rookie of the Year OF Al Bumbry (Virginia State's runner-up in scoring 16.7 ppg as a freshman in 1964-65) tied a MLB mark with three triples against the Milwaukee Brewers, helping the Baltimore Orioles clinch the 1973 East Division title. . . . Philadelphia Athletics P George Earnshaw (Swarthmore, PA, participant in 1922) earned victory #21 in 1931. . . . P Dallas Green (Delaware's second-leading scorer and rebounder in 1954-55) released by the Philadelphia Phillies in 1967. . . . San Francisco Giants C Tom Haller (backup forward for Illinois in 1956-57 and 1957-58 under coach Harry Combes) hammered a game-ending homer in the ninth inning to account for the only run in a win against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1967. . . . Washington Senators CF Irv Noren (player of the year for California junior college state champion Pasadena City in 1945) tied an A.L. nine-inning record with 11 putouts in 1951. . . . San Diego Padres P Chris Young (All-Ivy League first-team selection for Princeton in 1999-2000) took a no-hitter into the ninth inning before finishing with a 6-2 victory against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 2006 after Joe Randa ripped a two-run homer.
21 - New York Giants P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century), appearing for the third time in four games, notched his 30th victory in 1903. . . . Brooklyn Dodgers P Preacher Roe (played for Harding, AR, in late 1930s) hurled a shutout against the St. Louis Cardinals in the nightcap of a 1949 doubleheader. . . . New York Yankees 1B Bill "Moose" Skowron (scored 18 points in eight games for Purdue in 1949-50) contributed five hits but they stranded a MLB-mark 20 baserunners in a 13-7 setback against the Boston Red Sox in 1956.
20 - Detroit Tigers 1B Darrell Evans (member of Jerry Tarkanian-coached Pasadena City, CA, club winning 1967 state community college crown) launched his 400th career homer in 1988. . . . Baltimore Orioles bonus baby C Tom Gastall (captain of Boston University's team in 1954-55) died at the age of 24 in 1956 when he crashed into Chesapeake Bay while secretly flying his previously-damaged light plane. . . . C Frank Grube (starter for Lafayette in 1926-27) purchased from the St. Louis Browns by the Chicago White Sox in 1935. . . . San Diego Padres OF Tony Gwynn (All-WAC second-team selection with San Diego State in 1979-80 and 1980-81) stole five bases against the Houston Astros in 1986, tying the modern N.L. record for thefts in a single contest. . . . Cincinnati Reds P Jay Hook (Northwestern's third-leading scorer as a sophomore with 10.7 ppg in 1955-56) hurled a two-hit shutout, chilling the Milwaukee Braves' pennant aspirations in 1960. . . . 3B Ryan Minor (two-time All-Big Eight Conference first-team selection for Oklahoma was league player of year as a junior in 1994-95 when averaging 23.6 ppg and 8.4 rpg) replaced Cal Ripken Jr. in the Baltimore Orioles' starting lineup, ending Ripken's MLB record consecutive-game streak at 2,632. . . . Philadelphia Phillies P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) yielded a MLB-record 40th homer in 1955. . . . Brooklyn Dodgers INF Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in PCC both of his seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) contributed his fifth steal of home in the 1949 campaign. . . . Baltimore Orioles OF Ken Singleton (Hofstra freshman team in mid-1960s) socked his 246th and final MLB homer in 1984. Singleton's last three round-trippers were grand slams.
19 - New York Yankees Hall of Fame OF Earle Combs (three-year captain for Eastern Kentucky) scored five runs in an 18-9 romp over the Chicago White Sox in 1930. . . . Cleveland Indians OF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) walked five times in a 15-2 rout of the Boston Red Sox in 1951. . . . 2B Frankie Frisch (Fordham captain) and INF Charlie Gelbert (scored at least 125 points each of his last three seasons with Lebanon Valley, PA, in late 1920s) each stroked three hits for the St. Louis Cardinals in a 9-1 win against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1935. . . . Washington Senators 1B-OF Frank Howard (two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection when leading Ohio State in scoring and rebounding in 1956-57 and 1957-58) fanned five times against the Boston Red Sox in the opener of a 1970 twinbill. . . . Detroit Tigers SS Harvey Kuenn (played five games for Wisconsin in 1951-52) went 5-for-5 against the Cleveland Indians in 1954. . . . Chicago White Sox P Ted Lyons (two-time All-SWC first-team selection for Baylor in early 1920s) had a no-hitter with two outs in the ninth inning broken up by a single from Bobby Veach of the Washington Senators in the nightcap of a 1925 doubleheader. . . . OF Bill Nicholson (played for Washington College, MD, in mid-1930s), the N.L. leader in homers and RBI in 1943, collected a single, two doubles and a homer to help the Chicago Cubs snap an 11-game losing streak with a 6-0 victory against the World Series-bound St. Louis Cardinals. . . . OF Curtis Pride (led William & Mary in steals three times and assists twice from 1986-87 through 1989-90) helped the Boston Red Sox tie the score with a ninth-inning pinch-hit homer but the Chicago White Sox went on to prevail in the 10th. . . . Cincinnati Reds P Eppa Rixey (Virginia letterman in 1912 and 1914) tossed a 1-0 shutout against the Philadelphia Phillies in a 1923 twinbill. . . . Brooklyn Dodgers P Preacher Roe (played for Harding, AR, in late 1930s) improved his record to 21-2 in 1951 with a 3-0 shutout against the St. Louis Cardinals. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates P Bob Veale (scored 1,160 points from 1955-56 through 1957-58 with Benedictine, KS) hurled a 10-inning, one-hitter against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1965.
18 - In 1987, Detroit Tigers 1B Darrell Evans (member of Jerry Tarkanian-coached Pasadena City, CA, club winning 1967 state community college crown) became the first 40-year-old to reach the 40-homer plateau in a single season. . . . Hall of Fame C Rick Ferrell (played for Guilford, NC, in mid-1920s) and his brother (P Wes Ferrell) thrown out of the game by an umpire after the Boston Red Sox teammates protest a call too vehemently in 1934. . . . New York Giants P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) tossed his 11th shutout en route to 33rd victory in 1908. . . . St. Louis Cardinals P Ray Washburn (led Whitworth, WA, in scoring when named All-Evergreen Conference in 1958-59 and 1959-60) hurled a no-hitter at San Francisco. The gem came the day after Gaylord Perry of the Giants no-hit the Cards, handing P Bob Gibson (Creighton's leading scorer in 1955-56 and 1956-57) one of his five 1-0 defeats in 1968.
17 - C Gene Desautels (letterman for Holy Cross in 1929 and 1930) awarded on waivers from the Cleveland Indians to the Philadelphia Athletics in 1945. . . . New York Giants 2B Frankie Frisch (Fordham captain) hit a decisive homer in the 10th inning of a 5-4 decision over the Cincinnati Reds in 1926. . . . New York Giants P Jim Hearn (Georgia Tech letterman in 1941-42) hurled a shutout against the Chicago Cubs in 1952. . . . Los Angeles Dodgers P Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) tossed his 11th shutout of the 1963 campaign, a modern MLB record for a lefthander. . . . The longest hitting streak of the 1940 season ended at 21 games when Philadelphia Phillies OF Danny Litwhiler (member of JV squad with Bloomsburg, PA, three years in the mid-1930s) went hitless against the Cincinnati Reds. . . . New York Yankees 3B Graig Nettles (shot 87.8% from free-throw line for San Diego State in 1963-64) supplied a go-ahead homer in the 11th inning of a 5-3 win against the Milwaukee Brewers in 1976. . . . Montreal Expos OF Curtis Pride (led William & Mary in steals three times and in assists twice from 1986-87 through 1989-90), born with 95% hearing disability, stroked his first MLB hit in 1993 (against the Philadelphia Phillies).
16 - Switch-hitting C Mark Bailey (Southwest Missouri State's top rebounder in 1980-81) homered from both sides of the plate in 1984 as a rookie with the Houston Astros. . . . Chicago Cubs 2B Glenn Beckert (three-year letterman for Allegheny, MA) established a dubious MLB record (subsequently tied by Todd Helton in 1998) by stranding 12 baserunners in an 18-5 victory against the New York Mets in 1972. . . . Cleveland Indians OF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) extended his hitting streak to 21 games with a first-inning grand slam against the Washington Senators in 1948. . . . St. Louis Cardinals CF Taylor Douthit (California letterman from 1922 through 1924), en route to amassing 84 RBI as a leadoff hitter, singled in the game's only run against the Brooklyn Dodgers in the 10th inning in 1930. . . . OF Jim Northrup (second-leading scorer and third-leading rebounder for Alma, MI, in 1958-59) purchased from the Montreal Expos by the Baltimore Orioles in 1974. . . . In 1954, Philadelphia Phillies P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) became the first N.L. hurler to reach the 20-win plateau five successive seasons since Carl Hubbell in the mid-1930s. . . . P Dave Sisler (All-Ivy League second-team selection for Princeton's first NCAA Tournament team in 1952) traded with cash by the Washington Senators to the Cincinnati Reds for P Claude Osteen in 1961. . . . In 1993, Minnesota Twins DH-RF Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) singled against the Oakland A's for his 3,000th hit.
15 - In the opener of a 1946 doubleheader, Boston Red Sox P Boo Ferriss (Mississippi State letterman in 1941) registered his 25th triumph, a 4-1 verdict over the Chicago White Sox. . . . Los Angeles Dodgers RF Frank Howard (two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection when leading Ohio State in scoring and rebounding in 1956-57 and 1957-58) went 4-for-4 and contributed two assists in a 6-4 victory against the Chicago Cubs in 1962. . . . In 1961, Los Angeles Dodgers P Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) set a N.L. single-season record for most strikeouts by a lefthander. . . . Chicago White Sox P Ted Lyons (two-time All-SWC first-team selection for Baylor in early 1920s), en route to pacing the A.L. in ERA (2.10), hurled a three-hitter against the Boston Red Sox in 1940 on a day commemorating his career. . . . In 1908, New York Giants P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) defeated the St. Louis Cardinals for the 24th straight time. . . . In his first MLB start, Philadelphia Athletics P Bill McCahan (three-year Duke letterman named to All-Southern Conference Tournament team in 1942) tossed a shutout against the Cleveland Indians in 1946 in a contest called after seven innings. . . . P Joe Niekro (played for West Liberty WV in mid-1960s) traded by the Houston Astros to the New York Yankees in 1985.
14 - New York Yankees P Rich Beck (listed on Gonzaga's roster in 1961-62) fanned eight batters and walked none while allowing one earned run in his seven-inning debut against the Washington Senators in 1965. . . . Showing no indication of 20-year-old jitters in a pennant race, Brooklyn Dodgers P Ralph Branca (sixth-leading scorer for NYU in 1943-44) hurled a 5-0 shutout against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1946. . . . In 1974, 3B Graig Nettles (shot 87.8% from free-throw line for San Diego State in 1963-64) homered for the New York Yankees in the first inning before brother Jim Nettles homered for the Detroit Tigers in the second. . . . Brooklyn Dodgers P Preacher Roe (played for Harding, AR, in late 1930s) improved his record to 20-2 in 1951 with a 3-1 victory against the Pittsburgh Pirates. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates P Bob Veale (scored 1,160 points from 1955-56 through 1957-58 with Benedictine, KS), supported by Roberto Clemente's pair of homers, blanked the New York Mets, 6-0, in 1968.
13 - Arizona Diamondbacks P Andy Benes (played briefly for Evansville in 1985-86) hurled a one-hitter against the Cincinnati Reds in 1998. . . . P Ownie Carroll (Holy Cross letterman in 1922) purchased from the New York Yankees by the Cincinnati Reds in 1930. . . . In 1997, San Diego Padres OF Tony Gwynn (All-WAC second-team selection with San Diego State in 1979-80 and 1980-81) reached the 200-hit plateau in a lone season for the fifth time in his career. . . . In 1972, Detroit Tigers 1B-OF Frank Howard (two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection when leading Ohio State in scoring and rebounding in 1956-57 and 1957-58) socked his 13th career homer off his apparent favorite pitcher - Baltimore Orioles starter Dave McNally. . . . In 1992, Cleveland Indians rookie Kenny Lofton (Arizona's leader in steals for 1988 Final Four team compiling a 35-3 record) broke the A.L. record for stolen bases by a first-year player with thefts #53 and #54. Lofton went on to finish the campaign with a league-high 66 steals and 14 assists by a center fielder. . . . Hall of Fame P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) made his first MLB start for the New York Giants in 1900. . . . Boston Red Sox C Sammy White (All-PCC Northern Division first-five selection for Washington in 1947-48 and 1948-49) made an unassisted double play against the Chicago White Sox in 1953.
12 - Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading scorer in 1945-46) tied a MLB single-season mark in 1956 when he swatted his 13th homer against a single team (Brooklyn Dodgers). . . . Washington Senators OF Brant Alyea (Hofstra's leading scorer and rebounder in 1960-61 after being runner-up in both categories the previous season) debuted in 1965 with a pinch-hit homer on the first pitch to him against the California Angels. . . . Atlanta Braves 1B Darrell Evans (member of Jerry Tarkanian-coached Pasadena City, CA, club that won 1967 state community college crown) hit a grand slam against the Cincinnati Reds in the opener of a 1974 doubleheader. . . . P Cotton Pippen (Texas Western letterman in 1929-30) awarded on waivers from the Philadelphia Athletics to the Detroit Tigers in 1939. . . . P Dennis Rasmussen (sixth-man for Creighton averaged 5.1 ppg in three seasons from 1977-78 through 1979-80) shipped by the New York Yankees to the San Diego Padres in 1983 to complete an earlier deal.
11 - Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading scorer in 1945-46) suffered a broken hand, ending his 1954 season. . . . Although only 21 years old, Brooklyn Dodgers P Ralph Branca (sixth-leading scorer for NYU in 1943-44) notched his 20th victory in 1947. . . . Detroit Tigers 1B Darrell Evans (member of Jerry Tarkanian-coached Pasadena City, CA, club that won 1967 state community college crown) supplied four hits in a 9-2 triumph against the Baltimore Orioles in 1984. . . . San Francisco Giants All-Star P Atlee Hammaker (averaged 5.3 ppg as a freshman in 1976-77 and 4.9 as a sophomore in 1977-78 under East Tennessee State coach Sonny Smith) fanned 14 Houston Astros in 1983. . . . New York Giants OF Monte Irvin (played for Lincoln, PA, 1 1/2 years in late 1930s) contributed his fifth steal of home during the 1951 campaign. . . . New York Giants P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) tossed shutouts in 1906 and 1909. . . . OF Bake McBride (averaged 12.7 ppg and 8.1 rpg in 21 games with Westminster, MO, in 1968-69 and 1969-70) scampered all the way home from first base after an errant pickoff attempt for the decisive run, giving the St. Louis Cardinals a 25-inning, 4-3 win at New York in 1974. The marathon was the longest game to a decision in MLB history, lasting 7 hours 4 minutes. . . . Chicago Cubs INF Paul Popovich (averaged 3.3 ppg for West Virginia's 1960 NCAA playoff team) pounded a grand slam in a 7-0 victory against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1971. . . . Philadelphia Phillies P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) hurled a three-hit shutout against the San Francisco Giants in 1959, ending rookie 1B Willie McCovey's 22-game hitting streak. . . . OF Evar Swanson (played all five positions for Knox, IL, when it was known as Lombard College) traded by the St. Louis Cardinals to the Chicago White Sox for two players to be designated in 1932.
10 - In 1954, Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading scorer in 1945-46) broke a N.L. record by hitting his ninth homer on the road against a lone opponent (Brooklyn Dodgers at Ebbets Field). . . . Milwaukee Brewers P Jim Colborn (attended Whittier, CA, in mid-1960s before studying for master's at Edinburgh where he was All-Scotland in basketball) went the distance against the Detroit Tigers for his 19th triumph in 1973. . . . New York Giants 2B Frankie Frisch (Fordham captain) went 6-for-6 before grounding out in a 22-1 romp over the Boston Braves in the opener of a 1924 doubleheader. . . . INF Ben Geraghty (letterman for Villanova from 1933-34 through 1935-36) traded by the Brooklyn Dodgers to the Washington Senators in 1937. . . . Washington Senators 1B-OF Frank Howard (two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection when leading Ohio State in scoring and rebounding in 1956-57 and 1957-58) hammered two homers against the Cleveland Indians in 1970. . . . Atlanta Braves 2B Davey Johnson (averaged 1.7 ppg with Texas A&M in 1961-62) put a jolt into one against the San Francisco Giants for his 40th homer in 1973. . . . C Nate Smith (letterman for Tennessee State in 1953-54 and 1954-55) purchased from the Los Angeles Dodgers by the Baltimore Orioles in 1962.
9 - SS Alvin Dark (letterman for LSU and USL during World War II) accounted for all of the New York Giants' offense with two homers in a 2-0 victory against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1950 as teammate Sal Maglie hurled a MLB-tying fourth straight shutout. . . . Brooklyn Robins 2B Jake Flowers (member of Washington College's 1923 "Flying Pentagon" squad in Maryland) knocked in the winning run in the ninth inning in a 3-2 win against the New York Giants in 1928. . . . P Steve Hamilton (Morehead State's leading scorer and rebounder in 1956-57 and 1957-58) awarded on waivers from the New York Yankees to the Chicago White Sox in 1970. . . . In 1964, Los Angeles Dodgers 1B-OF Frank Howard (two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection when he led Ohio State in scoring and rebounding in 1956-57 and 1957-58) hammered his eighth homer in 20 at-bats against San Francisco Giants P Bob Hendley, including four in a row the previous year (not in the same game). . . . In 1965, Los Angeles Dodgers P Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) hurled his fourth no-hitter in as many years. It was a perfect game against the Chicago Cubs, who yielded a lone safety but incurred their second one-hit setback this season against L.A. LF Lou Johnson (Kentucky State teammate of legendary HBCU coach Davey Whitney averaged 5.7 ppg and 2 rpg in 1951-52) secured the game's only hit and scored the lone run. . . . INF Tim Nordbrook (letterman in 1968-69 for Loyola, LA) purchased from the Baltimore Orioles by the California Angels in 1976. . . . P John Stuper (two-time all-conference player for Butler County, KS, Community College) traded by the St. Louis Cardinals to the Cincinnati Reds in 1984. . . . Kansas City Athletics 1B-OF Preston Ward (second-leading scorer for Southwest Missouri State in 1946-47 and 1948-49) walloped three homers in a row against the Baltimore Orioles in 1958. . . . Philadelphia Phillies OF Cy Williams (Notre Dame forward in 1909-10) whacked homers in his first two at-bats but they weren't enough to prevent a 12-6 reversal against the Brooklyn Robins in 1926.
8 - New York Yankees P Jim Beattie (Dartmouth's top rebounder in 1974-75 when he was selected team MVP and honorable mention All-Ivy League) secured a 13-2 win in 1978 when the Boston Red Sox committed seven errors. . . . Bake McBride (averaged 12.7 ppg and 8.1 rpg in 21 games with Westminster, MO, in 1968-69 and 1969-70) handled 11 chances for the Philadelphia Phillies in a 5-3 victory at Chicago in 1978, tying the N.L. mark for right fielders. . . . Gene Michael (Kent State's leading scorer with 14 ppg in 1957-58) fired as Chicago Cubs manager in 1987. . . . Philadelphia Phillies OF Cy Williams (Notre Dame forward in 1909-10) whacked a decisive grand slam in an 8-4 triumph against the Brooklyn Robins in 1926.
7 - OF Brant Alyea (Hofstra's leading scorer and rebounder in 1960-61 after being runner-up in both categories the previous season) drove in all of the Minnesota Twins' runs with two homers in a 7-6 win against the Milwaukee Brewers in the opener of a 1970 doubleheader. . . . Cleveland Indians OF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) supplied a pair of homers in a 6-0 verdict over the Baltimore Orioles in 1955. . . . Sammy Esposito (averaged 7 ppg as Indiana starter in 1951-52) started in place of Chicago White Sox 2B Nellie Fox in 1960, ending Fox's consecutive-game streak at 798. . . . Detroit Tigers OF Hoot Evers (starter for Illinois in 1939-40) went for the cycle, adding another triple, and amassing six RBI in a 13-13, 10-inning tie with the Cleveland Indians in 1950. . . . New York Giants P Jim Hearn (Georgia Tech letterman in 1941-42) had a 12-game winning streak against the Pittsburgh Pirates snapped in 1953. . . . New York Giants OF Monte Irvin (played for Lincoln, PA, 1 1/2 years in late 1930s) ripped a 500-foot homer in a 7-3 nod over the Boston Braves in 1951. . . . New York Yankees 3B Graig Nettles (shot 87.8% from free-throw line for San Diego State in 1963-64) accounted for the game's only run with a homer against the Detroit Tigers in 1974. But Nettles lost a single when it was discovered he used a corked bat. . . . Detroit Tigers RF Jim Northrup (second-leading scorer and third-leading rebounder for Alma, MI, in 1958-59) went 5-for-5 with two homers in a 3-2, 11-inning victory against the Washington Senators in 1971. . . . Brooklyn Dodgers P Preacher Roe (played for Harding, AR, in late 1930s) walked six Philadelphia Phillies batters but raised his record to 19-2 in 1951 with an 11-6 decision over P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47). . . . P Garry Roggenburk (led Dayton in scoring all three seasons from 1959-60 through 1961-62 and grabbed a school-record 32 rebounds in his third varsity game en route to pacing the Flyers in rebounding his first two years) purchased from the Minnesota Twins by the Boston Red Sox in 1966. . . . New York Yankees OF Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) got hung up in a rundown between third base and home plate following a pitchout but escaped to score the decisive run in a 3-2 triumph against the Oakland A's in 1985. . . . New York Giants 1B Babe Young (Fordham letterman in 1935-36) blasted a grand slam in a 4-1 victory against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1940. . . . San Diego Padres P Chris Young (All-Ivy League first-team selection for Princeton in 1999-00) retired the first 23 Milwaukee Brewers batters en route to a two-hitter in 2008. It was Young's first MLB complete game.
6 - P Andy Benes (played briefly for Evansville in 1985-86) defeated his brother, Alan, when the St. Louis Cardinals erupted for 11 third-inning runs in an 11-2 nod over the Chicago Cubs in 2002. . . . Philadelphia Athletics C Mickey Cochrane (Boston University player in early 1920s) clobbered a two-run homer in the 10th inning in a 3-1 verdict over the Boston Red Sox, giving Lefty Grove his 25th triumph in 1930. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates SS Dick Groat (two-time All-American with Duke in 1950-51 and 1951-52 when finishing among nation's top five scorers each season) suffered a broken wrist in 1960. . . . Chicago White Sox P Ted Lyons (two-time All-SWC first-team selection for Baylor in early 1920s) knocked in the decisive run with a triple as he reached the 20-win plateau in 1930 with a 2-1 decision over the Cleveland Indians, snapping Wes Ferrell's 13-game winning streak. . . . New York Giants P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) struck out 14 Brooklyn batters in a 6-2 triumph in 1906. . . . Gene Michael (Kent State's leading scorer with 14 ppg in 1957-58) fired as New York Yankees manager in 1981 despite winning the first-half pennant. . . . Minnesota Twins 3B Graig Nettles (shot 87.8% from free-throw line for San Diego State in 1963-64) whacked his first MLB homer in 1968. The round-tripper came off 31-game winner Denny McLain of the Detroit Tigers. . . . Philadelphia Phillies P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) went the distance in a 17-inning, 7-6 victory against the Boston Braves in 1952. . . . In 1948, Boston Braves Hall of Fame P Warren Spahn twice picked off Brooklyn Dodgers INF Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in Pacific Coast Conference both of his seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41). . . . Bill Virdon (played for Drury, MO, in 1949) fired as manager of the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1973. Virdon is replaced by Danny Murtaugh, who assumed control of the club for the fourth and final time.
5 - P Ralph Branca (sixth-leading scorer for NYU in 1943-44) earned the victory as Brooklyn Dodgers teammate Gil Hodges (played for Oakland City, IN, in 1947 and 1948) hammered a grand slam in a 5-2 verdict over the Philadelphia Phillies in 1951. . . . Philadelphia Athletics P George Earnshaw (Swarthmore, PA, participant in 1922) tossed a one-hitter against the Boston Red Sox in 1931. . . . Boston Red Sox INF Buddy Myer (Mississippi State letterman in 1923-24) doubled before scoring the winning run in the 18th inning of a 12-11 decision over the New York Yankees in the opener of a 1927 doubleheader. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates OF Bill Virdon (played for Drury, MO, in 1949) accounted for the game's only run when he blasted a 10th-inning homer against the Milwaukee braves in 1958.
4 - The Boston Braves started a streak of nine consecutive doubleheaders in 1928 by losing the opener, 3-2, to Brooklyn on a 10th-inning homer by 2B Jake Flowers (member of Washington College's 1923 "Flying Pentagon" squad in Maryland). . . . San Diego Padres Of Tony Gwynn (All-WAC second-team selection with San Diego State in 1979-80 and 1980-81) went 4-for-4 against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1996. . . . P Jim Hearn (Georgia Tech letterman in 1941-42) and New York Giants teammate Sal Maglie each hurled a shutout in a 1950 twinbill against the Philadelphia Phillies. . . . P Andy Karl (Manhattan letterman in mid-1930s) traded by the Philadelphia Phillies to the Chicago Cubs in 1943. Karl refused to report to his new team the following spring. . . . 1B Jack Phillips (leading scorer for 14-1 Clarkson, NY, in 1942-43) traded by the Pittsburgh Pirates to the Chicago White Sox in 1954.
3 - Baltimore Orioles P Mike Flanagan (averaged 13.9 ppg for Massachusetts' 15-1 freshman squad in 1971-72) became MLB's first 20-game winner in the 1979 season. . . . In his final MLB appearance in 1975, St. Louis Cardinals P Bob Gibson (Creighton's leading scorer in 1955-56 and 1956-57) allowed a pinch-hit grand slam to the Chicago Cubs' Pete LaCock before retiring SS Don Kessinger (three-time All-SEC selection for Mississippi from 1961-62 through 1963-64 while finishing among nation's top 45 scorers each year). . . . Brooklyn Dodgers rookie P Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) hurled his second straight shutout in 1955 (4-0 against the Pittsburgh Pirates). . . . Cleveland Indians OF Kenny Lofton (Arizona's leader in steals for 1988 Final Four team compiling a 35-3 record) tied a MLB record by scoring in his 18th straight game, stole five bases and supplied five hits, including a walk-off homer in the 13th inning, in a 12-11 victory against the Baltimore Orioles in 2000. . . . Philadelphia Athletics rookie P Bill McCahan (three-year Duke letterman named to All-Southern Conference Tournament team in 1942) hurled a no-hitter against Washington in 1947.
2 - Bonus baby 2B Jerry Adair (one of Oklahoma State's top three scorers in 1956-57 and 1957-58 while ranking among nation's top 12 free-throw shooters each season) made his MLB debut with the Baltimore Orioles in 1958. . . . INF Bosey Berger (NCAA consensus All-American first-team selection in 1932 for Maryland) combined with Chicago White Sox teammate Mike Kreevich to hit homers as the first two batters in a game for the second time in the 1937 campaign. . . . After sitting out almost a month because of a broken rib, New York Giants SS Alvin Dark (letterman for LSU and USL during World War II) fell and broke his shoulder in a game against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1955. . . . Boston Red Sox P Boo Ferriss (Mississippi State letterman in 1941) won his 12th straight contest for victory No. 24 in the opener of a 1946 twinbill against the New York Yankees. . . . In 1983, Baltimore Orioles P Mike Flanagan (averaged 13.9 ppg for Massachusetts' 15-1 freshman squad in 1971-72) posted his 13th consecutive triumph over the Minnesota Twins when teammate Ken Singleton (Hofstra freshman team in mid-1960s) broke up a scoreless duel with a ninth-inning homer. . . . Philadelphia Phillies P Lefty Hoerst (four-year letterman for La Salle in late 1930s) yielded only two hits but managed to lose by walking four batters in the eighth inning in 1942. . . . Washington Senators slugging 1B-OF Frank Howard (two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection when leading Ohio State in scoring and rebounding in 1956-57 and 1957-58) received intentional passes his first three plate appearances, twice leading off an inning, against the Cleveland Indians in 1970. . . . Chicago Cubs INF Vance Law (averaged 6.8 ppg for Brigham Young from 1974-75 through 1976-77) accounted for the game's only run with a ninth-inning homer off the Los Angeles Dodgers' Bob Welch in 1986. . . . Philadelphia Phillies rookie OF Danny Litwhiler (member of JV squad with Bloomsburg, PA, three years in mid-1930s), en route to a 21-game hitting streak, collected six safeties and eight RBI in a 1940 doubleheader sweep of the New York Giants. . . . OF Larry Sheets (All-Old Dominion Athletic Conference selection for Eastern Mennonite, VA, in 1981-82 and 1982-83) shipped by the Milwaukee Brewers to the Seattle Mariners as part of a conditional deal in 1993. . . . Boston Red Sox P Sonny Siebert (team-high 16.7 ppg for Missouri in 1957-58 as an All-Big Eight Conference second-team selection) hurled a one-hitter and socked two homers in a 3-0 triumph against the Baltimore Orioles in 1971. . . . Boston Red Sox P Dave Sisler (All-Ivy League second-team selection for Princeton's first NCAA Tournament team in 1952) surrendered back-to-back homers to Hall of Famers Yogi Berra and Mickey Mantle in 1958. It was one of 12 times the New York Yankees' duo whack back-to-back round-trippers. They homer in the same game 50 times. . . . P Bob Veale (scored 1,160 points with Benedictine, KS, from 1955-56 through 1957-58) purchased from the Pittsburgh Pirates by the Boston Red Sox in 1972.
1 - SS Dick Groat (two-time All-American with Duke in 1950-51 and 1951-52 when finishing among nation's top five scorers each season) received a bases-loaded walk in the 21st inning to give the San Francisco Giants a 1-0 victory at Cincinnati in 1967. . . . In 1931, New York Giants rookie P Jim Mooney (played for East Tennessee State) notched his fourth win and second shutout since being summoned from the minors three weeks earlier. . . . Brooklyn Dodgers P Preacher Roe (played for Harding, AR, in late 1930s) yielded five solo homers but the St. Louis Cardinals still were soundly defeated, 12-5, in 1953. . . . Bob Veale (scored 1,160 points from 1955-56 through 1957-58 with Benedictine, KS) made relief appearance for the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1971 when they started what is believed to be the first all-black lineup (including several Latinos) in MLB history (against the Philadelphia Phillies). . . . Pittsburgh Pirates OF Bill Virdon (played for Drury, MO, in 1949) belted a two-out, game-ending grand slam in a 6-4 verdict over the Cincinnati Reds in 1963.

MLB achievements/highlights in August by former college basketball players

MLB achievements/highlights in July by former college basketball players

MLB achievements/highlights in June by former college basketball players

MLB achievements/highlights in May by former college basketball players

MLB achievements/highlights in April by former college basketball players

Berry, Berry Good: Dynamic Davion Earned All-Big Sky First-Team Status

New Niagara coach Chris Casey hopes guard Emile Blackman, by the time he becomes eligible in 2014-15, continues to make the progress he displayed at the end of last season before tagging along with his coach from LIU Post. In his last six games, Blackman averaged 16.8 ppg and 4.8 rpg while shooting 52% from the floor and nearly 58% on three-pointers. Niagara struck small-school lightning at the turn of the 21st Century when Mercyhurst (Pa.) transfer Demond Stewart became Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference MVP in 2000-01.

A striking number of standout major-college players started their careers playing for a four-year small college before transferring. Of course, the most prominent player in this category is all-time great Elgin Baylor. After leaving College of Idaho, Baylor became an NCAA unanimous first-team All-American with Seattle in 1957-58.

More than 30 different players became NCAA Division I conference all-league selections in the 1980s and 1990s after beginning their careers with a small four-year college. Last season, Weber State swingman Davion Berry (transfer from Cal State Monterey Bay) joined the following chronological list of first-team all-conference selections since the NCAA playoffs expanded to at least 64 teams in 1985 after starting their college careers playing for non-Division I four-year schools:

Season First-Team Selection Pos. Division I School Conference Four-Year Small College
1984-85 Curtis High G Nevada-Reno Big Sky Tennessee-Martin
1984-85 Jim McCaffrey G Holy Cross Metro Atlantic St. Michael's (Vt.)
1984-85 Bob McCann C Morehead State Ohio Valley Upsala (N.J.)
1985-86 Oscar Jones G Delaware East Coast Winston-Salem State (N.C.)
1985-86 Jim McCaffrey G Holy Cross Metro Atlantic St. Michael's (Vt.)
1985-86 Bob McCann C Morehead State Ohio Valley Upsala (N.J.)
1985-86 Jerry Stroman F Utah Western Athletic Benedict (S.C.)
1986-87 Marchell Henry F East Carolina Colonial Athletic St. Andrews (N.C.)
1986-87 Avery Johnson G Southern (La.) SWAC Cameron (Okla.)
1986-87 Bob McCann* C Morehead State Ohio Valley Upsala (N.J.)
1986-87 Ron Simpson F Rider East Coast Adelphi (N.Y.)
1987-88 Avery Johnson* G Southern (La.) SWAC Cameron (Okla.)
1987-88 Larry Jones* F Boston University ECAC North Atlantic C.W. Post (N.Y.)
1988-89 Gerald Glass F Mississippi SEC Delta State (Miss.)
1989-90 Gerald Glass F Mississippi SEC Delta State (Miss.)
1990-91 Marcus Kennedy* F-C Eastern Michigan Mid-American Ferris State (Mich.)
1990-91 Tony Walker F Saint Peter's Metro Atlantic Kean College (N.J.)
1992-93 Leon McGee G Western Michigan Mid-American Michigan Tech
1993-94 Tucker Neale* G Colgate Patriot League Ashland (Ohio)
1994-95 Tucker Neale G Colgate Patriot League Ashland (Ohio)
1995-96 Johnny Taylor F UT-Chattanooga Southern Knoxville (Tenn.)
1996-97 Johnny Taylor* F UT-Chattanooga Southern Knoxville (Tenn.)
1996-97 Raymond Tutt G UC Santa Barbara Big West Azusa Pacific (Calif.)
1997-98 Andrew Betts C Long Beach State Big West C.W. Post (N.Y.)
1997-98 Chad Townsend G Murray State Ohio Valley St. Edward's (Tex.)
1999-00 Matt Gladieux G Coastal Carolina Big South Bellarmine (Ky.)
2000-01 Demond Stewart* G Niagara Metro Atlantic Mercyhurst (Pa.)
2001-02 Justin Rowe C Maine America East Clearwater Christian (Fla.)
2003-04 Miah Davis* G Pacific Big West Cal State Stanislaus
2004-05 Yemi Nicholson* C Denver Sun Belt Fort Lewis (Colo.)
2012-13 Davion Berry G-F Weber State Big Sky Cal State Monterey Bay

*Nine of these players were named conference MVP.
NOTE: Tennessee-Martin subsequently moved up to the DI level.

Niagara Falls Off Postseason Projection List Because of Hofstra Transfers

Niagara, an NIT participant last season, isn't expected to return to postseason play in 2014 after two of the Purple Eagles' top three scorers - Juan'ya Green and Ameen Tanksley - tagged along with coach Joe Mihalich when he moved to Hofstra. Following is an alphabetical list of prominent players who transferred from one major college to another with the same head coach although he wasn't his father:

Player Pos. Head Coach First School Second School
Mike Aaman F Dan Hurley Wagner Rhode Island 13
Brent Arrington G Sean Woods Mississippi Valley State 12 Morehead State 14
Pasha Bains G Larry Shyatt Wyoming 99 Clemson 2000
Bill Brigham F Mike Jarvis Boston University 89-90 George Washington 92-93
Anthony Buford G Bob Huggins Akron 88-90 Cincinnati 92
Adrian Crawford G Steve Robinson Tulsa 97 Florida State 99-01
Greg Davis F Dave Bliss New Mexico 98-99 Baylor 01-02
*Nate Erdmann G Kelvin Sampson Washington State 94 Oklahoma 96-97
Josh Fisher G Lorenzo Romar Pepperdine Saint Louis 01-04
Prince Fowler G Billy Tubbs Oklahoma 95 Texas Christian 97-99
John David Gardner G Brad Brownell UNC Wilmington 05 Wright State 08-10
Juan'ya Green G Joe Mihalich Niagara 12-13 Hofstra 15
R.T. Guinn C Dave Bliss New Mexico 00 Baylor 02
Kevin Henry G Dave Bliss New Mexico 98-00 Baylor 02
Denard Holmes F Abe Lemons Texas 82 Oklahoma City 85
Gary Hooker F Ron Greene Mississippi State 76-78 Murray State 80
Shawn James C Ron Everhart Northeastern 05-06 Duquesne 08
LeDarion Jones F Larry Shyatt Clemson 96-97 Wyoming 99-00
Thomas Kilgore G Ben Braun Eastern Michigan California 98-99
Mark Lyons G Sean Miller Xavier 09 Arizona 13
Mike Mitchell F Boyd Grant Fresno State 86-88 Colorado State 90
Nic Moore G Tim Jankovich Illinois State 12 Southern Methodist 14
Anthony Pendleton G George Raveling Iowa Southern California 88-89
Scoonie Penn G Jim O'Brien Boston College 96-97 Ohio State 99-00
Merle Rousey G Hank Iba Colorado 34 Oklahoma A&M 36-37
Malik Smith G Richard Pitino Florida International 13 Minnesota 14
Ameen Tanksley G-F Joe Mihalich Niagara 12-13 Hofstra 15
Robert Vaden G-F Mike Davis Indiana 05-06 UAB 08
Ross Varner F Lorenzo Romar Pepperdine Saint Louis 02
Pax Whitehead G-F Jan van Breda Kolff Cornell 93 Vanderbilt 95-97
Sean Wightman F Bob Donewald Illinois State 89 Western Michigan 91-93
Jason Williams G Billy Donovan Marshall 95-96 Florida 98
Dedric Willoughby G Tim Floyd New Orleans 93-94 Iowa State 96-97
Jack Worthington G Abe Lemons Texas 82-83 Oklahoma City 85-86

*Erdmann played for a junior college between four-year school stints.

NOTES: Aaman committed to Wagner before choosing to enroll with Hurley at Rhode Island, Fisher signed with Pepperdine but never played there before choosing to follow Romar to SLU, Kilgore never played for EMU after transferring there from Central Michigan, Lyons was an academic partial qualifier in 2008-09 and Pendleton signed with Iowa but never played for the Hawkeyes because of scholastic shortcomings. . . . Mitchell played two seasons at Fresno State under Grant's successor (Ron Adams). . . . Varner went on an LDS Mormon mission for two years between stints at Pepperdine and Saint Louis.

The Biggest Losers: Twenty DI Schools Suffered Most Defeats Last Season

A total of 120 NCAA Division I schools, 20 of them last season, have incurred their most defeats in a single campaign over the last six years. The only power conference members in this dubious category in 2011-12 were Auburn (9-23) and Mississippi State (10-22) from the SEC.

No major college has an all-time high for setbacks lower than the 16 losses incurred by UNLV. Elsewhere, Nebraska never has won an NCAA playoff game but the Huskers have also never incurred a 20-loss campaign. Additional schools never to lose at least 20 games in a single season include Boise State, College of Charleston, Connecticut, Duke, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan State, North Carolina State, Oklahoma, Temple, UAB, Vanderbilt, Villanova, Virginia Commonwealth and Western Kentucky.

