On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on May 8 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 8 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 8

  • Jerry Adair (one of Oklahoma State's three leading basketball scorers in 1956-57 and 1957-58 while ranking among the nation's top 12 free-throw shooters each season) committed an eighth-inning miscue for the Baltimore Orioles against the Detroit Tigers in 1965, ending his MLB-record streaks for consecutive errorless games by a 2B (89) and consecutive chances handled without an error (438).

  • San Diego Padres RHP Mike Adams (played for Texas A&M-Kingsville in 1996-97) notched his fourth hold in nine days but was scored upon for the first time in last 16 relief appearances in 2011.

  • Philadelphia Phillies CF Ethan Allen (Cincinnati letterman in 1924-25 and 1925-26) supplied five RBI in a 13-6 triumph against the Chicago Cubs in 1934.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers C Ferrell Anderson (Kansas letterman in 1936-37 and 1937-38) furnished four hits in an 8-5 win against the Cincinnati Reds in 1946.

  • LF Bob Cerv (ranked fourth on Nebraska's career scoring list in 1949-50 when finishing his career) acquired from the Los Angeles Angels by the New York Yankees in 1961 for his third tour of duty in pinstripes.

  • Philadelphia Athletics C Mickey Cochrane (five-sport athlete with Boston University) collected three doubles against the Cleveland Indians in 1932.

  • Cincinnati Reds 1B George Crowe (four-year letterman from 1939-40 through 1942-43 for Indiana Central after becoming first high school player named state's Mr. Basketball) clobbered two homers in a 7-6 victory against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1957.

  • In 1948, Cleveland Indians RF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) whacked the longest home run at Washington's Griffith Stadium since Babe Ruth in 1922.

  • St. Louis Cardinals CF Taylor Douthit (California letterman from 1922 through 1924) contributed four hits against the Boston Braves in the first of six straight outings with multiple safeties in 1929.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates SS Dick Groat (two-time All-American with Duke in 1950-51 and 1951-52 when finishing among nation's top five scorers each season) provided three hits in each game of a 1955 doubleheader split against the New York Giants.

  • Philadelphia Phillies 1B Harvey Hendrick (Vanderbilt letterman in 1918) went 4-for-4 against the Chicago Cubs in 1934.

  • RHP Jay Hook (Northwestern's third-leading scorer with 10.7 ppg as a sophomore in 1955-56) traded by the New York Mets to the Milwaukee Braves in 1964.

  • Atlanta Braves 2B Davey Johnson (averaged 1.7 ppg for Texas A&M in 1961-62) delivered two homers and five RBI against the New York Mets in 1973.

  • LF "Sweet" Lou Johnson (Kentucky State teammate of legendary HBCU coach Davey Whitney averaged 5.7 ppg and 2 rpg in 1951-52) traded by the Milwaukee Braves with cash to the Detroit Tigers in 1963.

  • Chicago White Sox RHP Bob Keegan (Bucknell letterman in 1941-42 and 1942-43) yielded three homers to Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame OF Ted Williams in a 4-1 defeat in 1957.

  • Detroit Tigers SS Harvey Kuenn (played briefly for Wisconsin in 1951-52 after competing on JV squad previous season) registered his second four-hit outing in a six-game span in 1956.

  • Chicago Cubs 3B Vance Law (averaged 6.8 ppg for Brigham Young from 1974-75 through 1976-77) went 3-for-3 with six RBI against the San Francisco Giants in 1988.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates SS Johnny Logan (played for Binghamton in 1948-49) hit safely as a pinch-hitter for the third straight time in 1963.

  • Chicago Cubs CF Jerry Martin (1971 Southern Conference MVP after he was Furman's runner-up in scoring the previous season) stroked four hits against the Cincinnati Reds in 1979.

  • Baltimore Orioles RHP Ben McDonald (started six times as freshman forward for LSU in 1986-87 under coach Dale Brown) won his first seven starts in 1994.

  • Philadelphia Phillies RF Bill Nicholson (Washington College MD guard for two years in mid-1930s) provided five RBI against the Cincinnati Reds in the nightcap of a 1949 twinbill.

  • Boston Red Sox 2B Marv Olson (All-Iowa Conference selection in 1929-30 with Luther IA) manufactured four hits in a 7-5 win against the St. Louis Browns in 1932.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers C-OF Don Padgett (freshman in 1934 excelled in multiple sports for Lenoir-Rhyne NC) smacked a decisive three-run pinch homer in an 8-5 win against the Cincinnati Reds in 1946.

Training Ground: LA Tech and VCU Join List of Schools Losing Six Coaches

The departure of Michael White to Florida enabled Louisiana Tech to join the list of schools losing at least six head coaches over the years to other major colleges or the NBA. VCU also joined the group this year when Shaka Smart aligned with Texas.

LA Tech lost four mentors in a 16-year span from 1974 to 1989. Incredibly, Tulsa lost four coaches in a seven-year period from 1995 to 2001. The following list shows Idaho (11 years from 1983 to 1993), Princeton (12 years from 2000 to 2011), Murray State (14 years from 1985 to 1998), New Orleans (14 years from 1994 to 2007) and Penn (15 years from 1971 to 1985) losing four coaches in comparable short spans:

Idaho (7) - Dave MacMillan (left for Minnesota/1927), Dave Strack (Michigan/1960), Joe Cipriano (Nebraska/1963), Don Monson (Oregon/1983), Tim Floyd (New Orleans/1988), Kermit Davis (Texas A&M/1990), Larry Eustachy (Utah State/1993)

Kansas State (7) - Jack Gardner (Utah/1953), Tex Winter (Washington/1968), Cotton Fitzsimmons (Phoenix Suns/1970), Lon Kruger (Florida/1990), Dana Altman (Creighton/1994), Bob Huggins (West Virginia/2008), Frank Martin (South Carolina/2012)

Montana (7) - Jud Heathcote (Michigan State/1976), Jim Brandenburg (Wyoming/1978), Mike Montgomery (Stanford/1986), Stew Morrill (Colorado State/1991), Pat Kennedy (Towson/2004), Larry Krystkowiak (assistant with Milwaukee Bucks/2006), Wayne Tinkle (Oregon State/2014)

Murray State (7) - Ron Greene (Indiana State/1985), Steve Newton (South Carolina/1991), Scott Edgar (Duquesne/1995), Mark Gottfried (Alabama/1998), Mick Cronin (Cincinnati/2006), Billy Kennedy (Texas A&M/2011), Steve Prohm (Iowa State/2015)

Penn (7) - Howie Dallmar (Stanford/1954), Jack McCloskey (Wake Forest/1966), Dick Harter (Oregon/1971), Chuck Daly (assistant with Philadelphia 76ers/1977), Bob Weinhauer (Arizona State/1982), Craig Littlepage (Rutgers/1985), Fran Dunphy (Temple/2006)

Tulsa (7) - Ken Hayes (New Mexico State/1975), Nolan Richardson Jr. (Arkansas/1985), Tubby Smith (Georgia/1995), Steve Robinson (Florida State/1997), Bill Self (Illinois/2000), Buzz Peterson (Tennessee/2001), Danny Manning (Wake Forest/2014)

Clemson (6) - Doc Stewart (Texas/1923), Press Maravich (North Carolina State/1962), Bill C. Foster (Miami FL/1984), Cliff Ellis (Auburn/1994), Rick Barnes (Texas/1998), Oliver Purnell (DePaul/2010)

Dartmouth (6) - Ozzie Cowles (Michigan/1946), Dave Gavitt (Providence/1969), George Blaney (Holy Cross/1972), Gary Walters (Providence/1979), Reggie Minton (Air Force/1984), Paul Cormier (Fairfield/1991)

Louisiana Tech (6) - Scotty Robertson (New Orleans Jazz/1974), J.D. Barnett (Virginia Commonwealth/1979), Andy Russo (Washington/1985), Tommy Joe Eagles (Auburn/1989), Jim Wooldridge (assistant with Chicago Bulls/1998), Michael White (Florida/2015)

Marquette (6) - Tex Winter (Kansas State/1953), Rick Majerus (assistant with Milwaukee Bucks/1986), Kevin O'Neill (Tennessee/1994), Mike Deane (Lamar/1999), Tom Crean (Indiana/2008), Buzz Williams (Virginia Tech/2014)

New Orleans (6) - Ron Greene (Mississippi State/1977), Benny Dees (Wyoming/1987), Tim Floyd (Iowa State/1994), Tic Price (Memphis/1997), Monte Towe (assistant with North Carolina State/2006), Buzz Williams (Marquette/2007)

Princeton (6) - Butch van Breda Kolff (Los Angeles Lakers/1967), Pete Carril (assistant with Sacramento Kings/1996), Bill Carmody (Northwestern/2000), John Thompson III (Georgetown/2004), Joe Scott (Denver/2007), Sydney Johnson (Fairfield/2011)

Virginia Commonwealth (6) - Dana Kirk (Memphis State/1979), J.D. Barnett (Tulsa/1985), Mike Pollio (Eastern Kentucky/1989), Jeff Capel III (Oklahoma/2006), Anthony Grant (Alabama/2009), Shaka Smart (Texas/2015)

Xavier (6) - Ned Wulk (Arizona State/1957), Bob Staak (Wake Forest/1985), Pete Gillen (Providence/1994), Skip Prosser (Wake Forest/2001), Thad Matta (Ohio State/2004), Sean Miller (Arizona/2009)

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on May 7 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 7 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 7

  • Baltimore Orioles DH Al Bumbry (Virginia State's runner-up in basketball scoring with 16.7 ppg as freshman in 1964-65) provided four hits for the second time in a four-game span in 1975.

  • INF-OF Harvey Hendrick (Vanderbilt letterman in 1918) traded by the Brooklyn Robins to the Cincinnati Reds in 1931.

  • LF David Justice (led Thomas More KY in assists in 1984-85) jacked two homers while going 4-for-4 to help the Cleveland Indians erase a 9-1 deficit and defeat the Tampa Devil Rays, 20-11, in 1999. The next year, Justice provided three extra-base hits and five RBI against the Toronto Blue Jays in 2000.

  • In 1946, Philadelphia Athletics 1B Bruce Konopka (Southern California letterman in 1940-41) collected his third extra-base pinch-hit the first week of the month.

  • Detroit Tigers SS Harvey Kuenn (played briefly for Wisconsin in 1951-52 after competing on JV squad previous season) contributed four hits against the Chicago White Sox in 1955.

  • 1B Ed Morgan (Tulane letterman from 1923-24 through 1925-26) hit safely in first 14 starts of the 1934 campaign with the Boston Red Sox before he was blanked by the Detroit Tigers.

  • RHP Jack Ogden (competed with Swarthmore PA in 1918) traded by the Cincinnati Reds with Leo Durocher to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1933.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers 2B Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in Pacific Coast Conference both of his seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) amassed multiple-hit outings in 13 of first 19 games in 1951.

  • RHP Hal Schumacher (played for St. Lawrence NY) combined with New York Giants teammate Carl Hubbell to toss back-to-back shutouts in a 1932 doubleheader against the Cincinnati Reds.

  • Cleveland Indians rookie 3B Freddy Spurgeon (played for Kalamazoo MI in 1921-22) went 4-for-4 against the Chicago White Sox in 1925.

  • Chicago White Sox LHP Matt Thornton (averaged 5.8 ppg and 2.4 rpg for Grand Valley State MI from 1995-96 through 1997-98) fanned five Toronto Blue Jays in two innings as he went unscored upon in 10 relief appearances during the month in 2010.

  • 1B-OF Preston Ward (second-leading scorer for Southwest Missouri State in 1946-47 and 1948-49) tripled after three teammates walked to spur the Brooklyn Dodgers to a 9-5 victory at Chicago in 1948.

  • New York Giants 1B Bill White (played two years with Hiram OH in early 1950s) homered in his first MLB at-bat in 1956 (against the St. Louis Cardinals).

Beginner's Luck? Ex-Hofstra Hoopster Brant Alyea Homered on 1st MLB Pitch

How many Eddie Rosarios were former college basketball players before making it on the diamond? Rosario (Minnesota Twins) became the 117th MLB player hitting a homer in his first at-bat (29th on initial pitch he faced). Among the five ex-college hoopsters homering in first at-bat on the following chronological list, Hofstra's Brant Alyea appears to be the only one to go deep on the the initial MLB pitch he faced:

Ex-Hoopster College First MLB Team Date Opponent Yielding HR
Ace Parker Duke Philadelphia Phillies 4-30-37 Boston Red Sox
Ted Tappe Washington State Cincinnati Reds 9-14-50 Brooklyn Dodgers
Wally Moon Texas A&M St. Louis Cardinals 4-13-54 Chicago Cubs
Bill White Hiram (Ohio) New York Giants 5-7-56 St. Louis Cardinals
Brant Alyea* Hofstra Washington Senators 9-12-65 California Angels

*Hit homer on first MLB pitch he faced.

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on May 6 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 6 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 6

  • Hall of Fame C Mickey Cochrane (Boston University basketball player in early 1920s) clobbered his first MLB homer with the Philadelphia Athletics in 1925.

  • Boston Red Sox rookie RHP Boo Ferriss (Mississippi State letterman in 1941) hurled his second straight shutout in 1945, whitewashing the New York Yankees, 5-0.

  • New York Giants 2B Frankie Frisch (Fordham captain) furnished four hits against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1924.

  • RF Jim Gleeson (NAIA Hall of Famer was an all-league player for Rockhurst MO in early 1930s) traded by the Cincinnati Reds to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1942.

  • Detroit Tigers LF Hank Greenberg (enrolled at NYU on hoop scholarship in 1929 but attended college only one semester) contributed three extra-base hits in a 6-4 victory against the New York Yankees in 1940.

  • Cleveland Indians 1B Mike Hargrove (Northwestern Oklahoma State letterman) collected three doubles against the Chicago White Sox in 1983.

  • Milwaukee Braves SS Johnny Logan (played for Binghamton in 1948-49) supplied at least three hits for the third consecutive contest in 1959.

  • In 1968, San Francisco Giants RHP Lindy McDaniel (played for Oklahoma's 1954-55 freshman squad) established a N.L. record with his 225th consecutive errorless game.

  • New York Yankees LF Bud Metheny (William & Mary letterman from 1935-36 through 1937-38) stroked four hits in a 4-3 win against the Boston Red Sox in 1944.

  • In 1967, 1B Cotton Nash (three-time All-American averaged 22.7 ppg and 12.3 rpg for Kentucky from 1961-62 through 1963-64) traded by the California Angels with cash to the Chicago White Sox for 1B Bill "Moose" Skowron (scored 18 points in eight games for Purdue in 1949-50).

  • Cleveland Indians 3B Graig Nettles (shot 87.8% from free-throw line for San Diego State in 1963-64) stroked three doubles against the Chicago White Sox in 1972.

  • A two-out, seventh-inning single by CF Jim Northrup (second-leading scorer and third-leading rebounder for Alma MI in 1958-59) was the Detroit Tigers' lone safety when they were blanked, 4-0, by Dave Leonard of the Baltimore Orioles in 1968.

  • Chicago White Sox rookie LHP Gary Peters (played for Grove City PA in mid-1950s) won his first MLB start in 1963, limiting the Kansas City Athletics to four hits and one run over eight innings.

  • LF Rip Repulski (started a few games for St. Cloud State MN) traded by the Los Angeles Dodgers to the Boston Red Sox in 1960.

  • Cincinnati Reds 1B Champ Summers (led SIUE in scoring in 1969-70 after doing same with Nicholls State in 1964-65) went 4-for-4 and chipped in with five RBI against the Houston Astros in the opener of a 1979 doubleheader.

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on May 5 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 5 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 5

  • Los Angeles Angels 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading basketball scorer in 1945-46) launched two homers against the Kansas City Royals in 1964.

  • Chicago White Sox SS Bosey Berger (Maryland's first All-American led Southern Conference in scoring in league competition in 1930-31) banged out four hits against the Philadelphia Athletics in 1938.

  • Seattle Mariners 1B Bruce Bochte (starting forward for Santa Clara's NCAA playoff team in 1969-70) contributed four hits against the Boston Red Sox in 1979.

  • In 1943, New York Giants LF Vic Bradford (Alabama letterman in 1937) supplied his lone MLB hit with a single against the Boston Braves.

  • 2B Marv Breeding (played for Samford in mid-1950s) traded by the Atlanta Braves to the San Francisco Giants in 1966.

  • Boston Braves SS Dick Culler (#9 jersey retired by High Point for Little All-American in 1935 and 1936) went 5-for-6 in a 1945 doubleheader against the New York Giants.

  • After two shaky starts in 1951, Pittsburgh Pirates RHP Con Dempsey (played for San Francisco during Golden Age of athletics on Hilltop) tossed two shutout innings of relief against the New York Giants in his third and final MLB appearance.

  • RHP George Earnshaw (competed for Swarthmore PA in 1922) ignited a 17-game winning streak for the Philadelphia Athletics in 1931 with a 4-1 triumph over the Boston Red Sox.

  • St. Louis Browns C Rick Ferrell (played forward for Guilford NC before graduating in 1928) furnished four hits for the second time in a three-game span in 1931.

  • Oakland Athletics 3B Wayne Gross (led Cal Poly Pomona in assists in 1974-75) went 4-for-4, including three extra-base hits, in a 6-2 win against the Detroit Tigers in 1981.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers 1B Gil Hodges (played for Oakland City IN in 1947 and 1948) homered twice against the Cincinnati Reds in 1951.

  • Atlanta Braves RF David Justice (led Thomas More KY in assists in 1984-85) smacked two homers against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1996.

  • St. Louis Browns LHP Ernie Koob (Western Michigan letterman in 1914) hurled a no-hitter against the Chicago White Sox in 1917.

  • OF Don Lock (led Wichita State in field-goal percentage in 1956-57 and 1957-58) traded by the Philadelphia Phillies to the Boston Red Sox in 1969.

  • In a twinbill sweep of the Philadelphia Phillies, St. Louis Cardinals LF Wally Moon (averaged 4.3 ppg with Texas A&M in 1948-49 and 1949-50) began a 24-game hitting streak, the longest of the 1957 season in the N.L.

  • 1B-OF Norm Siebern (member of Southwest Missouri State's back-to-back NAIA Tournament titlists in 1952 and 1953) scored five runs for the Kansas City Athletics in an 18-6 romp over the Cleveland Indians in the opener of a doubleheader in 1962.

  • Detroit Tigers SS Ken Szotkiewicz (Georgia Southern letterman in 1966-67) supplied career highs of two hits and two RBI against the Minnesota Twins in 1970.

  • San Diego Padres OF Will Venable (All-Ivy League first-team selection as junior and second-team choice as senior averaged 9.3 ppg under Princeton coach John Thompson III from 2001-02 through 2004-05) stroked a game-winning, two-run single in the bottom of the 12th inning in a 6-5 win against the Kansas City Royals in 2014.

You're Billy the Kidding Me: Donovan Never Named National Coach of Year

"It is better to be looked over than overlooked." - Mae West

It doesn't seem possible, but Billy Donovan is bound for the NBA's Oklahoma City Thunder without ever earning acclaim as national coach of the year by a major award. The former New England athlete (Providence) didn't deflate balls, but was shunned despite becoming Florida's all-time winningest mentor and directing the Gators to back-to-back NCAA Tournament titles (2006 and 2007).

Maryland named its court after Gary Williams, the school's all-time winningest coach who guided the Terrapins to the 2002 NCAA title during a span when he became the only mentor ever to defeat the nation's top-ranked team in four straight seasons (2000-01 through 2003-04). Surprisingly, Williams never was courted as national coach of the year by one of the major awards, joining Donovan and other NCAA championship coaches such as Denny Crum, Joe B. Hall, Don Haskins, Rollie Massimino and Jim Valvano "shorted" by this dubious distinction.

Does this blemish exist because of envious fellow coaches or is the Brady Punch-obsessed media in dire need of brain scans while focusing more on deflated Patriot balls than inflated Clinton Crime Family wallets? A total of 16 individuals received acclaim as national COY despite never reaching an NCAA playoff regional final - Rod Barnes, Tony Bennett, Perry Clark, Jim Crews, Keno Davis, Matt Doherty, Cliff Ellis, Eddie Fogler, Frank Haith, Leonard Hamilton, Marv Harshman, Todd Lickliter, George Raveling, Al Skinner, Charlie Spoonhour and Dick Versace. Following is an alphabetical list of high-profile retired or non-DI coaches joining Donovan who never received one of the five major national coach of the year awards since 1955 despite their significant achievements:

Dave Bliss - Compiled a total of 14 20-win seasons with three different schools.

Dale Brown - Led LSU to 15 consecutive postseason tournaments (1979 through 1993) en route to becoming the second-winningest coach in SEC history at the time (behind Adolph Rupp) in both overall and SEC games.

Vic Bubas - Guided Duke to NCAA Tournament Final Four appearances three times in a four-year span from 1963 through 1966.

Pete Carril - Never incurred a losing record in 29 seasons with Princeton from 1968 through 1996.

Gale Catlett - Went his first 23 seasons without a losing record with Cincinnati and West Virginia; participated in nine consecutive national postseason tournaments in the 1980s.

Denny Crum - Won 15 regular-season conference championships in the Missouri Valley and Metro in his first 23 seasons with Louisville; only coach to twice win conference and NCAA tournaments in the same year (1980 and 1986).

Don DeVoe - Compiled a total of 12 20-win seasons with three different schools.

Don Donoher - One of first 10 coaches to take his first three teams to the NCAA playoffs guided his first seven Dayton clubs to national postseason competition; posted double digits in victories all 25 seasons.

Lefty Driesell - One of only three different coaches to guide four different schools to the NCAA playoffs; captured conference tournament titles in four different leagues; only coach to win more than 100 games for four different schools en route to total of 786 victories; had 14 final Top 20 rankings.

Hugh Durham - One of only three coaches in NCAA history to win at least 225 games for two Division I schools, directing both Florida State and Georgia to the Final Four.

Bill C. Foster - Only six losing records in 25 seasons at the Division I level with UNC Charlotte, Clemson, Miami (FL) and Virginia Tech.

Jack Gardner - Only coach to direct two different schools to the Final Four at least twice apiece.

Pete Gillen - Remarkable run with Xavier (winning five Midwestern Collegiate Conference Tournament titles in six-year span from 1986 through 1991) before posting 20-win seasons with Providence in the Big East and Virginia in the ACC.

Joe B. Hall - Averaged 23 victories annually in 13 seasons with Kentucky, reaching championship game in either NCAA Tournament or NIT three times in a four-year span from 1975 through 1978.