Nearly one-fourth of the current active coaches have the dubious distinction of holding the school single-season record for most reversals. But they can take some comfort in the fact that revered NCAA title mentors such as Jim Calhoun, Denny Crum, Jud Heathcote and Mike Krzyzewski are in the same classification. Following is an alphabetical list of NCAA DI schools and the rock-bottom season or seasons when they sustained their most setbacks (TBD with coaches denotes "to be determined"):

NCAA DI College Season W-L Pct. Coach (Year at School)
Air Force 1995-96 5-23 .179 Reggie Minton (12th of 16)
Akron 1995-96 3-23 .115 Dan Hipsher (1st of nine)
Alabama 1968-69 4-20 .167 C.M. Newton (1st of 12)
Alabama A&M 2011-12 7-21 .250 Willie Hayes (1st of TBD)
Alabama State 2012-13 10-22 .313 Lewis Jackson (8th of TBD)
Albany 2009-10 7-25 .219 Will Brown (9th of TBD)
Alcorn State 2009-10 2-29 .065 Larry Smith (2nd of three)
American 1983-84 6-22 .214 Ed Tapscott (2nd of eight)
Appalachian State 1974-75 3-23 .115 Press Maravich (3rd of three)
Arizona 1958-59 4-22 .154 Fred Enke (34th of 36)
Arizona State 1969-70 4-22 .154 Ned Wulk (13th of 25)
Arizona State 2006-07 8-22 .267 Herb Sendek (1st of TBD)
Arkansas 1970-71 5-21 .192 Lanny Van Eman (2nd of four)
Arkansas-Little Rock 1999-2000 4-24 .143 Sidney Moncrief (only season)
Arkansas-Pine Bluff 2001-02 2-26 .071 Harold Blevins (7th of seven)
Arkansas-Pine Bluff 2003-04 1-26 .037 Van Holt (2nd of six)
Arkansas State 1994-95 8-20 .286 Nelson Catalina (11th of 11)
Arkansas State 2007-08 10-20 .333 Dickey Nutt (13th of 13)
Arkansas State 2011-12 14-20 .412 John Brady (4th of TBD)
Army 1991-92 4-24 .143 Tom Miller (2nd of three)
Auburn 2012-13 9-23 .281 Tony Barbee (3rd of TBD)
Austin Peay State 2012-13 8-23 .258 Dave Loos (23rd of TBD)
Ball State 2007-08 6-24 .200 Billy Taylor (1st of TBD)
Baylor 1923-24 11-29 .275 Frank Bridges (4th of six)
Belmont 1977-78 8-23 .258 Dick Campbell (4th of four)
Belmont 1978-79 13-23 .361 Don Purdy (1st of eight)
Bethune-Cookman 1997-98 1-26 .037 Horace Broadnax (1st of five)
Binghamton 2011-12 2-29 .065 Mark Macon (3rd of three)
Boise State 1980-81 7-19 .269 Dave Leach (1st of three)
Boston College 2011-12 9-22 .290 Steve Donahue (2nd of TBD)
Boston University 1999-2000 7-22 .241 Dennis Wolff (6th of 15)
Bowling Green 2005-06 9-21 .300 Dan Dakich (9th of 10)
Bradley 2011-12 7-25 .219 Geno Ford (1st of TBD)
Brigham Young 1996-97 1-25 .038 Tony Ingle (interim)
Brown 1968-69 3-23 .115 Stan Ward (15th of 15)
Brown 2011-12 8-23 .258 Jesse Agel (4th of four)
Bryant 2009-10 1-29 .033 Tim O'Shea (2nd of TBD)
Bucknell 2008-09 7-23 .233 David Paulsen (1st of TBD)
Buffalo 1991-92 2-26 .071 Dan Bazzani (9th of 10)
Butler 1980-81 5-22 .185 Joe Sexson (4th of 12)
Butler 1989-90 6-22 .214 Barry Collier (1st of 11)
California 1978-79 6-21 .222 Dick Kuchen (1st of seven)
UC Irvine 1996-97 1-25 .038 Rod Baker (6th of six)
Cal Poly 1994-95 1-26 .037 Steve Beason (9th of nine)
UC Riverside 2012-13 6-25 .194 Jim Wooldridge (6th of six)
UC Santa Barbara 1982-83 7-20 .259 Ed DeLacy (5th of five)
Cal State Fullerton 1964-65 1-25 .038 Alex Omalev (5th of 12)
Cal State Northridge 1960-61 10-24 .294 Paul Thomas (3rd of five)
Campbell 2003-04 3-24 .111 Robbie Laing (1st of TBD)
Canisius 2007-08 6-25 .194 Tom Parrotta (2nd of six)
Canisius 2011-12 5-25 .167 Tom Parrotta (6th of six)
Centenary 2010-11 1-29 .033 Adam Walsh (1st of TBD)
Central Arkansas 2010-11 5-24 .172 Corliss Williamson (1st of three)
Central Connecticut State 1990-91 4-24 .143 Mike Brown (3rd of three)
Central Michigan 2003-2004 6-24 .200 Jay Smith (7th of nine)
Central Michigan 2005-2006 4-24 .143 Jay Smith (9th of nine)
Charleston Southern 1978-79 2-25 .074 David Reese (1st of two)
Charlotte 1984-85 5-23 .179 Hal Wissel (3rd of three)
Chattanooga 2011-12 11-21 .344 John Shulman (8th of nine)
Chicago State 2002-03 3-27 .100 Bo Ellis* (5th of five)
Cincinnati 1983-84 3-25 .107 Tony Yates (1st of six)
The Citadel 2007-08 6-24 .200 Ed Conroy (2nd of four)
The Citadel 2011-12 6-24 .200 Chuck Driesell (2nd of TBD)
Clemson 1967-68 4-20 .167 Bobby Roberts (6th of eight)
Clemson 1982-83 11-20 .355 Bill Foster (8th of nine)
Clemson 1999-2000 10-20 .333 Larry Shyatt (2nd of five)
Cleveland State 2003-04 4-25 .138 Mike Garland (1st of three)
Coastal Carolina 1995-96 5-21 .192 Michael Hopkins (1st of three)
Colgate 1982-83 3-24 .111 Tony Relvas (1st of four)
Colgate 1985-86 1-24 .040 Tony Relvas (4th of four)
College of Charleston 1949-50 4-19 .174 Willard Silcox (3rd of six)
Colorado 2008-09 9-22 .290 Jeff Bzdelik (2nd of three)
Colorado State 1980-81 3-24 .111 Tony McAndrews (1st of seven)
Columbia 2002-03 2-25 .074 Armond Hill (8th of eight)
Connecticut 1968-69 5-19 .208 Burr Carlson (2nd of two)
Connecticut 1986-87 9-19 .321 Jim Calhoun (1st of 26)
Coppin State 2001-02 6-25 .194 Fang Mitchell (16th of TBD)
Cornell 1973-74 3-23 .115 Tony Coma* (2nd of two)
Creighton 1993-94 7-22 .241 Rick Johnson (3rd of three)
Dartmouth 1917-18 0-26 .000 F.H. Walker (only season)
Davidson 1988-89 7-24 .226 Bobby Hussey (8th of eight)
Davidson 1989-90 4-24 .143 Bob McKillop (1st of TBD)
Dayton 1992-93 4-26 .133 Jim O'Brien (4th of five)
Delaware 2006-07 5-26 .161 Monte Ross (1st of TBD)
Delaware State 1987-88 3-25 .107 Marshall Emery (6th of six)
Denver 2006-07 4-25 .138 Terry Carroll (6th of six)
DePaul 2008-09 9-24 .273 Jerry Wainwright (4th of five)
DePaul 2010-11 7-24 .226 Oliver Purnell (1st of TBD)
Detroit 1987-88 7-23 .233 Don Sicko* (6th of six)
Detroit 2007-08 7-23 .233 Perry Watson (15th of 15)
Detroit 2008-09 7-23 .233 Ray McCallum (1st of TBD)
Drake 1996-97 2-26 .071 Kurt Kanaskie (1st of seven)
Drexel 2007-08 12-20 .375 Bruiser Flint (7th of TBD)
Duke 1994-95 13-18 .419 Mike Krzyzewski* (15th of TBD)
Duquesne 2005-06 3-24 .111 Danny Nee (5th of five)
East Carolina 1983-84 4-24 .143 Charlie Harrison (2nd of five)
East Carolina 2006-07 6-24 .200 Ricky Stokes (2nd of two)
Eastern Illinois 2007-08 7-22 .241 Mike Miller (3rd of seven)
Eastern Kentucky 1998-99 3-23 .115 Scott Perry (2nd of three)
Eastern Michigan 2000-01 3-25 .107 Jim Boone (1st of five)
Eastern Washington 1986-87 5-23 .179 Joe Folda (2nd of two)
Eastern Washington 1995-96 3-23 .115 Steve Aggers (1st of five)
East Tennessee State 2012-13 10-22 .313 Murry Bartow (10th of TBD)
Elon 1994-95 3-24 .111 Mark Simons (2nd of 10)
Evansville 2003-04 7-22 .241 Steve Merfeld (2nd of five)
Fairfield 1989-90 7-21 .250 Mitch Buonaguro (4th of six)
Fairleigh Dickinson 2011-12 3-26 .103 Greg Vetrone (3rd of four)
Florida 1981-82 5-22 .185 Norman Sloan (8th of 15)
Florida A&M 1993-94 4-23 .148 Ron Brown (1st of three)
Florida A&M 2011-12 10-23 .303 Clemon Johnson (1st of TBD)
Florida Atlantic 1999-2000 2-28 .067 Sidney Green (1st of six)
Florida International 2009-10 7-25 .219 Isiah Thomas (1st of three)
Florida State 2000-01 9-21 .300 Steve Robinson (4th of five)
Fordham 2002-03 2-26 .071 Bob Hill (4th of four)
Fordham 2009-10 2-26 .071 Dereck Whittenburg (7th of seven)
Fresno State 2008-09 13-21 .382 Steve Cleveland (4th of six)
Furman 2008-09 6-24 .200 Jeff Jackson (3rd of seven)
Furman 2012-13 7-24 .226 Jeff Jackson (7th of seven)
Gardner-Webb 2002-03 5-24 .172 Rick Scruggs (8th of 15th)
George Mason 1969-70 4-23 .148 Hap Spuhler (3rd of three)
Georgetown 1971-72 3-23 .115 Jack Magee (6th of six)
George Washington 1988-89 1-27 .036 John Kuester (4th of five)
Georgia 1951-52 3-22 .120 Red Lawson (1st of 14)
Georgia Southern 2010-11 5-27 .156 Charlton Young (2nd of four)
Georgia State 1984-85 2-26 .071 Tom Pugliese* (2nd of two)
Georgia Tech 1980-81 4-23 .148 Dwane Morrison (8th of eight)
Gonzaga 1989-90 8-20 .286 Dan Fitzgerald (5th of 15)
Grambling State 1999-2000 1-30 .032 Larry Wright (1st of nine)
Green Bay 1984-85 4-24 .143 Dick Lien (3rd of three)
Hampton 1974-75 2-21 .087 Solomon Frazier/Joe Buggs
Hampton 2011-12 12-21 .364 Edward Joyner Jr. (3rd of TBD)
Hartford 2008-09 7-26 .212 Dan Leibovitz (3rd of four)
Harvard 2003-04 4-23 .148 Frank Sullivan (13th of 16)
Hawaii 1977-78 1-26 .037 Larry Little (2nd of nine)
High Point 2008-09 9-21 .300 Bart Lundy (6th of six)
Hofstra 2012-13 7-25 .219 Mo Cassara (3rd of three)
Holy Cross 2009-10 9-22 .290 Sean Kearney (only season)
Houston 1999-2000 9-22 .290 Clyde Drexler (2nd of two)
Houston Baptist 2010-11 5-26 .161 Ron Cottrell (20th of TBD)
Howard 1999-2000 1-27 .036 Kirk Saulny (2nd of two)
Idaho 2006-07 4-27 .129 George Pfeifer (1st of two)
Idaho State 1949-50 5-25 .167 Ed Willett (2nd of two)
Illinois 2007-08 16-19 .457 Bruce Weber (5th of nine)
Illinois-Chicago 2010-11 7-24 .226 Howard Moore (1st of TBD)
Illinois State 1990-91 5-23 .179 Bob Bender (2nd of four)
Indiana 2008-09 6-25 .194 Tom Crean (1st of TBD)
Indiana State 1988-89 4-24 .143 Ron Greene (4th of four)
Indiana State 2002-03 7-24 .226 Royce Waltman (6th of 10)
IUPU Fort Wayne 2003-04 3-25 .107 Doug Noll (5th of six)
IUPUI 2012-13 6-26 .188 Todd Howard (2nd of TBD)
Iona 2006-07 2-28 .067 Jeff Ruland (9th of nine)
Iowa 2009-10 10-22 .313 Todd Lickliter (3rd of three)
Iowa State 1975-76 3-24 .111 Ken Trickey (2nd of two)
Jackson State 1982-83 6-24 .200 Paul Covington (16th of 19)
Jackson State 2011-12 7-24 .226 Tevester Anderson (9th of TBD)
Jacksonville 2005-06 1-26 .037 Cliff Warren (1st of TBD)
Jacksonville State 2010-11 5-25 .167 James Green (3rd of TBD)
James Madison 1985-86 5-23 .179 John Thurston (1st of three)
James Madison 2005-06 5-23 .179 Dean Keener (2nd of four)
James Madison 2006-07 7-23 .233 Dean Keener (3rd of four)
Kansas 1961-62 7-18 .280 Dick Harp (6th of eight)
Kansas 1972-73 8-18 .308 Ted Owens (9th of 19)
Kansas State 1945-46 4-20 .167 Fritz Knarr (2nd of two)
Kennesaw State 2011-12 3-28 .097 Lewis Preston (1st of TBD)
Kent State 1977-78 6-21 .222 Rex Hughes* (4th of four)
Kentucky 1988-89 13-19 .406 Eddie Sutton (4th of four)
Lafayette 1994-95 2-25 .074 John Leone (7th of seven)
Lamar 2012-13 3-28 .097 Pat Knight (2nd of TBD)
La Salle 1995-96 6-24 .200 Speedy Morris (10th of 15)
Lehigh 1996-97 1-26 .037 Sal Mentesana (1st of six)
Liberty 2001-02 5-25 .167 Mel Hankinson (4th of four)
Lipscomb 2001-02 6-21 .222 Scott Sanderson (3rd of 14)
Long Beach State 2007-08 6-25 .194 Dan Monson (1st of TBD)
Long Island University 1993-94 3-24 .111 Paul Lizzo (19th of 20)
Longwood 2012-13 8-25 .242 Mike Gillian (10th of 10)
Louisiana-Lafayette 1994-95 7-22 .241 Marty Fletcher (9th of 11)
Louisiana-Monroe 2011-12 3-26 .103 Keith Richard (2nd of TBD)
Louisiana State 1966-67 3-23 .115 Press Maravich (1st of six)
Louisiana Tech 1993-94 2-25 .074 Jerry Loyd (5th of five)
Louisville 1997-98 12-20 .375 Denny Crum (27th of 30)
Loyola of Chicago 2011-12 7-23 .233 Porter Moser (1st of TBD)
Loyola (Md.) 2003-04 1-27 .036 Scott Hicks (4th of four)
Loyola Marymount 2008-09 3-28 .097 Bill Bayno (only season)
Maine 2007-08 7-23 .233 Ted Woodward (4th of TBD)
Manhattan 1985-86 2-26 .071 Tom Sullivan (only season)
Marist 2009-10 1-29 .033 Chuck Martin (2nd of five)
Marquette 1963-64 5-21 .192 Eddie Hickey (6th of six)
Marshall 1991-92 7-22 .241 Dwight Freeman (2nd of four)
Marshall 2004-05 6-22 .214 Ron Jirsa (2nd of four)
Maryland 1940-41 1-21 .045 Burton Shipley (18th of 24)
Maryland-Baltimore County 2009-10 4-26 .133 Randy Monroe (6th of TBD)
Maryland-Baltimore County 2011-12 4-26 .133 Randy Monroe (8th of TBD)
Maryland-Eastern Shore 2007-08 4-28 .125 Meredith Smith (only season)
Massachusetts 1979-80 2-24 .077 Ray Wilson (1st of two)
Massachusetts 1980-81 3-24 .111 Ray Wilson (2nd of two)
McNeese State 1987-88 7-22 .241 Steve Welch (1st of seven)
McNeese State 1991-92 7-22 .241 Steve Welch (5th of seven)
Memphis 1969-70 6-20 .231 Moe Iba (4th of four)
Mercer 1990-91 2-25 .074 Brad Siegfried (2nd of two)
Miami (Fla.) 1991-92 8-24 .250 Leonard Hamilton (2nd of 10)
Miami (Ohio) 2012-13 9-22 .290 John Cooper (1st of TBD)
Michigan 2007-08 10-22 .312 John Beilein (1st of TBD)
Michigan State 1949-50 4-18 .182 Alton Kircher (only season)
Michigan State 1964-65 5-18 .217 Forddy Anderson (11th of 11)
Michigan State 1987-88 10-18 .357 Jud Heathcote (12th of 19)
Middle Tennessee State 2000-01 5-22 .185 Randy Wiel (5th of six)
Milwaukee 1994-95 3-24 .111 Steve Antrim (8th of eight)
Milwaukee 1997-98 3-24 .111 Ric Cobb (3rd of four)
Milwaukee 2012-13 8-24 .250 Rob Jeter (8th of TBD)
Minnesota 2006-07 9-22 .290 Dan Monson (7th of seven)
Mississippi 1964-65 4-21 .160 Eddie Crawford (3rd of six)
Mississippi State 1985-86 8-22 .267 Bob Boyd (5th of five)
Mississippi State 2012-13 10-22 .313 Rick Ray (1st of TBD)
Mississippi Valley State 2008-09 7-25 .219 Sean Woods (1st of four)
Missouri 1966-67 3-22 .120 Bob Vanata (5th of five)
Missouri-Kansas City 2008-09 7-24 .226 Matt Brown (2nd of six)
Missouri-Kansas City 2012-13 8-24 .250 Matt Brown (6th of six)
Missouri State 2012-13 11-22 .333 Paul Lusk (2nd of TBD)
Monmouth 2007-08 7-24 .226 Dave Calloway (10th of 13)
Montana 1944-45 7-23 .233 George Dahlberg (1st of 11)
Montana State 1933-34 5-22 .185 Schubert Dyche (6th of seven)
Montana State 1969-70 4-22 .154 Gary Hulst (1st of three)
Morehead State 1997-98 3-23 .115 Kyle Macy (1st of nine)
Morehead State 2005-06 4-23 .148 Kyle Macy (9th of nine)
Morgan State 2005-06 4-26 .133 Butch Beard (5th of five)
Mount St. Mary's 2001-02 3-24 .111 Jim Phelan (48th of 49)
Murray State 1978-79 4-22 .154 Ron Greene (1st of seven)
Navy 2011-12 3-26 .103 Ed DeChellis (1st of TBD)
Nebraska 1962-63 6-19 .240 Jerry Bush (8th of eight)
Nebraska 1999-2000 11-19 .367 Danny Nee (14th of 14)
Nebraska 2002-03 11-19 .367 Barry Collier (3rd of six)
Nebraska-Omaha 1993-94 4-22 .154 Bob Hanson (25th of 25)
Nevada 1971-72 2-24 .077 Jack Spencer (13th of 13)
New Hampshire 1987-88 4-25 .138 Gerry Friel (19th of 20)
New Hampshire 1990-91 3-25 .107 Jim Boylan (2nd of three)
New Hampshire 1999-2000 3-25 .107 Phil Rowe (1st of six)
New Mexico 1979-80 6-22 .214 Charlie Harrison (only season)
New Mexico State 2004-05 6-24 .200 Lou Henson (16th of 16)
New Orleans 2009-10 8-22 .267 Joe Pasternack (3rd of four)
New York University 1970-71 5-20 .200 Lou Rossini (13th of 13)
Niagara 2010-11 9-23 .281 Joe Mihalich (13th of 15)
Nicholls State 1990-91 3-25 .107 Rickey Broussard (1st of 12)
Nicholls State 2001-02 2-25 .074 Rickey Broussard (12th of 12)
Nicholls State 2002-03 3-25 .107 Ricky Blanton (1st of two)
Norfolk State 2010-11 12-20 .375 Anthony Evans (4th of TBD)
North Carolina 2001-02 8-20 .286 Matt Doherty (2nd of three)
UNC Asheville 1993-94 3-24 .111 Randy Wiel (1st of three)
North Carolina A&T 2002-03 1-26 .037 Curtis Hunter (4th of four)
North Carolina Central 2008-09 4-27 .129 Henry Dickerson (5th of five)
UNC Greensboro 2008-09 5-25 .167 Mike Dement (8th of 11)
North Carolina State 1966-67 7-19 .269 Norman Sloan (1st of 14)
North Carolina State 1992-93 8-19 .296 Les Robinson (3rd of six)
North Carolina State 1993-94 11-19 .367 Les Robinson (4th of six)
UNC Wilmington 2008-09 7-25 .219 Benny Moss (3rd of four)
North Dakota 2009-10) 8-23 .258 Brian Jones (4th of TBD)
North Dakota State 1937-38 2-20 .091 Bob Lowe (5th of 13)
North Dakota State 1967-68 6-20 .231 Doug cowman (3rd of three)
Northeastern 1995-96 4-24 .143 Dave Leitao (2nd of two)
Northern Arizona 1988-89 2-25 .074 Pat Rafferty (1st of two)
Northern Illinois 2011-12 5-26 .161 Mark Montgomery (1st of TBD)
Northern Iowa 2000-01 7-24 .226 Sam Weaver (3rd of three)
North Texas 1989-90 5-25 .167 Jimmy Gales (4th of seven)
Northwestern 1999-2000 5-25 .167 Kevin O'Neill (3rd of three)
Northwestern State 1984-85 3-25 .107 Wayne Yates (5th of five)
Notre Dame 1965-66 5-21 .192 Johnny Dee (2nd of seven)
Oakland 1974-75 4-22 .154 Eugene Boldon (7th of eight)
Oakland 1975-76 5-22 .185 Eugene Boldon (8th of eight)
Oakland 1977-78 4-22 .154 Jim Mitchell (2nd of three)
Ohio University 1997-98 5-21 .192 Larry Hunter (9th of 12)
Ohio State 1994-95 6-22 .214 Randy Ayers (6th of eight)
Ohio State 1997-98 8-22 .267 Jim O'Brien (1st of five)
Oklahoma 1955-56 4-19 .174 Doyle Parrack (1st of seven)
Oklahoma 1968-69 7-19 .269 John MacLeod (2nd of six)
Oklahoma State 1971-72 4-22 .154 Sam Aubrey (2nd of three)
Old Dominion 2012-13 5-25 .167 Blaine Taylor* (12th of 12)
Oral Roberts 1992-93 5-22 .185 Ken Trickey (6th of six)
Oregon 1921-22 7-24 .226 George Bohler (2nd of three)
Oregon State 2007-08 6-25 .194 Jay John (6th of six)
Pacific 1983-84 3-27 .100 Tom O'Neil (2nd of six)
Pennsylvania 2009-10 6-22 .214 Jerome Allen* (1st of TBD)
Pennsylvania 2012-13 9-22 .290 Jerome Allen (4th of TBD)
Penn State 2004-05 7-23 .233 Ed DeChellis (2nd of eight)
Pepperdine 1965-66 2-24 .077 Robert Dowell (18th of 20)
Pepperdine 2009-10 7-24 .226 Tom Asbury (8th of nine)
Pittsburgh 1976-77 6-21 .222 Tim Grgurich (2nd of five)
Portland 1988-89 2-26 .071 Larry Steele (2nd of seven)
Portland State 2002-03 5-22 .185 Heath Schroyer (1st of three)
Prairie View 1991-92 0-28 .000 Elwood Plummer (8th of 18)
Presbyterian 2009-10 5-26 .161 Gregg Nibert (21st of TBD)
Princeton 2007-08 6-23 .207 Sydney Johnson (1st of four)
Providence 1984-85 11-20 .355 Joe Mullaney (18th of 18)
Purdue 2004-05 7-21 .250 Gene Keady (25th of 25)
Quinnipiac 2000-01 6-21 .222 Joe DeSantis (5th of 11)
Radford 2011-12 6-26 .188 Mike Jones (1st of TBD)
Rhode Island 1999-2000 5-25 .167 Jerry DeGregorio (1st of two)
Rice 2007-08 3-27 .100 Willis Wilson (16th of 16)
Richmond 1977-78 4-22 .154 Carl Slone (4th of four)
Richmond 2006-07 8-22 .267 Chris Mooney (2nd of TBD)
Rider 1988-89 5-23 .179 John Carpenter (23rd of 23)
Robert Morris 1996-97 4-24 .143 Jim Boone (1st of four)
Rutgers 1954-55 2-22 .083 Don White (10th of 11)
Rutgers 1987-88 7-22 .241 Craig Littlepage (3rd of three)
Sacramento State 2008-09 2-27 .069 Brian Katz (1st of TBD)
Sacred Heart 1999-2000 3-25 .107 Dave Bike (22nd of TBD)
St. Bonaventure 2004-05 2-26 .071 Anthony Solomon (2nd of four)
St. Francis (N.Y.) 1983-84 2-26 .071 Gene Roberti (5th of five)
St. Francis (N.Y.) 1993-94 1-26 .037 Ron Ganulin (3rd of 14)
Saint Francis (Pa.) 2005-06 4-24 .143 Bobby Jones (7th of nine)
Saint Francis (Pa.) 2012-13 5-24 .172 Rob Krimmel (1st of TBD)
St. John's 2003-04 6-21 .222 Mike Jarvis* (6th of six)
Saint Joseph's 1911-12 6-22 .214 John Donahue (1st of eight)
Saint Joseph's 2010-11 11-22 .333 Phil Martelli (16th of TBD)
Saint Louis 1982-83 5-23 .179 Rich Grawer (1st of 10)
Saint Mary's 2000-01 2-27 .069 Dave Bollwinkel (4th of four)
Saint Peter's 2011-12 5-26 .161 John Dunne (6th of seven)
Samford 1975-76 3-23 .115 Fred Crowell (1st of four)
Sam Houston State 1967-68 9-22 .290 Archie Porter (4th of 11)
Sam Houston State 1978-79 5-22 .185 Dennis Price (4th of four)
San Diego 2003-04 4-26 .133 Brad Holland (10th of 13)
San Diego State 1986-87 5-25 .167 Smokey Gaines (8th of eight)
San Francisco 1985-86 7-21 .250 Jim Brovelli (1st of 10)
San Francisco 2007-08 10-21 .323 Jessie Evans* (4th of four)
San Jose State 2005-06 6-25 .194 George Nessman (1st of eight)
San Jose State 2006-07 5-25 .167 George Nessman (2nd of eight)
Santa Clara 2011-12 8-22 .267 Kerry Keating (5th of TBD)
Savannah State 2004-05 0-28 .000 Ed Daniels Jr. (3rd of three)
Savannah State 2005-06 2-28 .067 Horace Broadnax (1st of TBD)
Seattle 1992-93 6-24 .200 Al Hairston (2nd of nine)
Seton Hall 1982-83 6-23 .207 P.J. Carlesimo (1st of 12)
Siena 2004-05 6-24 .200 Rob Lanier (4th of four)
Siena 2012-13 8-24 .250 Mitch Buonaguro (3rd of TBD)
South Alabama 2001-02 7-21 .250 Bob Weltlich (5th of five)
South Carolina 1937-38 3-21 .125 Ted Petoskey (3rd of five)
South Carolina 1998-99 8-21 .276 Eddie Fogler (6th of eight)
South Carolina 2011-12 10-21 .323 Darrin Horn (4th of four)
South Carolina State 2011-12 5-26 .161 Tim Carter (5th of TBD)
USC Upstate 1977-78 4-26 .133 Bill Hinson (1st of three)
South Dakota 1987-88 5-23 .179 Doug Martin (6th of six)
South Dakota State 1985-86 8-20 .286 Jim Thorson (1st of eight)
South Dakota State 2008-09 13-20 .394 Scott Nagy (14th of TBD)
Southeast Missouri State 2008-09 3-27 .100 Zac Roman (only season)
South Florida 2010-11 10-23 .303 Stan Heath (4th of TBD)
Southeastern Louisiana 1988-89 3-24 .111 Leo McClure (only full season)
Southern 2010-11 4-26 .133 Rob Spivery (6th of six)
Southern California 2011-12 6-26 .188 Kevin O'Neill (3rd of TBD)
Southern Illinois 2011-12 8-23 .258 Chris Lowery (8th of eight)
SIU-Edwardsville 2009-10 5-23 .179 Lennox Forrester (3rd of TBD)
Southern Methodist 1981-82 6-21 .222 Dave Bliss (3rd of nine)
Southern Methodist 1993-94 6-21 .222 John Shumate (6th of seven)
Southern Methodist 2008-09 9-21 .300 Matt Doherty (3rd of six)
Southern Mississippi 1971-72 0-24 .000 Jeep Clark (1st of five)
Southern Utah 2009-10 7-22 .241 Roger Reid (3rd of five)
Stanford 1992-93 7-23 .233 Mike Montgomery (7th of 18)
Stephen F. Austin 1989-90 2-25 .074 Mike Martin (2nd of two)
Stetson 2010-11 8-23 .258 Derek Waugh (11th of 11)
Stony Brook 2005-06 4-24 .143 Steve Pikiell (1st of TBD)
Syracuse 1961-62 2-22 .083 Marc Guley (12th of 12)
Temple 1958-59 6-19 .240 Harry Litwack (7th of 21)
Temple 1974-75 7-19 .269 Don Casey (2nd of nine)
Tennessee 1990-91 12-22 .353 Wade Houston (2nd of five)
Tennessee 1993-94 5-22 .185 Wade Houston (5th of five)
Tennessee-Martin 2011-12 4-27 .129 Jason James (3rd of TBD)
Tennessee State 2002-03 2-25 .074 Nolan Richardson III* (3rd of three)
Tennessee Tech 1979-80 5-21 .192 Cliff Malpass (4th of four)
Tennessee Tech 1993-94 10-21 .323 Frank Harrell (6th of 10)
Tennessee Tech 1997-98 9-21 .300 Frank Harrell (10th of 10)
Texas 1982-83 6-22 .214 Bob Weltlich (1st of six)
Texas A&M 1991-92 6-22 .214 Tony Barone (1st of seven)
Texas A&M 2001-02 9-22 .290 Melvin Watkins (4th of six)
Texas A&M-Corpus Christi 2011-12 6-24 .200 Willis Wilson (1st of TBD)
Texas-Arlington 1976-77 3-24 .111 Bob LeGrand (1st of 11)
Texas Christian 2005-06 6-25 .194 Neil Dougherty (4th of six)
Texas-El Paso 2002-03 6-24 .200 Billy Gillispie (1st of two)
Texas-Pan American 2009-10 6-27 .182 Ryan Marks (1st of TBD)
Texas-San Antonio 1985-86 7-24 .226 Don Eddy* (2nd of two)
Texas Southern 2007-08 7-25 .219 Robert Moreland (27th of 27)
Texas Southern 2008-09 7-25 .219 Tony Harvey (1st of TBD)
Texas State 2005-06 3-24 .111 Dennis Nutt (6th of six)
Texas Tech 1990-91 8-23 .258 Gerald Myers (21st of 21)
Texas Tech 2011-12 8-23 .258 Billy Gillispie (1st of TBD)
Toledo 2009-10 4-28 .125 Gene Cross (2nd of two)
Toledo 2010-11 4-28 .125 Tod Kowalczyk (1st of TBD)
Towson 2011-12 1-31 .031 Patrick Skerry (1st of TBD)
Troy 1977-78 1-23 .042 Wes Bizilia (5th of nine)
Tulane 1989-90 4-24 .143 Perry Clark (1st of 11)
Tulsa 1948-49 4-20 .200 John Garrison (2nd of two)
Tulsa 1976-77 7-20 .259 Jim King (2nd of 5th)
Tulsa 1987-88 8-20 .286 J.D. Barnett (3rd of six)
Tulsa 2003-04 9-20 .310 John Phillips (3rd of four)
Tulsa 2004-05 9-20 .310 John Phillips* (3rd of four)
UAB 2001-02 13-17 .433 Murry Bartow (6th of six)
UCF 2000-01 8-23 .258 Kirk Speraw (8th of 17)
UCLA 1937-38 4-20 .167 Caddy Works (17th of 18)
UCLA 1938-39 7-20 .259 Caddy Works (18th of 18)
UCLA 1940-41 6-20 .231 Wilbur Johns (2nd of nine)
UNLV 1994-95 12-16 .429 Tim Grgurich* (only season)
UNLV 1995-96 10-16 .385 Bill Bayno (1st of six)
Utah 2011-12 6-25 .194 Larry Krystkowiak (1st of TBD)
Utah State 1981-82 4-23 .148 Rod Tueller (3rd of nine)
Utah Valley 2009-10 12-18 .400 Dick Hunsaker (7th of TBD)
Utah Valley 2012-13 14-18 .438 Dick Hunsaker (10th of TBD)
Valparaiso 1989-90 4-24 .143 Homer Drew (2nd of 22)
Vanderbilt 2002-03 11-18 .380 Kevin Stallings (4th of TBD)
Vermont 1987-88 3-24 .111 Tom Brennan (2nd of 19)
Villanova 1973-74 7-19 .269 Rollie Massimino (1st of 19)
Villanova 1992-93 8-19 .296 Steve Lappas (1st of nine)
Villanova 2011-12 13-19 .406 Jay Wright (11th of TBD)
Virginia 1960-61 3-23 .115 Billy McCann (4th of six)
Virginia Commonwealth 1997-98 9-19 .321 Sonny Smith (9th of nine)
Virginia Military 1970-71 1-25 .038 Mike Schuler (2nd of three)
Virginia Military 1981-82 1-25 .038 Charlie Schmaus (6th of six)
Virginia Military 1982-83 2-25 .074 Marty Fletcher (1st of four)
Virginia Tech 1953-54 3-24 .111 Red Laird (7th of eight)
Wagner 1990-91 4-26 .133 Tim Capstraw (2nd of 10)
Wagner 2009-10 5-26 .161 Mike Deane (7th of seven)
Wake Forest 2010-11 8-24 .250 Jeff Bzdelik (1st of TBD)
Washington 1993-94 5-22 .185 Bob Bender (1st of nine)
Washington State 1952-53 7-27 .206 Jack Friel (25th of 30)
Weber State 1986-87 7-22 .241 Larry Farmer (2nd of three)
Western Carolina 2000-01 6-25 .194 Steve Shurina (1st of five)
Western Illinois 2003-04 3-25 .107 Derek Thomas (1st of five)
Western Kentucky 1945-46 15-19 .441 Ed A. Diddle (24th of 42)
Western Kentucky 1997-98 10-19 .345 Matt Kilcullen* (4th of four)
Western Michigan 1978-79 7-23 .233 Dick Shilts (3rd of three)
Western Michigan 1982-83 5-23 .179 Vern Payne (1st of seven)
West Virginia 2001-02 8-20 .286 Gale Catlett (21st of 24)
Wichita State 1995-96 8-21 .276 Scott Thompson (4th of four)
William & Mary 2011-12 6-26 .188 Tony Shaver (9th of TBD)
Winston-Salem State 2006-07 5-24 .172 Bobby Collins (1st of TBD)
Winthrop 1993-94 4-23 .148 Dan Kenney (2nd of six)
Wisconsin 1981-82 6-21 .222 Bill Cofield (6th of six)
Wofford 1979-80 7-25 .219 Wayne Earhardt (3rd of eight)
Wright State 1996-97 7-20 .259 Jim Brown (interim)
Wyoming 1958-59 4-22 .154 Everett Shelton (19th of 19)
Wyoming 1973-74 4-22 .154 Moe Radovich (1st of three)
Xavier 1972-73 3-23 .115 Dick Campbell (2nd of two)
Yale 1998-99 4-22 .154 Dick Kuchen (13th of 13)
Youngstown State 1992-93 3-23 .115 John Stroia (4th of four)
Youngstown State 2001-02 5-23 .179 John Robic (3rd of six)
Youngstown State 2004-05 5-23 .179 John Robic (6th of six)

*Coach wasn't in charge of team the entire season.

Can Fox Sports 1 Be Dawn of New Era for Media or Will it Be More of Same?

There are ample reasons why the majority of Americans fail to have confidence in a biased mass media to report the news fully, accurately and fairly. According to a Gallup poll, fewer than 1/4 of American adults have "a great deal" of confidence in newspapers and television news. Whether they admit it or not, the recent sales of the Boston Globe and Washington Compost and pending peddling of the Chicago Tribune and Los Angeles Slimes are additional signs of the apocalypse for the print media.

As for online entities, anyone want to take a bet about tiresome Tina Brown being at the helm when another media outlet runs aground regarding her stewardship of the Daily Beast? But at least Brown boasts a beastly charity ostensibly to "driving solutions that advance women and girls" although it spends the majority of funds raised with her "solution" throwing lavish parties for its director and connected friends.

A problem persists that the overwhelming majority of slanted reporters chronicling events big and small write through a liberal prism insulting our common sense and intelligence. The sports sandbox of the fourth-rate estate is cut largely from the same cloth complicit in the dumbing down of America. For instance, how else do you explain the widespread media support for troubled Ole Miss guard Marshall Henderson after his latest run-in with the law? Similarly, there is overkill on Kevin Ware's "House of Cards" comeback story stemming from a gruesome injury on TV for a Louisville backup guard averaging an anemic 3.3 points per game.

Actually, it only takes a few minutes assessing Twitter incest and the flock of fake followers to reveal much of the follow-the-pack press simply kissing each other's butt like a pack of puppies in a municipality without a dog catcher. Compare the content of the majority of the most popular college basketball websites and it's easy to discern they all virtually read the same. Where are the irascible and irreverent reporters bucking the system by circumventing all of the spin? A classic example of the shoddy storytelling was ESPN.com's HOF puff piece on coach Jerry Tarkanian conveniently letting ignorance linger by overlooking the excessive number of criminals he embraced in his programs. What's so difficult about aspiring to tell the whole tale rather than tailoring an account in order to get a high-five or interview at a ceremony?

Does the establishment media, boasting a veracity comparable to Pinnochio, really care about the integrity of college hoops? Frankly, it's a privilege, not a right, to compete as a college athlete. If more players were genuine students, they would comprehend the value of an education and analysts wouldn't be so obsessed with providing them additional "goodies." Thus it's disturbing to see the abysmal graduation ratios and coddling of suspended Henderson after his well-documented checkered past and recent drug-related travails.

You couldn't tell it from the genuine rodeo clowns in the press but something is wrong with the frequency of college basketball players running afoul of the law. Where are the provoking stories and commentary assessing how enforcing more rigorous academic standards could virtually eliminate this blight? What is being done to reduce the seemingly incessant number of "tough guys" tossing women around like rag dolls?

Held hostage by an Ariel Castro-like media as manipulative as Jodi Arias, the general public suffers from gullible glorification syndrome. When the lame-stream sports media is as incompetent as the general newsroom and editorial department, they foist athletic heroes upon the general public such as Lance Armstrong, Ryan Braun, Aaron Hernandez, Johnny "I Can Sign My Name" Manziel, O.J. Simpson, A-Roid, Manti Te'o, Michael Vick and Tiger Woods. In basketball specifically, hoop media sycophants canonize tattooed Louisville coach Rick Pitino not long after his repulsive restaurant-closing porn-star tryout and Jimmy V is hailed endlessly in hypocritical history rewrites despite coach Valvano having two different schools - Iona and North Carolina State - vacate NCAA playoff participation.

By any measure, the puff-piece enemies of illumination fail to tell the entire story. The gutless wonders in the media aren't combative enough to explore an issue much beyond being a slobbering stenographer for the school. Who really believes Hall of Famer Pitino went directly from normal extracurricular activity for a leader of men to Hall of Shame extraordinary bumping and grinding in a public venue? Who has examined the number of suspect characters Pitino has had on his rosters such as Brandon Bender, Derrick Caracter, Richie Farmer, Carlos Hurt, Derrick Miller, Bryant Northern, Antoine Walker, Samaki Walker and Terrence Williams?

Getting rid of evidence (abortion) isn't confined to morally-bankrupt coaches. In an era of sexual gratification, how did Duke All-American J.J. Redick become so savvy he had an abortion contract with his flame as an NBA rookie? Has an enterprising sports reporter evaluated how many abortions have been sanctioned by college basketball coaches so female players could remain on the court and male players wouldn't be hampered by becoming deadbeat dads? No, not when the men's championship coach has an extortion trial, end-of-the-pack Kentucky Derby horse, limited-edition bourbon bottle, meaningful marlin, favorite son, testimonial tattoo, Lexus dealership and White House visit to cover.

The myopic media, responding like the NSA in the "least untruthful manner," caters to a low-information public susceptible to prejudging inflammatory comments such as "could have son who looked like me" from someone who ostensibly is supposed to be looking out for all the people. What is the ratio of the cherry-picking journalistic jewels referring to Trayvon Martin as a boy, child or kid compared to explanations citing reasons why Skittles was kicked out of his home and school?

A colossal collection of condescending clowns fail to comprehend the culture they've helped create is completely contemptible such as underwriting professional student Sandra Flukey's birth control into her 30s because she is too lazy to make arrangements to secure modestly-priced protection herself. How often does the media allow a retread such as Jesse striving to stay relevant to run in front of cameras for some diatribe but ignore the murders of children in his own Chicago backyard (a/k/a Dodge City)? As for college sports, the predictably pathetic press has allowed universities of lower learning to become little more than halfway houses for wayward youth.

The media, shackled by an amateurish historical perspective, should be detached from the subjects they cover but they almost never challenge them with any sort of confrontational style. Regrettably, that is the extent of how thin-skinned coaches such as Alabama's Lou "Don't Ask Me Any More (Football) Questions About This" Saban and the sports media view their roles. In such a lack-of-accountability atmosphere, North Carolina coach Roy Williams has no qualms announcing he's "tired of answering questions" about troubled P.J. Hairston. Why doesn't Williams, in the aftermath of a long-time academic tutor quitting in protest, really show who is in charge by prohibiting Hairston (subsequently suspended for the season) from taking any of those rigorous African-studies classes?

The familiar family-atmosphere refrain from father-figure coaches and administrators about "doing all they could to mentor and guide him" is nauseating. Is that distorted definition of "everything" all that fans and the media ask of them? Were the recruits genuine student-athletes in the first place? Wouldn't you love to see the laughable transcripts of the majority of the troublemakers?

At some point, the blatantly dishonest coaches and media, collaborating for a "Duck Dynasty" of sorts ducking the difficult questions and issues, need to look in the mirror about accountability. Petrified of being denied access, the hacks fail to yield more than baffling babbling. Eschewing ethics, morality and honor, the Pravda-like press impress anyone with a triple-digit IQ about as much as a MSLSD-round table featuring any of Outcast's Phil Pimping-lunatic lineup comprised of AllintheStank, Alec "Rude Pig" Baldfaceliar, The Sicko (featuring Foolre' and Mental Stall), The Daily Dumbdown, Martin "The Defecator" Hotair (a/k/a Pipsqueak Brit With Brain Problems), Karen "Disturbed" Foolish, Blabbering Hall, RINO Joe, Katty "Contemptible" Kay, Down With Deceive WhoreHacky (a/k/a goofy game-show host wannabee), Rachel "Spreading Cyclical Depression" Madcow, Chrissy "Thrill Up My Leg" Softball (a/k/a "Gigglin' With Shrillary"), Ancient Mitchill, Mika the Myopic Mannequin (a/k/a "Inappropriate Touchdown" to Baghdad Bob Gibbs), Joyless Reid, Alex Twit, NowWithClueless, Sgt. "I Know Nothing" Schultz, Al "Not So" Sharpton (a/k/a "Resist We Much" and the "Mob Rat"), The Ass' Word or some hallucinating high-pitched hyphenated highbrow from academia so incredibly ignorant she believes the word "ObamaCare" is racist and reveled in mocking a defenseless black baby adopted by the Romney family. Does this human debris, exhibiting fewer ethical credentials than MSNBC's edifying weekend lineup of hardcore criminals or Commie-loving Van Jones as a host on CNN's Crossfire, illustrate the best, brightest and most honest our country can produce in the newsrooms? If so, God help us all. Really, does anyone with an ounce of prime-time testosterone in their household watch depressive Rachel - whether or not butch drones on in a Washington Compost column promoting abortion - rather than an infinitely more vibrant Fox Megyn Kelly?

It might be unrealistic but will the advent of Fox Sports 1 help shake up things among the sports media? There's an opening for the fledgling network if ESPN continues making decisions such as exchanging a stump for a rump, dismissing loyal Howie Schwab before bringing back dismissive Keith Olbermann, a MSLSD reject "not high on list" of ex-Washington Nationals manager Davey Johnson, a former Texas A&M hoopster. When do we formally start the "countdown" on "Drivin' Mr. Daisy" exhibiting those little traits making him a full-fledged facist "Worst Person in the World" nominee? Then, Jason Twitlock, who previously couldn't control his denigrating gun aimed at ESPN, rejoined the network and promptly did the dirty via a "couple inches of pain" directed at former Fox colleague Thayer Evans (now with SI). ESPN promptly called Twitlock on the carpet but didn't respond likewise regarding Olbermann for doing virtually the same thing to a New York reporter. Twitlock should reappear on Sports Reporters with Big Apple columnist Mike Lupica so we can hear a parting shot about the "Little Fella" being "an insecure, mean-spirited busybody." Will most of the African-American sports journalists selective Twitlock is supposed to nurture be like him? ESPN apparently doesn't boast much of a background check process after having Philly columnist/molester Bill Conlin among its Sports Reporters for an extended period.

This nonsense comes on the heels of ESPN driving disgraced Bruce "Interior Decorator" Pearl down our throats as an expert (at lying to NCAA investigators) along with Dancin' and Mumblin' Ray Lewis as he keeps trying to find his blood-stained cream suit in Atlanta while serving as the passionate NFL poster boy for fathering children out of wedlock. What a colossal pile of crap when an ESPN host asked Lewis - the network's top mind(backer) after Hugh Douglas departed - about how a player should conduct himself off the playing field! Thus we're not really blindsided when ESPN's journalistic integrity took "hits" as NFL pressure apparently led the Extra Sensitive Pious Network to refuse "to go all the way" in a concussion investigation project with Frontline and Miami columnist Dan LeBatard, a typical sanctimonious ESPN host, "gave" his baseball Hall of Fame vote to readers of Deadspin's snarky sports blog.

Essentially, what happened to pugnacious competition chasing down a story among media outlets? Rather than chronic adoration, shouldn't they be like an acerbic town crier assuring us Kate's baby doesn't have Grandpa's ears? Instead, there should be a stop-and-frisk policy for the delusional press to see if they have any courage or intellect. For instance, ESPN is virtually immune to widespread criticism because most of the flacks aspire to work for the network alongside journalistic jewel Jalen "Uncle Tom" Rose.

Some members of the media seem to give Henderson a pass because they were among the first to promote him. But the press should always be uncomfortable, not orgasmic, in its pursuits even if they become a trendsetter. This corner designated North Carolina's Michael Jordan as national player of the year in 1982-83 when every other precinct anointed Virginia's Ralph Sampson. Does that mean UNC and iconic Jordan, especially since he can dunk at 50, deserve deference forevermore if his alma mater sports suspect academic credentials, he spends too much time gambling/womanizing, makes inane executive decisions or if one of his kids acts like a derelict?

If you were responsible for generating the first significant national publicity for Auburn's Charles "Round Mound of Rebound" Barkley, are you supposed to resemble most of the idolatry-practicing media and virtually ignore his numerous off-the-court transgressions or college hoops analysis as lame as his golf swing?

Americans deserve a skeptical honest media but most don't have the basketballs for the job and are as confused as Bradley Manning in who they are plus what they should be. As shamelessly one-sided as conservatives have asserted for years, excessive media malpractice finally discarded the pretense of objectivity. Once and for all, the amateur hour collection of misguided minions have been unmasked as aggressive advocates; not adversarial journalists.

Tackling College Basketball's Connection to Pro Football Hall of Fame

College basketball boasts a significant presence during the Pro Football Hall of Fame enshrinement weekend in Canton, Ohio. The following alphabetical list of former college hoopsters comprise more than 10 percent of the HOF members:

DOUG ATKINS, Tennessee
Member of College Football Hall of Fame and Pro Football Hall of Fame. Eight-time Pro Bowl participant played 17 NFL seasons (1953 through 1969) as a defensive end with the Cleveland Browns, Chicago Bears and New Orleans Saints. He was a first-round NFL draft selection (11th pick overall) after competing in two Cotton Bowls and one Sugar Bowl. . . . Atkins originally enrolled on a basketball scholarship at Tennessee, where he played one season of varsity basketball before concentrating on football. The 6-5, 210-pound center averaged 9.9 points per game for the 1950-51 Volunteers, ranking third on the team in scoring. He was selected by the Minneapolis Lakers in the 1953 NBA draft.

MORRIS "RED" BADGRO, Southern California
Member of Pro Football Hall of Fame was an offensive and defensive end with the New York Yankees (1927 and 1928), New York Giants (1930 through 1935) and Brooklyn Dodgers (1936) in a nine-year NFL career that was interrupted by a stint in major league baseball. Hit .257 in two seasons (1929 and 1930) as an outfielder with the St. Louis Browns after becoming a three-time All-Pro with the Giants. . . . Earned varsity basketball letters for the Trojans in 1924-25 and 1926-27. Named to the first five on the All-Pacific Coast Conference team as a forward in 1926-27 when he was USC's MVP.

CLIFF BATTLES, West Virginia Wesleyan College
Halfback became member of College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame. Led the NFL in rushing as a rookie with Boston in 1932 and in his final season with Washington in 1937. First NFL player to rush for 200 yards in a game (215 yards in 16 carries for the Boston Redskins against the New York Giants in 1933). . . . The 6-1, 195-pounder played four seasons of varsity basketball in college.

SAMMY BAUGH, Texas Christian
Member of College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame is considered by many as the finest quarterback in history. Consensus All-American in 1936. Passed for 21,886 yards and 186 touchdowns in 16 years (1937 through 1952) with the Washington Redskins. First-round pick led the NFL in passing five times, in punting five times and in pass interceptions once. Five-time All-Pro participant held almost all of the NFL's passing records when he retired. His 44-yard gallop was the longest run from scrimmage in a 3-2 victory over LSU in the 1936 Sugar Bowl before helping the Horned Frogs defeat Marquette, 16-6, in the 1937 Cotton Bowl. . . . Three-year letterman in basketball at TCU was an honorable mention selection on the All-Southwest Conference team as a senior in 1936-37.

BOBBY BELL, Minnesota
Member of the College Football Hall of Fame and Pro Football Hall of Fame. He was a consensus All-American choice as a tackle and winner of the Outland Award as the nation's outstanding interior lineman in 1962. Selected in the seventh round of the 1963 AFL draft by the Dallas Texans. As a linebacker, the nine-time All-Pro selection intercepted 25 passes in his 12-year career with the Kansas City Chiefs. Bell played in two Super Bowls (I and IV). . . . He became the first African-American basketball player for Minnesota when he appeared in three games in the 1960-61 season, collecting four points and four rebounds.

JIM BROWN, Syracuse
Movie actor is member of College Football Hall of Fame and Pro Football Hall of Fame. Earned All-American honors in football and lacrosse. Averaged 6.2 yards per carry as a senior in 1956 and scored 43 points in a game against Colgate. Co-MVP in 1957 Cotton Bowl. The first-round draft choice established NFL career records for yards rushing (12,312), rushing attempts (2,359), rushing average (5.2 per carry), touchdowns (126) and years leading league in rushing (eight) in his nine seasons (1957 through 1965) with the Cleveland Browns. Nine-time Pro Bowl selection. . . . Averaged 14 points per game for the Orangemen basketball team as a sophomore and 11.3 as a junior. He is reluctant to specifically say why he quit the team before his senior season when Syracuse participated in the NCAA Tournament for the first time, but indicated it was because of a racial quota. "Well, they basically didn't want to start more than two blacks (Vinnie Cohen and Manny Breland) although nobody could outrun, outjump or outshoot me," said Brown, who was selected in the ninth round of the 1957 NBA draft by the Syracuse Nationals. "It really was a tragedy the way athletics were handled there at the time," said Cohen, who went on to become a Washington, D.C., lawyer for 40 years. Excerpt from school guide: "Brownie is a powerfully built youth, who helps under the boards, and is an excellent shot as well." His son Jimmy, a two-time All-MEAC first-team selection, played for three NCAA Tournament teams with North Carolina A&T from 1983 through 1985 after transferring from Southern Cal and was the Aggies' leading scorer as a senior with 18.2 points per game.

JUNIOUS "BUCK" BUCHANAN, Grambling
Pro Football Hall of Famer was the first pick overall in the 1962 AFL draft by the Dallas Texans. The 6-7, 285-pound defensive tackle missed only one game because of injury in his 13-year pro career, which included a streak of eight consecutive seasons being named to either the AFL All-Star Team or NFL Pro Bowl. Instrumental in the Kansas City Chiefs' victory over the heavily-favored Minnesota Vikings in Super Bowl IV. . . . Concentrated solely on football after earning a basketball letter as a freshman in 1958-59. Buchanan and teammate Ernie Ladd both intended on only playing basketball for Grambling before legendary coach Eddie Robinson kept both from transferring by allegedly giving them a key to the cafeteria's kitchen so they could go there and eat whenever they were hungry if the pair would come out for the football squad.

EARL "DUTCH" CLARK, Colorado College
Member of College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame. Halfback and quarterback was named to All-NFL team in six of his seven seasons with Portsmouth (1931 and 1932) and Detroit (1934 through 1938). Led the NFL in scoring in 1932, 1935 and 1936. Player-coach of Detroit in 1937 and 1938) and head coach of Cleveland Rams from 1939 through 1942. First-team QB on the 1928 AP All-American team. Scored at least one touchdown in 21 consecutive college football games. . . . The 6-0, 180-pounder was an All-Rocky Mountain Conference choice in basketball all four seasons (first team as a freshman and senior, second team as a junior and third team as a sophomore). Sketch in Spalding Official Guide: "There isn't a man who could match Clark as a floor guard. The best dribbler ever to bounce a ball in the conference."

GEORGE CONNOR, Holy Cross/Notre Dame
Member of College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame was Outland Trophy winner (outstanding interior lineman) as a tackle on Notre Dame's 1946 national championship team. Consensus All-American football choice in 1946 and 1947. Earned All-America honors as a tackle at Holy Cross in 1943 before transferring to Notre Dame. First-round draft choice by the New York Giants in 1946 (5th pick overall). Played offensive/defensive tackle and linebacker with the Chicago Bears for eight years from 1948 through 1955, earning All-NFL first-team honors from 1949 through 1953. . . . Averaged 2.5 points per game as a 6-3, 225-pound center on the Irish's 1946-47 basketball team. Basketball letterman with Holy Cross in 1943 and 1944.

LEN DAWSON, Purdue
Member of Pro Football Hall of Fame completed 2,136 passes for 28,731 yards and 239 touchdowns in 19 seasons (1957 through 1975) with the Cleveland Browns, Dallas Texans and Kansas City Chiefs. First-round draft choice of the Pittsburgh Steelers went on to become a seven-time All-Pro. Quarterbacked the Chiefs to victory over Minnesota in Super Bowl following 1969 season. . . . Played in two games as a 6-0, 180-pound guard for Purdue's basketball team in the 1956-57 campaign.

MIKE DITKA, Pittsburgh
Member of College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame. The tight end caught 427 passes for 5,812 yards and 43 touchdowns in 12 NFL seasons (1961 through 1972) with the Chicago Bears, Philadelphia Eagles and Dallas Cowboys. The first-round draft choice participated in two Super Bowls with Dallas (V and VI) after playing five Pro Bowls with the Bears (1962 through 1966). Coached Super Bowl winner in 1985 season when the Bears compiled an 18-1 overall record. Registered a 112-68 mark in 11 years (1982-92) as coach of the Bears. Coached the New Orleans Saints in the late 1990s between stints as a network analyst. . . . The 6-2, 205-pound forward averaged 2.8 points and 2.6 rebounds per game in two seasons with the Panthers (1958-59 and 1959-60) after playing in high school under Press Maravich, the father of Pete Maravich, the NCAA's all-time leading scorer. Sketch in school basketball guide: "A natural athlete who never quits. If Pitt wins a few games, there is a good chance he will be in the thick of things."

WILBUR "WEEB" EWBANK, Miami (Ohio)
Member of Pro Football Hall of Fame is the only head coach to win championships in both the NFL (Baltimore Colts in 1958 and 1959) and AFL (New York Jets in 1968). . . . Two-year basketball letterman for Miami (1926-27 and 1927-28) compiled a 5-13 record as head basketball coach at his alma mater in 1938-39 and an 8-12 mark as Brown's head basketball coach in 1946-47.

OTTO GRAHAM, Northwestern
Member of College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame. Quarterback earned All-American honors and finished third in Heisman Trophy voting as a senior in 1943. First-round draft choice of the Detroit Lions in 1944 (4th pick overall). Played 10 seasons (1946 through 1955) with the Cleveland Browns and quarterbacked team to championship game each year (All-America Football Conference from 1946 through 1949 and NFL from 1950 through 1955). Compiled a 105-17-4 playing record in regular-season pro competition, completing 1,464 of 2,626 passes for 23,584 yards and 174 touchdowns. Five-time Pro Bowl selection (1951 through 1955). Compiled a 17-22-3 record as coach of the Washington Redskins in three years from 1966 through 1968. . . . Played three seasons of varsity basketball, finishing second in the Big Ten in scoring as a sophomore (13.1 points per game) and as a junior (15.8). The 6-0 forward earned second-team All-Big Ten honors in 1941-42 and first five honors in 1942-43. Also played for Colgate as a senior. NCAA consensus first-team All-American in 1944 and second-team All-America in 1943. Left Northwestern with the highest scoring total in school history with more than 600 points. Played one season with the Rochester Royals in the National Basketball League, averaging 5.2 points per game for the 1945-46 squad that won the NBL title.

HARRY "BUD" GRANT, Minnesota
Former NFL and CFL end and coach. First-round choice by the Philadelphia Eagles in the 1950 NFL draft. Played with Philadelphia in 1951 and 1952 and Winnipeg of the CFL from 1953 through 1956. Caught 272 passes for 4,197 yards and 20 touchdowns in six pro seasons, leading the CFL in pass receptions in 1953 (with 68), 1954 (49) and 1956 (63). Coached Winnipeg in the CFL (1957-66) and Minnesota in the NFL (1967-85). Coach of four CFL champions and four NFL Super Bowl teams. . . . Third-leading scorer for the Gophers' basketball squad in 1948-49 (8.5 points per game) after being named team MVP the previous season over first-team All-American Jim McIntyre. Finished 13th in the Big Ten Conference in scoring in 1946-47 with a 9.3 average. Played two seasons in the NBA, including a rookie year when he was a member of the Lakers' 1950 championship team.

GEORGE HALAS, Illinois
Member of Pro Football Hall of Fame compiled a 324-151-31 record as an NFL coach, guiding the Chicago Bears to seven NFL titles. His 40-year NFL coaching career also included stints with the Decatur/Chicago Staleys. MVP of the 1919 Rose Bowl as an end for Great Lakes. . . . The 6-0, 175-pound Halas, known for his gritty defense, was a starting guard for the Illini team that won the Big Ten basketball title in 1916-17 with a 10-2 record. He was captain of the squad the next season before entering the armed forces in mid-January. He was also an outfielder in 12 games for the New York Yankees in 1919.

MEL HEIN, Washington State
Hall of Fame charter member played with the New York Giants for 15 years from 1931 through 1945. In 1994, Hein was named to the NFL's all-time 75-year anniversary team. Eight-time All-NFL center scored a touchdown in 1938 when he was named the league's MVP. In college, he intercepted eight passes in a game against Idaho. . . . The 6-2, 220-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1930 after leading WSU to a Rose Bowl bid. He was supervisor of officials for the American Football Conference of the NFL until his retirement.

ELROY "CRAZY LEGS" HIRSCH, Wisconsin/Michigan
Member of College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame. First-round draft choice by Cleveland in 1945 (5th pick overall). Played halfback, defensive back and offensive end as a pro with the Chicago Rockets of the All-America Football Conference from 1946 through 1948 and Los Angeles Rams of the NFL from 1949 through 1957. Caught 387 passes and scored 66 touchdowns as a pro. Played in four NFL championship games. Held the Rams' team record for most touchdown receptions for almost 40 years until it was broken by Isaac Bruce in 2001. . . . Starting center for the Wolverines' basketball team in 1944 while undergoing military training there. Sketch in Michigan guide: "Naval transfer from Wisconsin was a big aid, chiefly through his flaming competitive spirit."

PAUL HORNUNG, Notre Dame
Member of College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame earned All-American honors as a quarterback in 1955 and 1956. Only Heisman Trophy winner to play for a losing team (2-8 as a senior). First pick overall in the NFL draft as a bonus selection. Played nine seasons as a halfback/placekicker with the Green Bay Packers, leading the NFL in scoring in 1959, 1960 and 1961. He rushed for 3,711 yards and 50 touchdowns and caught 130 passes for 1,480 yards and 12 touchdowns. Played in five NFL championship games and two Pro Bowls (1960 and 1961). . . . Played varsity basketball for the Irish as a sophomore, averaging 6.1 points per game in 10 contests. Wrote Hornung in his autobiography Golden Boy: "(Coach Johnny) Jordan liked to tip a few, and sometimes, on the road, he'd take me out drinking with him. He could do that because I wasn't on basketball scholarship."

MARV LEVY, Coe (Iowa)
Hall of Famer (elected in 2001) compiled a 143-112 record as coach of the Kansas City Chiefs (1978-82) and Buffalo Bills (1986-97). He had a 17-5 mark against Don Shula, the winningest coach in NFL history. Posted an 11-8 postseason mark with the Bills en route to becoming the only NFL coach to win four consecutive league or conference championships. But he lost four straight Super Bowls. He was special teams coach of the Washington Redskins' 1972 Super Bowl entrant. Also served as head coach for three colleges--New Mexico (14-6 record in two years in 1958 and 1959), California (8-29-3 record in four years from 1960 through 1963) and William & Mary (23-25-2 in five years from 1964 through 1968). . . . Coached basketball one season for his alma mater in 1955-56. The team compiled a 20-5 record, won the Midwest Collegiate Conference with a 14-2 mark and lost to Stephen F. Austin, 74-62, in the first round of the NAIA Tournament. Levy earned a basketball letter with the 1949-50 Coe squad that posted a 3-14 mark.

RONNIE LOTT, Southern California
Unanimous All-American defensive back played 15 seasons in the NFL with the San Francisco 49ers, Los Angeles Raiders, New York Jets and Kansas City Chiefs (1981 through 1995). Intercepted 14 passes for the Trojans (two for touchdowns) before intercepting 63 passes in regular-season NFL competition and nine in the postseason. First-round draft choice played in 10 Pro Bowl games and four Super Bowls. . . . Collected nine assists, four points and three rebounds in six games for the Trojans' basketball squad as a junior in 1979-80.

JOHN MACKEY, Syracuse
Three-time All-Pro tight end became an NFL Hall of Famer after being a second-round draft choice by the Baltimore Colts in 1963. The 6-2, 220-pounder caught 331 passes for 5,236 yards and 38 touchdowns in 10 seasons. Six of his nine TD catches in 1966 came on plays of more than 50 yards. He grabbed a deflected pass from Johnny Unitas for a 75-yard TD in Super Bowl V after having three pass receptions in Super Bowl III. . . . Mackey collected 28 points and 28 rebounds in six basketball games with the Orangemen in 1960-61.

GEORGE MUSSO, Millikin (Ill.)
Member of Pro Football Hall of Fame played for seven divisional winners and four NFL title teams. The 6-2, 270-pound guard and tackle played for 12 seasons (1933 through 1944) with the Chicago Bears. As a collegian, he played against future President Ronald Reagan, who attended Eureka. As a member of the Bears in 1935, Musso played against future President Gerald Ford in the Bears-College All-Star Game in Chicago. . . . Three-year basketball letterman in college.

EARLE "GREASY" NEALE, West Virginia Wesleyan College
Pro Football Hall of Famer compiled a 63-43 record as coach of the Philadelphia Eagles for 10 years from 1941 through 1950, winning back-to-back NFL titles by shutting out their opponents in championship games in 1948 and 1949. Guided Washington and Jefferson (Pa.) to the 1922 Rose Bowl before coaching Virginia and West Virginia. He starred as an end on Jim Thorpe's pre-World War I Canton Bulldogs. Also played as a major league outfielder with the Cincinnati Reds for eight years from 1916 to 1924, hitting .357 in the infamous "Black Sox" 1919 World Series. . . . Class of 1915 at WVWC.

ERNIE NEVERS, Stanford
Member of College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame. He was a consensus All-American selection as a senior fullback in 1925 before rushing for 37 touchdowns in five NFL seasons with the Duluth Eskimos (1926 and 1927) and Chicago Cardinals (1929 through 1931). Set NFL record with a 40-point game against the Chicago Bears in 1929. Co-MVP of the 1925 Rose Bowl. . . . Compiled a 6-12 pitching record in three seasons (1926 through 1928) with the St. Louis Browns. He yielded two of Babe Ruth's record-tying 60 home runs in 1927. . . . Lettered in basketball for Stanford as a sophomore and junior. Named to the All-Pacific Coast Conference second five as a junior in 1924-25. Historians say he was a fine shooter, an excellent dribbler, tough on defense, and generally a terrifying figure for the opposition. The Spalding Basketball Guide said: "He is almost as good a basketball player as he is a football star. With his speed, weight and general all-around ability, he was a stellar performer."

CLARENCE "ACE" PARKER, Duke
College Hall of Famer led the Blue Devils to a three-year record of 24-5 in the mid-1930s, serving as team captain in his final season in 1936 when they went 9-1. After playing a variety of positions (quarterback, tailback, defensive back and punter), was a second-round choice in the 1937 NFL draft (13th overall). Passed for 3,935 yards and 22 touchdowns, rushed for 1,108 yards and 10 TDs and punted for a 39.5-yard average with the Brooklyn Dodgers/Boston Yanks in six years from 1937 through 1941 and 1945. Three-time consensus All-Pro led the NFL in passing yards in 1938 with 865. He paced the league with six interceptions in 1940 when he was named NFL Most Valuable Player. . . . Basketball letterman for the Blue Devils in 1935-36. Also played major league baseball with the Philadelphia Athletics.

ART SHELL, Maryland-Eastern Shore
Member of Pro Football Hall of Fame was head coach of the Los Angeles Raiders for six years from 1989 through 1994. Offensive tackle for the Raiders from 1968 through 1982 played in eight Pro Bowls (1973 through 1979 and 1981) after being picked in the third round. Participated in Super Bowls XI and XV. . . . Two-year basketball letterman as a 6-5, 265-pound center at school that was then known as Maryland State College. Sketch from school guide: "Pure muscle. Amazing agility. Uncompromising under the boards, nobody pushes big Art without a battle."

ROGER STAUBACH, Navy
Member of College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame won Heisman Trophy in 1963. Passed for 3,571 yards and rushed for 682 in his career at Navy (1962 through 1964). Quarterback in four Super Bowls during his 11 seasons with the Dallas Cowboys. Six-time Pro Bowl selection passed for 22,700 yards and 153 touchdowns after being a 10th-round draft choice in 1964. . . . Averaged 9.3 points per game for the 1961-62 Navy plebe (freshman) basketball team. The 6-2, 190-pound forward scored five points in four games for Midshipmen varsity squad the next season.

JOE STYDAHAR, West Virginia
Member of College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame. Earned All-American honors as a 6-4, 230-pound tackle in 1935. Played nine seasons (1936 through 1942, 1945, and 1946) with the Chicago Bears after being their first-round pick in the first NFL draft. Named to All-NFL team four times from 1937 through 1940. Coached Los Angeles Rams (1950-51) and Chicago Cardinals (1953-54), leading Rams to 1951 NFL title. In 1934, he he set a school record with seven blocked punts, including three for touchdowns. Participated in both the East-West Shrine Game and College Football All-Star Game in Chicago. . . . Three-year basketball letterman was captain of the Mountaineers' 1934-35 team that compiled a 16-6 record. Selected as a center to the first five on West Virginia's Pre-World War II team that was named as part of the university's all-time basketball squad.

EMLEN TUNNELL, Toledo
Member of Pro Football Hall of Fame played in nine Pro Bowl games (1951 through 1958 and 1960). Defensive back established career records for interceptions (79), yards gained on interceptions (1,282) and yards gained on punt returns (2,209) in 14 seasons (1948 through 1961) with the New York Giants and Green Bay Packers. . . . The 6-1, 180-pound forward was a top reserve for the 1942-43 Toledo basketball team that compiled a 22-4 record and finished second in the NIT.

DOAK WALKER, Southern Methodist
Member of both the College Football and Pro Football Hall of Fame. SMU legend was a three-time All-American halfback and the school's only Heisman Trophy winner (as a junior in 1948). Finished third in Heisman voting in 1947 and 1949. Scored 38 touchdowns in his four-year SMU career, including two kickoff returns in 1947. Walker rushed for 1,928 yards in college, passed for 1,654, caught passes for 454 and returned eight interceptions for 176. He was also a punter and placekicker for the Mustangs. Co-MVP in back-to-back Cotton Bowls (1948 and 1949). First-round choice by the New York Bulldogs in the 1949 NFL draft (3rd pick overall). Walker rushed for 1,520 yards and 12 touchdowns in six years with the Detroit Lions (1950 through 1955), leading the NFL in scoring as a rookie (128 points) and in his final season (96). Member of NFL championship teams in 1952 and 1953 scored on a 62-yard run in the '52 title game. Five-time Pro Bowl selection (1951-52-54-55-56). . . . Walker was a basketball letterman in 1945-46 with SMU as a freshman.

LARRY RAYFIELD WRIGHT, Fort Valley State (Ga.)
Seventh-round draft choice played with the Dallas Cowboys for 13 years from 1967 through 1979. All-Pro offensive tackle six straight seasons from 1971 through 1976. Caught a touchdown pass as a tight end in 1968. Played in five Super Bowls (following 1970, 1971, 1975, 1977 and 1978 campaigns). . . . The 6-6, 245-pounder, an All-SIAC basketball player, averaged 17 ppg and 15 rpg as a junior and 21 ppg and 17.4 rpg as a senior.

Honors Court: McDermott May Become First MVP in Two Different Leagues

There is every indication that Creighton forward Doug McDermott could become the first individual to be undisputed Most Valuable Player in two different NCAA Division I conferences. McDermott was a two-time league MVP for the Bluejays, who left the Missouri Valley to join the Big East.

Virginia center Ralph Sampson had the lowest scoring average (17.6 points per game from 1980-81 through 1982-83) among the 29 players during spans in the last 50-plus years when they captured three or four MVP awards in a Division I conference. Sampson's average was 26.6 ppg lower than LSU guard Pete Maravich's NCAA-record mark (44.2 from 1967-68 through 1969-70).

No player from a power conference has achieved the three-time feat since Kansas' Danny Manning in the Big Eight from 1985-86 through 1987-88. Ohio State's Jerry Lucas, auctioning off much of his basketball memorabilia, probably doesn't care that he might have been the first three-time DI conference MVP (Big Ten in early 1960s). Prior to a foot injury early last season, Lehigh's C.J. McCollum could have joined the following chronological list of standouts who became player of the year in a DI alliance three or four seasons since the early 1960s:

Player Pos. School Conference (Seasons) MVP Summary
Jerry Lucas C Ohio State Big Ten (1960-62) Averaged 24.3 ppg and 17.2 rpg while shooting 62.4% from the floor over three-year span.
Fred Hetzel F-C Davidson Southern (1963-65) Averaged 25.7 ppg and 13.8 rpg while shooting 55.4% from the floor over three-year span.
Clem Haskins G-F Western Kentucky Ohio Valley (1965-67) Averaged 22.1 ppg and 10.6 rpg over three-year span.
Pete Maravich G Louisiana State Southeastern (1968-70) Averaged 44.2 ppg, 6.4 rpg and 5.1 apg over three-year span.
Gene Phillips F Southern Methodist Southwest (1969-71) Averaged 26.1 ppg and 7.5 rpg while shooting 81.7% from the free-throw line over three-year span.
David Thompson F North Carolina State Atlantic Coast (1973-75) Averaged 26.8 ppg and 8.1 rpg while shooting 55.3% from the floor over three-year span.
Bernard King F Tennessee Southeastern (1975-77) Averaged 25.8 ppg and 13.2 rpg while shooting 59% from the floor over three-year span.
Bill Cartwright C San Francisco West Coast (1977-79) Averaged 21.5 ppg and 11.5 rpg while shooting 60.4% from the floor over three-year MVP span.
Michael Brooks F La Salle East Coast (1978-80) Averaged 24.1 ppg and 12.5 rpg while shooting 55.4% from the floor over three-year MVP span.
Harry Kelly F Texas Southern Southwestern Athletic (1980-83) Averaged 27.9 ppg and 9.9 rpg over four-year span.
Ralph Sampson C Virginia Atlantic Coast (1981-83) Averaged 17.6 ppg, 11.5 rpg and 3.1 bpg while shooting 57.5% from the floor over three-year MVP span.
Joe Binion F North Carolina A&T Mid-Eastern Athletic (1982-84) Averaged 19.8 ppg and 10.8 rpg while shooting 50.9% from the floor over three-year MVP span.
Willie Jackson F Centenary Trans America Athletic (1982-84) Averaged 23.9 ppg and 9.2 rpg over three-year MVP span.
Alfredrick Hughes F Loyola (Ill.) Midwestern Collegiate (1983-85) Averaged 26.5 ppg and 8.8 rpg over three-year MVP span.
Chris Mullin G-F St. John's Big East (1983-85) Averaged 20.4 ppg and 4.3 rpg while shooting 55.4% from the floor and 86.5% from the free-throw line over three-year MVP span.
Wayman Tisdale C Oklahoma Big Eight (1983-85) Averaged 25.6 ppg and 10.1 rpg while shooting 57.8% from the floor over three-year span.
Larry Krystkowiak F Montana Big Sky (1984-86) Averaged 20.4 ppg and 10.7 rpg while shooting 57.1% from the floor and 80.1% from the free-throw line over three-year MVP span.
Reggie Lewis F Northeastern ECAC North (1985-87) Averaged 23.7 ppg and 8.5 rpg over three-year MVP span.
David Robinson C Navy Colonial Athletic (1985-87) Averaged 24.8 ppg, 12.2 rpg and 4.8 bpg while shooting 61.2% from the floor over three-year MVP span.
Danny Manning F Kansas Big Eight (1986-88) Averaged 21.7 ppg and 8.2 rpg while shooting 59.9% from the floor over three-year MVP span.
Lionel Simmons F La Salle Metro Atlantic Athletic (1988-90) Averaged 26 ppg and 11.3 rpg over three-year MVP span.
Clarence Weatherspoon F Southern Mississippi Metro (1990-92) Averaged 19.3 ppg and 10.3 rpg while shooting 58.4% from the floor over three-year MVP span.
Tony Dunkin F Coastal Carolina Big South (1990-93) Averaged 20.7 ppg and 7 rpg while shooting 52.2% from the floor and 41.2% from beyond the three-point arc over four-year span.
Gary Trent F Ohio University Mid-American (1993-95) Averaged 22.7 ppg and 11.3 rpg while shooting 57.3% from the floor over three-year span.
Keith Van Horn F Utah Western Athletic (1995-97) Averaged 21.5 ppg and 8.9 rpg while shooting 52.4% from the floor and 87% from the free-throw line over three-year MVP span.
George Evans F George Mason Colonial Athletic (1999-2001) Averaged 17.9 ppg and 8.3 rpg while shooting 58.4% from the floor over three-year MVP span.
David West F-C Xavier Atlantic 10 (2001-03) Averaged 18.8 ppg and 10.8 rpg while shooting 53.1% from the floor over three-year MVP span.
Taylor Coppenrath F Vermont America East (2003-05) Averaged 23.1 ppg and 7.5 rpg over three-year MVP span.
Nick Fazekas F Nevada Western Athletic (2005-07) Averaged 21 ppg and 10.3 rpg while shooting 53.2% from the floor and 82.3% from the free-throw line over three-year MVP span.
Caleb Green F Oral Roberts Mid-Continent (2005-07) Averaged 20.2 ppg and 9.1 rpg while shooting 52.6% from the floor over three-year MVP span.

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Score Big in August MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only four percent of active MLB players earned college diplomas.

Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is an August calendar involving such versatile athletes:

AUGUST
31 - P Mike Flanagan (averaged 13.9 ppg for Massachusetts' 15-1 freshman basketball squad in 1971-72) traded by the Baltimore Orioles to the Toronto Blue Jays in 1987. Toronto released knuckleballer Phil Niekro to make room on roster for Flanagan. . . . 1B-OF Dick Gernert (Temple letterman in 1948-49 when averaging 2.7 ppg) purchased from the Chicago Cubs by the Detroit Tigers in 1960. . . . Dallas Green (Delaware's second-leading scorer and rebounder in 1954-55) named manager of the Philadelphia Phillies in 1979. . . . Brooklyn Dodgers 1B Gil Hodges (played for Oakland City, IN, in 1947 and 1948) swatted four homers in a 19-3 romp over the Boston Braves in 1950. . . . 1B-OF Frank Howard (two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection when leading Ohio State in scoring and rebounding in 1956-57 and 1957-58) purchased from the Texas Rangers by the Detroit Tigers in 1972. . . . P Bill Krueger (led WCAC in free-throw percentage in 1975-76 with Portland) traded by the Minnesota Twins to Montreal Expos in 1992. It is one of four seasons Krueger split time between the A.L. and N.L. during his career. . . . 2B Davey Lopes (NAIA All-District 15 selection for Iowa Wesleyan averaged 16.9 ppg as a freshman in 1964-65 and 12.1 as a sophomore in 1965-66) shipped by the Oakland Athletics to the Chicago Cubs in 1984 to complete an earlier deal. . . . Chicago White Sox P Ted Lyons (two-time All-SWC first-team selection for Baylor in early 1920s) lifted after seven innings and 15 hits opposing the St. Louis Browns in 1941. It is Lyons' final incomplete MLB game as he finished three subsequent starts in 1941, all 20 in 1942 and all five in 1946 (after serving in U.S. military during World War II). . . . SS Gene Michael (Kent State's leading scorer with 14 ppg in 1957-58) banged out four of the New York Yankees' 25 hits in an 18-6 romp over the Chicago White Sox in 1974. . . . A three-run, ninth-inning homer by OF Wally Moon (averaged 4.3 ppg with Texas A&M in 1948-49 and 1949-50) gave the Los Angeles Dodgers a 5-2 victory against the San Francisco Giants in 1959 when teammate Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) broke Dizzy Dean's N.L. mark and tied Bob Feller's MLB record of 18 strikeouts in a single game. . . . OF Lyle Mouton (starter in LSU's backcourt with All-American Chris Jackson for 1989 NCAA playoff team) shipped by the Detroit Tigers to the Houston Astros as part of a conditional deal in 2001. . . . 3B Graig Nettles (shot 87.8% from free-throw line for San Diego State in 1963-64) belted two homers to power the New York Yankees to a 5-4 victory against Seattle in 1977. . . . OF Irv Noren (player of year for California junior college state champion Pasadena City in 1945) awarded off waivers from the Kansas City Athletics to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1957. . . . P Denny Riddleberger (averaged 5.7 ppg and 2.5 rpg for Old Dominion in 1965-66) traded by the Pittsburgh Pirates with cash to the Washington Senators for P George Brunet in 1970. . . . Closer Lee Smith (averaged 3.4 ppg and 1.9 rpg with Northwestern State in 1976-77) traded by the St. Louis Cardinals to the New York Yankees in 1993. . . . DH Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) purchased from the Minnesota Twins by the Cleveland Indians in 1994.
30 - Tim Cullen (starting guard for Santa Clara in 1962-63 when he averaged 10 ppg) tied a MLB single-inning record with three errors in the eighth frame for the Washington Senators against the Oakland A's in 1969 one year before he led A.L. second basemen in fielding percentage. Washington 1B-OF Frank Howard (two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection when he led Ohio State in scoring and rebounding in 1956-57 and 1957-58) contributed four hits in the Senators' 11-3 victory. . . . 2B Jack Dittmer (played basketball for Iowa in 1949-50) supplied one of the Milwaukee Braves' eight homers in a 19-4 romp over the Pittsburgh Pirates in the opener of a 1953 doubleheader. . . . INF Tim Nordbrook (letterman in 1968-69 for Loyola, LA) purchased from the Chicago White Sox by the Toronto Blue Jays in 1977. . . . Bill Virdon (played for Drury, MO, in 1949) fired as manager of the Montreal Expos in 1984.
29 - In 1951, New York Giants P Jim Hearn (Georgia Tech letterman in 1941-42) defeated the Pittsburgh Pirates for the eighth straight time. . . . Brooklyn Dodgers 1B Gil Hodges (played for Oakland City, IN, in 1947 and 1948) drove in seven runs and whacked two homers in a 13-1 victory against the Cincinnati Reds in 1951. . . . In 1966, Chicago Cubs P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) registered the final triumph of his 19-year Hall of Fame career. . . . INF Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in Pacific Coast Conference both of his seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) hit for the cycle against the St. Louis Cardinals in the opener of a 1948 doubleheader. . . . San Diego Padres OF Will Venable (All-Ivy League first-team selection as a junior and second-team choice as a senior averaged 9.3 ppg under Princeton coach John Thompson III from 2001-02 through 2004-05) tripled in his first MLB at-bat in 2008.
28 - New York Yankees 1B Tony Clark (San Diego State's leading scorer in WAC games in 1991-92) slugged three homers in an 18-6 trouncing of the Toronto Blue Jays in 2004. . . . Detroit Tigers RF Jim Northrup (second-leading scorer and third-leading rebounder for Alma, MI, in 1958-59) went 6-for-6 against the Oakland A's in 1969. Northrup's 13th-inning homer over the roof won the game, 5-3. . . . P Jeff Shaw (freshman guard for Rio Grande, OH, squad compiling a 31-5 record and reaching second round of 1985 NAIA Tournament) traded by the Montreal Expos to the Chicago White Sox in 1995.
27 - In 1964, California Angels 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading scorer in 1945-46) became the 23rd player to reach the 300-homer plateau when he connected at Kansas City. . . . Starting on two days rest, Brooklyn Dodgers P Ralph Branca (sixth-leading scorer for NYU in 1943-44) spun a two-hit shutout against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1951, entering the ninth inning with a no-hitter. . . . In his second MLB start, Brooklyn Dodgers P Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) fanned 14 Cincinnati Reds in a 7-0 two-hit shutout in 1955. . . . Hall of Fame P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) resigned as Cincinnati Reds manager in 1918 to accept a commission as a captain in the chemical warfare branch of the Army during World War I. . . . Chicago White Sox P Gary Peters (played for Grove City, PA, in mid-1950s) hurled an 11-inning shutout against the Boston Red Sox in the nightcap of a 1967 doubleheader. . . . Pinch-hitter Jimmy Stewart (All-Volunteer State Athletic Conference selection for Austin Peay State in 1959-60 and 1960-61) stroked a bases-loaded triple to spur the Cincinnati Reds to an 8-7 victory against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1971.
26 - Boston Red Sox P Boo Ferriss (Mississippi State letterman in 1941) posted his 20th victory by doubling home the game-winning run in a 4-3 verdict over the Philadelphia Athletics in the opener of a 1945 doubleheader. . . . Dallas Green (Delaware's second-leading scorer and rebounder in 1954-55) fired as manager of the New York Mets in 1996. . . . New York Giants P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) tossed his seventh shutout of the 1902 campaign. Twelve years later, Mathewson hurled a two-hit shutout against the St. Louis Cardinals in the nightcap of a twinbill to register his 20th triumph in 1914. . . . In 1977, 3B Graig Nettles (shot 87.8% from free-throw line for San Diego State in 1963-64) stroked a two-run triple in the ninth inning to lift the New York Yankees to their 12th win in 13 contests (6-5 against the Texas Rangers). . . . P Dennis Rasmussen (sixth-man for Creighton averaged 5.1 ppg in three seasons from 1977-78 through 1979-80) traded by the New York Yankees to the Cincinnati Reds in 1987. . . . Baltimore Orioles P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47), released earlier in the year by the Yankees, outdueled New York star lefthander Whitey Ford, 2-1, in 1962. . . . In 1939, Cincinnati Reds 3B Billy Werber (first Duke All-American in 1929-30) became the initial player to bat in a televised major league game (against the Brooklyn Dodgers).
25 - New York Yankees Hall of Fame OF Earle Combs (three-year captain for Eastern Kentucky) incurred a severe shoulder injury colliding with a teammate in the outfield, contributing to Combs retiring following the 1935 campaign. . . . Boston Red Sox P Boo Ferriss (Mississippi State letterman in 1941) topped the visiting Cleveland Indians, 2-1, to improve his 1946 Fenway Park mark to 13-0. . . . In 1982, San Diego Padres rookie OF Tony Gwynn (All-WAC second-team selection with San Diego State in 1979-80 and 1980-81) broke his wrist diving for a fly ball en route to falling short of a .300 batting average for the only time in his 20-year career (.289). . . . OF David Justice (led Thomas More, KY, in assists in 1984-85) and Atlanta Braves teammate Fred McGriff whacked back-to-back homers for the second time in 10 days in 1993. . . . New York Giants P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) reached the 20-win plateau for the seventh straight season in 1909. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates OF Gary Redus (J.C. player for Athens, AL, and father of Centenary/South Alabama hoopster) hit for the cycle against the Cincinnati Reds in 1989. . . . New York Yankees 3B Red Rolfe (played briefly with Dartmouth in 1927-28 and 1929-30) extended his streak of scoring at least one run to 18 straight contests in 1939.
24 - Brooklyn Dodgers P Ralph Branca (sixth-leading scorer for NYU in 1943-44) hurled a three-hit shutout against the Chicago Cubs in 1951, striking out 10 and walking none. . . . San Francisco Giants P Ed Halicki (set Monmouth's single-game rebounding record with 40 as a junior in 1970-71 before leading Hawks in scoring with 21 ppg as a senior) hurled a no-hitter against the New York Mets in 1975. . . . SS Doc Lavan (played for Hope, MI, from 1908 through 1910) purchased from the St. Louis Browns by the Philadelphia Athletics in 1919. . . . New York Giants OF Hank Lieber (played for Arizona in 1931) tied a MLB single-inning record by lashing two homers during an eight-run uprising in the second frame against the Chicago Cubs in 1935. . . . Los Angeles Dodgers 2B Davey Lopes (NAIA All-District 15 selection for Iowa Wesleyan averaged 16.9 ppg as a freshman in 1964-65 and 12.1 as a sophomore in 1965-66) stole five bases in a 3-0 triumph against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1974. The next year, Lopes extended his MLB record streak to 38 consecutive successful steal attempts before he was thrown out by Montreal Expos C Gary Carter in the 12th inning. . . . Philadelphia Phillies P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) had a streak of 13 consecutive complete games against the Milwaukee Braves snapped in 1954. . . . In 1952, Brooklyn Dodgers P Preacher Roe (played for Harding, AR, in late 1930s) registered his 10th straight victory against the St. Louis Cardinals, 10-4.
23 - 3B Gene Freese (captain of 1952 NAIA Tournament team for West Liberty WV) purchased from the Pittsburgh Pirates by the Chicago White Sox in 1965. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates SS Dick Groat (two-time All-American with Duke in 1950-51 and 1951-52 when finishing among nation's top five scorers each season) knocked in the winning run in the 11th inning of the nightcap of a 1959 doubleheader against the Los Angeles Dodgers to give reliever Elroy Face his 16th victory without a loss. . . . Los Angeles Dodgers 1B Gil Hodges (played for Oakland City, IN, in 1947 and 1948) hammered his 14th career grand slam to set a new N.L. record. It was the first grand slam in the history of the franchise on the West Coast. . . . Utilityman Jimmy Stewart (All-Volunteer State Athletic Conference selection for Austin Peay State in 1959-60 and 1960-61) slugged a three-run, pinch-hit homer off Hall of Famer Tom Seaver to spark the Cincinnati Reds to a 7-5 triumph against the New York Mets in 1970. . . . P Tom Zachary (Guilford, NC, letterman in 1916) awarded on waivers from the Washington Senators to the New York Yankees in 1928.
22 - Pittsburgh Pirates OF Carson "Skeeter" Bigbee (Oregon letterman in 1915), playing in his third straight extra-inning game against Brooklyn, went to bat 11 times in a 22-inning marathon in 1917. . . . P Jim Konstanty (Syracuse player in late 1930s) awarded on waivers from the Philadelphia Phillies to the New York Yankees in 1954. . . . Chicago Cubs OF Bill Nicholson (played for Washington College, MD, in mid-1930s) socked a game-winning homer in the bottom of the 11th inning in a 5-4 decision over the Cincinnati Reds in 1942. . . . INF Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in Pacific Coast Conference both of his seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) contributed five hits in the nightcap of a 1951 doubleheader to spark the Brooklyn Dodgers to their 14th straight victory against the St. Louis Cardinals.
21 - Boston Red Sox INF Jack Barry (letterman for Holy Cross in 1908) tied a MLB record with four sacrifices at Cleveland in 1916. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates P Dave Giusti (made 6 of 10 field-goal attempts in two games for Syracuse in 1959-60) twirled a shutout and knocked in six runs with a pair of bases-loaded doubles in an 11-0 rout of the Cincinnati Reds in 1966. . . . Monte Irvin (played for Lincoln, PA, 1 1/2 years in late 1930s) named special assistant to Commissioner William Eckert in 1968. . . . Chicago White Sox P Ted Lyons (two-time All-SWC first-team selection for Baylor in early 1920s) hurled a no-hitter against the Boston Red Sox in 1926. Lyons required only 67 minutes and 81 pitches. . . . 3B Graig Nettles (shot 87.8% from free-throw line for San Diego State in 1963-64) accounted for both of the New York Yankees' runs via a homer and double in a 2-1 triumph against the Texas Rangers in 1977. . . . P Floyd Newkirk (Hall of Fame selection at Illinois College) made his lone MLB appearance with the New York Yankees in 1934. . . . Pitchers Paul Reuschel (Western Illinois' leading rebounder in 1966-67 with 15.2 per game) and Rick Reuschel collaborated on a 7-0 victory for the Chicago Cubs against the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1975 - the first time brothers combined on a shutout. Paul relieved in the seventh inning after Rick was forced to leave because of a blister on his finger.
20 - Kansas City Athletics OF Bob Cerv (ranked fourth on Nebraska's career scoring list in 1949-50 when finishing his career) swatted three homers in an 11-10 defeat against the Boston Red Sox in 1959. . . . P Bill Connors (averaged 6 ppg and 2.3 rpg for Syracuse in 1960-61) purchased from the Chicago Cubs by the New York Mets in 1967. . . . Chicago White Sox P Bob Keegan (Bucknell letterman in 1941-42 and 1942-43), utilizing a new slow delivery, hurled a 6-0 no-hitter against the Washington Senators in 1957. . . . SS Don Kessinger (three-time All-SEC selection for Mississippi from 1961-62 through 1963-64 while finishing among nation's top 45 scorers each year) traded by the St. Louis Cardinals to the Chicago White Sox in 1977. . . . 2B Davey Lopes (NAIA All-District 15 selection for Iowa Wesleyan averaged 16.9 ppg as a freshman in 1964-65 and 12.1 as a sophomore in 1965-66) set a Los Angeles Dodgers record with 15 total bases in an 18-8 romp over the Chicago Cubs in 1974 (three homers, double and single). . . . Philadelphia Phillies P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) had his 15-game winning streak against the Pittsburgh Pirates snapped in 1953. . . . Brooklyn Dodgers SS Tommy Brown (17 years old) became the youngest player to hit a MLB homer in 1945 when he connected off Pittsburgh Pirates P Preacher Roe (played for Harding, AR, in late 1930s). . . . Birdie Tebbetts (played for Providence in 1932) resigned as manager of the Cleveland Indians in 1966. . . . New York Yankees OF Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) walloped the 300th homer of his career in 1986.
19 - 2B Marv Breeding (played for Samford in mid-1950s) purchased from the Los Angeles Dodgers by the Baltimore Orioles in 1964. . . . Philadelphia Phillies P Andy Karl (Manhattan letterman from 1933 through 1935) saved slugger Jimmie Foxx's only MLB pitching decision in 1945 (6-2 win over the Cincinnati Reds). . . . New York Giants P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) had his 22-game winning streak against the Cincinnati Reds snapped in 1911. . . . OF Gary Redus (J.C. player for Athens, AL, and father of Centenary/South Alabama performer) traded by the Chicago White Sox to the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1988. . . . 1B-OF Norm Siebern (member of Southwest Missouri State's back-to-back NAIA Tournament titlists in 1952 and 1953) supplied a pinch-hit, bases-loaded triple to help the Boston Red Sox outlasted the California Angels, 12-11, in 1967. . . . Bill Virdon (played for Drury, MO, in 1949) hired as manager by the Houston Astros in 1975.
18 - P Ray Burris (played for Southwestern Oklahoma State) purchased from the New York Yankees by the New York Mets in 1979. . . . INF Charlie Gelbert (scored at least 125 points each of his last three seasons with Lebanon Valley, PA, in late 1920s) awarded on waivers from the Washington Senators to the Boston Red Sox in 1940. . . . Dallas Green (Delaware's second-leading scorer and rebounder in 1954-55) fired as manager of the Philadelphia Phillies in 1989. . . . New York Giants CF Hank Lieber (played for Arizona in 1931) collected a homer, triple and two doubles in an 8-4 triumph against the Cincinnati Reds in 1935. . . . P Steve Renko (averaged 9.9 ppg and 5.8 rpg as Kansas sophomore in 1963-64) traded by the Chicago Cubs to the Chicago White Sox in 1977.
17 - 1B Ron Allen (Youngstown State's scoring and rebounding leader as a sophomore in 1961-62) secured his only MLB hit, a ninth-inning homer at San Diego in 1972, after the brother of standout 1B Dick Allen replaced ejected St. Louis Cardinals teammate Joe Torre. . . . Bing Devine (Washington, MO, letterman in mid-1930s) fired as general manager of the St. Louis Cardinals in 1964 before they go on to win the World Series against the New York Yankees. . . . OF Curt Flood and 3B Gene Freese (captain of 1952 NAIA Tournament team for West Liberty WV), the first two St. Louis Cardinals batters, hammer back-to-back home runs off Los Angeles Dodgers LHP Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) in the opener of a 1958 doubleheader. . . . Baltimore Orioles P Dick Hall (averaged 11.9 ppg in 1948-49, 13.4 in 1949-50 and 15.4 in 1950-51 for Swarthmore's Southern Division champions in Middle Atlantic states Conference) provided a perfect inning of relief against the Kansas City Athletics in 1963, giving him 28 consecutive batters retired in a span of five appearances. . . . In 1985, Reggie Jackson of the New York Yankees, moving past Willie McCovey and Ted Williams on the all-time homer list, swatted his 522nd career round-tripper off Oakland A's P Bill Krueger (led WCAC in free-throw percentage in 1975-76 with Portland). . . . New York Giants P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) hurled his second straight three-hit shutout against Chicago in 1905.
16 - Los Angeles Dodgers P Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) improved his record to 19-5 with a 3-0 shutout against the St. Louis Cardinals but will miss the remainder of the 1964 season because of an elbow injury incurred while sliding back into second base earlier in the month. . . . In 1911, New York Giants P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) defeated the Cincinnati Reds for the 22nd straight time.
15 - Milwaukee Braves P Gene Conley (All-PCC first-team selection led North Division in scoring in 1949-50 as a Washington State sophomore) won his ninth consecutive contest in 1954 (2-1 against the Chicago Cubs). Seven years later, Conley was with the Boston Red Sox in 1961 when he tossed a shutout and hit a homer in an 8-0 shelling of the Cleveland Indians. . . . 1B Walt Dropo (Connecticut's first player ever to average 20 points for a season with 21.7 ppg in 1942-43) was hospitalized after being beaned in 1950 but the Boston Red Sox began a streak of winning 27 of their next 30 games. . . . New York Giants P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) blanked opponents going into extra innings but wound up losing each contest - against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1910 and Boston Braves in 1914. . . . OF Greasy Neale (West Virginia Wesleyan College hoopster graduated in 1915) pilfered second, third and home in the ninth inning to help the Cincinnati Reds upend the New York Giants, 4-0, in 1919. . . . OF Bill Nicholson (played for Washington College, MD, in the mid-1930s) socked three homers, two doubles and a single but the Chicago Cubs dropped both ends of a 1942 doubleheader against the Pittsburgh Pirates. . . . OF Randy Winn (Santa Clara backcourtmate of eventual two-time NBA Most Valuable Player Steve Nash in 1993-94), playing his first home game with the San Francisco Giants, hit for the cycle against the Cincinnati Reds in 2005.
14 - Cleveland Indians SS Lou Boudreau (leading scorer for Illinois' 1937 Big Ten Conference co-champion) suffered a broken right ankle in a collision at second base in 1945. . . . P Ralph Branca (sixth-leading scorer for NYU in 1943-44) won his first and only decision with the New York Yankees (3-1 over the Boston Red Sox in 1954). . . . St. Louis Cardinals P Bob Gibson (Creighton's leading scorer in 1955-56 and 1956-57) hurled a no-hitter at Pittsburgh in 1971. . . . Texas Rangers 1B Mike Hargrove (Northwestern Oklahoma State basketball letterman) supplied a leadoff homer for the second straight game in 1977. . . . P Dave Madison (letterman for LSU from 1939-40 through 1942-43) traded by the St. Louis Browns to the Detroit Tigers in an eight-player swap in 1952. . . . In 1991, St. Louis Cardinals reliever Lee Smith (averaged 3.4 ppg and 1.9 rpg with Northwestern State in 1976-77) reached the 30-save plateau for the sixth time en route to leading the N.L. with 47. . . . Birdie Tebbetts (played for Providence in 1932) resigned as manager of the Cincinnati Reds in 1958. . . . St. Louis Cardinals 1B Bill White (played two years with Hiram, OH, in early 1950s) hit for the cycle in the opener of a 1960 doubleheader against the Pittsburgh Pirates. . . . In 1991, California Angels RF-DH Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) slugged the 400th homer of his career.
13 - Chicago White Sox P Dave DeBusschere (three-time All-American for Detroit from 1959-60 through 1961-62) tossed a shutout against the Cleveland Indians in 1963. . . . In 1955, Cleveland Indians OF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) made his first miscue after an A.L.-record 165 errorless games. . . . Boston Red Sox P Boo Ferriss (Mississippi State letterman in 1941) won his eighth straight game for victory No. 20 in 1946. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates P Dave Giusti (made 6 of 10 field-goal attempts in two games for Syracuse in 1959-60) hurled a one-hitter to beat the Chicago Cubs, 1-0, in 1966. . . . New York Giants P Jim Hearn (Georgia Tech letterman in 1941-42) shut out the Philadelphia Phillies' Whiz Kids in 1950. . . . C Don Prohovich (member of Holy Cross' 1954 NIT champion) traded with $15,000 by the White Sox to the Cubs for utilityman Earl Averill Jr. in 1960. Deal was the first swap of players between the two Chicago franchises. . . . Cincinnati Reds P Eppa Rixey (Virginia letterman in 1911-12 and 1913-14) drove in two runs and blanked the Pittsburgh Pirates, 3-0, in 1932.
12 - In 1953, Philadelphia Phillies P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) beat the Pittsburgh Pirates for the 15th consecutive time. Roberts reached the 20-win plateau for the fourth straight season. . . . Baltimore Orioles OF Larry Sheets (All-Old Dominion Athletic Conference selection for Eastern Mennonite, VA, in 1981-82 and 1982-83) and teammate Wayne Gross socked back-to-back pinch-hit homers but they weren't enough to prevent an 8-5 setback against the Cleveland Indians in 1985. . . . Arizona Diamondbacks rookie 2B Junior Spivey (redshirted his only semester at Northwestern Oklahoma State on a basketball scholarship before transferring to a KS junior college) registered his second five-hit game of the 2001 campaign. . . . Chicago Cubs INF-OF Riggs Stephenson (Alabama letterman in 1920) knocked in the winning run in the 11th inning of a 3-2 victory against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1930. . . . San Francisco Giants OF Randy Winn (Santa Clara backcourtmate of eventual two-time NBA Most Valuable Player Steve Nash in 1993-94) accounted for the game's only run with a homer at Florida in 2005.
11 - New York Giants P Curt Barclay (Oregon's third-leading scorer and rebounder as a sophomore in 1950-51) hurled a three-hit, 5-0 shutout against the Philadelphia Phillies in the opener of a 1957 doubleheader. . . . C Mickey Cochrane (Boston University player in early 1920s) delivered a decisive ninth-inning hit to give the win to P George Earnshaw (Swarthmore, PA, player in 1922) in the Philadelphia Athletics' 3-2 decision over the Washington Senators in 1928. . . . Gene Desautels (Holy Cross letterman in 1929 and 1930) caught the entire game for the Cleveland Indians without a putout (no strikeouts) in 1942 when they have a 14-inning scoreless tie with the Detroit Tigers. . . . OF Bill Nicholson (played for Washington College, MD, in mid-1930s) capped off back-to-back-to-back homers by the Chicago Cubs but the three straight round-trippers weren't enough to prevent a 7-5 defeat against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1941. . . . P Jim Wilson (letterman for San Diego State's 1942 NAIA Tournament participant) traded by the Cleveland Indians to the Detroit Tigers in 1949.
10 - Pittsburgh Pirates OF Carson "Skeeter" Bigbee (Oregon basketball letterman in 1915) posted his second five-hit game in less than two months in 1922. . . . 1B-OF Dick Gernert (letterman with Temple in 1948-49 when he averaged 2.7 ppg) homered in the 10th inning to help catapult the Boston Red Sox to a 3-1 victory against the New York Yankees in 1952. . . . In 1936, INF Buddy Myer (Mississippi State letterman in 1923-24), the defending A.L. batting champion, sent home by the Washington Senators to recover from a season-long stomach ailment. . . . C Cal Neeman (Illinois Wesleyan's leading scorer in 1947-48 and 1948-49) purchased from the Cleveland Indians by the Washington Senators in 1963. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates CF Bill Virdon (played for Drury, MO, in 1949) tied a MLB mark by notching two assists in the seventh inning of the nightcap of a 1958 doubleheader against the Cincinnati Reds. Twenty-four years later in 1982, Virdon was fired as manager of the Houston Astros.
9 - Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading scorer in 1945-46) hit two homers in an 8-3 setback against the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1961. . . . New York Mets P Roger Craig (forward with North Carolina State's 1949-50 freshman basketball team) ended his N.L. record-tying 18-game losing streak by beating the Chicago Cubs, 7-3. Craig will be on the losing end of a shutout nine times in 1963. . . . New York Giants SS Alvin Dark (letterman for LSU and USL during World War II) extended his hitting streak to 17 games in 1951. . . . Los Angeles Dodgers 2B Davey Lopes (NAIA All-District 15 selection for Iowa Wesleyan averaged 16.9 ppg as freshman in 1964-65 and 12.1 ppg as sophomore in 1965-66) set new MLB record by stealing his 32nd consecutive base without being caught in 1975. . . . OF Bill Nicholson (played for Washington College, MD, in mid-1930s) traded by the Philadelphia Athletics to the Washington Senators in 1938. . . . Boston Braves rookie C Ebba St. Claire (Colgate letterman in 1941-42) tied a N.L. backstop standard by participating in three double plays in a single game in 1951.
8 - SS Gene Michael (Kent State's leading scorer with 14 ppg in 1957-58) stroked a two-out single in the ninth inning to give the New York Yankees a 3-2 victory against the Texas Rangers in 1973. . . . OF Bill Nicholson (played for Washington College, MD, in mid-1930s) pounded an 11th-inning homer to propel the Chicago Cubs to a 2-1 triumph against the Cincinnati Reds in 1947. . . . Philadelphia Phillies P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) won his eighth straight decision and fourth game in 10 days in 1956.
7 - 2B Dutch Meyer (letterman for TCU in 1934-35 and 1935-36) traded by the New York Giants to the Detroit Tigers in 1940. . . . P Joe Niekro (played for West Liberty WV in mid-1960s) awarded off waivers from the Detroit Tigers to the Atlanta Braves in 1973. . . . OF Jim Northrup (second-leading scorer and third-leading rebounder for Alma, MI, in 1958-59) shipped by the Detroit Tigers to the Montreal Expos as part of a conditional deal in 1974. . . . In 1990, California Angels OF Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) collected his 2,500th career hit.
6 - In 1932, 1B Dale Alexander (starting center for Milligan, TN, in mid-1920s) provided a single for the Boston Red Sox' lone safety off Wes Ferrell of the Cleveland Indians. . . . Mickey Cochrane (Boston University player in early 1920s) fired as Detroit Tigers manager in 1938. . . . San Diego Padres OF Tony Gwynn (All-WAC second-team selection with San Diego State in 1979-80 and 1980-81) went 4-for-5 in a 12-10 win against the Montreal Expos in 1999, posting the 3,000th hit of his MLB career. . . . P Mark Hendrickson (two time All-Pacific-10 Conference selection paced Washington State in rebounding four straight seasons from 1992-93 through 1995-96) made his MLB debut with the Toronto Blue Jays in 2002. . . . INF Davey Johnson (averaged 1.7 ppg with Texas A&M in 1961-62) traded by the Philadelphia Phillies to the Chicago Cubs in 1978. . . . San Francisco Giants 1B-OF Rick Leach (averaged 15.5 ppg for Michigan's junior varsity team in 1975-76) suspended for 60 days in 1990 following a positive drug test. . . . Washington Senators INF Buddy Myer (Mississippi State letterman in 1923-24) contributed four hits in a 13-11 victory against the New York Yankees in the opener of a 1929 doubleheader. . . . 1B Jack Phillips (leading scorer for 14-1 Clarkson, NY, in 1942-43) purchased from the New York Yankees by the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1949.
5 - Baltimore Orioles OF Al Bumbry (Virginia State's runner-up in scoring with 16.7 ppg as a freshman in 1964-65) belted his second leadoff homer in two days in 1982. . . . OF Billy Cowan (co-captain of Utah's 1960 NCAA playoff team) traded by the New York Mets to the Milwaukee braves in 1965. . . . P Dave Giusti (made 6 of 10 field-goal attempts in two games for Syracuse in 1959-60) purchased from the Oakland Athletics by the Chicago Cubs in 1977. . . . New York Giants P Jim Hearn (Georgia Tech letterman in 1941-42) yielded a leadoff single before throttling the Pittsburgh Pirates the remainder of the way in a 5-0 shutout win in 1950. . . . Of Kenny Lofton (Arizona's leader in steals for 1988 Final Four team compiling a a35-3 record) scored the winning run in the 11th inning in 2001 when the Cleveland Indians erased a 14-2 deficit in the seventh to prevail, 15-14, against the Seattle Mariners. . . . Baltimore Orioles P Ben McDonald (started six games as a 6-6 freshman forward for LSU in 1986-87) hurled a one-hit shutout against the Milwaukee Brewers in 1994. . . . Philadelphia Phillies OF Cy Williams (Notre Dame forward in 1909-10), who went on to lead the N.L. in homers in 1927, hit for the cycle in a 9-7 triumph against the Pittsburgh Pirates.
4 - In 1961, Chicago Cubs OF George Altman (appeared in 1953 and 1954 NAIA Tournament with Tennessee State) became the first player ever to hit two homers in a single game off Los Angeles Dodgers Hall of Fame P Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54). . . . In 1971, St. Louis Cardinals P Bob Gibson (Creighton's leading scorer in 1955-56 and 1956-57) posted his 200th career victory. . . . San Diego Padres OF Tony Gwynn (All-WAC second-team selection with San Diego State in 1979-80 and 1980-81), securing at least five hits in a game for the fourth time in the 1993 season, stroked six safeties in an 11-10 triumph against the San Francisco Giants. . . . St. Louis Browns P Ernie Nevers (All-PCC second-five choice in 1924-25 for Stanford) hurled his first complete game, defeating the Philadelphia Athletics, 3-1, in 1926. . . . While warming up prior to the fifth inning in a 1983 game at Toronto, New York Yankees OF Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) accidentally killed a seagull with a thrown ball. . . . New York Yankees P Tom Zachary (Guilford, NC, letterman in 1916) notched his seventh straight win with a shutout against the Cleveland Indians in the opener of a 1929 doubleheader.
3 - SS Dick Culler (Little All-American in 1935 and 1936 with High Point, NC) purchased from the Chicago Cubs by the New York Giants in 1948. . . . Alvin Dark (letterman for LSU and USL during World War II) fired as manager of the Oakland Athletics in 1967. . . . P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) surrendered 15 hits in 10 innings but the New York Giants still defeated the Cincinnati Reds, 7-6, in 1909. . . . Gene Michael (Kent State's leading scorer with 14 ppg in 1957-58) dismissed as New York Yankees manager in 1982 after losing a doubleheader against the Chicago White Sox. . . . Montreal Expos OF Ken Singleton (Hofstra freshman team in mid-1960s) secured the only hit off Bill Hands of the Chicago Cubs in the nightcap of a 1972 doubleheader.
2 - Philadelphia Athletics C Mickey Cochrane (Boston University player in early 1920s) hit for the cycle against the New York Yankees in 1933. . . . INF Tim Cullen (starting guard for Santa Clara in 1962-63 when he averaged 10 ppg) traded by the Chicago White Sox to the Washington Senators for SS Ron Hansen in 1968. . . . Cleveland Indians OF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) hammered three homers in an 11-0 victory against the Washington Senators in 1950. . . . P Cal Koonce (standout for Campbell in 1960 and 1961 when North Carolina-based school was a junior college) purchased from the Chicago Cubs by the New York Mets in 1967. . . . P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) yielded 15 singles but the New York Giants still defeated the Pittsburgh Pirates, 8-4, in 1911. . . . Bill Virdon (played for Drury, MO, in 1949) fired as manager of the New York Yankees and succeeded by Billy Martin in 1975.
1 - In 1957, 1B Gil Hodges (played for Oakland City, IN, in 1947 and 1948) hit his 13th career grand slam to set a new N.L. record. It was the final grand slam in the history of the Brooklyn franchise before the Dodgers moved to Los Angeles. . . . In 1913, New York Giants P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) reached the 20-win plateau for the 11th consecutive season. . . . Hitless in his first six at-bats, RF Jim Northrup (second-leading scorer and third-leading rebounder for Alma, MI, in 1958-59) homered in the 16th inning to give the Detroit Tigers a 4-3 victory against the California Angels in 1971. . . . Philadelphia Phillies P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) posted his 200th triumph with a three-hit, 3-1 success at Chicago in 1958.

MLB achievements/highlights in July by former college basketball players

MLB achievements/highlights in June by former college basketball players

MLB achievements/highlights in May by former college basketball players

MLB achievements/highlights in April by former college basketball players

Conference Kingpins: KU Could Become 4th School to Win 10 Titles in Row

Kansas, bolstered by the presence of a freshman crop that could be even better than Kentucky's acclaimed class, could become only the fourth school to capture at least 10 consecutive regular-season conference championships. Despite the early departure to the NBA of leading scorer Ben McLemore, the Jayhawks are expected to continue their sterling Big 12 Conference track record under coach Bill Self while surviving the loss of 11 undergraduates in the last seven NBA drafts - 2007 (Julian Wright), 2008 (Darrell Arthur, Mario Chalmers and Brandon Rush), 2010 (Cole Aldrich and Xavier Henry), 2011 (Marcus Morris, Markieff Morris and Josh Selby), 2012 (Thomas Robinson) and 2013 (Ben McLemore).

UCLA's streak of 13 straight undisputed league titles from 1967 through 1979 is considered one of the foremost achievements in NCAA history. Following is a summary of the seven schools to secure at least eight straight regular-season league titles:

UCLA (13 in Pacific-8/10; 171-15 league record from 1966-67 through 1978-79)

Season League Mark Scoring Leader Rebounding Leader Coaches Overall Mark
1966-67 14-0 Lew Alcindor (29 ppg) Lew Alcindor (15.5 rpg) John Wooden 30-0
1967-68 14-0 Lew Alcindor (26.2) Lew Alcindor (16.5) John Wooden 29-1
1968-69 13-1 Lew Alcindor (24) Lew Alcindor (14.6) John Wooden 29-1
1969-70 12-2 Sidney Wicks (18.6) Sidney Wicks (11.9) John Wooden 28-2
1970-71 14-0 Sidney Wicks (21.3) Sidney Wicks (12.8) John Wooden 29-1
1971-72 14-0 Bill Walton (21.1) Bill Walton (15.5) John Wooden 30-0
1972-73 14-0 Bill Walton (20.4) Bill Walton (16.9) John Wooden 30-0
1973-74 12-2 Bill Walton (19.3) Bill Walton (14.7) John Wooden 26-4
1974-75 12-2 David Meyers (18.3) David Meyers (7.9) John Wooden 28-3
1975-76 12-2 Richard Washington (20.1) Marques Johnson (9.4) Gene Bartow 27-5
1976-77 11-3 Marques Johnson (21.4) Marques Johnson (11.1) Gene Bartow 24-5
1977-78 14-0 David Greenwood (17.5) David Greenwood (11.4) Gary Cunningham 25-3
1978-79 15-3 David Greenwood (19.9) David Greenwood (10.3) Gary Cunningham 25-5

Connecticut (10 in Yankee; 71-8 from 1950-51 through 1959-60)

Season League Mark Scoring Leader Rebounding Leader Coach Overall Mark
1950-51 6-1 Vin Yokabaskas (15.5) William Ebel (9) Hugh Greer 22-4
1951-52 6-1 Vin Yokabaskas (16.8) Burr Carlson (14.5) Hugh Greer 20-7
1952-53 5-1 Art Quimby (16.7) Art Quimby (20.5) Hugh Greer 17-4
1953-54 7-0 Art Quimby (16.3) Art Quimby (22.6) Hugh Greer 23-3
1954-55 7-0 Art Quimby (23.2) Art Quimby (24.4) Hugh Greer 20-5
1955-56 6-1 Gordon Ruddy (16.6) unavailable Hugh Greer 17-11
1956-57 8-0 Bob Osborne (15.6) Al Cooper (11.8) Hugh Greer 17-8
1957-58 10-0 Jack Rose (13) Al Cooper (11) Hugh Greer 17-10
1958-59 8-2 Jack Rose (16) Ed Martin (12.1) Hugh Greer 17-7
1959-60 8-2 John Pipczynski (15.2) Walt Griffin (11.5) Hugh Greer 17-9

UNLV (10 in PCAA/Big West; 165-13 from 1982-83 through 1991-92)

Season League Mark Scoring Leader Rebounding Leader Coach Overall Mark
1982-83 15-1 Sidney Green (22.1) Sidney Green (11.9) Jerry Tarkanian 28-3
1983-84 16-2 Richie Adams (12.7) Richie Adams (6.7) Jerry Tarkanian 29-6
1984-85 17-1 Richie Adams (15.8) Richie Adams (7.9) Jerry Tarkanian 28-4
1985-86 16-2 Anthony Jones (18) Armon Gilliam (8.5) Jerry Tarkanian 33-5
1986-87 18-0 Armon Gilliam (23.2) Armon Gilliam (9.3) Jerry Tarkanian 37-2
1987-88 15-3 Gerald Paddio (19.4) Jarvis Basnight (6.9) Jerry Tarkanian 28-6
1988-89 16-2 David Butler (15.4) Stacey Augmon (7.4) Jerry Tarkanian 29-8
1989-90 16-2 Larry Johnson (20.6) Larry Johnson (11.4) Jerry Tarkanian 35-5
1990-91 18-0 Larry Johnson (22.7) Larry Johnson (10.9) Jerry Tarkanian 34-1
1991-92 18-0 J.R. Rider (20.7) Elmore Spencer (8.1) Jerry Tarkanian 26-2

NOTE: UNLV tied New Mexico State in 1989-90.

Kansas (nine in Big 12; 125-23 from 2004-05 through 2012-13)

Season League Mark Scoring Leader Rebounding Leader Coach Overall Mark
2004-05 12-4 Wayne Simien (20.3) Wayne Simien (11) Bill Self 23-7
2005-06 13-3 Brandon Rush (13.5) Brandon Rush (5.9) Bill Self 25-8
2006-07 14-2 Brandon Rush (13.8) Julian Wright (7.8) Bill Self 33-5
2007-08 13-3 Brandon Rush (13.3) Darnell Jackson (6.7) Bill Self 37-3
2008-09 14-2 Sherron Collins (18.9) Cole Aldrich (11.1) Bill Self 27-8
2009-10 15-1 Sherron Collins (15.5) Cole Aldrich (9.8) Bill Self 33-3
2010-11 14-2 Marcus Morris (17.2) Markieff Morris (8.3) Bill Self 35-3
2011-12 16-2 Thomas Robinson (17.7) Thomas Robinson (11.9) Bill Self 32-7
2012-13 14-4 Ben McLemore (15.9) Jeff Withey (8.5) Bill Self 31-6

NOTE: Kansas tied Oklahoma in 2004-05, Texas in 2005-06 and 2007-08 and Kansas State in 2012-13.

Idaho State (eight in Rocky Mountain; 76-4 from 1952-53 through 1959-60)

Season League Mark Scoring Leader Rebounding Leader Coach Overall Mark
1952-53 10-0 Les Roh (16.6) unavailable Steve Belko 18-7
1953-54 9-1 Les Roh (17.1) unavailable Steve Belko 22-5
1954-55 9-1 Les Roh (21.7) unavailable Steve Belko 18-8
1955-56 9-1 Les Roh (20.8) unavailable Steve Belko 18-8
1956-57 12-0 Jim Rodgers (15) Jack Allain (12.5) John Grayson 25-4
1957-58 10-0 Lloyd Harris (14.7) LeRoy Bacher (9) John Grayson 22-6
1958-59 9-1 Jim Rodgers (17.4) Homer Watkins (11.6) John Grayson 21-7
1959-60 8-0 Myrl Goodwin (16.4) unavailable John Evans 21-5

Kentucky (eight in SEC; 82-3 from 1944-45 through 1951-52)

Season League Mark Scoring Leader Rebounding Leader Coach Overall Mark
1944-45 4-1 Jack Tingle (11.7) unavailable Adolph Rupp 22-4
1945-46 6-0 Jack Parkinson (11.3) unavailable Adolph Rupp 28-2
1946-47 11-0 Ralph Beard (10.9) unavailable Adolph Rupp 34-3
1947-48 9-0 Alex Groza (12.5) unavailable Adolph Rupp 36-3
1948-49 13-0 Alex Groza (20.5) unavailable Adolph Rupp 32-2
1949-50 11-2 Bill Spivey (19.3) unavailable Adolph Rupp 25-5
1950-51 14-0 Bill Spivey (19.2) Bill Spivey (17.2) Adolph Rupp 32-2
1951-52 14-0 Cliff Hagan (21.6) Cliff Hagan (16.5) Adolph Rupp 29-3

NOTES: Kentucky tied Tennessee in 1944-45 and Louisiana State in 1945-46. . . . UK did not field a team in 1952-53 before tying LSU in 1953-54 and winning outright in 1954-55.

Long Beach State (eight in PCAA; 75-13 from 1969-70 through 1976-77)

Season League Mark Scoring Leader Rebounding Leader Coaches Overall Mark
1969-70 10-0 George Trapp (16.3) Sam Robinson (7.8) Jerry Tarkanian 23-5
1970-71 10-0 Ed Ratleff (19.9) George Trapp (11) Jerry Tarkanian 24-5
1971-72 10-2 Ed Ratleff (21.4) Nate Stephens (10.3) Jerry Tarkanian 25-4
1972-73 10-2 Ed Ratleff (22.8) Leonard Gray (9.3) Jerry Tarkanian 26-3
1973-74 12-0 Clifton Pondexter (15.6) Clifton Pondexter (8.6) Lute Olson 24-2
1974-75 8-2 Rich Johnson (17.8) Bob Gross (8.5) Dwight Jones 19-7
1975-76 6-4 Anthony McGee (14.8) Clarence Ruffen (7.4) Dwight Jones 14-12
1976-77 9-3 Lloyd McMillian (15.8) Lloyd McMillian (7.9) Dwight Jones 21-8

NOTE: Long Beach State tied Cal State Fullerton in 1975-76 and San Diego State in 1976-77.

College Basketball's Significant Connection to Baseball's Hall of Fame

The Baseball Hall of Fame weekend is weakened by no living inductees holding court for the first time since 1965. But there has been a significant number of living and breathing versatile athletes who went from the basketball court to achieve stardom in baseball's HOF. The following individuals among the more than 300 MLB Hall of Famers were college hoopsters:

WALTER ALSTON, Miami (Ohio)
Managed the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers for 23 seasons (1954 through 1976), winning seven National League pennants and three World Series. In eight All-Star Game assignments, Alston was the winning manager a record seven times. He struck out in his only major league at-bat with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1936. . . . The 6-2, 195-pound Alston, a charter member of his alma mater's Athletic Hall of Fame, lettered in basketball in 1932-33, 1933-34 and 1934-35. He scored 10 of Miami's 15 points in a 32-15 defeat against Indiana in his senior season.

LOU BOUDREAU, Illinois
Infielder hit .295 in 15 seasons (1938 through 1952) with the Cleveland Indians and Boston Red Sox. Managed Indians, Red Sox, Kansas City Athletics and Chicago Cubs, starting his managerial career at the age of 24 in 1942. As player-manager in 1948, the shortstop led Cleveland to the A.L. title and earned MVP honors by hitting .355 with 116 RBI. He hit a modest .273 in the World Series. The seven-time All-Star led the A.L. with 45 doubles on three occasions (1941, 1944 and 1947) and paced the league in batting average in 1944 (.327). . . . Played two varsity basketball seasons for Illinois (1936-37 and 1937-38) under coach Doug Mills. As a sophomore, Boudreau led the Illini in scoring with an 8.7-point average as the team shared the Big Ten Conference title. Compiled an 8.8 average the next year. After helping the Illini upset St. John's in a game at Madison Square Garden, the New York Daily News described him as "positively brilliant" and said he "set up countless plays in breathtaking fashion." . . . Averaged 8.2 points per game for Hammond (Ind.) in the National Basketball League in 1938-39.

ALBERT B. "HAPPY" CHANDLER, Transylvania (Ky.)
Twice governor of Kentucky (1935-39 and 1955-59), U.S. senator (1939-45) and commissioner of baseball (1945-51). He oversaw the initial steps toward integration of the major leagues. Democrat embraced the "Dixiecrats" in the late 1940s. . . . Captain of Transylvania's basketball team as a senior in 1920-21.