Don Haskins - Captured four Western Athletic Conference Tournament championships with Texas-El Paso in a seven-year span from 1984 through 1990 while winning more than 20 games each of those seasons; compiled a total of 17 20-win campaigns.

Lou Henson - Compiled only one losing record in his last 22 years with Illinois and New Mexico State; finished in first division of the Big Ten Conference nine straight seasons.

Terry Holland - Averaged 20 victories annually in 21 seasons with Davidson and Virginia.

Harry Litwack - Finished third with Temple in three consecutive national postseason tournaments (1956 and 1958 in NCAA and 1957 in NIT). Posted only one losing record in 21 seasons with the Owls through 1973.

Rollie Massimino - Averaged more than 20 victories annually in the 1980s; participated in 14 consecutive national postseason tournaments with Villanova and UNLV before coaching at small-school level in Florida.

Ray Mears - Finished lower than third place in SEC standings with Tennessee just once in his final 14 seasons from 1964 through 1977.

Shelby Metcalf - Averaged 18.6 victories annually with Texas A&M in an 18-year span from 1971-72 through 1988-89.

Eldon Miller - Won more than 20 games with three different DI schools (Western Michigan, Ohio State and Northern Iowa).

Joe Mullaney - Reached the 20-win plateau nine straight seasons from 1958-59 through 1966-67, directing Providence to the NIT semifinals four times in the first five years of that stretch; won more than two-thirds of his games with the Friars decided by fewer than five points.

C.M. Newton - Posted at least 22 victories with Alabama six times in the last seven seasons of the 1970s.

Dave Odom - Won 20 or more games 10 times in a 14-year span from 1992-93 through 2005-06 with Wake Forest and South Carolina.

Ted Owens - Finished first or second in Big Eight Conference standings each of his first seven seasons with Kansas from 1965 through 1971.

Tom Penders - Won at least 20 games with three different schools (Rhode Island, Texas and George Washington) a total of 10 times in a 13-year span from 1987 through 1999 before winning more than 20 games three times in six seasons with Houston.

Jack Ramsay - Worst record in 11 seasons with St. Joseph's was an 18-10 mark.

Wimp Sanderson - Won five SEC Tournament titles with Alabama, including three in a row from 1989 through 1991.

Fred Schaus - Won Southern Conference Tournament championships each of his six seasons with West Virginia from 1955 through 1960 before posting winning records in Big Ten competition all six years with Purdue.

Roy Skinner - Compiled only one losing record in 16 seasons with Vanderbilt.

Billy Tubbs - Directed Oklahoma to 12 consecutive 20-win seasons, a Big Eight Conference best; took the Sooners to national postseason play his last 13 years with them before moving on to TCU and Lamar.

Jim Valvano - Guided Iona to a school-record 29 victories in 1979-80 before winning at least 18 games each of his last nine seasons with North Carolina State from 1982 through 1990.

Gary Williams - All-time winningest coach for Maryland directed 13 teams to Top 20 finishes in final polls, including a couple of them with Boston College.

Ned Wulk - All-time winningest coach for Arizona State finished atop conference standings in six of his first seven seasons with the Sun Devils.

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on May 4 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 4 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 4

  • Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading basketball scorer in 1945-46) cracked a grand slam in the bottom of the 10th inning of a 10-6 triumph against the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1961.

  • Chicago Cubs 1B Larry Biittner (runner-up in scoring and rebounding for Buena Vista IA in 1966-67) banged out four hits against the Cincinnati Reds in the nightcap of a 1980 doubleheader.

  • Oakland Athletics 3B Wayne Gross (led Cal Poly Pomona in assists in 1974-75) contributed two homers and five RBI in an 11-5 win against the New York Yankees in 1979.

  • In the midst of a career-high 23-game hitting streak in 1980, Cleveland Indians 1B Mike Hargrove (Northwestern Oklahoma State letterman) supplied at least one RBI in his eighth consecutive contest.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers 1B Gil Hodges (played for Oakland City IN in 1947 and 1948) went 4-for-4, including two homers and two doubles, against the Milwaukee Braves in 1959.

  • In 1927, New York Giants RHP Mul Holland (Virginia letterman from 1923-24 through 1926-27) posted his lone MLB victory.

  • Milwaukee Braves SS Johnny Logan (played for Binghamton in 1948-49) logged three doubles in a 9-4 win against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1953.

  • San Diego Padres 3B Graig Nettles (shot 87.8% from free-throw line for San Diego State in 1963-64) whacked two homers against the Chicago Cubs in 1985.

  • St. Louis Browns LHP Joe Ostrowski (leading scorer in 1942-43 for Scranton PA) tossed his second complete-game victory in as many starts in 1950.

  • Atlanta Braves RHP Ron Reed (Notre Dame's leading rebounder in 1963-64 and 1964-65) incurred the defeat in a 20-inning marathon against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1973.

  • In 1966, Houston Astros RHP Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) tossed the last of 45 MLB shutouts in his 19-year Hall of Fame career.

  • RHP Sonny Siebert (team-high 16.7 ppg for Missouri in 1957-58 as All-Big Eight Conference second-team selection) shipped by the Boston Red Sox to the Texas Rangers as part of a conditional deal in 1973.

  • RHP Lee Smith (averaged 3.4 ppg and 1.9 rpg with Northwestern State in 1976-77) traded by the Boston Red Sox to the St. Louis Cardinals for OF Tom Brunansky in 1990.

  • Cleveland Indians 2B Freddy Spurgeon (played for Kalamazoo MI in 1921-22) supplied four hits and four RBI against the St. Louis Browns in 1926.

  • Detroit Tigers 2B Gary Sutherland (averaged 7.4 ppg with USC in 1963-64) stroked four hits against the Minnesota Twins in 1976.

Curry Favor: Ex-Davidson Dynamo Not First Mid-Major Mistake by NBA Execs

Golden State guard Stephen Curry, anointed NBA Most Valuable Player this season before shattering the league's record for most three-pointers in a single playoff and guiding the Warriors to their first NBA Finals appearance in 40 years, neither is too small nor too fragile. What is too small and fragile are the minds of any genius who overlooked the Davidson All-American for significantly inferior performers as a high school recruit and those who subsequently bypassed him in a similar fashion in the NBA draft. Knuckleheads offended by Curry's dynamo daughter at a post-game press conference podium should save their angst for those individuals on a basketball payroll despite shunning Curry - occasionally including colleagues.

In retrospect, it defies belief ESPN "expert" Seth Greenberg boasted the gall to patronize Virginia Tech All-American Dell Curry's son by offering a spot on the Hokies' roster as a walk-on before the Minnesota Timberwolves picked long-forgotten Jonny Flynn one slot ahead of the incomparable Curry in 2009. In other words, Greenberg and the Timberwolves are the only individual and pro team capable of stopping Curry. Of course, Loyola (Md.) is the only college capable of containing Curry, holding the nation's top point producer scoreless in 2008-09.

In a previous non-sexist straightforward generation when fifty-something Hannah Storm also dressed like a teenager, Stockton-to-Malone could have been a hallmark of the Washington Bullets/Wizards rather than the Utah Jazz if there were more astute judgments made in 1984 and 1985 between mid-major and SEC/ACC players. Smug egghead prosecutors seeking face time appealing to low-information voters by indicting hard-working policemen probably would have more stature probing low-intelligence individuals previously laying an egg bypassing workmanlike Curry. Following is an alphabetical list of mid-major standouts selected behind players from current power conference members before they became league MVP such as Curry, Finals MVP, appeared in five or more All-Star Games or all-time Top 10 in assists, blocked shots, rebounds or steals:

Mid-Major Standout (Pick Overall) College Year Players From Current Power League Member Chosen Ahead of Him in Draft
Tiny Archibald (19) Texas-El Paso 1970 Jim Ard (Cincinnati)/Gary Freeman (Oregon State)/Al Henry (Wisconsin)/Mike Price (Illinois)/John Vallely (UCLA)
Maurice Cheeks (36) West Texas State 1978 Marty Byrnes (Syracuse)/Harry Davis (Florida State)/Jack Givens (Kentucky)/Butch Lee (Marquette)/Wayne Radford (Indiana)/Raymond Townsend (UCLA)/Rick Wilson (Louisville)
Larry Costello (12) Niagara 1954 Ed Kalafat (Minnesota)/Bob Mattick (Oklahoma State)/Dick Rosenthal (Notre Dame)
Stephen Curry (7) Davidson 2009 Jonny Flynn (Syracuse)/Hasheem Thabeet (Connecticut)
Joe Dumars (18) McNeese State 1985 Uwe Blab (Indiana)/Kenny Green (Wake Forest)/Keith Lee (Memphis State)
Wayne Embry (23) Miami (Ohio) 1958 Pete Brennan (North Carolina)/Archie Dees (Indiana)/Roy DeWitz (Kansas State)/Vern Hatton (Kentucky)/Frank Howard (Ohio State)/John Nacincik (Maryland)/Joe Quigg (North Carolina)/Lamar Sharrar (West Virginia)
Walt Frazier (5) Southern Illinois 1967 Sonny Dove (St. John's)
Hal Greer (14) Marshall 1958 Pete Brennan (North Carolina)/Archie Dees (Indiana)/Vern Hatton (Kentucky)/Joe Quigg (North Carolina)/Lamar Sharrar (West Virginia)
Richie Guerin (17) Iona 1954 Dick Farley (Indiana)/Ed Kalafat (Minnesota)/Bob Mattick (Oklahoma State)/Dick Rosenthal (Notre Dame)
Dennis Johnson (29) Pepperdine 1976 Bob Carrington (Boston College)/Norm Cook (Kansas)/Jacky Dorsey (Georgia)/Scott Lloyd (Arizona State)/Willie Smith (Missouri)/Chuckie Williams (Kansas State)
Gus Johnson (11) Idaho 1963 Art Heyman (Duke)/Tom Hoover (Villanova)/Tom Thacker (Cincinnati)/Gerry Ward (Boston College)
Sam Jones (8) North Carolina Central 1957 George BonSalle (Illinois)/Lennie Rosenbluth (North Carolina)/Win Wilfong (Memphis State)
Rudy LaRusso (12) Dartmouth 1959 Don Goldstein (Louisville)/John Richter (North Carolina State)/Joe Ruklick (Northwestern)
Karl Malone (13) Louisiana Tech 1985 Kenny Green (Wake Forest)/Keith Lee (Memphis State)
Cedric "Cornbread" Maxwell (12) UNC Charlotte 1977 Tom LaGarde (North Carolina)
Steve Nash (15) Santa Clara 1996 Todd Fuller (North Carolina State)
Willis Reed (10) Grambling 1964 Gary Bradds (Ohio State)/George Wilson (Cincinnati)
John Stockton (16) Gonzaga 1984 Lancaster Gordon (Louisville)/Terence Stansbury (Temple)/Melvin Turpin (Kentucky)
Nate Thurmond (4) Bowling Green 1963 Art Heyman (Duke)/Tom Thacker (Cincinnati)
Chet Walker (14) Bradley 1962 Paul Hogue (Cincinnati)/John Rudometkin (Southern California)

NOTE: Drafts in 1958, 1959, 1962, 1963 and 1964 included territorial picks.

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on May 3 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 3 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 3

  • In 1977, Chicago Cubs RHP Ray Burris (basketball-baseball standout in Southwestern Oklahoma State Hall of Fame) fired a five-hit shutout against the Houston Astros for his first of five victories in the month.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates 1B Donn Clendenon (four-sport letterman with Morehouse GA) cracked two-run homers in the 8th and 12th innings in a 5-4 win against the Cincinnati Reds in 1966.

  • Detroit Tigers C Mickey Cochrane (five-sport athlete with Boston University) collected four hits, including three for extra bases, against the Chicago White Sox in 1937.

  • Boston Red Sox LF Hoot Evers (Illinois starter in 1939-40) scored four runs against the St. Louis Browns in the opener of a 1953 doubleheader.

  • Washington Senators C Rick Ferrell (played forward for Guilford NC before graduating in 1928) registered four hits against the St. Louis Browns in 1939.

  • First triumph in 1982 campaign for Baltimore Orioles LHP Mike Flanagan (averaged 13.9 ppg for UMass' freshman squad in 1971-72) was a three-hit shutout against the Seattle Mariners. Seven years later with the Toronto Blue Jays, Flanagan provided the final whitewash of his 18-year career (four-hitter against the Oakland Athletics in 1989).

  • INF Jake Flowers (member of 1923 "Flying Pentagon" championship squad for Washington College MD) traded by the St. Louis Cardinals to the Brooklyn Robins in 1927.

  • LHP Steve Hamilton (Morehead State's leading scorer and rebounder in 1956-57 and 1957-58) traded by the Cleveland Indians to the Washington Senators in 1962.

  • Teammates OF Irv Noren (player of year for California junior college state champion Pasadena City in 1945) and INF Tommie Upton (led Southeast Missouri State in scoring three years last half of 1940s and was school's career scoring leader upon graduation; while serving in military, he was All-EIBL first-team selection with Penn in 1945-46) traded by the Washington Senators to the New York Yankees for promising OF Jackie Jensen and three other players in 1952. Upton never played for the Yanks.

  • RHP Steve Roser (center for Clarkson NY before passing up senior season after signing professional baseball contract in 1940) purchased from the New York Yankees by the Boston Braves in 1946.

  • RHP Rollie Sheldon (third-leading scorer as a sophomore for Connecticut's 1960 NCAA Tournament team) traded by the New York Yankees to the Kansas City Athletics in 1965.

  • Chicago Cubs SS Roy Smalley Jr. (one of top scorers in 1942-43 and 1943-44 for Drury MO) went 4-for-4 against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1950.

Professional Grade: Donovan & Hoiberg Seek to Match Brown's NBA Success

Will Billy Donovan, who directed Florida to back-to-back NCAA Tournament titles in 2006 and 2007, find out it's a star-crossed crossing over from college to the NBA (Oklahoma City Thunder)? Ditto Fred Hoiberg, who returned to his old stomping grounds with the Chicago Bulls after assembling a program at Iowa State capable of returning his alma mater to the Final Four for the first time since 1944. Just ask Dick Vitale if it takes more than a fresh or "pretty" face to make a successful transition. Only four NBA coaches boast tenures of five or more seasons. Brad Stevens, who guided Butler to back-to-back NCAA playoff championship games in 2010 and 2011, was swept this year with the Boston Celtics in his first NBA playoff series.

SMU's Larry Brown, one of the first six men to be hired by an NBA team after winning an NCAA championship, is the only one in this category to compile a winning NBA playoff record. Three other coaches directed teams to the NCAA Final Four and the NBA championship series - Jack Ramsay (St. Joseph's 1961 and Portland Trail Blazers 1977), Fred Schaus (West Virginia 1959 and the Los Angeles Lakers 1962), 1963, 1965, 1966) and Butch van Breda Kolff (Princeton 1965 and the Lakers 1968, 1969). Neither Ramsay (8-11) nor Schaus (6-7) finished their collegiate coaching careers with winning NCAA playoff records, however.

Only Phil Jackson and Pat Riley coached in and won more NBA playoff games than Brown. Following is an alphabetical list summarizing the NBA careers of Brown and 16 additional individuals who aligned with NBA franchises as head coaches after guiding a college team to the Final Four:

Coach NCAA Final Four Team(s) NBA Years Regular-Season Playoff Record
Larry Brown UCLA '80/Kansas '86 & '88 27 1,098-904 100-93
John Calipari Massachusetts '96/Memphis '08/Kentucky '11, '12, '14 & '15 3 72-112 0-3
P.J. Carlesimo Seton Hall '89 9 239-315 6-13
*Bob Feerick Santa Clara '52 2 63-74 0-2
Ed Jucker Cincinnati '61, '62 & '63 2 80-84 0-0
Doggie Julian Holy Cross '47 & '48 2 47-81 0-0
Lon Kruger Florida '94 3 69-122 0-0
Frank McGuire St. John's '52/North Carolina '57 1 49-31 6-6
Mike Montgomery Stanford '98 2 68-96 0-0
Harold Olsen Ohio State '39, '44, '45 & '46 3 95-63 7-11
Rick Pitino PC '87/Kentucky '93, '96 & '97/Louisville '05 & '12 6 192-220 6-7
Jack Ramsay St. Joseph's '61 21 864-783 44-58
Fred Schaus West Virginia '59 7 315-245 23-38
Brad Stevens Butler '10 & '11 2 65-99 0-4
Jerry Tarkanian UNLV '77, '87, '90 & '91 1 9-11 0-0
Butch van Breda Kolff Princeton '65 9 266-253 21-12
Tex Winter Kansas State '58 & '64 2 51-78 0-0

*Feerick's NBA record includes one season with the Washington Capitols (1949-50) before he was named coach at Santa Clara.

NOTES: Jucker (Rollins), Julian (Dartmouth), Kruger (UNLV and Oklahoma), McGuire (South Carolina), Olsen (Northwestern), Pitino (Kentucky and Louisville), Schaus (Purdue), Tarkanian (Fresno State), van Breda Kolff (Lafayette and Hofstra) and Winter (Northwestern and Long Beach State) returned to college as head coaches after their stints in the NBA. . . . Ken Loeffler was coach of the St. Louis Bombers and Providence Steamrollers for three seasons (1946-47 through 1948-49) before directing La Salle to back-to-back Final Fours (1954 champion and 1955 runner-up). . . . Phil Woolpert, coach of San Francisco's back-to-back NCAA champions (1955 and 1956), coached the San Francisco Saints for one season in the old American Basketball League.

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on May 2 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 2 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 2

  • Chicago Cubs 2B Glenn Beckert (three-year letterman for Allegheny PA) contributed three extra-base hits against the Atlanta Braves in 1972.

  • Baltimore Orioles CF Al Bumbry (Virginia State's runner-up in scoring with 16.7 ppg as freshman in 1964-65) stroked four hits against the Seattle Mariners in 1979.

  • Chicago Cubs CF Billy Cowan (co-captain of Utah's 1970 NCAA playoff team) knocked in five runs against the Houston Colt .45s in 1964.

  • Cincinnati Reds 1B George Crowe (four-year letterman from 1939-40 through 1942-43 for Indiana Central after becoming the first high school player named the state's "Mr. Basketball") drove in six runs in a 7-3 victory at St. Louis in 1958.

  • Boston Red Sox C Gene Desautels (Holy Cross letterman in 1929 and 1930) went 4-for-4 against the Philadelphia Athletics in 1938.

  • After winning four straight starts in April, Florida Marlins LHP Mark Hendrickson (two-time All-Pacific-10 Conference selection paced Washington State four straight seasons in rebounding 1992-93 through 1995-96) earned the triumph in a 6-4 verdict over the San Diego Padres in 2008.

  • New York Yankees rookie LF Charlie Keller (three-year letterman with Maryland from 1934-35 through 1936-37) scored four runs and chipped in with six RBI against the Detroit Tigers in 1939.

  • INF Buddy Myer (letterman for Mississippi State in 1923-24) traded by the Washington Senators to the Boston Red Sox in 1927.

  • 3B Graig Nettles (shot 87.8% from free-throw line for San Diego State in 1963-64) swatted a pinch-hit grand slam for the Atlanta Braves in a 12-4 victory against the Houston Astros in 1987.

  • Philadelphia Phillies RHP Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) struck out 13 Chicago Cubs in a 4-2 triumph in 1957. No Philly infielder had an assist in the contest.

  • In 1958, Boston Red Sox RHP Dave Sisler (All-Ivy League second-team selection for Princeton's first NCAA Tournament team in 1952) fired his lone MLB shutout (against the Detroit Tigers). The next year, Sisler was traded by the Red Sox to the Tigers on this date.

Ex-College Hoopster Tracking Undeniable Thug UBL Remains in Shadows

Do you want to be our hero? Last year, Fox News carried a riveting two-part program featuring Navy SEAL Team 6 member Robert O'Neill (senior chief petty officer is recipient of two Silver and five Bronze Stars) as "The Man Who Killed Usama Bin Laden." Amid focusing on the fourth anniversary ridding Planet Earth of UBL, it seems we should also be celebrating authentic courage from the college basketball ranks stemming from an individual instrumental in tracking the terrorist down. But the selfless ex-athlete from a Midwest university hasn't "come out of the closet" for security reasons and might be underground with a fake identification unless, of course, ax-grinding Left Coast Sen. Dianne Feinstein rats him out amid another of her vendettas.

In the documentation about dispatching UBL to hell (equivalent status even if satisfying 72 virgins is what transpired), the White House unveiled a photograph of President Barack Obama and his Cabinet inside the Situation Room, watching the daring commando raid unfold on May 1, 2011. But POTUS (JV player for Occidental CA) apparently wasn't the tallest ex-college hoopster in the room. Standing just outside the frame of that famous pic was an anonymous Central Intelligence Agency officer ("CIA John") who pursued UBL as a dogmatic deputy chief and reportedly was also influential as one of the principal proponents of drone deterrence. Two days after the world's most-wanted man was transformed into marine treat when dumped into the North Arabian Sea, "CIA John" accompanied then CIA Director Leon Panetta to Capitol Hill, where the Senate Intelligence Committee received a full briefing on the mission.

According to AP accounts at the time, the meticulous senior intelligence analyst was the first individual to put in writing that a legitimate CIA lead had been assembled on possibly locating UBL. He spearheaded the collection of clues for nearly 10 years, leading the agency to a fortified compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan, and its epic counter-terrorism success. Our freedom-loving nation is eternally grateful that his manhunt accuracy as a deep-cover agent in pinpointing UBL's whereabouts stood in stark contrast to his free-throw marksmanship as a deep-bench player (barely over 30%) as a member of multiple NCAA playoff teams.

Sy Hersh muckraking notwithstanding, box-office hit "Zero Dark Thirty" was an inspiring movie focusing on a young female CIA operative allegedly also from flyover country. She exhibited her tenacity, dedication and courage in primarily monitoring a vital courier for al-Qaeda's upper brass. According to Esquire, the shooter who killed UBL (subsequently acknowledged as Butte MT native O'Neill) gave the magazine out of his gun as a souvenir to bloodhound "Maya." While the film doesn't do justice to the male super spy, the patriot is likely to defer anyway to the concept "there is no 'I' in team." Naturally, Langley issued a perfunctory "no comment" because concern exists about publishing his name and running biographical details might make him a target for retribution.