GORDON "MICKEY" COCHRANE, Boston University
Hall of Famer hit .320 (highest career mark ever for a catcher) with the Philadelphia Athletics and Detroit Tigers in 13 seasons from 1925 through 1937. Swatted three homers in a single game as a rookie. Lefthanded swinger was A.L. MVP in 1928 and 1934. Led the A.L. in on-base percentage in 1933 (.459) and ranked among the league top nine in batting average five times (1927-30-31-33-35). Participated in five World Series (1929-30-31- 34-35). . . . Five-sport athlete with BU, including basketball (class of '24).

EARLE COMBS, Eastern Kentucky
Hall of Fame outfielder hit .325 with the New York Yankees in 12 seasons from 1924 through 1935. Lefthanded swinger led the A.L. in hits with 231 in 1927 when he also paced the the league in singles and triples. Also led the A.L. in triples in 1928 and 1930. Assembled a 29-game hitting streak in 1931. Leadoff hitter and "table- setter" for the Yankees' potent "Murderer's Row" offense ranked among the A.L. top six in runs eight straight years when he became the first player in modern major league history to score at least 100 runs in his first eight full seasons. Posted a .350 batting average in four World Series (1926-27-28-32) before a pair of serious collisons shortened his productive career. Served as coach with the Yankees (1936-44), St. Louis Browns (1947), Boston Red Sox (1948-54) and Philadelphia Phillies (1955). . . . Captain of his alma mater's basketball squad for three years when the school was known as Eastern State Normal.

LARRY DOBY, Virginia Union
Outfielder hit .283 with 253 home runs and 969 RBI in a 13-year career from 1947 through 1959 with the Cleveland Indians and Chicago White Sox. The first black player in the American League twice led the A.L. in homers (32 in 1952 and 1954). He was the first African-American to lead a league in homers (1952 and 1954) and the first to participate in the World Series (1948). Hit 20 or more round-trippers eight consecutive seasons from 1949 through 1956 while finishing among the A.L. top nine in slugging percentage each year. The seven-time All-Star drove in 100 or more runs five times, leading the A.L. with 126 in 1954 when the Indians won 111 games before being swept by the New York Giants in the World Series. Appeared in 1948 and 1954 World Series with the Indians, winning Game 4 in '48 with a homer off Braves star Johnny Sain. Doby managed the White Sox for most of 1978 (37-50 record). . . . The 6-1, 180-pounder attended LIU on a basketball scholarship but transferred to Virginia Union prior to the start of the season after Uncle Sam summoned him for World War II service. Doby was told Virginia Union had a ROTC program and he could complete his freshman season before being drafted. He became eligible the second semester of the 1942-43 season and was a reserve guard on a team that won the CIAA title.

RICK FERRELL, Guilford (N.C.)
Catcher hit over .300 five times en route to a .281 career batting average with the St. Louis Browns, Boston Red Sox and Washington Senators in 18 years from 1929 through 1947. He set an A.L. record with 1,805 games behind the plate. Traded with his brother (pitcher Wes Ferrell) from Boston to Washington during the 1937 campaign. . . . The 5-10, 160-pounder was a basketball forward before graduating in 1928.

FRANKIE FRISCH, Fordham
Registered a run of 11 consecutive .300 seasons and set fielding records for chances and assists with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1927. As player-manager with the Cards, he instilled the rollicking all-out style of hardnosed play that prompted a team nickname of "The Gashouse Gang." His season strikeout total topped 20 only twice en route to a .316 average in his 19-year career, which also included a stint with the New York Giants. . . . According to his bio in Total Baseball, "The Fordham Flash" captained the Rams' basketball squad. In 1925, Frisch officiated the first-ever game played in the Rose Hill Gym (the oldest NCAA Division I facility in the nation).

BOB GIBSON, Creighton
Compiled a 251-174 pitching record with 3,117 strikeouts and 2.91 ERA in 17 seasons (1959 through 1975) with the St. Louis Cardinals. In 1968, he pitched 13 shutouts en route to a 1.12 ERA, the second-lowest since 1893 in 300 innings. Gibson notched a 7-2 mark and 1.89 ERA in nine games in the 1964, 1967 and 1968 World Series (92 strikeouts in 81 innings). He set a World Series record with 17 strikeouts against the Detroit Tigers on October 2, 1968. . . . First Creighton player to average 20 points per game for his career (20.2). Led the school in scoring in 1955-56 (40th in the country with 22 ppg) and 1956-57 and was second-leading scorer in 1954-55 before playing one season (1957-58) with the Harlem Globetrotters. Sketch from school brochure: "Possesses outstanding jump shot and for height (6-1) is a terrific rebounder."

TONY GWYNN, San Diego State
Padres outfielder hit .338 in 20 seasons (1982 through 2001), winning eight N.L. batting titles--1984, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1994, 1995, 1996 and 1997. Played in 15th All-Star Game in 1999 before topping the 3,000-hit plateau later in the year. Holds N.L. record for most years leading league in singles (six). Won a Gold Glove five times (1986-87-89-90-91). He hit .368 in the 1984 N.L. Championship Series to help San Diego reach the World Series against the Detroit Tigers. Also participated in the 1998 World Series against the New York Yankees. Became baseball coach at his alma mater after retiring from the major leagues. . . . Averaged 8.6 ppg and 5.5 apg in 107 games with the Aztecs in four seasons (1977-78 through 1980-81). The 5-11, 170-pound guard was named second-team All-Western Athletic Conference as both a junior and senior. Led the WAC in assists as both a sophomore and junior and was third as a senior. Paced San Diego State in steals each of his last three seasons. Selected in the 10th round of 1981 NBA draft by the San Diego Clippers.

MONTE IRVIN, Lincoln (Pa.)
Outfielder-first baseman hit .293 with 99 home runs and 443 RBI in eight major league years (1949 through 1956) with the New York Giants and Chicago Cubs. Irvin led the N.L. in RBI with 121 in 1951, the same year he led the World Series in hitting (.458 vs. crosstown Yankees) after collecting seven hits in the first two contests of the six-game set. He was a member of the Giants' squad that swept the Cleveland Indians in the 1954 World Series. The 6-1, 195-pounder was one of the first black players signed after baseball's color line was broken in 1947. Among the brightest stars in the Negro Leagues, he registered league highs of .422 in 1940 and .396 in 1941 before spending three years in the Army. . . . His athletic career was nearly prematurely ended when an infection from a scratched hand in a basketball game kept him close to death for seven weeks. Irvin participated in basketball for 1 1/2 years in the late 1930s for Lincoln, an all-black university in Oxford, Pa., before dropping out of school.

SANDY KOUFAX, Cincinnati
Compiled a 165-87 record and 2.76 ERA in 12 seasons as a lefthanded pitcher with the Brooklyn (1955 through 1957) and Los Angeles (1958 through 1966) Dodgers. Led the N.L. in ERA in each of his last five seasons, going 25-5 in 1963 (MVP), 26-8 in 1965 and 27-9 in 1966 (Cy Young Award). Pitched four no-hitters and had 98 games with at least 20 strikeouts. Notched a 4-3 record and 0.95 ERA in eight World Series games in 1959, 1963 (MVP), 1965 (MVP) and 1966. . . . The Brooklyn native attended Cincinnati one year on a combination baseball/basketball scholarship before signing a pro baseball contract for a reported $20,000 bonus. He was the third-leading scorer with a 9.7-point average as a 6-2, 195-pound forward for the Bearcats' 12-2 freshman team in 1953-54. Koufax compiled a 3-1 pitching record in his lone college baseball campaign, averaging 14.3 strikeouts and 8.4 bases on balls per game when his statistics are converted to a nine-inning game ratio. . . . Ed Jucker, coach of Cincinnati's NCAA titlists in 1961 and 1962, coached the Bearcats' baseball squad and freshman basketball team in 1953-54. Jucker said of Koufax's basketball ability: "He could jump extremely well, was a strong kid and a good driver. He would have made a fine varsity player. We certainly could have used him." If viewers pay attention to CBS acknowledging celebrities in the stands during telecasts with crowd shots, they've probably noticed that Koufax regularly attends the Final Four.

TED LYONS, Baylor
Spent his entire 21-year career with the Chicago White Sox (1923 through 1942 and 1946) after never playing in the minors. Managed the White Sox from 1946 through 1948. Three-time 20-game winner compiled a 260-230 record and 3.67 ERA in 594 games. He pitched a no-hitter against the Boston Red Sox in 1926. In 1939, Lyons hurled 42 consecutive innings without issuing a walk. . . . Earned four basketball letters at Baylor from 1919-20 through 1922-23. Consensus first-team selection on All-Southwest Conference squad as a sophomore and senior.

CHRISTY MATHEWSON, Bucknell
Often regarded as baseball's greatest pitcher, the righthander compiled a 372-188 record and 2.13 ERA with 79 shutouts for the New York Giants in 17 years from 1900 to 1916 before winning his lone start with Cincinnati in 1916. Led the N.L. in ERA five times (1905-08-09-11-13). Hall of Famer ranked among the N.L. top five in victories 12 years in a row from 1903 through 1914. Paced the N.L. in strikeouts on five occasions in a six-year span from 1903 through 1908. Won 30 games or more in three consecutive seasons, leading the Giants in their 1905 World Series victory over the Philadelphia Athletics by hurling three shutouts in six days. Also appeared in three straight World Series from 1911 through 1913. . . . The 6-2 Mathewson also played football and basketball at the turn of the 20th Century for Bucknell (class of '02).

CUM POSEY, Penn State/Duquesne
Founder and co-owner of the Homestead Greys professional baseball team that won eight consecutive National Negro League titles. . . . Posey was the first African American to complete in intercollegiate athletics for Penn State in 1910-11. He later attended Duquesne. A legend in Pittsburgh sports history was owner/player for the famed Leondi Club, an independent basketball team that was the National Negro Championship team for many years.

EPPA RIXEY JR., Virginia
Compiled a 266-251 record with 3.15 ERA in 21 seasons (1912 through 1917 and 1919 through 1933) with the Philadelphia Phillies and Cincinnati Reds. He never played a minor league game and appeared in the 1915 World Series with the Phillies. Missed the 1918 campaign while serving overseas with an Army chemical-warfare division. Rixey won 19 or more games six years, including 1922 when he led the N.L. with 25 victories with the Reds. In his next to last season, he pitched a string of 27 consecutive scoreless innings at age 42. The N.L.'s winningest lefthanded pitcher until Warren Spahn broke his record was selected to the Hall of Fame in 1963. . . . The 6-5, 210-pound Rixey, who also played golf at Virginia, earned basketball letters in 1911-12 and 1913-14.

ROBIN ROBERTS, Michigan State
Compiled a 286-245 record in 19 seasons (1948 through 1966) with the Philadelphia Phillies, Baltimore Orioles, Houston Astros and Chicago Cubs. He was a twenty-game winner for six consecutive seasons with the Phillies (1950 through 1955), leading the N.L. in victories the last four years in that span. The seven-time All-Star lost his only World Series start in 1950, 2-1, when the Yankees' Joe DiMaggio homered off him in the 10th inning. . . . Roberts played three seasons of basketball with the Spartans (1944-45 through 1946-47). He averaged 10.6 points per game as a freshman (team's third-leading scorer as he was eligible because of WWII), 9.8 as a sophomore (second-leading scorer) and 9.0 as a junior (second-leading scorer). The 6-0, 190-pound forward led the team in field-goal percentage as a junior captain. Sketch from school basketball guide: "Regarded by newsmen as one of the greatest players today in college basketball. A poll by Detroit Free Press named him the `most valuable' collegiate player in Michigan. He is not especially fast, but he's extremely well-coordinated, passes exceptionally well, and is a beautiful one-hand shot artist."

JACKIE ROBINSON, UCLA
Infielder hit .311 with 137 homers as a regular on six N.L. pennant winners with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 10 seasons (1947 through 1956). After becoming Rookie of the Year in 1947, Robinson was named MVP in 1949 when he led the N.L. with a .342 batting average and 37 stolen bases. The six-time All-Star homered in the 1952 All-Star Game. He had two homers and seven doubles in World Series competition. . . . Football, basketball and track standout at Pasadena City College in 1937-38 and 1938-39. Named to All-Southern California Junior College Conference Western Division all-star basketball team both years, a span in which UCLA was winless in league competition. First athlete in UCLA history to letter in football, basketball, baseball and track. Forward compiled the highest scoring average in the Pacific Coast Conference both of his seasons at UCLA (12.3 points per league game in 1939-40 as an all-league second-team selection and 11.1 in 1940-41). In his last UCLA athletic contest, he accounted for more than half of the Bruins' output with 20 points in a 52-37 loss to Southern California.

DAVE WINFIELD, Minnesota
Outfielder hit .283 with 465 home runs, 1,833 RBI and 3,110 hits in 22 seasons (1973 through 1988 and 1990 through 1995) with the San Diego Padres, New York Yankees, California Angels, Toronto Blue Jays, Minnesota Twins and Cleveland Indians. Appeared in 12 All-Star Games after never playing in the minors. Participated in the World Series with the Yankees (1981) and Blue Jays (1992). . . . Played two seasons of varsity basketball as a 6-6, 220-pound forward with the Gophers, averaging 6.9 points and 5.4 rebounds per game as a junior in 1971-72 and 10.5 points and 6.1 rebounds as a senior in 1972-73. He played the entire game in Minnesota's first NCAA Tournament appearance in 1972 under coach Bill Musselman. . . . Selected by the Atlanta Hawks in the fifth round of the 1973 NBA draft and the Utah Stars in the sixth round of the 1973 ABA draft. Didn't play college football, but was chosen in the 17th round of the 1973 NFL draft by the Minnesota Vikings. Excerpt from school guide: "Recruited out of intramural ranks to lend depth, became a starter and was a giant in the stretch drive. Amazing athlete leaps like a man catapulted. Soft touch from medium range."

Bing It! Democratic-Run Detroit Decays to Point of Mayor Seeking Bailout

Former Syracuse sensation Dave Bing, after failing to balance the budget as mayor of dying Detroit following more than 60 years of Democratic-rule decay, is weaving through the press(ure) looking to dish the rock (bankruptcy bailout). Despite the Motown metropolitan mess being 1,200 miles away from Sanford, Fla., the delusional Detroit City Council didn't have anything more important to do amid the blight but unanimously pass a resolution calling for a federal investigation to see whether civil rights charges are warranted against acquitted George Zimmerman. Detroit is so undeniably dense that the Pistons probably think Jason Collins can keep them from being deep-sixed in the NBA after averaging a robust 1.6 ppg and 1.9 rpg over the previous six seasons.

Didn't POTUS claim "we saved Detroit" before the feds threw $300 million down the drain trying to clean up the dump? Kwame Kilpatrick, one of Bing's predecessors, was sentenced to 28 years behind bars for an assortment of crimes. If vibrant Dick Vitale didn't do it, then no one is capable of reviving the entitlement-driven municipality. Our nation is beset by an abundance of ineffectual politicians such as a U.S. Senate that hasn't provided a rudimentary budget for more than three years and is infected by a "Dingy Harry" majority leader who makes his staff excempt from ObamaCare but not the average citizen paying his salary.

Is Detroit specifically a precursor of what could happen to the United States in general because of a mountain of debt? With a backdrop of half of the city's population being functionally illiterate, the facts don't lie and no plan is workable sans concessions that unions have strongly resisted. Do the union bosses need to take a remedial math class before budging? What could the impact be from stop paying the city council and mayor, strip union contracts and sell off assets or have the city enter into a consent agreement with the state? In other words, a white conspiracy theory to clueless clowns invested in some loathsome liberal narrative.

The pressure on Bing, a two-time All-American swingman, probably hasn't been this intense to deliver results since the weight of the world was on his shoulders in the 1966 NCAA Tournament when the senior teammate of Orange coach Jim Boeheim was limited to 10 points (more than 18 below his nationally fifth-best average) and committed a team-high 6 turnovers in a 91-81 setback against Duke in the East Regional final. Boeheim, who scored 15 points in the loss, probably can commiserate with Bing about crisis management in the aftermath of the abuse allegations involving long-time assistant Bernie Fine and Yahoo Sports' report about SU's longstanding pattern of failing to adhere to its drug policy.

Boeheim became one of the nation's all-time winningest coaches and an expert on how writers can win a Pulitzer Prize while Bing is among a list of ex-college hoopsters in the political arena. Check out CollegeHoopedia.com's exhaustive research on what All-Americans have done in a wide variety of vocations in the "real world" after their basketball-playing days ended.

The Way We (Defunct Leagues) Were: Who Went Where When? How & Why?

The Great West Conference really wasn't so great. Only in existence four seasons, most of its remaining members were absorbed by the Western Athletic Conference to help the once-proud WAC remain solvent. Following is a look at what happened to an alphabetical list of defunct lNCAA Division I leagues that the Great West has joined:

Defunct DI League Years Intact Summary of End Game Membership
American South 1988-91 Merged with Sun Belt Arkansas State, Central Florida (only 1991), Lamar, Louisiana Tech, New Orleans, Southwestern Louisiana, Texas-Pan American
American West 1995 & 1996 Joined Big Sky and Big West Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, Cal State Northridge, Sacramento State, Southern Utah
Big Eight 1929-96 Combined with half of SWC to form Big 12 Colorado (not 1929-47), Iowa State, Kansas, Kansas State, Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma, Oklahoma State (not 1929-58)
Border 1932-62 Disbanded when WAC was formed Arizona (not 1962), Arizona State, Hardin-Simmons (not 1932-41), New Mexico (not 1943, 1944 and 1952-62), New Mexico State, Northern Arizona (not 1954-62), Texas-El Paso (not 1932-35), Texas Tech (not 1932 and 1957-62), West Texas State (not 1932-41)
Eastern Intercollegiate 1933-39 Disbanded Carnegie Tech, Georgetown, Pittsburgh, Temple, West Virginia
Great Midwest 1992-95 Merged with Metro to form C-USA Cincinnati, Dayton (not 1992 and 1993), DePaul, Marquette, Memphis, St. Louis, UAB
Great West 2010-13 Absorbed by WAC Chicago State, Houston Baptist (not 2013), NJIT, North Dakota (not 2013), South Dakota (not 2013), Texas-Pan American, Utah Valley
Gulf Star 1985-87 Joined SLC or became independents before joining TAAC Nicholls State, Northwestern State, Sam Houston State, Southeastern Louisiana, Southwest Texas State, Stephen F. Austin State
Metro 1976-95 Merged with Great Midwest to form C-USA Cincinnati (not 1992-95), Florida State (not 1976 and 1992-95), Georgia Tech (not 1979-95), Louisville, Memphis State (not 1992-95), UNC Charlotte (not 1976-91), St. Louis (not 1983-95), South Carolina (not 1976-83 and 1992-95), Southern Mississippi (not 1976-82), South Florida (not 1976-91), Tulane (not 1986-89), Virginia Commonwealth (not 1976-91), Virginia Tech (not 1976-78)
Metropolitan Collegiate 1966-69 Disbanded Fairleigh Dickinson, Hofstra, Iona, LIU, Manhattan, NYU (not 1968 and 1969), St. Francis NY (not 1969), St. Peter's, Seton Hall, Wagner
Middle Atlantic/East Coast 1959-94 ECC merged with Mid-Continent American (not 1959-66 and 1985-94), Brooklyn (only 1992), Bucknell (not 1991-94), Buffalo (only 1992 and 1994), Central Connecticut State (not 1959-90), Chicago State (only 1994), Delaware (not 1992-94), Drexel (not 1992-94), Gettysburg (not after MAC dispersed in 1974), Hofstra (not 1959-65), Lafayette (not 1991-94), La Salle (not 1984-94), Lehigh (not 1991-94), UMBC (only 1991 and 1992), Muhlenberg (not 1965-94), Northeastern Illinois (only 1994), Rider (not 1959-66 and after 1992), Rutgers (not 1963-94), St. Joseph's (not 1983-94), Temple (not 1983-94), Towson State (not 1959-82 and after 1992), Troy State (only 1994), West Chester State (not 1959-65 and 1975-94)
Mountain States/Skyline 1938-62 Four teams combined with two from Border to form WAC Brigham Young, Colorado (not 1948-62), Colorado State, Denver, Montana (not 1938-51), New Mexico (not 1938-51), Utah, Utah State, Wyoming
New England/Yankee 1938-76 Disbanded Boston University (not 1938-72), Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts (not 1938-46), New Hampshire, Northeastern (not 1947-76), Rhode island, Vermont (not 1938-46)
Rocky Mountain 1923-63 Disbanded Adams State (not 1923-57), Brigham Young (not 1938-63), Colorado (not 1938-63), Colorado State (not 1938-63), Colorado State, Colorado School of Mines, Colorado Teachers (not 1935-63), Denver (not 1938-63), Greeley State/Northern Colorado (not 1923-34), Idaho State (not 1923-59 and 1961-63), Montana State (not 1958-63), Utah (not 1938-63), Utah State (not 1938-63), Western State/Colorado Western, Wyoming (not 1938-63)
Southwest 1915-96 Disbanded with members joining three different leagues (Big 12, C-USA & WAC) Arkansas (not 1915-23 and 1992-96), Baylor, Houston (not 1915-75), Oklahoma A&M (not 1926-96), Phillips OK (only 1920), Rice, SMU (not 1915-18), Southwestern TX (only 1915 and 1916), Texas, Texas A&M, TCU (not 1915-23), Texas Tech (not 1915-57)

Wade's World: Ex-Marquette All-American Needs Help Explaining Verdict

Where should the "soul-searching" NBA champion Miami Heat move its franchise until the state of Florida kisses the championship ring in rushing-to-judgment AG Eric Holder's back pocket and change stand-your-ground legislation? That question has as much substance as wondering if Stevie Wonder saw wonderful Holder tethered to title trappings the same way Russian President Vladimir Putin stole headlines acquiring similar NFL bling. Holder, receiving support from the left comparable to humiliated Huma (Shrillary II) standing by perverted Carlos Danger after the weiner's he-man online dialogue with a progressive activist from the Midwest, is showing as much legal expertise as he did as a Columbia hoopster (missing all four field-goal attempts for 1969-70 freshman squad).

Featuring an idea as intellectually bankrupt as Detroit's demonstrative Demo(crat) driving to demise, Dwyane Wade and his hypersensitive Heat teammates figured out how to don hoodies in their self-appointed roles as victimization humanitarians but he couldn't explain the Trayvon Martin verdict declaring George Zimmerman not guilty. "What do I tell my kids?" Wade tweeted, opening a lane for a mocking layup. Wade, rather than brushing up on facts concerning the Zimmerman case, exploited his sons as hoodie-donning props on an Ebony magazine cover. Turning up the "national-conversation" heat while unsure of the quality of classes Wade took under coach Tom Crean at Marquette, following are dos and don'ts (a/k/a "affirmative action") do-gooder Dwyane should tell his sons so they wade in wise, not wayward, waters:

  • Don't show any confidence in a biased mass media reporting the news fully, accurately and fairly if an incident doesn't fit their liberal narrative (see sexy terrorist Rolling Stones cover as classic example). Also, maybe we missed the politically-correct police memo, but is it now OK to deploy the word "boy" with such regularity or is it reserved solely for excuse-filled leftists similar to other intemperate terms?

  • Do the right thing like the courageous IT director even if you get fired by a fluffy Florida state attorney for sharing all of the trial evidence. Tell the whole truth unlike the putrid press and dishonorable state attorney who filed a misleading affidavit. Simply support a proper cause more than petulant POTUS does the Egyptian and Syrian Christian carnage although his administration seems fond of Charlie Chaplin while Syrians are gassed.

  • Don't impair your education by conducting yourself in such a manner you get kicked out of your home and/or school. Remember: Only about half of black males graduate from high school. In your academic pursuits, don't fall for POTUS pap such as the hoopster-in-chief claiming that raising the debt ceiling does not increase the nation's debt or ObamaCare is a first-rate online venture. And here's a novel thought while mulling over the fact a disproportionate number of lawbreakers are young black males: Resembling some repulsive rapper from the wrong side of the hood might make you look like a real or wannabee "knockout" criminal. On the other hand, New Jersey Nets minority owner Jay Z said dealing drugs helped shape his business skills long before inspiring our nation by cozying up to Communist Cuba with wife Beyoncé for their anniversary vacation.

  • Do become an authentic "national action" leader such as Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, Thomas Sowell and Dr. Ben Carson while rejecting the predictable pandering poison from retread race-baiting hustlers, aspiring to be relevant through their all-dark rainbow prism, wallowing in the grievance industry of shakedown selective civil rights such as their sainthood of Anita Hill. Rather than doing more harm to blacks than David Duke and George Wallace by always playing the "battered race syndrome" card from the bottom of a decadent deck, it might be prudent to focus more on paying your taxes and explaining to your son how to handle campaign money and a mistress.

  • Don't be a parasite smoking weed and getting involved with drugs unless it helps prevent you from becoming a nanny-state social engineer fantasizing in the "could've-been-me" world of dismissive and derisive phony scandals. Let me be clear! Phony is telling glaring untruths about retaining your existing healthcare or standing in front of caskets and hiding behind a hyped video while meandering to get to the bottom of patriotic, not languishing, Americans being murdered and belittling folks who deserve straight answers.

  • Do steer clear of street thuggery attacks and the Gangsta culture in every way. Spend more time like blustery Big O keeping an inventory of how items such as jewelry, not Skittles, came in your possession. Then you might be able to concentrate on "a spiritual union" with a partner (Mr. Oprah) or keep a keen watch on the "racist" Swiss. The devastation of fatherless boys caused by liberal welfare policies is a factor in the Centers for Disease Control reporting that young black men are 14 times more likely to commit murder than young white men.

  • Don't use the creepy term "Cracka" (offensive to Wheat Thins) when describing a Hispanic; let alone a wily White-Spanic or full-fledged caustic Caucasian. Although you might have a female friend claiming you "wanted to be a basketball player," that dialogue won't get you a passing grade in Trash Talking 101. Let your standards resonate a mite higher than rolling the dice like an AAU team from Atlanta donning "I AM TRAYVON" shirts before and after games in a Las Vegas tournament or the grandstanding Alabama State marching band spelling out his name for some sort of symbolic gesture at halftime of a football game. Please! You can do better than this drivel! Let's see if Alabama State's bereaved band can spell the name of any "Cracka" victim stemming from the Navy Yard rampage in the District of Columbia.

  • Do be sufficiently discriminating not to be a peer-pressure slave to liberal racism resulting in 90% of tunnel-vision blacks voting one way. Compare the percentage of blacks who voted for McCain/Romney in the last two presidential elections to percentage of whites who voted for Obama and then be honest with yourself asking who immerses themselves in tarnished practice of bigoted racial profiling to deal with never-forgotten white privilege. An I-have-a-dream struggle does continue trying to overcome prejudiced one-way voting expression. Enhance your credibility by making sure you develop enough remedial initiative to secure simplistic voter ID to exhibit such dynamic diversity. If the biased balloting ceased, the emancipation could be profiled online at www.blackpeoplefeat.com rather than wasting energy stalking Paula Deen. With respect to stark percentages, check out the Department of Justice's annual Victimization Report showing blacks committing more than half of the violent crimes against whites while whites commit only a few percent of the violent crimes against blacks.

  • Don't become "a terrible husband" like many promiscuous NBA players or infatuated with 72 virgins via Islamic martyrdom no matter how many condoms you can freely secure from a public school to mingle with a two-bit twerker. After all, "A Father First" divorce settlement in the "War on Women" can cost you in excess of $5 million. Records are made to be broken but don't get on the dead-beat "BabyDaddies" list of multiple illegitimate children with irresponsible Sperminators Kenny Anderson, Willie Anderson, Jason Caffey, Dwight Howard, Larry Johnson, Shawn Kemp, Calvin Murphy, Clifford Rozier, Scott Skiles, Latrell Sprewell, etc. Moreover, don't be as shamelessly reality-show shallow as Lamar Odom, a Heat teammate in 2003-04 when Wade was a rookie, and marry a no-talent Left Coast celebrity only a month after meeting her Kardashian can and/or clan. There is also something to be said for not duplicating the entitlement rudeness of hip-hop "artist" Kanye West when he interrupted singer Taylor Swift's awards acceptance speech or exhibiting a mite more class than Seattle Seahawks defensive back Roger Sherman following a Super Bowl-bound victory.

  • Do show respect for the opposite sex and sanctity of life by not contributing to more than 70% unwed mothers in the black community. Examine why FBI crime statistics show blacks raping several thousand white women annually while white-on-black rapes number between "0.0" and "sample based on 10 or fewer" (see Chapter 11 of "Mugged"). And if you say you're pro-little guy (such as highly-motivated work force seeking to double wages in their "career" at McDonalds); then "choose" to support the ultimate little guy (baby in a womb). Where are the marches to curtail the barbaric Planned Murderhood genocide of nearly 1,900 black baby abortions per day? A precise definition of blind-eye targeting is when 13% of the nation's population look like the serial-killer nurse from Houston undergoing 35% of all abhorrent abortions. How low can we sink as a society if the remainder of the country ever becomes like New York City where more black babies are killed by abortion than are born there? Incredibly, the New York Slimes was hailed by lib-nut bloodthirsty bloggers when Wade's teammate, Udonis Haslem, and his wife were depicted as courageous for challenging the "persistent abortion stigma that's deeply ingrained in our society."

  • Don't besmirch Kobe Bryant for failing to toe the solidarity line and don't associate extensively with "We Be New School People" who can't read cursive or speak English properly (ebonics eloquent to MSNBC's not-so-sharp ton of tampon-earring misfits and "clever" editing). Unless, of course, you've undergone sensitivity training and helping someone with a genuine learning disability (whether or not they're a homophobic perjurer).

  • Do stand your moral ground following these ethical principles so your personal responsibility will significantly decrease the odds you'll end up with a suspect legacy like slain Trayvon Martin or the chronic whiners exploiting tragedy on dopey ABC, CBS, NBC, CNN and MSLSD.

In the meantime, out-of-state, right-thinking Americans from flyover country, after enduring reparation racketeering rallies, will earn their money and not expect a handout so they can return to sunny Florida as soon as possible. Boasting enough dignity to pull their pants all the way up (literally and figuratively), they won't be nearly as narrow-minded and would love to watch the Heat to tell their kids about the experience without any assistance. Cover potential or not, Wade would probably need to don a hoodie again to hide his face in shame if he sat down for a penetrating interview regarding his jury-like knowledge of the width and breadth of basic facts about the Zimmerman case.

On the other equal-treatment hand, Wade is good at playing on both ends of the court. Thus he could play both sides of the lecture fence comparable to lunatic liberal activists condemning recent demented Demorat sexual escapades after the same enablers staunchly defended Sick Willie, the self-styled first black POTUS, for similar political-theatre bozo behavior. At the very least, any perceived problem could be blamed by genuine racial rodeo clowns on George Dubya, global warming, the Australian catcher for East Central (Okla.) murdered by human debris when shot in the back by hate-crime valueless scum while jogging or the white student "justifiably" assaulted on a Florida bus by three black teens for alleged drug ratting. Hopefully, Wade won't also take up the mantle of the "stop snitchin'" movement like Syracuse All-American Carmelo Anthony, who appeared in an underground DVD circulated in his hometown of Baltimore in 2004 encouraging those individuals questioned by the police to refuse to "snitch" on drug dealers and other criminals.

Encumbered by loathsome leftist leaders, we see low-life decay from sea (fatally shooting baby in a stroller in coastal GA, 14-year-old murdering his MA math teacher with a box cutter and slaughtering civilians at a Navy complex in nation's capitol) to dying sea (beating WWII veteran to death with flashlight in Washington state after he survived Okinawa). The so-called leaders with a deficit in character content 50 years removed from MLK mooch off vet Shorty's sacrifice but probably never would mention him unless it was for gun-control purposes if he had tried to defend himself with a weapon.

Where are the arrogant activists donning "We Are Santiago" T-shirts in memory of the infant murdered in cold blood or will they only get involved if an outraged commentator remarks they're surprised the perpetrator could twice count down from five before pulling the trigger? Are the black thrill killers in Oklahoma also going to be portrayed as possible bored sons of POTUS as he "takes us to darker places"? Would Aaron Alexis have been in a healthier state of mind if he simply drank more water, ate more organic food and participated regularly in "Let's Move" exercises? Will wise Wade show solidarity with a Melbourne mom by having him and his sons don a catcher's mask for a magazine cover shot or math flash cards supporting the young MA math teacher or Naval gear honoring the D.C. deceased? Integrity questions to ponder after shedding "Be Like Mike" mementos and trying to learn how to put on a "Trained by Dwyane" hoodie at his Re-Education Camp. Please don't tell me Kentucky's scholars were also making a similar political solidarity statement when the Wildcats broke out new warmup outfits midway through the 2013-14 campaign.

League Landscape: Nearly 50 Schools Will Be New Conference Members

"Man, that's messed up!" This concise summation certainly depicts higher education, which simply isn't what it used to be. Keeping remedial mathematics in mind, the Atlantic 10 Conference has more than that number of members; the Big Ten has more than 10 members and the Big 12 has fewer than 12 members. It would be helpful for sanity's sake if the Big Ten and Big 12 would swap names if only for accuracy before the Big Ten increases to 14 by adding Maryland and Rutgers.

With respect to precise directions and logistics, the Atlantic Coast Conference will feature Boston, Indiana (Notre Dame), Louisville, Pittsburgh and Syracuse in the not-too-distant future; the Atlantic Sun takes in East Tennessee; much of the Big East absorbs flyover country, and the Southeast(ern) extends to the Midlands (Missouri and Texas A&M).

Even the most ardent fan probably can't come anywhere close to naming half of the almost 50 schools switching conferences in 2013-14. Heaven knows how future generations will explain the Big East Conference split. As NFL Hall of Famer Vince Lombardi, who coached freshman basketball with Fordham, would famously say: "What the hell is going on out here?"

More than one-third of the nation's NCAA Division I schools joined new or different conferences thus far this century since the Mountain West was introduced in 1999-2000. And there's more membership maneuvering to come after 20 leagues incur changes the upcoming season. When Elon and the College of Charleston departed for the CAA, they became the 31st and 32nd schools to leave the Southern Conference. Following is an alphabetical list of the conference membership history of schools in different leagues in 2013-14:

New League Member Latest League Previous DI Conference(s)
Abilene Christian Southland (1969-73 and since 2014)
Boston University Patriot League (since 2014) Yankee (1973-76)/America East (1980-2013)
Bowling Green Mid-American (since 1954)
Butler Big East (since 2014) Missouri Valley (1933 & '34)/Mid-American (1947-50)/Horizon League (1980-2012)/Atlantic 10 (2013)
Cal State Bakersfield WAC (since 2014)
Central Florida American Athletic (since 2014) Sun Belt (1992)/Atlantic Sun (1994-2005)/C-USA (2006-2013)
Charlotte C-USA (1996-2005 and since 2014) Sun Belt (1977-91)/Metro (1992-95)/Atlantic 10 (2006-13)
Chicago State WAC (since 2014) Mid-Continent (1995-2006)/Great West (2010-13)
Cincinnati American Athletic (since 2014) Mid-American (1947-53)/Missouri Valley (1958-70)/Metro (1976-91)/Great Midwest (1992-95)/C-USA (1996-2005)/Big East (2006-13)
College of Charleston CAA (since 2014) TAAC (1994-98)/Southern (1999-2013)
Connecticut American Athletic (since 2014) New England/Yankee (1938-43 and 1946-76)/Big East (1980-2013)
Creighton Big East (since 2014) Missouri Valley (1929-48 and 1977-2013)
Denver Summit League (since 2014) Rocky Mountain (1923-37)/Skyline (1938-62)/Sun Belt (2000-12)/WAC (2013)
Florida Atlantic C-USA (since 2014) Atlantic Sun (1996-2004)/Sun Belt (2005-13)
Florida International C-USA (since 2014) TAAC (1992-98)/Sun Belt (1999-2013)
George Mason Atlantic 10 (since 2014) CAA (1983-2013)
Georgia State Sun Belt (1977-81 and since 2014) Atlantic Sun (1985-2005)/CAA (2006-13)
Grand Canyon WAC (since 2014)
Houston American Athletic (since 2014) Missouri Valley (1951-60)/SWC (1976-96)/C-USA (1997-2013)
Houston Baptist Southland (since 2014) TAAC (1980-89)/Great West (2009-13)
Incarnate Word Southland (since 2014)
Louisiana Tech C-USA (since 2014) Southland (1972-87)/American South (1988-91)/Sun Belt (1992-2001)/WAC (2002-13)
Loyola of Chicago Missouri Valley (since 2014) Horizon League (1980-2013)
Loyola (Md.) Patriot League (since 2014) Northeast (1982-89)/MAAC (1990-2013)
Massachusetts-Lowell America East (since 2014)
Memphis American Athletic (since 2014) Missouri Valley (1968-73)/Metro (1976-91)/Great Midwest (1992-95)/C-USA (1996-2013)
Middle Tennessee State C-USA (since 2014) Ohio Valley (1953-2000)/Sun Belt (2001-13)
Missouri-Kansas City WAC (since 2014) Summit League (1995-2013)
Monmouth MAAC (since 2014) Northeast (1986-2013)
New Orleans Southland (since 2014) Sun Belt (1977-80 and 1992-2011)/American South (1988-91)
North Texas C-USA (since 2014) Missouri Valley (1958-75)/Southland (1983-96)/Big West (1997-2000)/Sun Belt (2001-13)
Notre Dame ACC (since 2014) Big East (1996-2013)
Oakland Horizon League (since 2014) Summit League (1999-2013)
Old Dominion C-USA (since 2014) Sun Belt (1983-91)/CAA (1992-2013)
Pacific WCAC/WCC (1953-71 and since 2014) Big West (1972-2013)
Pittsburgh ACC (since 2014) Eastern 8 (1977-82)/Big East (1983-2013)
Quinnipiac MAAC (since 2014) Northeast (1999-2013)
San Jose State Mountain West (since 2014) WCAC (1953-69)/Big West (1970-96)/WAC (1997-2013)
Southern Methodist American Athletic (since 2014) SWC (1919-96)/WAC (1997-2005)/C-USA (2006-13)
South Florida American Athletic (since 2014) Sun Belt (1977-91)/Metro (1992-95)/C-USA (1996-2005)/Big East (2006-13)
Syracuse ACC (since 2014) Big East (1980-2013)
Temple American Athletic (since 2014) ECC (1959-82)/Atlantic 10 (1983-2013)
Texas-Arlington Sun Belt (since 2014) Southland (1969-2012 except for 1987)/WAC (2013)
Texas-Pan American WAC (since 2014) TAAC (1980)/American South (1988-91)/Sun Belt (1992-98)/Great West (2009-13)
Texas-San Antonio C-USA (since 2014) TAAC (1987-91)/Southland (1992-2012)/WAC (2013)
Texas State Sun Belt (since 2014) Gulf Star (1985-87)/Southland (1988-2012)/WAC (2013)
Utah State Mountain West (since 2014) Rocky Mountain (1925-37)/Skyline (1938-62)/Big West (1979-2005)/WAC (2006-13)
Utah Valley WAC (since 2014) Great West (2009-13)
Xavier Big East (since 2014) Midwestern Collegiate (1980-95)/Atlantic 10 (1996-2013)

Men For All Seasons: Many MLB All-Stars Previously Played College Hoops

Four former college basketball players - Rick Ferrell, Frankie Frisch, Oral Hildebrand and Hal Schumacher - appeared in the inaugural major league baseball All-Star Game in 1933 and at least one ex-college hoopster participated in every All-Star festivity through the remainder of the 20th Century.

An annual average of seven former college hoopsters were MLB All-Stars the first half of the 1950s (including Hall of Famers Monte Irvin, Robin Roberts and Jackie Robinson). Evidence of the recent reduction of dual-sport athletes is exhibited by the fact that pitchers Chris Young (2007) and Matt Thornton (2010) are the only players in this unique category since outfielder Randy Winn (2002).