Over the decades, there have been other notable "Secret Agent Men" in the CIA who were former college hoopsters. In fact, a Final Four player isn't required to hit a decisive basket or be selected Most Outstanding Player to be a hero. He doesn't even need to participate on the court. Bob Ames, a member of the Tom Gola-led La Salle teams in 1954 (national champion) and 1955 (runner-up to San Francisco), never got off the bench at the Final Four those two years although he was the only La Salle player to hit more than three-fourths of his free throws the season the Explorers won the NCAA title.

"Our coach, Ken Loeffler, only used seven guys, and Bob was the eighth man," said Frank Blatcher, a starter for the Explorers each season and their leading scorer with a total of 42 points at the Final Four on the championship team. "He had the talent. He just never got a chance to show it."

Ames, a pre-law major who scored a total of eight points in three NCAA playoff games in 1955, did have an opportunity to show his ability in another more vital endeavor, however. He joined the CIA and worked his way up the chain of command to become the Director of the CIA's Office of Analysis of the Near East and South Asia. "The Spy Who Loved Basketball" worked closely with both the Carter and Reagan administrations.

Regrettably, Ames was killed in Beirut in 1983. A truck loaded with TNT on a suicide mission rammed into the facility where Ames was staying while serving as a liaison trying to allay contacts among the Lebanese, Syrians and Israelis in hopes of calming the escalating discord.

"Here was a guy that turned out to have had a greater influence on our lives than just about any 1,000 other basketball players you can name," Blatcher said. "It just shows you that you don't have to be a star to accomplish something." Something like becoming a genuine American hero.

Elsewhere, the CIA's deputy director under George Bush in 1976 was Hank Knoche, the leading scorer in the Mountain States (Big Seven) Conference with 16.4 points per game for Colorado's 1946 NCAA Tournament team. Knoche, the father of former American University coach Chris Knoche, reputedly was the first player selected in the NBA's first college draft in 1947 after enrolling at Washington and Jefferson (Pa.) to play on a 16-4 team with two of his brothers. But he never appeared in the then-fledgling league, which doesn't have any official draft records prior to 1949. The franchise that selected him, the Pittsburgh Ironmen, folded shortly after the draft, and his rights reverted to the New York Knicks.

"I didn't know I was the first No. 1 pick until a writer from Atlanta called me for a story," Knoche said. "An NBA historian had informed him of my alleged status."

The elder Knoche, who went to live in the Denver area, chose not to play in an uncertain situation for little money. "I never received any contact from the Ironmen," he said. "The Knicks sent a contract offer in the mail, but it was for just $3,500 and that's if I made the team (many NBA standouts earn five times that amount every quarter).

"I chose to play industrial basketball, where I remember playing six times one year against seven-footer Bob Kurland (Oklahoma State three-time first-team All-American who never played in the NBA). That wasn't much fun going against Kurland because I was just a 6-4 center."

Knoche was recalled to the military during the Korean War, where he was assigned to intelligence work for the Navy and later embarked on a civilian career leading to a job with the CIA.

Another former college hoopster who carved out a CIA career was Pete Sivess, a center for Dickinson PA in 1935-36 before compiling a 7-11 record as a righthanded pitcher with the Philadelphia Phillies in three years from 1936 through 1938. While Moe Berg is the most famous MLB player linked with the CIA, his career as a spy pales in comparison to baseball contemporary Sivess, who is credited with defining CIA policy for handling Eastern Bloc defectors. During the height of the Cold War, Sivess conducted a "first haven" on Maryland's Eastern Shore where defectors were shipped to be debriefed. Probably the highest-profile spy Sivess monitored was "notorious double agent" Nicholas Shadrin, who died on a trip to Vienna in 1975 in a kidnapping attempt by Moscow's counterspies.

In the shadowy world of the CIA, no precise clues exist as to whether a basketball background for "CIA John" contributed to helping POTUS develop a comfort-zone bond with him similar to other ex-college hoopsters in his inner circle - Secretary of Education Arne Duncan (Harvard), departing Attorney General Eric Holder (Columbia), former "body man" Reggie Love (Duke) and former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Mike Mullen (Navy). But it isn't ridiculous to suggest there might not have been a second inauguration for President Obama if he didn't trust "CIA John."

A vital hurdle approving the raid came when the SEAL Squadron leader briefed Mullen on merits of the mission. According to O'Neill's anonymous interview with Esquire, Vice Admiral William McRaven, head of Joint Special Ops Command, compared the raid and its fighters to the basketball movie Hoosiers in a final briefing with the participants in Operation Neptune's Spear.

A pithy precept occasionally surfaces in basketball trash talking that "some talk a good game and some play a good game." Depending upon your point of view, Time's Person of the Year in 2011 and each subsequent year could have been "CIA John." Surely, ex-Time managing editor Rick Stengel, a backup for Pete Carril-coached Princeton in the mid-1970s, would have encouraged co-workers to give "CIA John" special consideration after the White House acknowledged him and his colleagues as "unbelievably competent professionals."

Deserved or not, other ex-college hoopsters may get the bulk of the glory ranging from taking credit for UBL's demise to some searing social issue actually paling in comparison. When, if ever, will our nation get the opportunity to pay homage to a genuine hoop hero comparable to Ames, Knoche and Sivess? Heaven only knows we need an authentic hero these days to offset riots in major U.S. cities, a lawless West Wing supported by ideologically-driven lame-stream media plus collegiate academic scandals and athletes treating women as bad as Sharia-Law zealot Islamic radicals. But at the moment, the stirring tale will simply be "The Greatest Hoop Story Never Fully Told."

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on May 1 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 1 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 1

  • Seattle Mariners RHP Jim Beattie (Dartmouth's top rebounder in 1974-75 when selected basketball team MVP and honorable mention All-Ivy League) hurled a four-hit shutout against the Boston Red Sox in 1985.

  • After teammate Bill Parsons walked the first three Oakland A's batters, RHP Jim Colborn (Whittier CA in mid-1960s before studying for master's at Edinburgh where he was All-Scotland in basketball) came in and pitched a complete-game 4-3 victory for the Milwaukee Brewers in 1973.

  • California Angels RHP Eddie Fisher (played for Oklahoma's 1954-55 freshman squad) permitted his lone earned run in first 12 relief appearances in the 1970 campaign.

  • St. Louis Cardinals 2B Frankie Frisch (Fordham captain) furnished three extra-base hits and four RBI against the Cincinnati Reds in 1927.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates 3B Lee Handley (Bradley letterman from 1932-33 through 1934-35) banged out four hits against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1941.

  • Cleveland Indians LF David Justice (led Thomas More KY in assists in 1984-85) delivered two homers against the Oakland Athletics in 1997.

  • New York Yankees LF Charlie Keller (three-year letterman with Maryland from 1934-35 through 1936-37) collected seven RBI against the St. Louis Browns in 1941.

  • Detroit Tigers RF Rusty Kuntz (played J.C. hoops for Cuesta CA) went 3-for-3 with three RBI against the Boston Red Sox in 1984.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates SS Johnny Logan (played for Binghamton in 1948-49) went 4-for-4 in a 4-2 loss against the San Francisco Giants in 1962.

  • 3B Billy Werber (first Duke hoop All-American in 1929-30) contributed a homer and double for the Cincinnati Reds during their eight-run fourth inning in 1940 when they defeated the Brooklyn Dodgers, 9-2.

  • A seventh-inning single by Boston Red Sox C Sammy White (All-PCC Northern Division first-five selection for Washington in 1947-48 and 1948-49) represented the only hit Hall of Fame P Bob Feller yielded in a 2-0 win for the Cleveland Indians in the opener of a doubleheader in 1955. It was Feller's MLB-record 12th one-hitter.

  • INF Dib Williams (played for Hendrix AR in mid-1920s) purchased from the Philadelphia Athletics by the Boston Red Sox in 1935.

College Basketball's Longstanding Impact on Opening Round of NFL Draft

Historically, the first 15 NFL drafts from 1936 through 1950 had a former college basketball regular selected among the top 10 picks. Four of the top six choices and five of the top 11 in the 1957 draft were ex-college hoopsters. To our knowledge, none of them featured the excess baggage of Jameis "Crab Legs" Winston, who is also a versatile athlete but in baseball.

Back in 1963 when men were men before all of the draft-day crying/kissing and diversity sensitivity training (#BringBackOurMen), five of the top 22 picks, including four from schools that have always been or subsequently became members of the Big Ten Conference, were in the same category. Following is an alphabetical list of NFL first-round draft choices who played varsity college basketball for a current NCAA Division I university:

First-Round Choice Pos. College Selected in Draft By NFL Pick Overall
Neill Armstrong OE-DB Oklahoma A&M Philadelphia Eagles 8th in 1947
Doug Atkins DE Tennessee Cleveland Browns 11th in 1953
Terry Baker QB-RB Oregon State Los Angeles Rams 1st in 1963
Sammy Baugh QB Texas Christian Boston Redskins 6th in 1937
*Hub Bechtol E Texas Tech/Texas Pittsburgh Steelers 5th in 1947
Johnny Bright RB Drake Philadelphia Eagles 5th in 1952
Jim Brown RB Syracuse Cleveland Browns 6th in 1957
Bob Carey WR Michigan State Los Angeles Rams 13th in 1952
Fred Carr LB Texas Western Green Bay Packers 5th in 1968
Shante Carver DE Arizona State Dallas Cowboys 23rd in 1994
Lynn Chandnois HB Michigan State Pittsburgh Steelers 8th in 1950
George Connor OL-DT-LB Notre Dame New York Giants 5th in 1946
Olie Cordill HB Rice Cleveland Browns 5th in 1940
Ernie Davis HB Syracuse Washington Redskins 1st in 1962
Glenn Davis HB Army Detroit Lions 2nd in 1947
Len Dawson QB Purdue Pittsburgh Steelers 5th in 1957
Mike Ditka TE Pittsburgh Chicago Bears 5th in 1961
Rickey Dudley TE Ohio State Oakland Raiders 9th in 1996
Ray Evans TB-DB Kansas Chicago Bears 9th in 1944
James Francis LB Baylor Cincinnati Bengals 12th in 1990
Reuben Gant TE Oklahoma State Buffalo Bills 18th in 1974
Tony Gonzalez TE California Kansas City Chiefs 13th in 1996
Otto Graham QB Northwestern Detroit Lions 4th in 1944
Harry "Bud" Grant E Minnesota Philadelphia Eagles 14th in 1950
Bob Griese QB Purdue Miami Dolphins 4th in 1967
Kevin Hardy DL Notre Dame New Orleans Saints 7th in 1968
Tom Harmon HB-DB Michigan Chicago Bears 1st in 1941
Todd Heap TE Arizona State Baltimore Ravens 31st in 2001
King Hill QB Rice Chicago Cardinals 1st as bonus pick in 1958
Elroy "Crazy Legs" Hirsch OE Michigan Cleveland Rams 5th in 1945
DeAndre Hopkins WR Clemson Houston Texans 27th in 2013
Paul Hornung RB Notre Dame Green Bay Packers 1st as bonus pick in 1957
Jack Jenkins FB-LB Vanderbilt Washington Redskins 10th in 1943
Ed "Too Tall" Jones DL Tennessee State Dallas Cowboys 1st in 1974
Matt Jones E Arkansas Jacksonville Jaquars 21st in 2005
Billy Kilmer QB UCLA San Francisco 49ers 11th in 1961
Ron Kramer WR Michigan Green Bay Packers 4th in 1957
Johnny Lattner HB Notre Dame Pittsburgh Steelers 7th in 1954
Bobby Layne QB Texas Chicago Bears 3rd in 1948
Ronnie Lott DB Southern California San Francisco 49ers 8th in 1981
Johnny Lujack QB Notre Dame Chicago Bears 4th in 1946
Don Lund FB-LB Michigan Chicago Bears 7th in 1945
Bob MacLeod B Dartmouth Brooklyn Dodgers 5th in 1939
Jim McDonald B Ohio State Philadelphia Eagles 2nd in 1938
Banks McFadden HB Clemson Brooklyn Dodgers 3rd in 1940
Rich McGeorge TE Elon Green Bay Packers 16th in 1970
Donovan McNabb QB Syracuse Philadelphia Eagles 2nd in 1999
R.W. McQuarters CB Oklahoma State San Francisco 49ers 28th in 1998
Leonard Mitchell DE Houston Philadelphia Eagles 27th in 1981
Mack Mitchell DE Houston Cleveland Browns 5th in 1975
Julius Peppers DE North Carolina Carolina Panthers 2nd in 2002
Pat Richter TE Wisconsin Washington Redskins 7th in 1962
Andre Rison WR Michigan State Indianapolis Colts 22nd in 1989
Jack Robbins QB Arkansas Chicago Cardinals 5th in 1938
Reggie Rogers DL Washington Detroit Lions 7th in 1987
Art Schlichter QB Ohio State Baltimore Colts 4th in 1982
Del Shofner E Baylor Los Angeles Rams 11th in 1957
Norm Snead QB Wake Forest Washington Redskins 2nd in 1961
Joe Stydahar T West Virginia Chicago Bears 6th in 1936
Doak Walker HB-DB Southern Methodist New York Bulldogs 3rd in 1949
Byron "Whizzer" White B Colorado Pittsburgh Steelers 4th in 1938
Alfred Williams DE Colorado Cincinnati Bengals 18th in 1991
Jack Wilson HB Baylor Cleveland Browns 2nd in 1942
Kendall Wright WR Baylor Tennessee Titans 20th in 2012

*Bechtol played in the AAFC, where he was a second-round pick (9th overall).

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on April 30 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is an April 30 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

APRIL 30

  • California Angels 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading basketball scorer in 1945-46) contributed four hits against the Boston Red Sox in 1966.

  • Detroit Tigers 1B Dale Alexander (starting center for Milligan TN in mid-1920s) supplied his sixth straight multiple-hit game and 10th in last 17 contests to finish the first month of the 1931 season with a .519 batting average.

  • Philadelphia Phillies CF Ethan Allen (Cincinnati letterman in 1924-25 and 1925-26) went 4-for-4 in a 5-4 win against the Boston Braves in 1934.

  • San Diego Padres RF Tony Gwynn (All-WAC second-team selection with San Diego State in 1979-80 and 1980-81) went 5-for-5 against the New York Mets in 1993 before adding four safeties against the Mets the next day.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers 1B Gil Hodges (played for Oakland City IN in 1947 and 1948) homered in fifth of last seven games of the month in 1958.

  • Washington Senators LF Frank Howard (two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection in 1956-57 and 1957-58 when leading Ohio State in scoring and rebounding) closed out the month by homering in three consecutive contests against the Milwaukee Brewers in 1970.

  • Baltimore Orioles rookie 2B Davey Johnson (averaged 1.7 ppg with Texas A&M in 1961-62) jacked two homers against the Detroit Tigers in 1966. Twelve years later with the Philadelphia Phillies, Johnson whacked a pinch grand slam against the San Diego Padres in 1978.

  • Detroit Tigers SS Harvey Kuenn (played briefly for Wisconsin in 1951-52 after competing on JV squad previous season) went 5-for-5 against the Washington Senators in 1955.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers 2B Davey Lopes (NAIA All-District 15 selection for Iowa Wesleyan averaged 16.9 ppg as freshman in 1964-65 and 12.1 ppg as sophomore in 1965-66) stole four bases against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1978.

  • In 1937, Philadelphia Athletics INF Clarence "Ace" Parker (Duke letterman in 1935-36) became the first A.L. player to hit a pinch-hit homer in his MLB debut (against Wes Ferrell of the Boston Red Sox).

  • 1B Jack Phillips (leading scorer for 14-1 Clarkson NY in 1942-43) traded by the Detroit Tigers to the Boston Red Sox in 1957.

  • RF Richie Scheinblum (averaged 6.1 ppg and 3.6 rpg for C.W. Post NY in 1962-63 and 1963-64) traded by the California Angels to the Kansas City Royals in 1974.

  • SS Roy Smalley Jr. (one of top scorers for Drury MO in 1942-43 and 1943-44) purchased from the Milwaukee Braves by the Philadelphia Phillies in 1955.

  • RF Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972), who was on base at least once in every game this month, tied a MLB record for RBI in April with 29 for the New York Yankees in 1988.

Space For Destroying Riotous Myth Regarding Kentucky's Historical Standing

Presstitutes making extemporaneous comments at the Final Four often were knowingly inappropriate Clintonesque or as confused as Bruce Jenner after trying to cope an extended period with Hollyweird's contemptible Kardashian clan. But now there probably has been ample time since the end of the season for proper reflection and "to have a conversation" on the historical significance of Kentucky's 38-1 club. In other words, it is time to "give space for those who wish to destroy" riotous myth about UK's 2014-15 edition warranting inclusion among the premier teams in NCAA history.

In the aftermath of amateurish analysis by mess media, the goal here is to attempt to yield a mite more credibility to a topic than POTUS' premature pollution via petty proffering regarding another choir boy, agitator-enabling bozo stand-down let-thugs-loot Baltimore mayor, sweeping-statement activist prosecutor catering to reparations devotees, monumental misfit Michael Moore seeking to disarm all police or studious Ray "Dancin' On Their Graves" Lewis and Carmelo "Snitches Get Stitches" Anthony imploring scholarly youth to refrain from violence. Don't want to get political savant Ashley Judd or "misguided young and old people" upset, but there was as much evidence of Kentucky deserving acclaim as an NCAA all-time Top 10 squad as support from no-show spectators during Orioles home game at Camden Yards on second day of riots-related curfew.

Was any college hoop pundit saying anything remotely the same about Wichita State a year earlier when the Shockers also entered the NCAA playoffs with an undefeated record? After all, the Missouri Valley Conference probably was as competent two campaigns ago as the quality exhibited by the SEC this past season. Moreover, have any of the clueless commentators heard of NCAA title titans such as Lew Alcindor (UCLA), Patrick Ewing (Georgetown), Stacey Augmon and Larry Johnson (UNLV), Jordan/Perkins/Worthy (North Carolina), Jerry Lucas and John Havlicek (Ohio State), Bill Russell and K.C. Jones (San Francisco), David Thompson (North Carolina State) and Bill Walton (UCLA)? Analysts should study all-time best recruiting classes before stepping out on a thin limb with their misinformed greatest-of-all-time proclamations comparable in authenticity to over-hyped Mayweather/Pacquiao "Dancin' With the Stars."

In a "one-and-done" era when the caliber of play has subsided so dramatically, the Wildcats weren't even the best team in the last four or six years of their illustrious program. Celebrated center Anthony Davis, the premier player for a national champion in 2012, is light years removed from any of UK's frontcourt players this season. Ditto John Wall in the backcourt in 2009-10. In fact, Big Blue Nation probably has boasted a better team every decade post-WWII. Consider the following talent over the years emanating from Lexington making it nearly impossible for this year's UK squad to crack the school's all-time Top 10 let alone a national all-time Top 10:

Season Record Multiple UK Standouts
1948-49 32-2 Alex Groza/Ralph Beard/Wallace Jones/Cliff Barker/Dale Barnstable
1953-54 25-0 Cliff Hagan/Frank Ramsey/Lou Tsioropoulos
1965-66 27-2 Pat Riley/Louie Dampier/Thad Jaracz/Larry Conley/Tommy Kron
1969-70 26-2 Dan Issel/Mike Pratt/Tom Parker/Larry Steele
1977-78 30-2 Jack Givens/Rick Robey/Kyle Macy/James Lee/Mike Phillips
1983-84 29-5 Melvin Turpin/Kenny Walker/Sam Bowie/Jim Master/Winston Bennett
1995-96 34-2 Tony Delk/Antoine Walker/Walter McCarty/Derek Anderson/Ron Mercer
2009-10 35-3 John Wall/DeMarcus Cousins/Patrick Patterson/Eric Bledsoe
2011-12 38-2 Anthony Davis/Michael Kidd-Gilchrist/Terrence Jones

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on April 29 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is an April 29 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

APRIL 29

  • In 1953, Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (LSU's leading basketball scorer in 1945-46) hit a homer into the center-field bleachers against the New York Giants at the Polo Grounds, a feat that had never been done before and would only be achieved twice more (by Hank Aaron and Lou Brock).

  • Detroit Tigers rookie 1B Dale Alexander (starting center for Milligan TN in mid-1920s) hit safely in his first 12 MLB games in 1929 before he was held hitless by the St. Louis Browns.

  • Cleveland Indians SS Lou Boudreau (leading scorer for Illinois' 1937 Big Ten Conference co-champion) banged out four hits against the St. Louis Browns in 1948.

  • CF Taylor Douthit (California letterman from 1922 through 1924) awarded on waivers from the Cincinnati Reds to the Chicago Cubs in 1933.

  • In 1930, Pittsburgh Pirates LHP Ralph Erickson (played for Idaho State in mid-1920s) won his lone MLB decision.

  • Houston Astros C Joe Ferguson (played in 1967 NCAA playoffs with Pacific) pounded two homers against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1977.

  • Brooklyn Robins 2B Jake Flowers (member of 1923 "Flying Pentagon" championship squad for Washington College MD) provided four hits, including three doubles, in a 19-15 win against the New York Giants in 1930. It was one of five games that month where he had at least three safeties.

  • Oakland Athletics rookie 3B Wayne Gross (led Cal Poly Pomona in assists in 1974-75) whacked two homers against the Boston Red Sox in 1977.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers 1B Frank Howard (two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection in 1956-57 and 1957-58 when leading Ohio State in scoring and rebounding) collected two homers and six RBI against the Chicago Cubs in 1961.

  • Detroit Tigers rookie CF Lynn Jones (averaged 10.4 ppg for Thiel PA from 1970-71 through 1973-74) finished his first month with a .389 batting average after notching fourth straight two-hit game in 1979.

  • Toronto Blue Jays P Dave Lemanczyk (averaged 4.5 ppg and 3.5 rpg for Hartwick NY teams compiling 51-21 record from 1969-70 through 1971-72) sustained his fifth setback of the month in as many starts in 1978.

  • RHP Roger Mason (multiple-year letterman for Saginaw Valley State MI in late 1970s) purchased from the Philadelphia Phillies by the New York Mets in 1994.

  • 2B Dutch Meyer (letterman for TCU in 1934-35 and 1935-36) traded by the Detroit Tigers to the Cleveland Indians in 1945.

  • In a 17-inning marathon where both starting pitchers went the distance, St. Louis Cardinals RHP Roy Parmelee (Eastern Michigan letterman in 1924-25 and 1925-26) outdueled New York Giants Hall of Famer Carl Hubbell, 2-1, in 1936.