Arizona, Illinois, San Diego State and Texas A&M each have had three former hoopsters go on to become MLB All-Stars. Washington Nationals manager Davey Johnson, a Texas A&M product, is among the individuals on the following alphabetical list of MLB All-Stars who played varsity basketball as a regular for a four-year college:

MLB All-Star Team(s) Pos. All-Star Seasons College Played Hoops
Joe Adcock Braves 1B 1960 Louisiana State
George Altman Cubs OF 1961 and 1962 Tennessee State
Glenn Beckert Cubs 2B 1969 through 1972 Allegheny (MA)
R.C. "Beau" Bell Browns OF 1937 Texas A&M
Bruce Bochte Mariners 1B 1979 Santa Clara
Frank Bolling Braves 2B 1961 and 1962 Spring Hill (AL)
Lou Boudreau* Indians SS 1940-41-42-43-44-47-48 Illinois
Ralph Branca Dodgers P 1947 through 1949 New York University
Al Bumbry Orioles OF 1980 Virginia State
Bob Cerv Athletics LF 1958 Nebraska
Tony Clark Tigers 1B 2001 Arizona/San Diego State
Mickey Cochrane* Tigers C 1934 and 1935 Boston University
Gene Conley Braves/Phillies P 1954-55-59 Washington State
George Crowe Reds 1B 1958 Indiana Central
Alvin Dark Giants SS 1951-52-54 LSU/Southwestern Louisiana
Larry Doby Indians OF 1949 through 1955 Virginia Union
Walt Dropo Red Sox 1B 1950 Connecticut
Hoot Evers Tigers OF 1948 and 1950 Illinois
Rick Ferrell* Red Sox/Senators C 1933 through 1938 and 1944 Guilford (NC)
Boo Ferriss Red Sox P 1946 Mississippi State
Frankie Frisch* Cardinals INF 1933 through 1935 Fordham
Bob Gibson* Cardinals P 1962-65-66-67-68-69-70-72 Creighton
Dick Groat Pirates/Cardinals SS 1959-60-62-63-64 Duke
Tony Gwynn* Padres OF 1984 through 1999 (except for 1988) San Diego State
Tom Haller Giants/Dodgers C 1966 through 1968 Illinois
Atlee Hammaker Giants P 1983 East Tennessee State
Mike Hargrove Rangers OF-1B 1975 Northwestern Oklahoma State
Jim Hearn Giants P 1952 Georgia Tech
Oral Hildebrand Indians P 1933 Butler
Gil Hodges Dodgers 1B 1949 through 1955 and 1957 St. Joseph's (IN)/Oakland City (IN)
Frank Howard Senators OF 1968 through 1971 Ohio State
Monte Irvin* Giants OF 1952 Lincoln (PA)
Davey Johnson Orioles/Braves 2B 1968-69-70-73 Texas A&M
Duane Josephson White Sox C 1968 Northern Iowa
David Justice Braves/Indians OF 1993-94-97 Thomas More (KY)
Charlie Keller Yankees OF 1940-41-43-46-47 Maryland
Don Kessinger Cubs SS 1968-69-70-71-72-74 Mississippi
Jim Konstanty Phillies P 1950 Syracuse
Vance Law Cubs 3B 1988 Brigham Young
Dave Lemanczyk Blue Jays P 1979 Hartwick (NY)
Hank Lieber Giants/Cubs OF 1938-40-41 Arizona
Danny Litwhiler Phillies OF 1942 Bloomsburg (PA)
Kenny Lofton Indians/Braves OF 1994 through 1999 Arizona
Davey Lopes Dodgers 2B 1978 through 1981 Iowa Wesleyan
Jerry Lumpe Tigers 2B 1964 Southwest Missouri State
Ted Lyons* White Sox P 1939 Baylor
Bake McBride Cardinals OF 1976 Westminster (MO)
Wally Moon Cardinals/Dodgers OF 1957 and 1959 Texas A&M
Buddy Myer Senators 2B 1935 and 1937 Mississippi State
Graig Nettles Yankees/Padres 3B 1975-77-78-79-80-85 San Diego State
Bill Nicholson Cubs RF 1940-41-43-44 Washington College (MD)
Claude Passeau Cubs P 1941-42-43-45-46 Millsaps (MS)
Gary Peters White Sox P 1964 and 1967 Grove City (PA)
Ron Reed Braves P 1968 Notre Dame
Robin Roberts* Phillies P 1950 through 1956 Michigan State
Jackie Robinson* Dodgers INF-OF 1949 through 1954 UCLA
Preacher Roe Dodgers P 1949 through 1952 Harding (AR)
Red Rolfe Yankees 3B 1937 through 1940 Dartmouth
Marius Russo Yankees P 1941 Long Island
Hal Schumacher Giants P 1933 and 1935 St. Lawrence (NY)
Don Schwall Red Sox P 1961 Oklahoma
Jeff Shaw Dodgers P 1998 and 2001 Rio Grande (OH)
Norm Siebern Athletics 1B 1962 through 1964 Southwest Missouri State
Sonny Siebert Indians/Red Sox P 1966 and 1971 Missouri
Lee Smith Cubs/Cardinals/Orioles/Angels P 1983-87-91-92-93-94-95 Northwestern State
Matt Thornton White Sox P 2010 Grand Valley State (MI)
Bob Veale Pirates P 1965 and 1966 Benedictine (KS)
Bill White Cardinals 1B 1959-60-61-63-64 Hiram (OH)
Sammy White Red Sox C 1953 Washington
Dave Winfield* Padres/Yankees OF 1977 through 1988 Minnesota
Randy Winn Devil Rays OF 2002 Santa Clara
Chris Young Padres P 2007 Princeton

*Baseball Hall of Famers.

Deal or No Deal? Stevens Shows Loyalty is 1-Way Street for College Coaches

In the wake of Brad Stevens leaving Butler for the NBA, the timing is right to reinforce the premise that it's a good thing some universities play in mammoth arenas because the egos of their "Pompous Pilots" wouldn't fit any other place. Much of the excess in the canonization of coaches is perpetrated by coaches-turned-television commentators who shamelessly fawn over their former colleagues.

The analysts should be more concerned about encouraging coaches to spare fans the pious blather about the sanctity of a contract or agreement. Granted, it's survival of the fittest amid the offer-you-can't-refuse backdrop. But in a great many cases, schools have been little more than convenient steppingstones for "larger-than-life" coaches along their one-way street to success. It's understandable in many instances that mercenaries are leaving the minute they're appointed because coaches are in a distasteful "hired-to-be-fired" vocation, where a pink slip is only one losing season or poor recruiting year away.

Nevertheless, loyalty has become too much of a one-way street. Players considering their options occasionally are grilled by coaches and commentators for contemplating transfers or leaving early for the NBA. There are countless examples of schools holding a player's eligibility hostage out of sheer vindictiveness. How much more one-sided can it be when that lame double standard exists?

After all, the value systems for high-profile coaches are sufficiently open-minded to permit running out on contracts when more lucrative jobs come open. Contracts are understood to be for the protection of the coach, not the team, whose players are somehow indentured to the schools for as many as four years of eligibility unless of course a coach chooses not to renew their scholarships. Perhaps that's why many believe incoming recruits should be allowed out of their letter-of-intent to seek another destination if the coach they signed with departs before they even get to campus.

Maybe it shouldn't be that way, but that's most definitely the way it is as contracts don't appear to mean squat to a striking number of meandering mentors who abandon ship like so many rats at high tide. Lon Kruger departed three different schools with at least four years remaining on pacts before leaving UNLV with two seasons left.

Many "leveraged" coaches have been preoccupied of late with attempting to virtually extort raises and extensions on already hefty packages. But in recent years, administrations at Boston College, Kent State, Marist, Miami (Fla.), St. John's and Wyoming seemed to be guinea pigs of sorts by fighting back via adherence to buyout clauses in trying to regain control of the situation in this big business atmosphere.

In mid-July 2010, a New York State Supreme Court Justice made a possible precedent-setting ruling in favor of Marist, which contended that coach Matt Brady's contract required him to secure written consent before negotiating with another school and forbade him from offering "a scholarship to current Marist players or to persons that he or his staff recruited to play at Marist" if he ever took a comparable job.

Brady clearly negotiated with James Madison in 2008 without "written" consent and Marist compiled a list of 19 prospects Brady recruited on behalf of Marist that it believed he should have been unable to recruit to JMU per the details of his contract. Four players on that "off-limits" list - Trevon Flores, Devon Moore, Andrey Semenov and Julius Wells - ultimately signed with JMU.

The judge ruled in favor of Marist's claims that Brady had an enforceable contract when he discussed leaving Marist with JMU, that JMU knew of the contract's existence, that JMU intentionally induced Brady to violate his fiduciary obligations under the contract, and that Marist incurred damages as a result of the breach of those obligations. Marist also filed a separate civil suit against Brady. In mid-May 2011, Kent State sued Geno Ford for more than $1.2 million in damages stemming from his departure for Bradley.

Five of Tulsa's previous seven coaches - Nolan Richardson, Tubby Smith, Steve Robinson, Bill Self and Buzz Peterson - left the school for more prestigious positions despite each of them having at least three years remaining on their contracts. Tulsa is one of three universities from which Self has bailed. He signed a five-year extension with Illinois in December, 2002, that included a bump in salary to $900,000 and payout of $500,000 if he stayed the life of the contract. There also was a buyout of $100,000 per year remaining on the pact.

Deal or no deal? The length of contracts doesn't seem to carry any weight as a factor in the equation. John Calipari and Leonard Hamilton are other coaches who left for the NBA with as many as seven years remaining on their college contracts. Stevens, who had nine years left, is the latest to join the following alphabetical list detailing coaches who still had contractual obligations to schools as long or longer than Stevens' six-year deal with the Boston Celtics when they left for greener pastures at some point in their careers:

Professional Grade: Brad Stevens Faces Star-Crossed Crossing Over to NBA

After Brad Stevens went green leaving Butler for a hefty contract to spearhead the Boston Celtics' rebuilding fortunes, the odds are greater for the NBA's youngest coach to return to college than posting a winning NBA playoff record by the expiration of his six-year contract. San Antonio's Gregg Popovich is the NBA's only head coach with a tenure of more than six seasons at his present position. Moreover, the prospect of gifted guard Rajon Rondo coming back from an injury and exhibiting contentment more than work stoppage during an extended youth movement are slim and none.

SMU's Larry Brown, one of six men to be hired by an NBA team after winning an NCAA championship, is the only one in this category to compile a winning NBA playoff record. Three other coaches directed teams to the NCAA Final Four and the NBA championship series - Jack Ramsay (St. Joseph's 1961 and Portland Trail Blazers 1977), Fred Schaus (West Virginia 1959 and the Los Angeles Lakers 1962), 1963, 1965, 1966) and Butch van Breda Kolff (Princeton 1965 and the Lakers 1968, 1969). Neither Ramsay (8-11) nor Schaus (6-7) finished their collegiate coaching careers with winning NCAA playoff records, however.

Only Phil Jackson and Pat Riley coached in and won more NBA playoff games than Brown. Stevens, who directed Butler to back-to-back NCAA playoff championship games in 2010 and 2011, will find out it's a star-crossed crossing over from college to the NBA. Following is an alphabetical list summarizing the NBA careers of Brown and 15 additional individuals who aligned with NBA franchises as head coaches after marshalling a college team to the Final Four:

Coach NCAA Final Four Team(s) NBA Years Regular-Season Playoff Record
Larry Brown UCLA '80/Kansas '86 & '88 27 1,098-904 100-93
John Calipari Massachusetts '96/Memphis '08/Kentucky '11 & '12 3 72-112 0-3
P.J. Carlesimo Seton Hall '89 9 239-315 6-13
*Bob Feerick Santa Clara '52 2 63-74 0-2
Ed Jucker Cincinnati '61, '62 & '63 2 80-84 0-0
Doggie Julian Holy Cross '47 & '48 2 47-81 0-0
Lon Kruger Florida '94 3 69-122 0-0
Frank McGuire St. John's '52/North Carolina '57 1 49-31 6-6
Mike Montgomery Stanford '98 2 68-96 0-0
Harold Olsen Ohio State '39, '44, '45 & '46 3 95-63 7-11
Rick Pitino PC '87/Kentucky '93, '96 & '97/Louisville '05 & '12 6 192-220 6-7
Jack Ramsay St. Joseph's '61 21 864-783 44-58
Fred Schaus West Virginia '59 7 315-245 23-38
Jerry Tarkanian UNLV '77, '87, '90 & '91 1 9-11 0-0
Butch van Breda Kolff Princeton '65 9 266-253 21-12
Tex Winter Kansas State '58 & '64 2 51-78 0-0

*Feerick's NBA record includes one season with the Washington Capitols (1949-50) before he was named coach at Santa Clara.

NOTES: Jucker (Rollins), Julian (Dartmouth), Kruger (UNLV and Oklahoma), McGuire (South Carolina), Olsen (Northwestern), Pitino (Kentucky and Louisville), Schaus (Purdue), Tarkanian (Fresno State), van Breda Kolff (Lafayette and Hofstra) and Winter (Northwestern and Long Beach State) returned to college as head coaches after their stints in the NBA. . . . Ken Loeffler was coach of the St. Louis Bombers and Providence Steamrollers for three seasons (1946-47 through 1948-49) before directing La Salle to back-to-back Final Fours (1954 champion and 1955 runner-up). . . . Phil Woolpert, coach of San Francisco's back-to-back NCAA champions (1955 and 1956), coached the San Francisco Saints for one season in the old American Basketball League.

Bailey Halfway to Matching Ex-College Hoopster Sandy Koufax's 4 No-Hitters

In the aftermath of Homer Bailey's second no-hitter in 10 months for the Cincinnati Reds, it's time to take a look at ex-college hoopsters who went on to hurl a no-no at the major-league level. Brooklyn native Sandy Koufax attended Cincinnati one year on a combination baseball/basketball scholarship under coach Ed Jucker in both sports before signing a pro baseball contract. Koufax was the third-leading scorer with 9.7 ppg for the Bearcats' 12-2 freshman squad in 1953-54 before hurling no-hitters in four straight seasons the first half of the 1960s.

San Francisco's Tim Lincecum, the victim of Bailey's latest no-no, hurled his own no-hitter shortly thereafter before Miami's Henderson Alvarez duplicated the feat on the final day of the regular season. Two former Bucknell products - Bob Keegan and Christy Mathewson - are among the following former college basketball players who went on to toss a MLB no-hitter (listed in reverse order):

Date No-Hit Pitcher Team Opponent Score Basketball College
5-14-1977 Jim Colborn Kansas City Royals Texas Rangers 6-0 Whittier CA
8-24-1975 Ed Halicki San Francisco Giants New York Mets 6-0 Monmouth NJ
7-30-1973 Jim Bibby Texas Rangers Oakland A's 6-0 Fayetteville State NC
8-14-1971 Bob Gibson St. Louis Cardinals Pittsburgh Pirates 11-0 Creighton
9-18-1968 Ray Washburn St. Louis Cardinals San Francisco Giants 2-0 Whitworth WA
6-10-1966 Sonny Siebert Cleveland Indians Washington Senators 2-0 Missouri
9-9-1965 Sandy Koufax Los Angeles Dodgers Chicago Cubs 1-0* Cincinnati
6-4-1964 Sandy Koufax Los Angeles Dodgers Philadelphia Phillies 3-0 Cincinnati
5-11-1963 Sandy Koufax Los Angeles Dodgers San Francisco Giants 8-0 Cincinnati
6-30-1962 Sandy Koufax Los Angeles Dodgers New York Mets 5-0 Cincinnati
8-20-1957 Bob Keegan Chicago White Sox Washington Senators 6-0 Bucknell
6-12-1954 Jim Wilson Milwaukee Braves Philadelphia Phillies 2-0 San Diego State
9-3-1947 Bill McCahan Philadelphia Athletics Washington Senators 3-0 Duke
8-21-1926 Ted Lyons Chicago White Sox Boston Red Sox 6-0 Baylor
6-13-1905 Christy Mathewson New York Giants Chicago Cubs 1-0 Bucknell
7-15-1901 Christy Mathewson New York Giants St. Louis Cardinals 5-0 Bucknell

*Perfect game.

Package Deals: High School Reunion Before Becoming First-Round Draft Pick

Forward Anthony Bennett, selected as the top overall pick in the NBA draft, attended Findlay Prep prior to his one-year stint with UNLV. One of Bennett's coaches at Findlay was Todd Simon, who is slated to join UNLV's staff as an assistant after previously serving as a video coordinator for two years under former Rebels coach Lon Kruger.

Prior to AAU posses, high school reunions were a popular recruiting ploy. There are usually more than a dozen active Division I head coaches who got their start as a college assistant by tagging along directly or being reunited with one of their regal high school recruits. Following is an alphabetical list of star players such as Bennett whose high school coach was employed at the same college as an assistant before the standout became an NBA first-round draft selection:

NBA First-Rounder College H.S. Coach/College Aide College Head Coach Draft Year Pro Team (Pick Overall)
Marvin Barnes Providence Jimmy Adams Dave Gavitt 1974 Philadelphia 76ers (2nd)
Howard Carter Louisiana State Rick Huckabay Dale Brown 1983 Denver Nuggets (15th)
Bill Cartwright San Francisco Don Risley Bob Gaillard 1979 New York Knicks (3rd)
Norm Cook Kansas Duncan Reid Ted Owens 1976 Boston Celtics (16th)
Ernie DiGregorio Providence Nick Macarchuk Dave Gavitt 1973 Buffalo Braves (3rd)
Julius Erving Massachusetts Ray Wilson Jack Leaman 1972 Milwaukee Bucks (12th)
Tyreke Evans Memphis Lamont Peterson John Calipari 2009 Sacramento Kings (4th)
Danny Ferry Duke Mike Brey Mike Krzyzewski 1989 Cleveland Cavaliers (2nd)
Darrell Griffith Louisville Wade Houston Denny Crum 1980 Utah Jazz (2nd)
Larry Hughes Saint Louis Derek Thomas Charlie Spoonhour 1998 Philadelphia 76ers (8th)
Jeff Lamp Virginia Richard Schmidt Terry Holland 1981 Portland Trail Blazers (15th)
Raymond Lewis Cal State Los Angeles Caldwell Black Bob Miller 1973 Philadelphia 76ers (17th)
Jamaal Magloire Kentucky Simeon Mars Rick Pitino 2000 Charlotte Hornets (19th)
Calvin Natt Northeast Louisiana Mike Vining Lenny Fant 1979 New Jersey Nets (8th)
Lamar Odom Rhode Island Jerry DeGregorio Jim Harrick 1999 Los Angeles Clippers (4th)
Stanley Roberts Louisiana State Jim Childers Dale Brown 1991 Orlando Magic (23rd)
Jalen Rose Michigan Perry Watson Steve Fisher 1994 Denver Nuggets (13th)
Brian Skinner Baylor Harry Miller Darrel Johnson 1998 Los Angeles Clippers (22nd)
Steve Stipanovich Missouri Rich Grawer Norm Stewart 1983 Indiana Pacers (2nd)
Kenny Thomas New Mexico Ron Garcia Dave Bliss 1999 Houston Rockets (22nd)
Tim Thomas Villanova Jimmy Salmon Steve Lappas 1997 New Jersey Nets (7th)
Wayman Tisdale Oklahoma Mike Mims Billy Tubbs 1985 Indiana Pacers (2nd)
Trent Tucker Minnesota Jessie Evans Jim Dutcher 1982 New York Knicks (6th)
Darnell Valentine Kansas Lafayette Norwood Ted Owens 1981 Portland Trail Blazers (16th)
Frank Williams Illinois Wayne McClain Bill Self 2002 Denver Nuggets (25th)

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Score Big in July MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only four percent of active MLB players earned college diplomas.

Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a July calendar involving such versatile athletes:

JULY
31 - P Mike Adams (played basketball for Texas A&M-Kingsville in 1996-97) traded by the San Diego Padres to the Texas Rangers in 2011. . . . Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading scorer in 1945-46) belted four homers off four different pitchers plus a double against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1954, setting a MLB record for most total bases in a game (18) that stood until broken by RF Shawn Green in 2002. . . . St. Louis Cardinals CF Taylor Douthit (California letterman from 1922 through 1924) collected five hits in an 18-5 pounding of the Philadelphia Phillies in 1928. . . . P Johnny Gee (captain of Michigan's 16-4 team in 1936-37) absorbed his first defeat since returning to the New York Giants in 1946 after a year's retirement. . . . Cleveland Indians 1B Mike Hargrove (Northwestern Oklahoma State letterman) scored five runs in a 16-11 victory against the Toronto Blue Jays in 1983. . . . Boston Red Sox rookie P Don Schwall (All-Big Seven Conference second-team selection as sophomore in 1956-57 when leading Oklahoma in rebounding) hurled the middle three innings for the A.L., yielding the only run, in a 1-1 tie in the second of two All-Star Games in 1961. . . . Boston Red Sox P Sonny Siebert (team-high 16.7 ppg for Mizzou in 1957-58 as an All-Big Eight Conference second-team selection) hurled a one-hitter at California in 1970. . . . Chicago Cubs OF Cy Williams (Notre Dame forward in 1909-10) clobbered a three-run homer to chase New York Giants Hall of Fame P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) in the opener of a 1915 doubleheader.
30 - Texas Rangers P Jim Bibby (Fayetteville State, NC, backup player and brother of UCLA All-American Henry Bibby) fanned 13 batters while hurling a no-hitter against the first-place Oakland A's in 1973. . . . 2B Marv Breeding (played for Samford in mid-1950s) traded by the Washington Senators to the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1963. . . . Alvin Dark (letterman for LSU and USL during World War II) fired as manager of the Cleveland Indians in 1971. . . . New York Giants OF Monte Irvin (played for Lincoln, PA, 1 1/2 years in late 1930s) tied a N.L. record by grounding into three double plays against the Milwaukee Braves in 1953. . . . New York Giants P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) had his 13-game winning streak snapped by the Pittsburgh Pirates, 3-1, in 1909. . . . Chicago White Sox P Gary Peters (played for Grove City, PA, in mid-1950s) faced only 29 batters in a 75-pitch, 6-0 shutout of the New York Yankees in 1966. . . . OF Randy Winn (Santa Clara backcourtmate of eventual two-time NBA Most Valuable Player Steve Nash in 1993-94) traded by the Seattle Mariners to the San Francisco Giants in 2005.
29 - Chicago White Sox OF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) knocked in eight runs in a 1956 doubleheader sweep of the Boston Red Sox. . . . OF Hoot Evers (starter for Illinois in 1939-40) awarded on waivers from the New York Giants to the Detroit Tigers in 1954. . . . Chicago White Sox P Joel Horlen, flirting with a no-hitter entering the ninth inning, wound up losing the game, 2-1, when OF Don Lock (led Wichita State in field-goal percentage in 1956-57 and 1957-58) socked a homer for the Washington Senators in 1963. . . . OF Sam Mele (NYU's leading scorer in 1943 NCAA playoffs) awarded on waivers from the Baltimore Orioles to the Boston Red Sox in 1954. . . . P Paul Reuschel (Western Illinois' leading rebounder in 1966-67 with 15.2 per game) posted the save when the Cleveland Indians extended their winning streak to seven games with a 9-6 decision over the Chicago White Sox in 1979.
28 - 1B Donn Clendenon (letterman for Morehouse, GA) set a New York Mets record by knocking in seven runs in a 12-2 rout of the San Francisco Giants in 1970. . . . Toronto Blue Jays P Dave Lemanczyk (averaged 4.5 ppg and 3.5 rpg from 1969-70 through 1971-72 on a couple of NCAA College Division Tournament teams for Hartwick, NY) registered his third shutout in 1979, blanking his former team, the Detroit Tigers, 3-0. . . . OF Kenny Lofton (Arizona's leader in steals for 1988 Final Four team compiling a 35-3 record) traded by the Chicago White Sox to the San Francisco Giants in 2002. . . . Chicago White Sox P Ted Lyons (two-time All-SWC first-team selection for Baylor in early 1920s) tied a MLB record with two doubles in a 10-run second inning en route to a 14-6 decision over the St. Louis Browns in the opener of a 1935 doubleheader. . . . Oakland Athletics CF Billy North (played four games with Central Washington in 1967-68) made an unassisted double play against the Kansas City Royals in 1973. . . . Brooklyn Dodgers iNF Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in PCC both of his seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) went on a 12-for-25 spurt en route to capturing the 1949 N.L. batting title.
27 - Brooklyn Dodgers P Roger Craig (forward with North Carolina State's 1949-50 freshman basketball team) hurled one of his four shutouts in 1959. . . . In an 8-0 victory against the Chicago Cubs, San Diego Padres OF Tony Gwynn (All-WAC second-team selection with San Diego State in 1979-80 and 1980-81) secured five hits in a game for the third time in the 1993 campaign. . . . Los Angeles P Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) fanned 16 Philadelphia Phillies in 11 innings before the Dodgers prevailed in 16 frames, 2-1, in 1966. . . . Boston Red Sox OF Joe Lahoud (letterman for New Haven, CT) hammered a two-run homer in the top of the 20th inning in a 5-3 win at Seattle in 1969. . . . OF Kenny Lofton (Arizona's leader in steals for 1988 Final Four team compiling a 35-3 record) traded by the Texas Rangers to the Cleveland Indians in 2007. . . . In the ninth inning against the California Angels, New York Yankees SS Gene Michael (Kent State's leading scorer with 14 ppg in 1957-58) pulled the hidden-ball trick for the second time in six weeks in 1970. . . . OF Greasy Neale (hoopster graduated from West Virginia Wesleyan College in 1915) supplied three of the Cincnnati Reds' eight stolen bases in a 14-5 triumph against the Philadelphia Phillies in the opener of a 1918 doubleheader. . . . Chicago Cubs OF Riggs Stephenson (Alabama letterman in 1920) broke his ankle stepping on first base against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1931.
26 - Chicago Cubs 2B Glenn Beckert (three-year letterman for Allegheny, MA) banged out five straight hits in a 7-6 decision over the Atlanta Braves in the nightcap of a 1970 doubleheader. . . . After incurring a 13-3 defeat against the New York Yankees, Boston Red Sox P Gene Conley (All-PCC first-team selection led North Division in scoring in 1949-50 as Washington State sophomore) and teammate Pumpsie Green mysteriously disappeared in 1962. Conley wanted to fly to Israel and went to the airport but was denied a ticket because he didn't have a visa. . . . OF Billy Cowan (co-captain of Utah's 1960 NCAA playoff team) purchased from the New York Yankees by the California Angels in 1969. . . . Acting St. Louis Cardinals manager Frankie Frisch (Fordham captain) contributed four hits but they weren't enough to prevent a 6-5 setback at Boston in the nightcap of a 1930 twinbill against the Braves. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates SS Dick Groat (two-time All-Ameican with Duke in 1950-51 and 1951-52 when finishing among nation's top five scorers each season) ended an 0-for-19 slump by going 5-for-5 in a 6-4 win against the Boston Braves in 1952. . . . New York Giants LF Hank Lieber (played for Arizona in 1931) started a fourth-inning triple play with a brilliant catch near the wall in a 5-4 verdict over the Cincinnati Reds in 1936. . . . New York Giants P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) won his 21st consecutive contest from the Cincinnati Reds in 1911. . . . 1B Babe Young (Fordham letterman in 1935-36) traded by the Cincinnati Reds to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1948.
25 - Joey Amalfitano (played for Loyola Marymount in 1952-53) became manager for the Chicago Cubs in 1980. . . . Detroit Tigers 1B Tony Clark (San Diego State's leading scorer in WAC games in 1991-92) homered from each side of the plate for the second time in 1999 season in a 9-1 triumph against the Boston Red Sox. . . . OF David Justice (led Thomas More, KY, in assists in 1984-85) jacked a home run to account for the Atlanta Braves' lone hit and game's only run in a 1-0 victory against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1992. . . . Chicago Cubs INF-OF Riggs Stephenson (Alabama letterman in 1920) contributed four hits in a 9-5 win against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1930. . . . Boston Red Sox 3B Jim Tabor (Alabama letterman in 1936-37) hit two homers in a 10-6 verdict over the Cleveland Indians in 1941.
24 - New York Yankees Hall of Fame OF Earle Combs (three-year captain for Eastern Kentucky) crashed into the wall in St. Louis in 1934, incurring a broken collarbone and fractured skull. . . . Cleveland Indians OF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) smashed a decisive 10th-inning, two-run homer at New York in 1954. The blast was Doby's third round-tripper in two days at Yankee Stadium.
23 - C Mark Bailey (led Southwest Missouri State in rebounding and field-goal shooting in 1980-81) traded by the Houston Astros to the Montreal Expos in 1988. . . . OF Bob Cerv (ranked fourth on school all-time scoring list in 1949-50 when finishing Nebraska career) and C Elston Howard socked back-to-back pinch-hit homers for the New York Yankees in the ninth inning in 1955 but they still lost to the Kansas City Athletics, 8-7, in 11 frames. . . . Utilityman Harvey Hendrick (Vanderbilt letterman in 1918) provided a pinch-hit grand slam in the 11th inning to give the Chicago Cubs a 9-5 win in the opener of a 1933 doubleheader against the Philadelphia Phillies. . . . Chicago Cubs OF Bill Nicholson (played for Washington College, MD, in the mid-1930s), after swatting four consecutive homers in two 1944 games (three in the opener of a doubleheader against the New York Giants), received the ultimate compliment. In the nightcap of the twinbill, he is issued an intentional walk forcing in a run. . . . In 1962, Brooklyn Dodgers iNF Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in Pacific Coast Conference both of his seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) became the first African-American inductee to the Baseball Hall of Fame.
22 - Philadelphia Athletics C Mickey Cochrane (Boston University hoopsler in early 1920s) hit for the cycle against the Washington Senators in 1932. . . . P Dallas Green (Delaware's runner-up in scoring and rebounding In 1954-55) purchased from the Philadelphia Phillies by the New York Mets in 1966. Green was returned to Philly three weeks later. . . . In 1999, Cleveland Indians manager Mike Hargrove (Northwestern Oklahoma State letterman) accidentally handed in an incorrect lineup card against the Toronto Blue Jays, forcing the Tribe to forfeit the DH and bat their pitcher in the seventh spot in the batting order. . . . OF Kenny Lofton (Arizona's leader in steals for 1988 Final Four team compiling a 35-3 record) traded by the Pittsburgh Pirates to the Chicago Cubs in 2003.
21 - Brooklyn Dodgers INF-OF Harvey Hendrick (Vanderbilt letterman in 1918) hit a game-winning, three-run homer in the ninth inning of a 9-8 decision over the St. Louis Cardinals in the opener of a 1930 doubleheader. Hendrick's decisive blast was one of four pinch-hit round-trippers during the twinbill (two for each team). . . . 2B Davey Lopes (NAIA All-District 15 selection for Iowa Wesleyan averaged 16.9 ppg as freshman in 1964-65 and 12.1 ppg as sophomore in 1965-66) traded by the Chicago Cubs to the Houston Astros in 1986. . . . In his first MLB start, Baltimore Orioles P Ben McDonald (started six games as a 6-6 freshman forward for LSU in 1986-87) blanked the Chicago White Sox, 2-0, in 1990. . . . New York Yankees OF Bud Metheny (letterman for William & Mary from 1935-36 through 1937-38) homered in a 12-3 romp over the Chicago White Sox in 1945. . . . In 1960, Philadelphia Phillies P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) hurled his third career one-hitter.
20 - 3B Gene Freese (captain of 1952 NAIA Tournament team for West Liberty WV) traded by the Chicago White Sox to the Houston Astros for Jim Mahoney and cash in 1966. . . . Cleveland Indians OF Kenny Lofton (Arizona's leader in steals for 1988 Final Four team compiling a 35-3 record) provided five hits in a 6-5 win against the Minnesota Twins in 1996. . . . P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) traded by the New York Giants to the Cincinnati Reds in 1916. . . . Baltimore Orioles P Ben McDonald (started six games as a 6-6 freshman forward for LSU in 1986-87) hurled a one-hit shutout against the Kansas City Royals in 1993.
19 - Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame C Rick Ferrell (played for Guilford, NC, in mid-1920s) hit a homer off his brother (Wes Ferrell of Cleveland Indians) in 1933. Wes, who whacked a round-tripper in the same inning (fourth), finished his career with 38 HRs in 548 games while Rick had 28 in 1,884 contests. . . . P Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) started a second straight game for the last-place Los Angeles Dodgers in 1958. He was lifted after walking four batters in the first inning the previous day. . . . Chicago White Sox OF Kenny Lofton (Arizona's leader in steals for 1988 Final Four team compiling a 35-3 record) lashed a leadoff homer for the second straight game against the Kansas City Royals in 2002. . . . P Gary Peters (played for Grove City, PA, in mid-1950s) whacked a 13th-inning pinch-hit homer to give the Chicago White Sox a 3-2 win against the Kansas City Athletics in 1964. . . . OF Ted Savage (led Lincoln, MO, in scoring average in 1955-56) knocked in the game-winning run in the 11th inning as the Cincinnati Reds overcame a 9-0 deficit to edge the Houston Astros, 10-9, in 1969. . . . New York Giants P Hal Schumacher (played for St. Lawrence, NY, in early 1930s) hurled a 12-hit shutout against the Cincinnati Reds in 1934. . . . New York Yankees 1B-Of Norm Siebern (member of Southwest Missouri State's back-to-back NAIA Tournament titlists in 1952 and 1953) notched his second five-hit game of the month in 1958 (against the Kansas City Athletics). . . . New York Yankees 1B Bill "Moose" Skowron (scored 18 points in eight games for Purdue in 1949-50) stroked a decisive ninth-inning, bases-loaded double in the ninth inning after previously providing two homers in a 13-11 triumph against the Cleveland Indians in 1960.
18 - P Mike Adams (played for Texas A&M-Kingsville in 1996-97) traded by the Cleveland Indians to the San Diego Padres in 2006. . . . Brooklyn Dodgers P Ralph Branca (sixth-leading scorer for NYU in 1943-44) hurled a one-hitter in a 7-0 win against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1947. . . . Los Angeles Dodgers C-OF Joe Ferguson (member of Pacific's 1967 NCAA playoff team) broke up a no-hit bid by Luke Walker of the Pittsburgh Pirates with a ninth-inning homer in the nightcap of a 1971 twinbill. . . . St. Louis Cardinals 2B Frankie Frisch (Fordham captain) hit two homers but they were in vain in an 8-7 setback against the New York Giants in 1930. . . . All-time hits leader Pete Rose of the Cincinnati Reds hit the only grand slam of his career with the homer yielded in 1964 by Philadelphia Phillies P Dallas Green (Delaware's second-leading scorer and rebounder in 1954-55). . . . OF Jim Lyttle (led Florida State in free-throw shooting in 1965-66 when he averaged 12.4 ppg) purchased from the Chicago White Sox by the Montreal Expos in 1975. . . . New York Giants P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) blanked the St. Louis Cardinals, 5-0, in the nightcap of a 1913 doubleheader but his record string of 68 walkless innings came to a halt. . . . OF Sam Mele (NYU's leading scorer in 1943 NCAA playoffs) managed the only hit for the Baltimore Orioles against Boston Red Sox P Russ Kemmerer in the opener of a 1954 doubleheader. . . . After speaking out against racial discrimination testifying in front of the House Un-American Activities Committee, Brooklyn Dodgers INF Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in Pacific Coast Conference both of his seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) scored twice, once on a steal of home in the sixth inning, in a 3-0 triumph against the Chicago Cubs in 1949. . . . St. Louis Cardinals 1B Bill White (played two years with Hiram, OH, in early 1950s) went 3-for-4 in each end of a twinbill sweep of the Chicago Cubs in 1961. White tied Ty Cobb's 49-year-old record of 14 hits in back-to-back doubleheaders.
17 - Cincinnati Reds LF Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading scorer in 1945-46) went 4-for-4 and threw out a runner at home plate in the ninth inning in a 9-8 victory against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1951. . . . 1B Tony Clark (San Diego State's leading scorer in WAC games in 1991-92) traded by the San Diego Padres to the Arizona Diamondbacks in 2008. . . . Legendary Babe Ruth drew his 2,000th career base on balls in 1934 at Cleveland off P Oral Hildebrand (All-American for Butler in 1928-29 and 1929-30). . . . In 1964, Baltimore Orioles P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) hurled a 5-0 shutout against the Detroit Tigers despite yielding 11 hits. . . . Boston Red Sox 3B Billy Werber (first Duke All-American in 1929-30) became the first A.L. player to hit four consecutive doubles in one game (opener of 1935 doubleheader against the Cleveland Indians). . . . St. Louis Cardinals 1B Bill White (played two years with Hiram, OH, in early 1950s) went 8-for-10 in a twinbill sweep of the Chicago Cubs in 1961.
16 - Chicago Cubs 2B Glenn Beckert (three-year basketball letterman for Allegheny, MA) stretched his hitting streak to 21 games with a decisive 12th-inning double in a 4-3 victory against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1968. . . . Detroit Tigers 1B Walt Dropo (Connecticut's first player ever to average 20 points for a season with 21.7 ppg in 1942-43) delivered two more hits, giving him an A.L. record-tying 15 safeties over a four-game span in 1952. . . . After 16 scoreless innings, New York Giants 2B Frankie Frisch (Fordham captain) stroked a bases-loaded triple to ignite a 7-0 win against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1920. . . . Los Angeles Dodgers manager Davey Johnson (averaged 1.7 ppg with Texas A&M in 1961-62) hospitalized in 2000 after experiencing dizziness as a result of an irregular heartbeat.
15 - Detroit Tigers 1B Walt Dropo (Connecticut's first player ever to average 20 points for a season with 21.7 ppg in 1942-43) tied a MLB record with 12 consecutive hits before his streak was snapped in the nightcap of a doubleheader against the Washington Senators in 1952. . . . P George Earnshaw (Swarthmore, PA, basketball participant in 1922) traded by the Brooklyn Dodgers to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1936. . . . A line drive by Pittsburgh Pirates RF Roberto Clemente broke the leg of St. Louis Cardinals P Bob Gibson (Creighton's leading scorer in 1955-56 and 1956-57). But Gibson returned from the injury to lead the Cards to the 1967 World Series championship. . . . New York Giants P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) hurled a no-hitter against St. Louis with a 5-0 win in 1901. Twelve years later, he used only 70 pitches to outduel Cincinnati Reds P Three Finger Brown, 4-2, extending Mathewson's streak of innings without issuing a walk to 61. . . . 1B Cotton Nash (three-time All-American averaged 22.7 ppg and 12.3 rpg in Kentucky career from 1961-62 through 1963-64) traded by the Chicago White Sox to the Minnesota Twins in 1969. . . . 1B-OF Norm Siebern (member of Southwest Missouri State's back-to-back NAIA Tournament titlists in 1952 and 1953) purchased from the San Francisco Giants by the Boston Red Sox in 1967. . . . In 1997, the Montreal Expos announced the retirement of closer Lee Smith (averaged 3.4 ppg and 1.9 rpg with Northwestern State in 1976-77).
14 - Cleveland Indians player-manager Lou Boudreau (leading scorer for Illinois' 1937 Big Ten Conference co-champion) banged out five extra-base hits - four doubles and a homer - but it wasn't enough to prevent an 11-10 defeat in the opening game of a 1946 doubleheader against the Boston Red Sox, which got three homers for eight RBI from Hall of Fame OF Ted Williams. . . . Detroit Tigers 1B Walt Dropo (Connecticut's first player ever to average 20 points for a season with 21.7 ppg in 1942-43) stroked five singles in an 8-2 win over the New York Yankees in 1952. . . . San Diego Padres Of Tony Gwynn (All-WAC second-team selection with San Diego State in 1979-80 and 1980-81) extended his hitting streak to 19 games with three safeties against the San Francisco Giants in 1977, raising his batting average to .402. . . . In a MLB first, Tom Haller (backup forward for Illinois in 1956-57 and 1957-58 under coach Harry Combes) was the Detroit Tigers' catcher in 1972 when his brother, Bill, umpired behind the plate. . . . Philadelphia Phillies P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) started the 1953 All-Star Game as the N.L. beat the A.L., 5-1, at Cincinnati's Crosley Field. . . . New York Yankees 1B Bill "Moose" Skowron (scored 18 points in eight games for Purdue in 1949-50) socked his second pinch-hit grand slam of the 1957 season. . . . OF Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) walloped two homers for the California Angels in an 8-7 triumph against the Toronto Blue Jays in 1990.
13 - Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading scorer in 1945-46) clobbered two homers, one a grand slam, in a 1956 doubleheader sweep of the Brooklyn Dodgers. . . . Chicago Cubs 2B Glenn Beckert (three-year basketball letterman for Allegheny, MA), stretching his hitting streak to 18 games, supplied a decisive single in the 11th inning in a 2-1 victory against the New York Mets in 1968. . . . In 1964, P Carl Bouldin (starting guard and co-captain for Cincinnati's 1961 NCAA champion) traded with 1B Bill "Moose" Skowron (scored 18 points in eight games for Purdue in 1949-50) by the Washington Senators to the Chicago White Sox for 1B Joe Cunningham and a player to be designated (P Frank Kreutzer). But Bouldin never pitched for the White Sox. . . . OF Hoot Evers (starter for Illinois in 1939-40) traded by the Baltimore Orioles to the Cleveland Indians in 1955. . . . P Andy Karl (Manhattan letterman from 1933 through 1935), the N.L. leader in appearances (67) and saves (15) in 1945, registered one of his saves in an 11-9 win for the Philadelphia Phillies against the Pittsburgh Pirates in the resumption of a previously-suspended contest. . . . Chicago Cubs rookie P Cal Koonce (standout for Campbell in 1960 and 1961 when the North Carolina-based school was a junior college) hurled a one-hitter against the Cincinnati Reds in 1962. . . . Montreal Expos OF Jim Lyttle (led Florida State in free-throw shooting in 1965-66 when he averaged 12.4 ppg) stroked a pinch-hit homer against the Atlanta Braves in 1973. . . . New York Giants P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) tossed an 11-hit shutout in a 4-0 verdict against the Cincinnati Reds in 1907. . . . San Diego Padres P Joe Niekro (played for West Liberty WV in mid-1960s) outdueled his brother, Phil Niekro of the Atlanta Braves, 1-0, in 1969. . . . Boston Red Sox P Steve Renko (averaged 9.9 ppg and 5.8 rpg as a Kansas sophomore in 1963-64) had a no-hitter with one out in the ninth inning against the Oakland A's in 1979 before yielding a safety to Rickey Henderson.
12 - In the 1955 All-Star Game in Milwaukee, Braves P Gene Conley (All-Pacific Coast Conference first-team selection led the North Division in scoring in 1949-50 as a Washington State sophomore) struck out the side in the top of the 12th inning, earning the victory (6-5) when Stan Musial of the St. Louis Cardinals homered in the bottom of the frame. . . . In 1949, Cleveland Indians OF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) and Brooklyn Dodgers INF Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in PCC both of his season with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) are among the first four black players in an All-Star Game. . . . In 1905, Chicago's Three Fingered Brown hurled a two-hitter as he notched the first of nine consecutive victories over Hall of Fame New York Giants P Christy Mathewson (played basketball for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century). . . . San Diego Padres OF Will Venable (All-Ivy League first-team selection as a junior and second-team choice as a senior averaged 9.3 ppg under Princeton coach John Thompson III from 2001-02 through 2004-05) notched his first MLB four-hit game (against the San Francisco Giants in 2009).
11 - Chicago Cubs OF George Altman (appeared in 1953 and 1954 NAIA Tournament with Tennessee State) slugged an eight-inning, pinch-hit homer for the N.L. in the first of two All-Star Games in 1961. . . . Cleveland Indians OF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) and New York OF Mickey Mantle each propel blasts in the 500-foot range to the RF upper deck at Yankee Stadium in 1953. . . . OF Don Lock (led Wichita State in field-goal percentage in 1956-57 and 1957-58) traded by the New York Yankees to the Washington Senators for 1B Dale Long in 1962. . . . Detroit Tigers RF Jim Northrup (second-leading scorer and third-leading rebounder for Alma, MI, in 1958-59) batted leadoff in 1973 when he drove in eight runs in a 14-2 triumph over the Texas Rangers. . . . P Ray Rippelmeyer (led Southern Illinois in scoring and rebounding as a sophomore in 1952-53 before transferring and becoming a two-time All-MIAA first-team selection by pacing Southeast Missouri State in scoring in 1953-54 and 1954-55) returned by the Washington Senators to the Cincinnati Reds in 1962 (earlier rule 5 draft selection).
10 - P Ralph Branca (sixth-leading scorer for NYU in 1943-44), hampered by an off-season pelvic injury, awarded on waivers from the Brooklyn Dodgers to the Detroit Tigers in 1953. . . . P Jim Hearn (Georgia Tech letterman in 1941-42) awarded on waivers from the St. Louis Cardinals to the New York Giants in 1950. Hearn goes on to lead the N.L. in shutouts (five) and ERA (2.49). . . . OF Jim Lyttle (led Florida State in free-throw shooting in 1965-66 when he averaged 12.4 ppg) purchased from the Kansas City Royals by the Montreal Expos in 1973. . . . New York Giants P Christy Mathewson (played basketball for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) extended his streak of consecutive innings without a free pass to 52 but had his nine-game winning streak end with a 3-2 setback against the Chicago Cubs in 1913. . . . In 1970, Cincinnati Reds SS Woodie Woodward went yard off Atlanta Braves P Ron Reed (Notre Dame's leading rebounder in 1963-64 and 1964-65) for Woodward's only homer in a nine-year N.L. career (684 of 880 games/1,672 of 2,187 at-bats). . . . New York Giants P Hal Schumacher (played for St. Lawrence, NY, in early 1930s), supported by three hits from OF Hank Lieber (played for Arizona in 1931), won his 11th straight game with a 10-3 verdict over the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1935. . . . San Diego Padres P Chris Young (All-Ivy League first-team selection for Princeton in 1999-00) incurred the loss for the N.L. in the 2007 All-Star Game. He yielded the first inside-the-park homer in All-Star Game history (Ichiro Suzuki in fifth inning).
9 - California Angels OF Billy Cowan (co-captain of Utah's 1960 NCAA playoff team) tied a MLB record in 1971 by fanning six times against the Oakland A's in the longest shutout in A.L. history (1-0 in 20 innings). . . . Brooklyn Dodgers P Roger Craig (forward with North Carolina State's 1949-50 freshman basketball team) relieved in the third inning and hurled 11 scoreless frames en route to a 4-3 win against the Milwaukee braves in 1959. . . . INF Charlie Gelbert (scored at least 125 points each of his last three seasons with Lebanon Valley, PA, in late 1920s) awarded on waivers from the Cincinnati Reds to the Detroit Tigers in 1937. . . . SS Dick Groat (two-time All-American with Duke in 1950-51 and 1951-52 when finishing among the nation's top five scorers each season) was part of the St. Louis Cardinals' entire N.L. starting infield in the 1963 All-Star Game, including 1B Bill White (played two years with Hiram, OH, in early 1950s), 2B Julian Javier and 3B Ken Boyer. . . . New York Giants P Jim Hearn (Georgia Tech letterman in 1941-42) hit two homers at the Polo Grounds in a 10-2 victory against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1955. . . . Washington Senators LF Frank Howard (two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection when he led Ohio State in scoring and rebounding in 1956-57 and 1957-58) tied a MLB record with seven strikeouts in a doubleheader split with the Boston Red Sox in 1965. . . . Chicago White Sox P Ted Lyons (two-time All-SWC first-team selection for Baylor in early 1920s) blanked the Philadelphia Athletics, 7-0, in the opener of a 1932 twinbill, snapping Hall of Famer Lefty Grove's 11-game winning streak. . . . OF-1B Len Matuszek (starter for Toledo's 18-7 team in 1975-76) traded by the Toronto Blue Jays to the Los Angeles Dodgers for OF Al Oliver in 1985. . . . OF Lyle Mouton (starter in LSU's backcourt with All-American Chris Jackson for 1989 NCAA playoff team) traded by the Philadelphia Phillies to the Cleveland Indians in 2003. . . . Atlanta Braves P Ron Reed (Notre Dame's leading rebounder in 1963-64 and 1964-65) got the first two outs in the ninth inning to help the N.L. blank the A.L., 1-0, in the 1968 All-Star Game at Houston's Astrodome. . . . P Tim Stoddard (starting forward opposite All-American David Thompson for North Carolina State's 1974 NCAA champion) traded by the San Diego Padres to the New York Yankees for P Ed Whitson in 1986.
8 - Boston Braves SS Alvin Dark (letterman for LSU and USL during World War II) carried off the field on a stretcher after being knocked unconscious by a thrown ball in 1949. . . . OF Monte Irvin (played basketball for Lincoln, PA, 1 1/2 years in late 1930s) hit a three-run double in the first inning and grand slam in the 11th to carry the New York Giants to a 10-7 triumph over the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1953. Starting P Jim Hearn (Georgia Tech letterman in 1941-42) failed in a bid to win his 13th straight against the Bucs. . . . Cincinnati Reds P Eppa Rixey (Virginia letterman in 1912 and 1914) won the 16-inning nightcap of a 1924 twinbill, 2-1, at Cincinnati. It triggered a streak of 31 straight scoreless innings for Rixey.
7 - P Mike Adams (played for Texas A&M-Kingsville in 1996-97) awarded on waivers from the New York Mets to the Cleveland Indians in 2006. . . . Detroit Tigers OF Hoot Evers (starter for Illinois in 1939-40) went 5-for-5 and scored five runs in a 13-3 victory over the Cleveland Indians in 1951. . . . Philadelphia Phillies OF Gary Redus (J.C. player for Athens, AL, and father of Centenary/South Alabama hoopster) ripped two homers in a 7-3 triumph over the Atlanta Braves in 1986. . . . P Preacher Roe (played for Harding, AR, in late 1930s) hit the lone homer in his Organized Baseball career (against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1953) as the Brooklyn Dodgers established a N.L. record by homering in 21 consecutive contests. . . . P Tom Zachary (Guilford, NC, letterman in 1916) traded by the St. Louis Browns to the Washington Senators in 1927.
6 - Pittsburgh Pirates P Jim Bibby (Fayetteville State, NC, backup player and brother of UCLA All-American Henry Bibby) improved his record to 11-1 with three scoreless innings of relief in a 20-inning, 5-4 victory over the Chicago Cubs in 1980. . . . Cleveland Indians SS Lou Boudreau (leading scorer for Illinois' 1937 Big Ten Conference co-champion) hit a first-inning homer to help the A.L. defeat the N.L., 3-1, in the 1942 All-Star Game. . . . CF Taylor Douthit (California letterman from 1922 through 1924) contributed five hits and two walks at Philadelphia to help the St. Louis Cardinals snap an 11-game losing streak with a 28-6 triumph over the Phillies in the nightcap of a 1929 doubleheader. . . . California Angels P Ed Halicki (NAIA All-American third-team choice in 1971-72 when he led Monmouth in scoring with 21 ppg after setting a school single-game rebounding record with 40 the previous season) hurled a two-hit shutout against the Milwaukee Brewers in 1980 (infield single in first inning and bloop double in ninth). . . . Mike Hargrove (Northwestern Oklahoma State letterman) replaced John McNamara as Cleveland Indians manager in 1991. . . . In his first MLB start, Brooklyn Dodgers P Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) toiled 4 1/3 innings against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1955, striking out four batters while yielding three hits and eight walks.
5 - Cleveland Indians OF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) became the first African-American player in the A.L., striking out as a pinch-hitter against the Chicago White Sox in 1947. . . . St. Louis Cardinals 2B Frankie Frisch (Fordham captain) tied a N.L. record with 16 chances in a 6-4 win over the Cincinnati Reds in 1930. . . . Detroit Tigers SS Harvey Kuenn (played five games for Wisconsin in 1951-52) provided the game's only tally with an 11th-inning homer against the Cleveland Indians in the nightcap of a 1954 twinbill. . . . New York Yankees CF Irv Noren (player of the year For California junior college state champion Pasadena City in 1945) collected a pair of homers and five RBI against the Philadelphia Athletics in the nightcap of a 1954 doubleheader. . . . In 1953, Philadelphia Phillies P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) blanked the Pittsburgh Pirates, 2-0, for his 28th consecutive complete game. . . . In 1998, Tampa Bay Devil Rays LF Randy Winn (Santa Clara backcourtmate of eventual two-time NBA Most Valuable Player Steve Nash in 1993-94) became the 3,000th career strikeout victim of Roger Clemens.
4 - 1B-OF Larry Biittner (runner-up in scoring and rebounding for Buena Vista, IA, in 1966-67) hurled the final 1 1/3 innings for the Chicago Cubs in the opener of a 1977 doubleheader against the Montreal Expos. . . . Cincinnati Reds 1B George Crowe (four-year letterman from 1939-40 through 1942-43 for Indiana Central after becoming first high schooler named state's "Mr. Basketball") went 5-for-5, driving in six runs, but it wasn't enough to prevent a 10-7 loss against the Milwaukee Braves in 1957. . . . New York Giants SS Alvin Dark (letterman for LSU and USL during World War II) hit a homer in each end of a 1950 doubleheader split with the Brooklyn Dodgers. . . . P Bob Garibaldi (starting forward for Santa Clara in 1961-62 when he averaged 10.6 ppg and 5.6 rpg) signed with the San Francisco Giants for a $150,000 bonus in 1962 after being named College World Series Most Outstanding Player. . . . Chicago Cubs OF Hank Lieber (played for Arizona in 1931) clobbered three homers against the St. Louis Cardinals in the opener of a 1939 twin bill. . . . Detroit Tigers RF Jim Northrup (second-leading scorer and third-leading rebounder for Alma, MI, in 1958-59) collected two homers, a triple and five RBI in a 13-10 victory over the California Angels in 1968. . . . Preacher Roe (played for Harding, AR, in late 1930s) and Ralph Branca (sixth-leading scorer for NYU in 1943-44) are the winning pitchers as the Brooklyn Dodgers sweep a 1951 doubleheader against the New York Giants. . . . Jeff Shaw (freshman guard for 31-5 Rio Grande, OH, team participating in 1985 NAIA Tournament) traded by the Cincinnati Reds to the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1968. He became the first pitcher in MLB history to lead two different clubs in saves in the same season (23 with the Reds and 25 with the Dodgers). . . . Boston Red Sox 3B Jim Tabor (Alabama letterman in 1936-37) socked four homers in a 1939 doubleheader against the Philadelphia Athletics, collecting 19 total bases and 11 RBI. Three of his round-trippers came in the nightcap, including a record-tying two grand slams in back-to-back innings.
3 - Kansas City Athletics LF Bob Cerv (ranked fourth on Nebraska's career scoring list in 1949-50 when finishing his career) hit a grand slam before P Herb Score settled down and fanned 14 in the Cleveland Indians' 8-4 triumph in 1959. . . . In 1994, the Cleveland Indians retired the uniform number of OF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist). Doby broke the A.L. color barrier in 1947. . . . P Roger Mason (multiple-year letterman for Saginaw Valley State, MI, in late 1970s) traded by the San Diego Padres to the Philadelphia Phillies in 1993. . . . In 1956, Pittsburgh Pirates 2B Johnny O'Brien (two-time All-American with Seattle was first college player to crack 1,000-point plateau in a season when he scored 1,051 in 37 games in 1951-52) became the last N.L. position player in the 20th Century to earn a victory on the mound.
2 - INF Jack Barry (letterman for Holy Cross in 1908) purchased from the Philadelphia Athletics by the Boston Red Sox in 1915. . . . OF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) signed as a free agent with the Cleveland Indians in 1947. . . . OF Frank Howard (two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection when he led Ohio State in scoring and rebounding in 1956-57 and 1957-58), OF Don Lock (led Wichita State in field-goal percentage in 1956-57 and 1957-58) and teammate Ken McMullen hit back-to-back-to-back homers in the sixth inning to power the Washington Senators to a 10-4 victory over the New York Yankees in 1966. . . . Detroit Tigers P Joe Niekro (played for West Liberty WV in mid-1960s) had his no-hit bid ended in the ninth inning in a 5-0 triumph against the New York Yankees in 1970. Fifteen years later, he posted his 200th career victory when the Houston Astros edged the San Diego Padres. . . . New York Giants P Roy Parmelee (letterman for Eastern Michigan in 1924-25 and 1925-26) tossed a 1-0 shutout to beat the St. Louis Cardinals' Dizzy Dean in the nightcap of a 1933 doubleheader. Teammate Carl Hubbell hurled an 18-inning whitewash for the Giants in the opener. . . . In 1983, OF Gary Redus (J.C. player for Athens, AL, and father of Centenary/South Alabama performer) ripped a leadoff homer for the second consecutive game against the Atlanta Braves.
1 - In 1943, Chicago White Sox OF Guy Curtright (two-time All-MIAA selection led Northeast Missouri State in scoring each of his four seasons in early 1930s) set a MLB rookie record (subsequently broken) with a 26-game hitting streak as a 30-year-old newcomer in his only season as a regular. . . . Cleveland Indians OF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) walked five times in a 19-inning, 4-3 victory over the St. Louis Browns in 1952. . . . C-OF Joe Ferguson (member of Pacific's 1967 NCAA playoff team) traded by the Houston Astros with cash to the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1978. . . . Washington Senators CF Irvin Noren (player of the year for California junior college state champion Pasadena City in 1945) collected a homer and two doubles but his output wasn't enough to prevent a 1951 doubleheader loss against the Philadelphia Athletics. . . . P Elmer Ponder (Oklahoma letterman in 1914 and 1916) traded by the Pittsburgh Pirates to the Chicago Cubs in 1921. . . . P Paul Splittorff (runner-up in scoring and rebounding for Morningside, IA, in 1967-68) retired in 1984. His 166 victories in 13 seasons are the most in Kansas City Royals history.