  • Washington Senators C Les Peden (Texas A&M letterman in 1941-42 and 1942-43) provided his lone MLB homer (against the Chicago White Sox in 1953).

  • Cleveland tied a MLB record by winning its first 10 games of the 1966 campaign before the Indians lost, 4-1, to Chicago White Sox LHP Gary Peters (played for Grove City PA in mid-1950s).

  • In the midst of 11 straight scoreless appearances in 1979, Philadelphia Phillies RHP Ron Reed (Notre Dame's leading rebounder in 1963-64 and 1964-65) won his third successive relief outing.

  • In 1975, LF Champ Summers (team-high scoring averages of 15.7 ppg for Nicholls State in 1964-65 and 22.5 ppg for SIUE in 1969-70) shipped by the Oakland Athletics to the Chicago Cubs to complete a deal made earlier in the month.

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on April 28 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is an April 28 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

APRIL 28

  • Oakland Athletics RHP Ray Burris (baseball-basketball standout in Southwestern Oklahoma State Hall of Fame) hurled a four-hit shutout against the Minnesota Twins in 1984.

  • In 1966, CF Billy Cowan (co-captain of Utah's 1960 NCAA playoff team) traded by the Atlanta Braves to the Chicago Cubs for cash and 3B Bobby Cox, who went on to become one of MLB's all-time winningest managers with the Braves.

  • Cincinnati Reds 1B George Crowe (four-year letterman from 1939-40 through 1942-43 for Indiana Central after becoming first high school player named state's Mr. Basketball) collected two homers and five RBI against the Chicago Cubs in 1956.

  • In 1928, St. Louis Cardinals CF Taylor Douthit (California letterman from 1922 through 1924) collected four hits against the Chicago Cubs, giving him 13 safeties over the last four games.

  • California Angels RHP Dave Frost (averaged 10.5 ppg and 4 rpg for Stanford from 1971-72 through 1973-74) fired a six-hit shutout against the Boston Red Sox in 1979.

  • San Diego Padres RF Tony Gwynn (All-WAC second-team selection with San Diego State in 1979-80 and 1980-81) collected five hits in a 7-3 victory over the Chicago Cubs in 1998, registering the ninth game of at least five hits in his career.

  • Baltimore Orioles 2B Davey Johnson (averaged 1.7 ppg with Texas A&M in 1961-62) hit safely in first 17 games of the 1971 campaign (career-high).

  • RF Jerry Martin (1971 Southern Conference MVP after he was Furman's runner-up in scoring the previous season) accounted for all of the Philadelphia Phillies' offense with a three-run homer in a 3-2 victory against the San Diego Padres in 1978.

  • In 1960, Los Angeles Dodgers OF Wally Moon (averaged 4.3 ppg with Texas A&M in 1948-49 and 1949-50) manufactured three hits in his third consecutive contest.

  • INF Tim Nordbrook (letterman in 1968-69 for Loyola LA) traded by the Toronto Blue Jays to the Milwaukee Brewers in 1978.

  • RHP Sonny Siebert (team-high 16.7 ppg for Mizzou in 1957-58 as an All-Big Eight Conference second-team selection) defeated the Angels, 2-1, as the Cleveland Indians tied a MLB record by winning their first 10 contests of the 1966 season.

  • Baltimore Orioles RF Ken Singleton (Hofstra freshman team in mid-1960s) grounded into a double play against the Chicago White Sox to snap his streak of 10 consecutive safeties in 1981.

  • Washington Senators RHP Dick Such (averaged 8.9 ppg and 7.4 rpg in 1964-65 and 10.5 ppg and 6.9 rpg in 1965-66 for Elon) posted his lone MLB victory (against the Milwaukee Brewers in 1970).

Mullin' It Over: St. John's Three-Time All-American is Coaching Newcomer

Chris Mullin, a five-time NBA All-Star in a 16-year career with the Golden State Warriors and Indiana Pacers, returned to his alma mater (St. John's '85) as head coach. Mullin didn't have any head coaching experience but joined LSU's Johnny Jones, Rutgers' Eddie Jordan and UNLV's Dave Rice as the only active coaches to have played for their alma mater in a Final Four.

In the aftermath of Fred Hoiberg leaving Iowa State for the Chicago Bulls, Jordan and Mullin are among the following alphabetical list of five active Division I head coaches guiding their alma mater after playing in the NBA:

Active Coach Alma Mater 1st Year Summary of NBA Playing Career
Bryce Drew Valparaiso '98 2011-12 Averaged 4.4 ppg, 1.2 rpg and 2.2 apg with three NBA teams in six seasons from 1998-99 through 2003-04
Eddie Jordan Rutgers '77 2013-14 Averaged 8.1 ppg, 1.9 rpg and 3.8 apg with four NBA teams in seven seasons from 1977-78 through 1983-84
Chris Mullin St. John's '85 2015-16 Averaged 18.2 ppg, 4.1 rpg and 3.5 apg with the Golden State Warriors and Indiana Pacers in 16 seasons from 1985-86 through 2000-01
Kevin Ollie Connecticut '95 2012-13 Averaged 3.8 ppg, 1.5 rpg and 2.3 apg with 12 NBA teams in 13 seasons from 1997-98 through 2009-10
Lorenzo Romar Washington '80 2002-03 Averaged 5.9 ppg, 1.1 rpg and 3.5 apg with three NBA teams in five seasons from 1980-81 through 1984-85

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on April 27 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is an April 27 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

APRIL 27

  • Pittsburgh Pirates SS Bill Almon (averaged 2.5 ppg in half a season for Brown's 1972-73 basketball team ending school's streak of 12 straight losing records) supplied three extra-base hits in a 13-5 victory against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1986.

  • Cleveland Indians SS Lou Boudreau (leading scorer for Illinois' 1937 Big Ten Conference co-champion) blasted two homers in a 4-2 victory against the Detroit Tigers in 1940.

  • Two NBA players - Gene Conley of the Boston Celtics and Dave DeBusschere of the New York Knicks - opposed each other as RHPs in 1963. Conley (All-PCC first-team selection led the North Division in scoring in 1949-50 as a Washington State sophomore) hurled 4-plus innings as starter for the Boston Red Sox while DeBusschere (three-time All-American for Detroit from 1959-60 through 1961-62) relieved for 2/3 of the fourth inning with the Chicago White Sox.

  • San Diego Padres RF Tony Gwynn (All-WAC second-team selection with San Diego State in 1979-80 and 1980-81) smacked two homers in a 6-4 victory against the San Francisco Giants in 1986.

  • Baltimore Orioles RHP Dick Hall (averaged 13.5 ppg from 1948-49 through 1950-51 for Swarthmore PA Middle Atlantic States Conference Southern Division champions) hurled a two-hit shutout against the Washington Senators in 1961.

  • 1B Mike Hargrove (Northwestern Oklahoma State letterman) stroked a bases-loaded double in the top of the 19th inning to spark the Cleveland Indians to an 8-4 win over the Detroit Tigers in 1984. Six years earlier with the Texas Rangers, Hargrove homered in his third consecutive contest in 1978.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers 1B Gil Hodges (played for Oakland City IN in 1947 and 1948) homered twice against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1951.

  • Cleveland Indians DH David Justice (led Thomas More KY in assists in 1984-85) delivered three extra-base hits against the Chicago White Sox in 1998.

  • Minnesota Twins LHP Bill Krueger (led WCAC in free-throw percentage as freshman en route to averaging 5.1 ppg for Portland from 1975-76 through 1979-80) won for the fourth time in as many starts this month in 1992, compiling an 0.84 ERA in first 32 innings.

  • Montreal Expos 2B Vance Law (averaged 6.8 ppg for Brigham Young from 1974-75 through 1976-77) banged out three extra-base hits against the Chicago Cubs in 1986.

  • C Hugh Poland (Western Kentucky letterman from 1931-32 through 1933-34) traded by the New York Giants to the Boston Braves in 1943.

  • Cleveland Indians 2B Riggs Stephenson (Alabama letterman in 1920) assembled three straight three-hit games against the Chicago White Sox in 1922.

  • RHP John Stuper (two-time all-conference junior college player in mid-1970s with Butler County PA) tossed his lone complete game with the Cincinnati Reds (two-hit, 2-1 win against the San Francisco Giants in 1985).

  • Boston Braves rookie RF Chuck Workman (two-time All-MIAA first-five selection was leading scorer in 1937 when Central Missouri won inaugural NAIA Tournament) went 8-for-11 against the New York Giants in his first three games of the 1943 campaign.

The Godfather: Patrick Sways He-Man Simmons to LSU Via Australian Link

LSU was a major disappointment last season with an underachieving roster. But the Tigers are expected to a highly-ranked team in 2015-16 with the addition of the nation's consensus #1 recruit (Ben Simmons) via an Australian connection. Simmons' godfather is Bayou Bengal assistant coach David Patrick, who recruited gifted guard Patty Mills from their native Australia when he was an assistant with Saint Mary's. Patrick averaged a modest 3.2 points per game for Louisiana-Lafayette from 1997-98 through 1999-00 after transferring from Syracuse.

Ethical questions linger when hiring the coach or relative of a prize high school prospect but "The Godfather" sequel represents nothing new when it comes to high school or family reunions. Package deals have been a relatively common practice over the years, including LSU all through the 1980s under coach Dale Brown. In 1989, Michigan was the 10th different school in a 20-year span to reach the Final Four with the help of a "coattail" franchise (assistant coach Perry Watson/starting guard Jalen Rose). There also were 10 first- and second-team consensus All-Americans in that stretch stemming from such high school reunions.

Unique recruiting cases are commonplace over the years. For instance, consensus first-team All-American Danny Manning was recruited by Kansas' Larry Brown, who brought in Manning's father as an assistant in the mid-1980s although Ed Manning had been working as a truck driver. Similarly, standout guard Dajuan Wagner went from New Jersey to Memphis, where his father, former NBA guard Milt Wagner, was working under Tigers coach John Calipari. Elsewhere, Daniel Hackett played for USC under Tim Floyd when his former Syracuse All-American father Rudy Hackett was hired as strength and conditioning manager.

Stephen Thompson Jr. is headed to Oregon State after the Beavers hired his father, a former Syracuse star, to their staff. Prior to AAU posses, high school reunions were routine recruiting ploys. There are usually more than a dozen active Division I head coaches who got their start as a college assistant by tagging along directly or being reunited with one of their prize high school prospects. Following is an alphabetical list of NCAA Division I schools featuring star players whose high school coach was reunited with that standout as a college assistant:

AKRON: Lannis Timmons joined Dan Hipsher's staff directly with Darryl Peterson in 2001. Peterson was the Zips' second-leading scorer (13.1 ppg) and rebounder (5 rpg) as a freshman and third-leading scorer (13.8 ppg) and second-leading rebounder (4.4 rpg) as a sophomore. . . . Former Central Michigan coach Keith Dambrot joined Hipsher's staff one year before high-scoring junior college recruit Derrick Tarver arrived in 2002 and two years before Dru Joyce III and Romeo Travis. Tarver led the Mid-American Conference in scoring in 2003-04. Travis and Joyce paced the Zips in scoring and assists, respectively, in 2005-06. Dambrot, who succeeded Hipsher as Akron's head coach in March 2004, coached Tarver, Joyce, Travis and acclaimed NBA prospect LeBron James locally at St. Vincent-St. Mary.