MLB achievements/highlights in June by former college basketball players

MLB achievements/highlights in May by former college basketball players

MLB achievements/highlights in April by former college basketball players

Better Early Than Never: UK Ties UNC For Most Undergraduate NBA Draftees

Kentucky, after having 14 undergraduates selected in the NBA draft in the last four years under coach John Calipari, tied North Carolina for most players in this "defector" category. But UK is expected to pass the Tar Heels in 2014 when the Wildcats should have multiple players leave school early for the fifth straight season to declare for the NBA draft.

It's debatable whether the undergrads should have returned to school for additional seasoning or even attended college in the first place. Following are the 13 schools with more than 10 defectors listed chronologically since the introduction of hardship cases in 1971:

Kentucky (22) - Tom Payne (1971), Rex Chapman (1988), Jamal Mashburn (1993), Antoine Walker (1996), Ron Mercer (1997), Nazr Mohammed (1998), Rajon Rondo (2006), Jodie Meeks (2009), Eric Bledsoe (2010), DeMarcus Cousins (2010), Daniel Orton (2010), Patrick Patterson (2010), John Wall (2010), Brandon Knight (2011), DeAndre Liggins (2011), Anthony Davis (2012), Terrence Jones (2012), Michael Kidd-Gilchrist (2012), Doron Lamb (2012), Marquis Teague (2012), Archie Goodwin (2013), Nerlens Noel (2013)

North Carolina (22) - Bob McAdoo (1972), James Worthy (1982), Michael Jordan (1984), J.R. Reid (1989), Jerry Stackhouse (1995), Rasheed Wallace (1995), Jeff McInnis (1996), Antawn Jamison (1998), Vince Carter (1998), Joseph Forte (2001), Raymond Felton (2005), Sean May (2005), Rashad McCants (2005), Marvin Williams (2005), Brandan Wright (2007), Wayne Ellington (2009), Ty Lawson (2009), Ed Davis (2010), Harrison Barnes (2012), John Henson (2012), Kendall Marshall (2012), Reggie Bullock (2013)

UCLA (16) - Richard Washington (1976), Stuart Gray (1984), Tracy Murray (1992), Jelani McCoy (1998), Baron Davis (1999), Jerome Moiso (2000), Trevor Ariza (2004), Jordan Farmar (2006), Arron Afflalo (2007), Kevin Love (2008), Luc Mbah a Moute (2008), Russell Westbrook (2008), Jrue Holiday (2009), Tyler Honeycutt (2011), Malcolm Lee (2011), Shabazz Muhammad (2013)

Connecticut (15) - Donyell Marshall (1994), Ray Allen (1996), Richard Hamilton (1999), Khalid El-Amin (2000), Caron Butler (2002), Ben Gordon (2004), Emeka Okafor (2004), Charlie Villanueva (2005), Josh Boone (2006), Rudy Gay (2006), Marcus Williams (2006), Hasheem Thabeet (2009), Kemba Walker (2011), Andre Drummond (2012), Jeremy Lamb (2012)

Kansas (15) - Norm Cook (1976), Darrin Hancock (1994), Paul Pierce (1998), Drew Gooden (2002), Julian Wright (2007), Darrell Arthur (2008), Mario Chalmers (2008), Brandon Rush (2008), Cole Aldrich (2010), Xavier Henry (2010), Marcus Morris (2011), Markieff Morris (2011), Josh Shelby (2011), Thomas Robinson (2012), Ben McLemore (2013)

Louisiana State (14) - DeWayne Scales (1980), Jerry Reynolds (1985), John Williams (1986), Chris Jackson (1990), Stanley Roberts (1991), Shaquille O'Neal (1992), Ronnie Henderson (1996), Randy Livingston (1996), Stromile Swift (2000), Brandon Bass (2005), Tyrus Thomas (2006), Glen Davis (2007), Anthony Randolph (2008), Justin Hamilton (2012)

Memphis (13) - Larry Kenon (1973), William Bedford (1986), Vincent Askew (1987), Sylvester Gray (1988), Penny Hardaway (1993), David Vaughn III (1995), Lorenzen Wright (1996), Dajuan Wagner (2002), Shawne Williams (2006), Chris Douglas-Roberts (2008), Derrick Rose (2008), Elliot Williams (2010), Will Barton (2012)

Arizona (12) - Eric Money (1974), Coniel Norman (1974), Brian Williams (1991), Mike Bibby (1998), Gilbert Arenas (2001), Richard Jefferson (2001), Michael Wright (2001), Andre Iguodala (2004), Marcus Williams (2006), Jerryd Bayless (2008), Derrick Williams (2011), Grant Jerrett (2013)

Michigan (12) - Campy Russell (1974), Tim McCormick (1984), Sean Higgins (1990), Chris Webber (1993), Jalen Rose (1994), Juwan Howard (1994), Maurice Taylor (1997), Robert Traylor (1998), Jamal Crawford (2000), Darius Morris (2011), Trey Burke (2013), Tim Hardaway Jr. (2013)

Texas (12) - LaSalle Thompson (1982), Chris Mihm (2000), T.J. Ford (2003), LaMarcus Aldridge (2006), Daniel Gibson (2006), P.J. Tucker (2006), Kevin Durant (2007), D.J. Augustin (2008), Avery Bradley (2010), Jordan Hamilton (2011), Cory Joseph (2011), Tristan Thompson (2011)

Duke (11) - William Avery (1999), Elton Brand (1999), Corey Maggette (1999), Carlos Boozer (2002), Mike Dunleavy Jr. (2002), Jay Williams (2002), Luol Deng (2004), Josh McRoberts (2007), Gerald Henderson (2009), Kyrie Irving (2011), Austin Rivers (2012)

Georgia Tech (11) - Dennis Scott (1990), Kenny Anderson (1991), Stephon Marbury (1996), Dion Glover (1999), Chris Bosh (2003), Jarrett Jack (2005), Javaris Crittenton (2007), Thaddeus Young (2007), Derrick Favors (2010), Gani Lawal (2010), Iman Shumpert (2011)

Ohio State (11) - Clark Kellogg (1982), Jim Jackson (1992), Michael Redd (2000), Mike Conley Jr. (2007), Daequan Cook (2007), Greg Oden (2007), Kosta Koufos (2008), B.J. Mullens (2009), Evan Turner (2010), Jared Sullinger (2012), Deshaun Thomas (2013)

Bruised Egos: DeShaun Thomas Almost Joined List of Undrafted All-Americans

What were they thinking? They must not have taken a college course in deductive reasoning. Vander Blue (left Marquette with eligibility remaining), Myck Kabongo (Texas), C.J. Leslie (North Carolina State), Marshawn Powell (Arkansas), Phil Pressey (Missouri), Adonis Thomas (Memphis) and B.J. Young (Arkansas) - potential All-Americans if they returned to school - were not among the chosen few in this year's NBA draft. Of course, the NBA is a difficult nut to crack. Even if they became All-Americans, there were no guarantees any of them would have been selected in 2014.

The NBA draft was reduced to seven rounds in 1985, three rounds in 1988 and to its present two rounds in 1989. Centers Bill Spivey of Kentucky and Sherman White of LIU, All-Americans in the early 1950s, went undrafted by the NBA allegedly because of possible repercussions stemming from a game-fixing scandal. A total of 21 All-Americans, including five in 2011, have gone undrafted by the NBA thus far in the 21st Century.

Three years ago, Sherron Collins (Kansas) and Scottie Reynolds (Villanova) became the initial NCAA consensus first-team All-Americans not to be selected in the NBA draft. Ohio State junior forward DeShaun Thomas (picked 58th overall by the San Antonio Spurs) narrowly avoided joining the following alphabetical list of All-Americans who weren't selected in the NBA draft:

Undrafted All-American Pos. School A-A Year(s)
Charlie Bell G Michigan State 2001
Melvin Booker G Missouri 1994**
Joe Capua G Wyoming 1956
Sherron Collins G Kansas 2009** and 2010*
Erwin Dudley F-C Alabama 2002
Jason Gardner G Arizona 2002 and 2003**
Ben Hansbrough G Notre Dame 2011**
Udonis Haslem C Florida 2001 and 2002
Bobby Joe Hill G Texas Western 1966
Terrell "Tu" Holloway G Xavier 2011
Kevin Houston G Army 1987
Keith "Mister" Jennings G East Tennessee State 1991**
Kevin Jones F West Virginia 2012**
Brandin Knight G Pittsburgh 2002
Byron Larkin G Xavier 1988
Chris Lofton G Tennessee 2007** and 2008**
John Lucas III G Oklahoma State 2004
Billy McCaffrey G Vanderbilt 1993**
Jerel McNeal G Marquette 2009
DeMarcus Nelson G-F Duke 2008
Kevin Pittsnogle F West Virginia 2006
Mike Pratt F Kentucky 1974
Hollis Price G Oklahoma 2003**
Jacob Pullen G Kansas State 2011
Allan Ray G Villanova 2006**
Dexter Reed G Memphis State 1977
Scottie Reynolds G Villanova 2010*
Bill Ridley G Illinois 1956
Juan "Pepe" Sanchez G Temple 2000
Jon Scheyer G Duke 2010**
Shea Seals F-G Tulsa 1997
Ron Slay F Tennessee 2003
Charles E. Smith G Georgetown 1989
Jordan Taylor G Wisconsin 2011
Max Williams G Southern Methodist 1960
Andre Woolridge G Iowa 1997

*NCAA consensus first-team All-American.
**NCAA consensus second-team All-American.
NOTE: Bell, Booker, Collins, Hansbrough, Haslem, Jennings, Jones, Lucas, McNeal, Ray, Sanchez and Smith went on to play in the NBA after signing as free agents. Pratt played in the ABA.

One and Done: Bennett is Fifth Freshman in Last Seven Years Drafted First

The newcomers are the latest not to give themselves sufficient time at the college level to amass one-for-the-books or one-for-the-ages career records. UNLV forward Anthony Bennett became the fifth freshman in the last seven years to become the first selection in the NBA draft.

Nerlens Noel became the fifth Kentucky freshman in the last four years to be among the NBA's top eight draft picks. Five of the top 14 choices this year are among the following alphabetical list of freshmen who left universities since troubled Dontonio Wingfield became the first major-college "one 'n done" frosh upon departing from Cincinnati in 1994:

Freshman Draftee Pos. College NBA Team Drafted By Year Round Overall Pick
Shareef Abdur-Rahim F-C California Vancouver Grizzlies 1996 1st 3rd
Steven Adams F Pittsburgh Oklahoma City Thunder 2013 1st 12th
Carmelo Anthony F Syracuse Denver Nuggets 2003 1st 3rd
Trevor Ariza F UCLA New York Knicks 2004 2nd 43rd
Jerryd Bayless G Arizona Indiana Pacers 2008 1st 11th
Bradley Beal G-F Florida Washington Wizards 2012 1st 3rd
Michael Beasley F Kansas State Miami Heat 2008 1st 2nd
Anthony Bennett F UNLV Cleveland Cavaliers 2013 1st 1st
Eric Bledsoe G Kentucky Oklahoma City Thunder 2010 1st 18th
Chris Bosh F Georgia Tech Toronto Raptors 2003 1st 4th
Avery Bradley G Texas Boston Celtics 2010 1st 19th
Mike Conley Jr. G Ohio State Memphis Grizzlies 2007 1st 4th
Daequan Cook G Ohio State Philadelphia 76ers 2007 1st 21st
Omar Cook G St. John's Orlando Magic 2001 2nd 32nd
Jamal Crawford G Michigan Cleveland Cavaliers 2000 1st 8th
Javaris Crittenton G Georgia Tech Los Angeles Lakers 2007 1st 19th
Anthony Davis C Kentucky New Orleans Hornets 2012 1st 1st
Ricky Davis F Iowa Charlotte Hornets 1998 1st 21st
Luol Deng F Duke Phoenix Suns 2004 1st 7th
DeMar DeRozan F Southern California Toronto Raptors 2009 1st 9th
Andre Drummond C Connecticut Detroit Pistons 2012 1st 9th
Kevin Durant F Texas Seattle SuperSonics 2007 1st 2nd
Tyreke Evans G Memphis Sacramento Kings 2009 1st 4th
Derrick Favors F Georgia Tech New Jersey Nets 2010 1st 3rd
Alton Ford F Houston Phoenix Suns 2001 2nd 51st
Keith "Tiny" Gallon C Oklahoma Milwaukee Bucks 2010 2nd 47th
Dion Glover G Georgia Tech Atlanta Hawks 1999 1st 20th
Archie Goodwin G-F Kentucky Oklahoma City Thunder 2013 1st 29th
Eric Gordon G Indiana Los Angeles Clippers 2008 1st 7th
Donte Greene F Syracuse Memphis Grizzlies 2008 1st 28th
Eddie Griffin F Seton Hall New Jersey Nets 2001 1st 7th
Maurice Harkless F St. John's Philadelphia 76ers 2012 1st 15th
Tobias Harris F Tennessee Charlotte Bobcats 2011 1st 19th
Donnell Harvey F Florida New York Knicks 2000 1st 22nd
Spencer Hawes C Washington Sacramento Kings 2007 1st 10th
Xavier Henry G Kansas Memphis Grizzlies 2010 1st 12th
J.J. Hickson F North Carolina State Cleveland Cavaliers 2008 1st 19th
Jrue Holiday G UCLA Philadelphia 76ers 2009 1st 17th
Larry Hughes G Saint Louis Philadelphia 76ers 1998 1st 8th
Kris Humphries F Minnesota Utah Jazz 2004 1st 14th
Grant Jerrett F Arizona Portland Trail Blazers 2013 2nd 40th
DerMarr Johnson G Cincinnati Atlanta Hawks 2000 1st 6th
DeAndre Jordan C Texas A&M Los Angeles Clippers 2008 2nd 35th
Cory Joseph G Texas San Antonio Spurs 2011 1st 29th
Michael Kidd-Gilchrist F Kentucky Charlotte Bobcats 2012 1st 2nd
Brandon Knight G Kentucky Detroit Pistons 2011 1st 8th
Kosta Koufos C Ohio State Utah Jazz 2008 1st 23rd
Ricky Ledo G Providence Milwaukee Bucks 2013 2nd 43rd
Kevin Love F UCLA Memphis Grizzlies 2008 1st 5th
Corey Maggette F Duke Seattle SuperSonics 1999 1st 13th
Stephon Marbury G Georgia Tech Milwaukee Bucks 1996 1st 4th
O.J. Mayo G Southern California Minnesota Timberwolves 2008 1st 3rd
Ben McLemore G-F Kansas Sacramento Kings 2013 1st 7th
Quincy Miller F Baylor Denver Nuggets 2012 2nd 38th
Shabazz Muhammad G UCLA Utah Jazz 2013 1st 14th
B.J. Mullens C Ohio State Dallas Mavericks 2009 1st 24th
Nerlens Noel C Kentucky New Orleans Pelicans 2013 1st 6th
Greg Oden C Ohio State Portland Trail Blazers 2007 1st 1st
Daniel Orton C-F Kentucky Orlando Magic 2010 1st 29th
Anthony Randolph F Louisiana State Golden State Warriors 2008 1st 14th
Zach Randolph C Michigan State Portland Trail Blazers 2001 1st 19th
Austin Rivers G Duke New Orleans Hornets 2012 1st 10th
Derrick Rose G Memphis Chicago Bulls 2008 1st 1st
Jamal Sampson F-C California Utah Jazz 2002 2nd 47th
Josh Selby G Kansas Memphis Grizzlies 2011 2nd 49th
Lance Stephenson F Cincinnati Indiana Pacers 2010 2nd 40th
Marquis Teague G Kentucky Chicago Bulls 2012 1st 29th
Tim Thomas F Villanova New Jersey Nets 1997 1st 7th
Tyrus Thomas F Louisiana State Portland Trail Blazers 2006 1st 4th
Tristan Thompson F Texas Cleveland Cavaliers 2011 1st 4th
Dajuan Wagner G Memphis Cleveland Cavaliers 2002 1st 6th
Bill Walker F Kansas State Washington Wizards 2008 2nd 47th
John Wall G Kentucky Washington Wizards 2010 1st 1st
Gerald Wallace F Alabama Sacramento Kings 2001 1st 25th
Rodney White F Charlotte Detroit Pistons 2001 1st 9th
Hassan Whiteside C Marshall Sacramento Kings 2010 2nd 33rd
Marvin Williams F North Carolina Atlanta Hawks 2005 1st 2nd
Shawne Williams F Memphis Indiana Pacers 2006 1st 17th
Dontonio Wingfield F Cincinnati Seattle SuperSonics 1994 2nd 37th
Brandan Wright F North Carolina Charlotte Hornets 2007 1st 8th
Tony Wroten Jr. G Washington Memphis Grizzlies 2012 1st 25th
Thaddeus Young F Georgia Tech Philadelphia 76ers 2007 1st 12th

NOTE: Manute Bol (DII Bridgeport in 1985) and Shawn Kemp (JC Trinity Valley in 1989) were the first two non- NCAA DI players selected as freshmen. Ledo did not play with PC for academic reasons.

The Wonder Years: Cruising to School Marks for Most Wins in Single Season

Been there; done that! It wasn't a first for coach Jim Crews when he guided Saint Louis (28-7) to a school record for most victories in a single season. In 1988-89, Crews set Evansville's existing Division I mark (25-6). Oddly, that was the same year when Anthony Bonner-led SLU set its previous standard. It was also the same campaign when Crews' predecessor, Rick Majerus, guided another school in Indiana (Ball State) to an all-time best worksheet (29-3).

Schools setting or tying records for most triumphs in a single Division I season last year included Louisville (35-5/coached by Rick Pitino), Gonzaga (32-3/Mark Few), Weber State (30-7/Randy Rahe), Wichita State (30-9/Gregg Marshall), Miami FL (29-7/Jim Larranaga), Bucknell (28-6/David Paulsen), Middle Tennessee State (28-6/Kermit Davis), Saint Louis (28-7/Jim Crews), Saint Mary's (28-7/Randy Bennett), Stephen F. Austin State (27-5/Danny Kaspar), Mississippi (27-9/Andy Kennedy), Southern Mississippi (27-10/Donnie Tyndall), Akron (26-7/Keith Dambrot), Valparaiso (26-8/Bryce Drew), Colorado State (26-9/Larry Eustachy), Florida Gulf Coast (26-11/Andy Enfield), Stony Brook (25-8/Steve Pikiell), Eastern Kentucky (25-10/Jeff Neubauer), Albany (24-11/Will Brown), East Carolina (23-12/Jeff Lebo), Wright State (23-13/Billy Donlon), North Carolina Central (22-9/LeVelle Moton), Western Illinois (22-9/Jim Molinari), Elon (21-12/Matt Matheny), Bryant (19-12/Tim O'Shea) and NJIT (16-13/Jim Engles).

After Miami achieved the feat, fellow power league members Colorado, Georgia, Northwestern and Southern California still need to win as many as 25 games in a single season. Although schedules include significantly more games than several decades ago, seven Pac-12 Conference members are among the 15 power league members who first set their existing single-season record for victories before the NCAA playoffs expanded to at least 32 teams in 1975. Following is a school-by-school look at the scoring and rebounding leaders for teams when they posted a school's winningest season at the DI level:

School Most Wins Season Scoring Leader Rebounding Leader
Abilene Christian 17-8 1971-72 Kent Martens (15.4 ppg) Willie Calvert (14.2 rpg)
Air Force 24-7 2005-06 Antoine Hood (14.9) Jacob Burtschi (6.1)
Akron 26-7 2006-07 Romeo Travis (14.9) Jeremiah Wood (7.8)
Akron 26-7 2012-13 Zeke Marshall (13) Demetrius Tree Treadwell (7.9)
Alabama 28-5 1986-87 Derrick McKey (18.6) Michael Ansley (7.8)
Alabama A&M 19-10 2001-02 Desmond Cambridge (20.7) Garik Nicholson (6.1)
Alabama State 22-6 1982-83 Lewis Jackson (23.8) Joe Williams (7.6)
Alabama State 22-6 1983-84 Lewis Jackson (29) Joe Williams (7.7)
Alabama State 22-10 2008-09 Brandon Brooks (13.7) Wesley Jones (6.5)
Albany 24-11 2012-13 Mike Black (14.8) Sam Rowley (6.2)
Alcorn State 28-1 1978-79 Larry Smith (17.6) Larry Smith (13.7)
American 24-6 1980-81 Russell "Boo" Bowers (23.5) Russell "Boo" Bowers (6.6)
American 24-8 2008-09 Garrison Carr (17.9) Brian Gilmore (5.4)
Appalachian State 25-8 2006-07 D.J. Thompson (15.6) Jeremy Clayton (7.1)
Arizona 35-3 1987-88 Sean Elliott (19.6) Anthony Cook (7.1)
Arizona State 26-3 1962-63 Joe Caldwell (19.7) Art Becker (11.2)
Arkansas 34-4 1990-91 Todd Day (20.7) Oliver Miller (7.7)
Arkansas-Little Rock 26-11 1986-87 Curtis Kidd (15.6) Curtis Kidd (8.4)
Arkansas-Pine Bluff 18-16 2009-10 Terrance Calvin (10.2) Lebaron Weathers (6.7)
Arkansas State 23-9 1990-91 Bobby Gross (15.4) Fred Shepherd (6.9)
Army 22-6 1969-70 Jim Oxley (15.6) Max Miller (7.5)
Auburn 29-4 1998-99 Chris Porter (16) Chris Porter (8.6)
Austin Peay 24-4 1976-77 Calvin Garrett (17.4) Otis Howard (8.3)
Austin Peay 24-11 2007-08 Drake Reed (14.4) Fernandez Lockett (6.8)
Ball State 29-3 1988-89 Curtis Kidd (14) Paris McCurdy (8.5)
Baylor 30-8 2011-12 Pierre Jackson (13.8) Perry Jones III (7.6)
Belmont 30-5 2010-11 Ian Clark (12.2) Mick Hedgepeth (5.9)
Bethune-Cookman 21-13 2010-11 C.J. Reed (18.8) Alexander Starling (6.7)
Binghamton 23-9 2008-09 D.J. Rivera (20) Reggie Fuller (7)
Birmingham-Southern 19-9 2002-03 Josiah James (13.7) Josiah James (6.3)
Birmingham-Southern 19-9 2005-06 James Collins (13) Sredrick Powe (6.1)
Boise State 25-9 2007-08 Reggie Larry (19.4) Reggie Larry (9.2)
Boston College 27-5 2000-01) Troy Bell (20.4) Kenny Harley (5.6)
Boston University 25-5 1996-97 Tunji Awojobi (19.4) Tunji Awojobi (10.2)
Bowling Green 28-7 1946-47 Charles Share (9.1) unavailable
Bradley 32-5 1949-50 Paul Unruh (12.8) unavailable
Bradley 32-6 1950-51 Gene Melchiorre (11.3) unavailable
Bradley 32-3 1985-86 Hersey Hawkins (18.7) Mike Williams (7.1)
Brigham Young 32-5 2010-11 Jimmer Fredette (28.9) Brandon Davies (6.2)
Brown 19-10 2007-08 Mark McAndrew (16.5) Chris Skrelia (6.6)
Bryant 19-12 2012-13 Dyami Starks (17.7) Alex Francis (8.6)
Bucknell 28-6 2012-13 Mike Muscala (18.7) Mike Muscala (11.1)
Buffalo 23-10 2004-05 Turner Battle (15.5) Yassin Idbihi (5.9)
Butler 33-5 2009-10 Gordon Hayward (15.5) Gordon Hayward (8.2)
California 30-6 1945-46 Andy Wolfe (13.4) unavailable
UC Irvine 25-5 2000-01 Jerry Green (19) Adam Parada (6.2)
Cal Poly 19-11 2006-07 Derek Stockalper (14.4) Derek Stockalper (7)
UC Riverside 17-13 2008-09 Kyle Austin (16.2) Aaron Scott (6.6)
UC Santa Barbara 23-9 2007-08 Alex Harris (20.2) Ivan Elliott (5.7)
Cal State Fullerton 24-9 2007-08 Josh Akognon (20.2) Scott Cutley (7.4)
Cal State Northridge 22-10 2000-01 Brian Heinle (20.2) Brian Heinle (9.2)
Cal State Sacramento 15-15 2005-06 Alex Bausley (13.6) Jason Harris (5.5)
Campbell 20-9 1993-94 Joe Spinks (20.9) Joe Spinks (8.8)
Canisius 22-6 1956-57 Henry Nowak (20.1) Henry Nowak (10.7)
Canisius 22-7 1993-94 Craig Wise (16.1) Micheal Meeks (7.5)
Centenary 25-4 1974-75 Robert Parish (18.9) Robert Parish (15.4)
Central Arkansas 14-16 2007-08 Nate Bowie (17.5) Durrell Nevels (8)
Central Connecticut State 27-5 2001-02 Corsley Edwards (15.4) Ron Robinson (9.3)
Central Florida 25-6 2003-04 Dexter Lyons (18.3) Roberto Morentin (6.9)
Central Michigan 25-7 2002-03 Chris Kaman (22.4) Chris Kaman (12)
Charleston Southern 21-9 1985-86 Ben Hinson (19.7) Bernard Innocent (7.3)
Charleston Southern 21-9 1986-87 Ben Hinson (22.6) Oliver Johnson (8.7)
Charlotte 28-5 1976-77 Cedric "Cornbread" Maxwell (22.2) Cedric "Cornbread" Maxwell (12.1)
Chattanooga 27-4 1981-82 Willie White (15.8) Russ Schoene (7)
Chicago State 22-6 1985-86 Darron Brittman (18.2) Shawn Bell (6.7)
Cincinnati 31-4 2001-02 Steve Logan (22) Donald Little (6.9)
The Citadel 20-7 1978-79 Tom Slawson (17.1) Tom Slawson (6.6)
The Citadel 20-13 2008-09 Demetrius Nelson (16.4) Demetrius Nelson (6.5)
Clemson 25-6 1986-87 Horace Grant (21) Horace Grant (9.6)
Cleveland State 29-4 1985-86 Clinton Smith (16.2) Eric Mudd (8.3)
Coastal Carolina 28-7 2009-10 Chad Gray (14.3) Joseph Harris (9.6)
Coastal Carolina 28-6 2010-11 Desmond Holloway (18.5) Sam McLaurin (7)
Colgate 18-10 1992-93 Tucker Neale (21.9) Darren Brown (11.3)
Colgate 18-14 2007-08 Kyle Roemer (16.2) Alex Woodhouse (6.3)
College of Charleston 29-3 1996-97 Thaddeous Delaney (15.8) Thaddeous Delaney (9.5)
Colorado 24-14 2010-11 Alec Burks (20.5) Andre Roberson (7.8)
Colorado 24-12 2011-12 Carlon Brown (12.6) Andre Roberson (11.1)
Colorado State 26-9 2012-13 Colton Iverson (14.2) Colton Iverson (9.8)
Columbia 23-5 1967-68 Jim McMillian (22.3) Jim McMillian (9.8)
Connecticut 34-2 1998-99 Richard Hamilton (21.5) Kevin Freeman (7.3)
Coppin State 26-7 1989-90 Reggie Isaac (21.2) Larry Stewart (11.2)
Cornell 29-5 2009-10 Ryan Wittman (17.5) Jeff Foote (8.1)
Creighton 29-5 2002-03 Kyle Korver (17.8) Kyle Korver (6.3)
Creighton 29-6 2011-12 Doug McDermott (22.9) Doug McDermott (8.2)
Dartmouth 22-4 1941-42 George Munroe (15) unavailable
Dartmouth 22-5 1957-58 Rudy LaRusso (15.3) Rudy LaRusso (18.6)
Dartmouth 22-6 1958-59 Rudy LaRusso (18.9) Rudy LaRusso (16.1)
Davidson 29-5 2006-07 Stephen Curry (21.5) Boris Meno (8.2)
Davidson 29-7 2007-08 Stephen Curry (25.9) Andrew Lovedale/Boris Meno (5.4)
Dayton 28-5 1951-52 Don Meineke (21.1) Don Meineke (11.7)
Delaware 27-4 1991-92 Alex Coles (14.3) Spencer Dunkley (8.8)
Delaware State 21-14 2005-06 Jahsha Bluntt (14.6) Jahsha Bluntt (4.8)
Delaware State 21-12 2006-07 Roy Bright (15.5) Jahsha Bluntt (4.9)
Denver 22-10 2012-13 Chris Udofia (13.3) Royce O'Neale (5.5)
DePaul 28-3 1986-87 Dallas Comegys (17.5) Dallas Comegys (7.5)
Detroit 25-4 1976-77 John Long (20.3) Terry Tyler (11)
Detroit 25-4 1977-78 John Long (21.4) Terry Tyler (12.6)
Detroit 25-6 1997-98 Derrick Hayes (13.8) Brian Alexander (7.1)
Detroit 25-12 2000-01 Rashad Phillips (22.4) Terrell Riggs (6.5)
Drake 28-5 2007-08 Josh Young (15.9) Jonathan Cox (8.6)
Drexel 29-7 2011-12 Frantz Massenat (13.7) Samme Givens (7.9)
Duke 37-3 1985-86 Johnny Dawkins (20.2) Mark Alarie (6.2)
Duke 37-2 1998-99 Elton Brand (17.7) Elton Brand (9.8)
Duquesne 26-3 1953-54 Dick Ricketts (17.2) Jim Tucker (13.6)
East Carolina 23-12 2012-13 Maurice Kemp (18.9) Robert Sampson (9.2)
Eastern Illinois 21-10 2000-01 Kyle Hill (23.8) Henry Domercant (6.8)
Eastern Kentucky 25-10 2012-13 Glenn Cosey (15.2) Eric Stutz (4.7)
Eastern Michigan 26-7 1990-91 Marcus Kennedy (20) Marcus Kennedy (8.1)
Eastern Washington 20-8 1985-86 Roosevelt Brown (16.3) John Randa (9.2)
East Tennessee State 28-5 1990-91 Keith "Mister" Jennings (20.1) Rodney English (5.8)
Elon 21-12 2012-13 Lucas Troutman (15.1) Ryley Beaumont (7.1)
Evansville 25-6 1988-89 Scott Haffner (24.5) Dan Godfread (8)
Fairfield 25-8 2010-11 Derek Needham (14.1) Ryan Olander (6.8)
Fairleigh Dickinson 23-7 1987-88 Jaime Latney (18.3) Jaime Latney (8)
Fairleigh Dickinson 23-7 1997-98 Elijah Allen/Rahshon Turner (17.8) Rahshon Turner (10.8)
Florida 35-5 2006-07 Taurean Green (13.3) Al Horford (9.5)
Florida A&M 22-8 1987-88 Aldwin Ware (19.5) Aldwin Ware (5.3)
Florida Atlantic 21-11 2010-11 Greg Gantt (14) Brett Royster (6)
Florida Gulf Coast 26-11 2012-13 Sherwood Brown (15.5) Sherwood Brown (6.5)
Florida International 21-8 1997-98 Raja Bell (16.6) Darius Cook (6.1)
Florida State 27-6 1971-72 Ron King (17.9) Reggie Royals (11)
Fordham 26-3 1970-71 Charlie Yelverton (23.3) Charlie Yelverton (12)
Fresno State 27-3 1981-82 Rod Higgins (15.1) Rod Higgins (6.3)
Furman 23-7 1979-80 Jonathan Moore (18.4) Jonathan Moore (10.1)
Gardner-Webb 23-9 2001-02 Bruce Fields (12.4) Bruce Fields (8.2)
George Mason 27-8 2005-06 Jai Lewis (13.7) Jai Lewis (7.8)
George Mason 27-7 2010-11 Cameron Long (15.1) Ryan Pearson (6.7)
Georgetown 35-3 1984-85 Patrick Ewing (14.6) Patrick Ewing (9.2)
George Washington 27-3 2005-06 Danilo Pinnock (14.5) Mike Hall (7.6)
Georgia 24-10 1982-83 Vern Fleming (16.9) Terry Fair (6.6)
Georgia Southern 25-6 1991-92 Tony Windless (17.6) Dexter Abrams (7.4)
Georgia State 29-5 2000-01 Shernard Long (18) Thomas Terrell (7.5)
Georgia Tech 28-7 1989-90 Dennis Scott (27.7) Malcolm Mackey (7.5)
Gonzaga 32-3 2012-13 Kelly Olynyk (17.8) Elias Harris (7.4)
Grambling State 22-8 1979-80 Robert Williams (17.9) Robert Williams (10.1)
Green Bay 27-7 1993-94 Jeff Nordgaard (15.6) Jeff Nordgaard (6.4)
Hampton 26-7 2001-02 Tommy Adams (19.7) Isaac Jefferson (9.4)
Hartford 18-16 2007-08 Joe Zeglinski (16.2) Michael Turner (5.5)
Harvard 26-5 2011-12 Kyle Casey (11.4) Keith Wright (8.1)
Hawaii 27-6 2001-02 Predrag Savovic (20.3) Haim Shimonovich (6.6)
High Point 19-11 2003-04 Danny Gathings (15.8) Danny Gathings (8)
Hofstra 26-5 2000-01 Norman Richardson (16.7) Greg Springfield (7.3)
Holy Cross 27-3 1946-47 George Kaftan (11.1) unavailable
Holy Cross 27-4 1949-50 Bob Cousy (19.4) unavailable
Houston 32-5 1983-84 Michael Young (19.8) Hakeem Olajuwon (13.5)
Houston Baptist 24-7 1983-84 Terry Hairston (14.7) Anicet Lavodrama (7.1)
Howard 24-4 1986-87 George Hamilton (12.8) John Spencer (9.3)
Idaho 27-3 1981-82 Ken Owens (15.6) Ke vin Smith (6.5)
Idaho State 25-5 1976-77 Steve Hayes (20.2) Steve Hayes (11.1)
Illinois 37-2 2004-05 Luther Head (15.9) James Augustine (7.6)
Illinois-Chicago 24-8 2003-04 Cedric Banks (18.4) Armond Williams (5.8)
Illinois State 25-6 1997-98 Rico Hill (18.4) Rico Hill (7.5)
Illinois State 25-10 2007-08 Osiris Eldridge (15.8) Anthony Slack (7.1)
Indiana 32-0 1975-76 Scott May (23.5) Kent Benson (8.8)
Indiana State 33-1 1978-79 Larry Bird (28.6) Larry Bird (14.9)
IPFW 18-12 2010-11 Frank Gaines (14.8) Frank Gaines (6.2)
IUPUI 26-7 2007-08 George Hill (21.5) George Hill (6.8)
Iona 29-5 1979-80 Jeff Ruland (20.1) Jeff Ruland (12)
Iowa 30-5 1986-87 Roy Marble Jr. (14.9) Brad Lohaus (7.7)
Iowa State 32-5 1999-2000 Marcus Fizer (22.8) Marcus Fizer (7.7)
Jackson State 25-9 1992-93 Lindsey Hunter (26.7) Godfrey Thompson (7.1)
Jacksonville 27-2 1969-70 Artis Gilmore (26.5) Artis Gilmore (22.2)
Jacksonville State 20-10 2002-03 Omar Barlett (15) Omar Barlett (7.1)
James Madison 24-6 1981-82 Linton Townes (16.3) Dan Ruland (6.3)
Kansas 35-4 1985-86 Danny Manning (16.7) Danny Manning (6.3)
Kansas 35-4 1997-98 Paul Pierce (20.5) Raef LaFrentz (11.4)
Kansas 35-3 2010-11 Marcus Morris (17.2) Markieff Morris (8.3)
Kansas State 29-8 2009-10 Jacob Pullen (19.3) Curtis Kelly (6.2)
Kent State 30-6 2001-02 Trevor Huffman (16) Antonio Gates (8.1)
Kentucky 38-2 2011-12 Anthony Davis (14.2) Anthony Davis (10.4)
Lafayette 24-7 1999-2000 Brian Ehlers (17.3) Stefan Ciosici (6.5)
Lamar 26-5 1983-84 Tom Sewell (22.9) Kenneth Perkins (7.4)
La Salle 30-2 1989-90 Lionel Simmons (26.5) Lionel Simmons (11.1)
Lehigh 27-8 2011-12 C.J. McCollum (21.9) C.J. McCollum (6.5)
Liberty 23-9 1996-97 Peter Aluma (15.7) Peter Aluma (6.6)
Liberty 23-12 2008-09 Seth Curry (20.2) Anthony Smith (6.5)
Lipscomb 21-11 2005-06 Eddie Ard (16.2) Shaun Durant (7.2)
Long Beach State 26-3 1972-73 Ed Ratleff (22.8) Leonard Gray (9.3)
Long Island 28-3 1936-37 Jules Bender (9.1) unavailable
Longwood 17-14 2008-09 Dana Smith (14.8) Dana Smith (6.4)
Louisiana-Lafayette 25-4 1971-72 Dwight "Bo" Lamar (36.3) Roy Ebron (14.2)
Louisiana-Lafayette 25-9 1999-2000 Orlando Butler (13.1) Lonnie Thomas (7.2)
Louisiana-Monroe 26-5 1992-93 Ryan Stuart (21.1) Ryan Stuart (9.5)
Louisiana State 31-5 1980-81 Howard Carter (16) Durand "Rudy" Macklin (9.8)
Louisiana Tech 29-3 1984-85 Karl Malone (16.5) Karl Malone (9)
Louisville 35-5 2012-13 Russ Smith (18.7) Gorgui Dieng (9.4)
Loyola Chicago 29-2 1962-63 Jerry Harkness (21.4) Les Hunter (11.4)
Loyola (Md.) 24-9 2011-12 Erik Etherly (13.7) Erik Etherly (7.5)
Loyola Marymount 28-4 1987-88 Eric "Hank" Gathers (22.5) Eric "Hank" Gathers (8.7)
Maine 24-7 1999-2000 Nate Fox (17.5) Nate Fox (7.5)
Manhattan 26-5 1994-95 Ted Ellis (14) Jason Hoover (6.4)
Marist 25-9 2006-07 Will Whittington (17.6) James Smith (6)
Marquette 28-1 1970-71 Dean Meminger (21.2) Jim Chones (11.5)
Marshall 25-6 1983-84 LaVerne Evans (20.5) Jeff Battle (4.5)
Marshall 25-6 1986-87 James "Skip" Henderson (21) Rodney Holden (8.8)
Maryland 32-4 2001-02 Juan Dixon (20.4) Lonny Baxter (8.2)
Maryland-Baltimore County 24-9 2007-08 Ray Barbosa (16.5) Darryl Proctor (8.4)
Maryland-Eastern Shore 27-2 1973-74 Rubin Collins (18) Joe Pace (12.8)
Massachusetts 35-2 1995-96 Marcus Camby (20.5) Marcus Camby (8.1)
McNeese State 21-11 1985-86 Jerome Batiste (18.4) Jerome Batiste (8.6)
McNeese State 21-9 2001-02 Jason Coleman (14.4) Fred Gentry (7.2)
McNeese State 21-12 2010-11 Patrick Richard (16.1) P.J. Alawoya (10.3)
Memphis 38-2 2007-08 Chris Douglas-Roberts (18.1) Joey Dorsey (9.5)
Mercer 27-11 2011-12 Langston Hall (11.4) Jake Gollon (5.9)
Miami (Fla.) 29-7 2012-13 Shane Larkin (14.5) Reggie Johnson (7)
Miami (Ohio) 24-6 1983-84 Ron Harper (16.3) Ron Harper (7.6)
Miami (Ohio) 24-8 1998-99 Wally Szczerbiak (24.2) Wally Szczerbiak (8.5)
Michigan 31-5 1992-93 Chris Webber (19.2) Chris Webber (10.1)
Michigan State 33-5 1998-99 Morris Peterson (13.6) Antonio Smith (8.4)
Middle Tennessee State 28-6 2012-13 Marcos Knight (12.6) Marcos Knight (5.8)
Milwaukee 26-6 2004-05 Ed McCants (17.4) Adrian Tigert (6.7)
Minnesota 31-4 1996-97 Bobby Jackson (15.3) Courtney James (7.2)
Mississippi 27-8 2000-01 Rahim Lockhart (13) Rahim Lockhart (8.1)
Mississippi 27-9 2012-13 Marshall Henderson (20.1) Murphy Holloway (9.7)
Mississippi State 27-8 2001-02 Mario Austin (16.1) Mario Austin (7.6)
Mississippi Valley State 22-7 1995-96 Marcus Mann (21.7) Marcus Mann (13.6)
Mississippi Valley State 22-7 2003-04 Attarrius Norwood (14.3) Willie Neal (7.6)
Missouri 31-7 2008-09 DeMarre Carroll (16.6) DeMarre Carroll (7.2)
Missouri-Kansas City 20-8 1991-92 Tony Dumas (21.5) David Robinson (6.8)
Missouri State 28-6 1986-87 Winston Garland (21.2) Greg Bell (7)
Monmouth 21-10 2000-01 Rahsaan Johnson (19.1) Rahsaan Johnson (6.1)
Monmouth 21-12 2003-04 Blake Hamilton (16.3) Blake Hamilton (6.4)
Montana 27-4 1991-92 Delvon Anderson (14.5) Daren Engellant (8.8)
Montana State 36-2 1927-28 John "Cat" Thompson (16.6) unavailable
Montana State 36-2 1928-29 John "Cat" Thompson (16.6) unavailable
Morehead State 25-6 1983-84 Earl Harrison (12.9) Earl Harrison (7.6)
Morehead State 25-10 2010-11 Kenneth Faried (17.3) Kenneth Faried (14.5)
Morgan State 27-10 2009-10 Reggie Holmes (21.4) Kevin Thompson (11.8)
Mount St. Mary's 21-8 1995-96 Chris McGuthrie (22.3) Riley Inge (6.5)
Murray State 31-5 2009-10 B.J. Jenkins (10.6) Tony Easley (5.8)
Murray State 31-2 2011-12 Isaiah Canaan (19) Ivan Aska (6)
Navy 30-5 1985-86 David Robinson (22.7) David Robinson (13)
Nebraska 26-8 1990-91 Rich King (15.5) Rich King (8.1)
Nevada 29-5 2006-07 Nick Fazekas (20.4) Nick Fazekas (11.1)
New Hampshire 19-9 1994-95 Matt Alosa (23.1) Scott Drapeau (9.8)
NJIT 16-13 2012-13 Chris Flores (16.9) Daquan Holiday (4.9)
New Mexico 30-5 2009-10 Darington Hobson (15.9) Darington Hobson (9.3)
New Mexico State 27-3 1969-70 Jimmy Collins (24.6) Sam Lacey (15.9)
New Orleans 26-4 1986-87 Ledell Eackles (22.6) Ronnie Grandison (9.7)
New Orleans 26-4 1992-93 Ervin Johnson (18.4) Ervin Johnson (11.9)
Niagara 27-4 1921-22 unavailable unavailable
Nicholls State 24-6 1994-95 Reggie Jackson (21.6) Reggie Jackson (10.8)
Norfolk State 26-10 2011-12 Kyle O'Quinn (15.9) Kyle O'Quinn (10.3)
North Carolina 36-3 2007-08 Tyler Hansbrough (22.6) Tyler Hansbrough (10.2)
UNC Asheville 24-10 2011-12 Matt Dickey (16.1) Jeremy Atkinson (6.6)
North Carolina A&T 26-3 1987-88 Claude Williams (16.2) Claude Williams (8.1)
North Carolina Central 22-9 2012-13 Jeremy Ingram (15.7) Stanton Kidd (6.9)
UNC Greensboro 23-6 1994-95 Scott Hartzell (15.7) Eric Cuthrell (9.8)
North Carolina State 30-7 1950-51 Sam Ranzino (20.8) Paul Horvath (13.2)
North Carolina State 30-1 1973-74 David Thompson (26) Tom Burleson (12.2)
UNC Wilmington 25-8 2005-06 T.J. Carter (13.6) Beckham Wyrick (5.4)
North Dakota 19-15 2010-11 Troy Huff (13.3) Patrick Mitchell (5.8)
North Dakota State 26-7 2008-09 Ben Woodside (23.2) Brett Winkelman (7.5)
Northeastern 27-5 1983-84 Mark Halsel (21) Mark Halsel (9.6)
Northeastern 27-7 1986-87 Reggie Lewis (23.3) Reggie Lewis (7.9)
Northern Arizona 21-7 1996-97 Andrew Mavis (15) Billy Hix (5.4)
Northern Arizona 21-8 1997-98 Andrew Mavis (13.9) Casey Frank (6)
Northern Arizona 21-11 2005-06 Kelly Golob (14.3) Ruben Boykin Jr. (7.2)
Northern Colorado 25-8 2009-10 Will Figures (16.6) Mike Proctor (5.6)
Northern Illinois 25-6 1990-91 Donnell Thomas (17) Donnell Thomas (8.2)
Northern Iowa 30-5 2009-10 Jordan Eglseder (11.9) Jordan Eglseder (7.2)
North Florida 16-16 2011-12 Parker Smith (14.5) Travis Wallace (5.3)
North Texas 24-9 2009-10 Josh White (14.5) George Odufuwa (10.7)
Northwestern 20-14 2009-10 John Shurna (18.2) John Shurna (6.4)
Northwestern 20-14 2010-11 John Shurna (16.6) Luka Mirkovic (5.2)
Northwestern State 26-8 2005-06 Clifton Lee (14.2) Clifton Lee (6.2)
Notre Dame 33-7 1908-09 unavailable unavailable
Oakland 26-9 2009-10 Keith Benson (17.3) Keith Benson (10.5)
Ohio University 29-8 2011-12 D.J. Cooper (14.7) Ivo Baltic (5.0)
Ohio State 35-4 2006-07 Greg Oden (15.7) Greg Oden (9.6)
Oklahoma 35-4 1987-88 Stacey King (22.3) Harvey Grant (9.4)
Oklahoma State 31-2 1945-46 Bob Kurland (19.5) unavailable
Oklahoma State 31-4 2003-04 Tony Allen (16) Ivan McFarlin (6.7)
Old Dominion 28-6 2004-05 Alex Loughton (14.1) Alex Loughton (8.2)
Oral Roberts 27-7 2011-12 Dominique Morrison (19.8) Michael Craion (6.3)
Oregon 30-13 1944-45 Dick Wilkins (12.9) unavailable
Oregon State 29-8 1924-25 unavailable unavailable
Pacific 27-4 2004-05 Guillaume Yango (13.2) Guillaume Yango (7.4)
Penn State 27-11 2008-09 Talor Battle (16.7) Jamelle Cornley (6.3)
Pennsylvania 28-1 1970-71 Bob Morse (15.4) David "Corky" Calhoun (8.6)
Pepperdine 25-5 1985-86 Dwayne Polee (15.7) Anthony Frederick (6.9)
Pepperdine 25-9 1999-2000 Brandon Armstrong (14.4) Kelvin Gibbs (7)
Pittsburgh 31-5 2003-04 Carl Krauser (15.4) Chris Taft (7.5)
Pittsburgh 31-5 2008-09 Sam Young (19.2) DeJuan Blair (12.3)
Portland 21-8 1994-95 Canaan Chatman (18.3) Canaan Chatman (6.8)
Portland 21-11 2009-10 Nik Raivio (14.1) Luke Sikma (7.5)
Portland State 23-10 2007-08 Jeremiah Dominquez (14.2) Deonte Huff (6)
Portland State 23-10 2008-09 Jeremiah Dominquez (12.9) Jamie Jones (5.3)
Prairie View 17-12 2002-03 Gregory Burks (18.1) Roderick Riley (7)
Presbyterian 14-15 2011-12 Allonzo Coleman (16.9) Allonzo Coleman (8.8)
Princeton 27-2 1997-98 Gabe Lewullis (14.2) Gabe Lewullis (5.3)
Providence 28-4 1973-74 Marvin Barnes (22.1) Marvin Barnes (18.7)
Purdue 29-4 1987-88 Troy Lewis (17.9) Todd Mitchell (5.8)
Purdue 29-5 1993-94 Glenn Robinson Jr. (30.3) Glenn Robinson Jr. (10.1)
Purdue 29-6 2009-10 E'Twaun Moore (16.4) JaJuan Johnson (7.1)
Quinnipiac 23-10 2009-10 James Feldeine (16.5) Justin Rutty (10.9)
Radford 22-7 1990-91 Doug Day (20.2) Tyrone Travis (6.6)
Rhode Island 28-7 1987-88 Carlton "Silk" Owens (21.8) Kenny Green (7.3)
Rice 25-4 1939-40 Bob Kinney (12.5) unavailable
Richmond 29-8 2010-11 Justin Harper (17.9) Justin Harper (6.9)
Rider 23-11 2007-08 Jason Thompson (20.4) Jason Thompson (12.1)
Rider 23-11 2010-11 Justin Robinson (15.2) Danny Stewart (7.1)
Robert Morris 26-8 2007-08 Jeremy Chappell (14.9) Tony Lee (6.6)
Robert Morris 26-11 2011-12 Velton Jones (16) Lucky Jones (6.1)
Rutgers 31-2 1975-76 Phil Sellers (19.2) Phil Sellers (10.2)
Sacred Heart 18-14 2006-07 Jarrid Frye (13.3) Brice Brooks (6)
Sacred Heart 18-14 2007-08 Brice Brooks (12.8) Drew Shubik (5.8)
St. Bonaventure 25-3 1969-70 Bob Lanier (29.1) Bob Lanier (16)
St. Francis (N.Y.) 23-5 1953-54 Hank Daubenschmidt (20.2) Hank Daubenschmidt (13.4)
Saint Francis (Pa.) 24-8 1990-91 Mike Iuzzolino (24.1) Joe Anderson (6.3)
St. John's 31-4 1984-85 Chris Mullin (19.8) Walter Berry (8.7)
St. John's 31-5 1985-86 Walter Berry (23) Walter Berry (11.1)
Saint Joseph's 30-2 2003-04 Jameer Nelson (20.6) Dwayne Jones (7)
Saint Louis 28-7 2012-13 Dwayne Evans (14) Dwayne Evans (7.7)
Saint Mary's 28-7 2008-09 Patrick Mills (18.4) Diamon Simpson (10.8)
Saint Mary's 28-6 2009-10 Omar Samhan (21.3) Omar Samhan (10.9)
Saint Mary's 28-7 2012-13 Matthew Dellavedova (15.8) Brad Waldow (6)
Saint Peter's 24-4 1967-68 Elnardo Webster (25) Pete O'Dea (14.6)
Saint Peter's 24-7 1990-91 Tony Walker (19.2) Tony Walker (7)
Samford 24-6 1998-99 Reed Rawlings (16.5) Marc Salyers (5.4)
Sam Houston State 25-8 2009-10 Gilberto Clavell (17.1) Gilberto Clavell (6.4)
San Diego 24-6 1986-87 Scott Thompson (15.9) Scott Thompson (7.4)
San Diego State 34-3 2010-11 Kawhi Leonard (15.5) Kawhi Leonard (10.6)
San Francisco 29-0 1955-56 Bill Russell (20.5) Bill Russell (21)
San Jose State 21-9 1980-81 Sid Williams (15.1) Sid Williams (7.2)
Santa Clara 27-2 1968-69 Dennis Awtrey (21.3) Dennis Awtrey (13.3)
Savannah State 21-12 2011-12 Rashad Hassan (13) Arnold Louis (7.8)
Seattle 26-2 1953-54 Joe Pehanick (20.5) Joe Pehanick (10)
Seton Hall 31-2 1952-53 Walter Dukes (26.1) Walter Dukes (22.2)
Seton Hall 31-7 1988-89 John Morton (17.3) Ramon Ramos (7.6)
Siena 27-8 2008-09 Edwin Ubiles (15) Ryan Rossiter (7.9)
Siena 27-7 2009-10 Alex Franklin (16.1) Ryan Rossiter (11.1)
South Alabama 26-7 2007-08 Demetric Bennett (19.7) DeAndre Coleman (7.8)
South Carolina 25-3 1969-70 John Roche (22.3) Tom Owens (14)
South Carolina State 25-8 1988-89 Rodney Mack (15.2) Rodney Mack (11.1)
South Carolina Upstate 21-13 2011-12 Torrey Craig (16.4) Torrey Craig (7.7)
South Dakota 22-7 2007-08 Dylan Grimsley (14.8) Tyler Cain (8.1)
South Dakota 22-10 2009-10 Tyler Cain (14.7) Tyler Cain (10.4)
South Dakota State 27-8 2011-12 Nate Wolters (21.2) Nate Wolters (5.1)
Southeastern Louisiana 24-9 2004-05 Ricky Woods (17.2) Nate Lofton (7.2)
Southeast Missouri State 24-7 1999-2000 Roderick Johnson (14.1) Roderick Johnson (8.6)
Southern (La.) 25-6 1989-90 Joe Faulkner (21.7) Joe Faulkner (9.2)
Southern California 24-2 1970-71 Dennis Layton (17.6) Ron Riley (15.3)
Southern California 24-5 1973-74 Gus Williams (15.5) John Lambert (6.9)
Southern California 24-6 1991-92 Harold Miner (26.3) Yamen Sanders (8)
Southern California 24-10 2000-01 Sam Clancy (17.3) Sam Clancy (7.5)
Southern Illinois 29-7 2006-07 Jamaal Tatum (15.2) Randal Falker (7.7)
Southern Methodist 28-7 1987-88 Kato Armstrong (16.1) Terry Thomas (7.9)
Southern Mississippi 27-10 2012-13 Dwayne Davis (16) Jonathan Mills (8.1)
Southern Utah 25-6 2000-01 Fred House (17.8) Dan Beus (7.9)
South Florida 22-10 1982-83 Charlie Bradley (28.2) Jim Grandholm (9.2)
Stanford 30-5 1997-98 Arthur Lee (14.5) Mark Madsen (8.2)
Stanford 30-2 2003-04 Josh Childress (15.7) Josh Childress (7.5)
Stephen F. Austin State 27-5 2012-13 Taylor Smith (15.7) Taylor Smith (9.2)
Stetson 22-4 1974-75 Otis Johnson (15.9) Otis Johnson (9)
Stony Brook 25-8 2012-13 Jameel Warney (12.4) Tommy Brenton (8.5)
Syracuse 34-3 2011-12 Kris Joseph (13.4) Fab Melo (5.8)
Temple 32-4 1986-87 Nate Blackwell (19.8) Tim Perry (8.6)
Temple 32-2 1987-88 Mark Macon (20.6) Tim Perry (8)
Tennessee 31-5 2007-08 Chris Lofton (15.5) Tyler Smith (6.7)
Tennessee-Martin 22-10 2008-09 Lester Hudson (27.5) Lester Hudson (7.9)
Tennessee State 19-10 1992-93 Carlos Rogers (20.3) Carlos Rogers (11.7)
Tennessee Tech 27-7 2001-02 Damien Kinloch (16.2) Damien Kinloch (8.5)
Texas 30-7 2005-06 P.J. Tucker (16.1) P.J. Tucker (9.5)
Texas A&M 26-8 1979-80 Vernon Smith (15.1) Rudy Woods (7.6)
Texas A&M-Corpus Christi 26-7 2006-07 Chris Daniels (15.3) Chris Daniels (6.7)
Texas-Arlington 24-9 2011-12 LaMarcus Reed (17.8) Jordan Reves (7.8)
Texas Christian 27-6 1997-98 Lee Nailon (24.9) Dennis Davis (9.8)
Texas-El Paso 28-1 1965-66 Bobby Joe Hill (15) Harry Flournoy (10.7)
Texas-Pan American 22-2 1974-75 Marshall Rogers (26.7) Gilbert King (13.3)
Texas-Pan American 22-4 1977-78 Michael Edwards (24.3) Henry Taylor (14.2)
Texas-San Antonio 22-7 1989-90 Bruce Wheatley (13.9) Bruce Wheatley (9.9)
Texas Southern 22-7 1982-83 Harry Kelly (28.8) Harry Kelly (11.7)
Texas Southern 22-7 1994-95 Kevin Granger (19.7) Anthony Jones (7.4)
Texas State 25-7 1993-94 Lynwood Wade (18.5) Lynwood Wade (8.5)
Texas Tech 30-2 1995-96 Jason Sasser (19.5) Tony Battie (8.9)
Toledo 24-6 1939-40 Bob Gerber (14.4) unavailable
Towson 21-9 1993-94 Terrance "Scooter" Alexander (17.4) John James (7.7)
Troy 26-6 2002-03 Ben Fletcher (13.9) Rob Lewin (8.1)
Tulane 24-4 1948-49 Jim Riffey (13.5) unavailable
Tulsa 32-5 1999-2000 David Shelton (13.5) Brandon Kurtz (7)
UAB 25-6 1981-82 Oliver Robinson (21.1) Chris Giles (7.6)
UAB 25-9 2009-10 Elijah Millsap (16.1) Elijah Millsap (9.5)
UCLA 35-4 2007-08 Kevin Love (17.5) Kevin Love (10.6)
UNLV 37-2 1986-87 Armon Gilliam (23.2) Armon Gilliam (9.3)
Utah 30-4 1990-91 Josh Grant (17.5) Josh Grant (8)
Utah State 30-5 2008-09 Gary Wilkinson (17.1) Gary Wilkinson (6.8)
Utah State 30-4 2010-11 Taj Wesley (14.8) Taj Wesley (8)
Utah Valley 22-7 2006-07 Ryan Toolson (15.5) Jordan Brady (5.2)
Valparaiso 26-8 2012-13 Ryan Broekhoff (15.7) Ryan Broekhoff (7.3)
Vanderbilt 28-6 1992-93 Billy McCaffrey (20.6) Bruce Elder (6.1)
Vermont 25-7 2004-05 Taylor Coppenrath (25.1) Taylor Coppenrath (8.9)
Vermont 25-8 2006-07 Mike Trimboli (15.8) Chris Holm (12.2)
Vermont 25-10 2009-10 Marqus Blakely (17.3) Marqus Blakely (9.3)
Villanova 30-8 2008-09 Dante Cunningham (16.1) Dante Cunningham (7.5)
Virginia 30-4 1981-82 Ralph Sampson (15.8) Ralph Sampson (11.4)
Virginia Commonwealth 29-7 2011-12 Bradford Burgess (13.5) Juvonte Reddic (6.7)
Virginia Military 26-4 1976-77 Ron Carter (20.4) Dave Montgomery (8.9)
Virginia Tech 25-10 1994-95 Shawn Smith (16) Adrian "Ace" Custis (10.5)
Virginia Tech 25-9 2009-10 Malcolm Delaney (20.2) Jeff Allen (7.4)
Wagner 25-6 2011-12 Latif Rivers (14.6) Jonathon Williams (5)
Wake Forest 27-6 2004-05 Eric Williams (16.1) Eric Williams (7.7)
Washington 30-3 1952-53 Bob Houbregs (25.6) Bob Houbregs (11.5)
Washington State 26-6 1940-41 Paul Lindeman (10.2) unavailable
Washington State 26-9 2007-08 Derrick Low (14.1) Aron Baynes (6)
Weber State 30-7 2012-13 Davion Berry (15.2) Joel Bolomboy (7.1)
Western Carolina 22-12 2009-10 Brandon Giles (11.9) Harouna Mutombo (4.6)
Western Illinois 22-9 2012-13 Terell Parks (12.7) Terell Parks (9.6)
Western Kentucky 30-3 1937-38 Harry Saddler (11.8) unavailable
Western Michigan 26-5 2003-04 Mike Williams (18.9) Anthony Kann (7.2)
West Virginia 31-7 2009-10 Da'Sean Butler (17.2) Devin Ebanks (8.1)
Wichita State 30-9 2012-13 Cleanthony Early (13.9) Carl Hall (6.8)
William & Mary 24-10 1948-49 Chester "Chet" Giermak (21.8) unavailable
Winthrop 29-5 2006-07 Michael Jenkins (14.8) Craig Bradshaw (6.3)
Wisconsin 31-5 2007-08 Brian Butch (12.4) Brian Butch (6.6)
Wofford 26-9 2009-10 Noah Dahlman (16.6) Tim Johnson (7.9)
Wright State 23-10 2006-07 DaShaun Wood (19.6) Drew Burleson (5.8)
Wright State 23-13 2012-13 Cole Darling (11.3) Cole Darling (4.6)
Wyoming 31-2 1942-43 Milo Komenich (16.7) unavailable
Xavier 30-7 2007-08 Josh Duncan (12.4) Derrick Brown (6.5)
Yale 29-7-1 1906-07 unavailable unavailable
Youngstown State 20-9 1997-98 Anthony Hunt (14.4) David Brown (7.3)

Father's Way: McDermotts Could Be Premier Dad-Son, Coach-Player Combo

Creighton's move joining the Big East Conference became a Happy Father's Day/Week/Month/Year for coach Greg McDermott when his son, Doug, chose to remain in college for his senior season. Barring injury, Doug should become the eighth player in NCAA DI history to crack the 3,000-point plateau. The McDermotts already have buttressed their case as one of the all-time top five father-son, coach-player combinations. But they are projected to end up atop that list if the Bluejays reach the NCAA Tournament and win a playoff game for the third straight season.

Dad will be paying about $40,000 for his All-American son to be a senior walk-on after the NCAA granted playmaker teammate Grant Gibbs a sixth year of eligibility. But if McDermott becomes the first player to capture conference MVP awards in two different leagues, he will join LSU legend Pete Maravich as the only other player to win three such league awards while on his father's roster.

Maravich never participated in the NCAA tourney. If Georgia State advances to the NCAA playoffs, the Hunters (dad Ron and son R.J.) will be a family duo worth tracking. Elsewhere, the McCallums probably would have cracked the following all-time Top 10 of sons playing under their dad at the same school if Ray Jr. had returned to Detroit for his senior season:

Rank Coach/Father School(s) Record Player/Son Pos. Son's Career Summary Under Father
1. Greg McDermott Creighton 107-38 Doug McDermott F Doug was three-time NCAA first-Team All-American from 2011-12 through 2013-14 after originally signing with old MVC rival Northern Iowa. As a sophomore and junior, he was MVC MVP before earning same award when BlueJays moved to the Big East Conference.
2. Press Maravich Louisiana State 49-35 Pete Maravich G Pete, a three-time unanimous NCAA first-team All-American, became the NCAA's career record holder for total points (3,667 in three years from 1967-68 through 1969-70) and scoring average (44.2 ppg). In his senior season, the Tigers had their highest SEC finish (2nd) and only postseason tournament appearance (NIT) in a 24-year span from 1955 through 1978.
3. Wade Houston Tennessee 60-68 Allan Houston G Allan, a four-time All-SEC first-team selection, averaged more than 20 ppg each of his four seasons en route to becoming the Volunteers' all-time leading scorer (2,801 points from 1989-90 through 1992-93). They participated in the NIT in his freshman and junior campaigns.
4. Bill Berry San Jose State 46-41 Ricky Berry G-F Ricky, after playing his freshman season with Oregon State, averaged 21 ppg, 5.6 rpg and 3.2 apg for the Spartans from 1985-86 through 1987-88 en route to becoming their all-time leading scorer (1,767 points). He was a three-time All-Big West Conference first-team selection.
5. Dick Acres Oral Roberts 47-34 Mark Acres C Dick coached his sons (including Jeff) from midway through the 1982-83 campaign through 1984-85. Mark, a three-time All-Midwestern City Conference first-team selection, averaged 18.5 ppg and 9.6 rpg and shot 56.4% from the floor. Mark was a two-time Midwestern City MVP who led the Titans in scoring and rebounding all four seasons. ORU participated in the 1984 NCAA Tournament.
6. Homer Drew Valparaiso 88-36 Bryce Drew G Bryce, who averaged 17.7 ppg, 5.2 apg and 1.5 spg from 1994-95 through 1997-98 en route to becoming the school's all-time leader in scoring and assists, was the Mid-Continent Conference MVP his last two seasons. The Crusaders won the MCC regular-season and league tournament championships all four years.
7. Dick Bennett Wisconsin-Green Bay 87-34 Tony Bennett G Tony, a three-time All-Mid-Continent Conference first-team selection, averaged 19.4 ppg and 5.1 apg from 1988-89 through 1991-92, finishing as UWGB's all-time leading scorer (2,285 points). He holds the NCAA career record for highest three-point field-goal percentage (.497/minimum of 200 made) and won the Frances Pomeroy Award his senior year as the nation's top player shorter than six feet tall. The Phoenix won the 1991 MCC Tournament and 1992 regular-season title.
8. Sonny Allen SMU/Nevada-Reno 64-48 Billy Allen G Billy averaged 13.1 ppg and 8.2 apg in 1981-82 and 1982-83 after transferring from SMU. The two-time All-Big Sky Conference selection set a UNR single-season record with 8.6 apg as a junior when he was a second-team choice before moving up to first-team status the next year. Billy led the SWC in assists as a freshman in 1978-79 (9 apg) and sophomore in 1979-80 (9.1 apg). He also paced the Mustangs in free-throw percentage both years. In his sophomore season, SMU tied its highest win total (16) in a 15-year span from 1967-68 through 1981-82.
9. Jerry Tarkanian UNLV 77-19 Danny Tarkanian G Danny led the Rebels in assists and steals each of his three seasons from 1981-82 through 1983-84 after transferring from Dixie Junior College (Utah). The All-Pacific Coast Athletic Association second-team selection finished second in the nation with 8.5 apg as a senior. UNLV participated in the NIT in 1982 and NCAA Tournament in 1983 and 1984. The Rebels captured the PCAA regular-season championship in 1983 and 1984.
10. Fred A. Enke Arizona 60-18 Fred W. Enke G Fred W., a future NFL quarterback, was a three-time All-Border Conference first-team selection from 1945-46 through 1947-48. The Wildcats participated in the 1946 NIT after their first of three consecutive league championships.

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