ARIZONA STATE: Scott Pera joined Herb Sendek's staff directly with point guard Derek Glasser in 2006 and one year before James Harden in 2007. Glasser paced ASU in assists each of his first two seasons while averaging more than six points per game. Harden led the Sun Devils in scoring (17.8 ppg) and steals (2.1 spg) as a freshman in 2007-08.

BAYLOR: Harry Miller joined Darrel Johnson's staff directly with his son, Roddrick, and teammate Brian Skinner in 1994. Miller became interim head coach shortly before the start of the season and then was given a five-year contract two months later. Roddrick Miller averaged 10.2 ppg in his career and was the Bears' third-leading scorer as a senior with 11.9 ppg. Skinner finished his career as their all-time leading rebounder and No. 3 scorer before becoming a first-round draft choice of the Los Angeles Clippers. . . . Brian O'Neill joined Dave Bliss' staff at New Mexico one year before center R.T. Guinn enrolled in 1999. They both subsequently moved with Bliss to Baylor where Guinn was the Bears' third-leading rebounder (4.3 rpg) as a sophomore in 2001-02 and second-leading rebounder 5.6 rpg) as a junior in 2002-03. . . . Jerome Tang joined Scott Drew's staff one year before forward Richard Hurd enrolled in 2004. Hurd averaged 4 ppg and 2 rpg as a freshman in 2004-05 before playing sparingly tghe next three seasons.

BETHUNE-COOKMAN: Owen Harris, Kevin Bradshaw's high school assistant coach, joined Cy McClairen's staff with Bradshaw in 1984. Bradshaw was the Wildcats' second-leading scorer with a 19-point average as a sophomore. He subsequently enrolled at U.S. International after a hitch in the Navy and led the nation in scoring in 1990-91 with 37.6 points per game.

BOSTON COLLEGE: Kevin Mackey joined Tom Davis' staff directly with Joe Beaulieu in 1977, which was one year before former high school teammate Dwan Chandler enrolled. Beaulieu, a transfer from Harvard, led the Eagles in rebounding in 1979 and 1980 and has the third-highest career field-goal shooting (57.1 percent) in school history. Chandler, a two-year starter, was runner-up to John Bagley in assists in 1980-81 and held the school record for most games played when his eligibility expired. Mackey went on to coach Cleveland State for seven seasons from 1983-84 through 1989-90, guiding the Vikings to the 1986 East Regional semifinals.

CAL STATE FULLERTON: Phil Mathews joined George McQuarn's staff directly with Tony Neal in 1981. Neal, the Titans' all-time leader in rebounding and steals, was their No. 3 career scorer in Division I when his eligibility expired. He was a sixth-round draft choice of the Los Angeles Lakers in 1985. Mathews eventually became coach at San Francisco.

CAL STATE LOS ANGELES: Caldwell Black, Raymond Lewis' high school assistant coach, joined Bob Miller's staff with him in 1971. After finishing runner-up in the nation in scoring as a sophomore with 32.9 ppg, Lewis became a first-round draft choice of the Philadelphia 76ers in the initial NBA draft where players could claim hardship status.

CANISIUS: Phil Seymore joined Marty Marbach's staff with Damone James, who averaged 10.3 points per game as a sophomore and was a key member for the Golden Griffins' NIT teams his last two years in 1994 and 1995.

CENTENARY: Ron Kestenbaum joined Riley Wallace's staff directly with Kevin Starke in 1976, which was the same year former high school teammate George Lett transferred from Hawaii. Lett, the Gents' No. 2 all-time leading rebounder (behind Robert Parish) and No. 3 scorer (behind Parish and former NBA player Tom Kerwin) when his eligibility expired, was a fifth-round draft choice of the Warriors in 1979. Starke led the Gents in assists as a freshman before transferring back home to St. Francis (N.Y.). Kestenbaum coached Arkansas-Little Rock for five seasons from 1979-80 through 1983-84, including a 23-6 record in 1982-83.

CINCINNATI: Mick Cronin, Damon Flint's high school assistant coach, joined Bob Huggins' staff two seasons after Flint started playing for the Bearcats in 1994-95. Flint was co-captain as a senior in 1996-97 after averaging 12.8 points and 3.5 assists per game as a junior. Cronin went on to become Murray State's head coach before accepting a similar position with the Bearcats in 2006.

COLORADO STATE: Ronald Coleman joined Tim Miles' staff only months before Chicago product Jermaine Morgan signed in the fall of 2011. Miles and Coleman subsequently departed at the end of the season for Nebraska.

DAYTON: Larry Miller joined Jim O'Brien's staff one year before Chip Jones and Derrick Dukes enrolled in 1990. Jones, a junior college transfer, was Midwestern Collegiate Conference Newcomer of the Year in 1991 (20.2 ppg and 5.6 rpg) but he didn't play as a senior because of academic problems. Dukes, the Flyers' principal playmaker during his career, was their second-leading scorer as a junior in 1992-93 (12.8 ppg). Dukes had 13 assists in a game against Southern.

DELAWARE: Larry Davis joined Steve Steinwedel's staff one year before Elsworth Bowers enrolled in 1986. Bowers was the Blue Hens' leading scorer and rebounder in his senior season. Davis went on to become Furman's coach for nine seasons from 1997-98 through 2005-06.

DETROIT: Charlie Coles joined Don Sicko's staff directly with Kevin McAdoo in 1982, which was one year before former high school teammate Brian Humes enrolled. McAdoo is the Titans' all-time assists leader. Humes was the Titans' 11th all-time leading scorer when his eligibility expired in 1987. Coles went on to become coach at Central Michigan and Miami (Ohio). . . . Jim Boyce joined Dick Vitale's staff with Terry Tyler, who averaged 15 points and 10.5 rebounds per game for the Titans from 1974-75 through 1977-78 before playing 11 seasons in the NBA with the Detroit Pistons, Sacramento Kings and Dallas Mavericks. Boyce eventually coached Eastern Michigan for seven seasons from 1979-80 through 1985-86.

DUKE: Notre Dame coach Mike Brey, Danny Ferry's high school assistant coach, joined Mike Krzyzewski's staff two years after Ferry enrolled in 1985. Ferry, a first-team consensus All-American in 1988-89 after being a second-teamer the previous year, was the Blue Devils' No. 4 all-time leading scorer and No. 5 rebounder when he graduated. Ferry, the second pick overall in the 1989 NBA draft, played 13 seasons with the Cleveland Cavaliers and San Antonio Spurs after spending one year in Italy.

DUQUESNE: Barry Brodzinski joined Mike Satalin's staff one year before Clayton Adams enrolled in 1987, which was one year before former high school teammate Mark Stevenson transferred from Notre Dame. Adams passed Norm Nixon to become the Dukes' all-time assists leader. Stevenson set an Atlantic 10 Conference record for scoring average in 1989-90 (27.2 ppg). . . . Mike Rice Sr. joined John Cinicola's staff directly with Baron "B.B." Flenory in 1976. Flenory was the Dukes' No. 5 all-time leading scorer and No. 2 in assists when his eligibility expired in 1980. Rice was promoted to head coach in 1978 and directed the Dukes for four seasons before coaching Youngstown State for five years.

FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL: Junior college recruit Marshod Fairweather rejoined coach Shakey Rodriguez in 1997, averaging 10.7 points per game in two seasons.

ILLINOIS: Wayne McClain joined Bill Self's staff three years after All-American guard Frank Williams enrolled in 1999. Williams averaged 14.3 ppg and 4.3 apg in three seasons with the Illini before entering the 2002 NBA draft as an undergraduate and becoming a first-round draft choice. McClain's son, Sergio, and J.C. recruit Marcus Griffin, a former high school teammate, were regulars for the Illini under Lon Kruger and Self in the seasons immediately before Wayne arrived.

ILLINOIS STATE: Ron Ferguson joined Will Robinson's staff three years after Mike Bonczyk enrolled in 1972. Bonczyk was the Redbirds' all-time leader in assists when his eligibililty expired in 1976.

INDIANA: Ron Felling joined Bob Knight's staff after Illinois "Mr. Basketball" Marty Simmons enrolled in 1983. Simmons transferred to Evansville following the 1984-85 campaign and was the Purple Aces' leading scorer two seasons before eventually becoming their head coach in 2007-08. Knight paid $25,000 to Felling, fired in December 1999, after signing an agreement in which he admitted to shoving him in anger into a television. Felling claims Knight assaulted him after eavesdropping on a private conversation with a former colleague in which he discussed Knight's propensity to "rant and rage." IU settled with Felling for $35,000.

INDIANA STATE: James Martin joined Tates Locke's staff directly with Darrin Hancock in 1993 when the forward transferred from Kansas. But Hancock, who played for Martin in Griffin, Ga., before attending junior college, dropped out of school to play professionally in Europe.

IOWA: Rick Moss joined Tom Davis' staff directly with Ray Thompson in 1988. Thompson scored more points than any freshman in Hawkeyes' history except for Roy Marble and was their leading scorer the next season when he was suspended. Thompson subsequently enrolled at Oral Roberts, where he averaged 24.6 ppg and 9.6 rpg.

JAMES MADISON: Ernie Nestor joined Lou Campanelli's staff three years after Sherman Dillard enrolled in 1973. Dillard, the Dukes' No. 2 all-time leading scorer with 2,065 points, was a sixth-round draft choice of the Indiana Pacers in 1978. Nestor eventually coached George Mason for five seasons from 1988-89 through 1992-93 before becoming head coach at Elon.

KANSAS: Duncan Reid joined Ted Owens' staff directly with Norm Cook in 1973. Cook, who declared early for the NBA draft after leading the Jayhawks in scoring in his junior season, still ranks among the top rebounders in school history. Cook, a first-round draft choice of the Celtics in 1976, also played briefly with the Nuggets. . . . Lafayette Norwood joined Owens' staff directly with Darnell Valentine in 1977. Valentine, the Jayhawks' all-time No. 4 scorer and third-leading assists man, was a first-round draft choice of the Portland Trail Blazers in 1981. He played nine seasons in the NBA with four different teams. . . . Ronnie Chalmers joined Bill Self's staff directly with his son, Mario, in 2005. Mario, a 6-1 guard, was a three-time Alaska 4A Player of the Year. He left college early for the NBA after being named Most Outstanding Player of the 2008 Final Four, finishing his Jayhawks career with 12.2 ppg, 2.8 rpg, 3.8 apg and 2.6 spg.

KANSAS STATE: Mark Reiner joined Jack Hartman's staff directly with Curtis Redding and Tyrone Ladson in 1976. Redding was the Wildcats' No. 2 scorer (behind eventual pro guard Mike Evans) in 1976-77 and 1977-78 before transferring to St. John's. Redding was an eighth-round draft choice of the Denver Nuggets in 1981. Ladson received one letter at K-State before transferring to Texas A&M. Reiner later coached Brooklyn College for 10 seasons from 1980-81 through 1989-90.

KENTUCKY: Bob Chambers joined Joe B. Hall's staff one year after Derrick Hord enrolled in 1979. Hord, the Wildcats' leading scorer as a junior, was a third-round draft choice of the Cleveland Cavaliers in 1983. . . . Simeon Mars joined Rick Pitino's staff as an administrative assistant directly with center Jamaal Magloire in 1996. Magloire, UK's all-time leader in blocked shots, paced the team in scoring, rebounding and field-goal shooting in 1999-00. Mars remained on Tubby Smith's staff after Pitino departed.

LONG BEACH STATE: Bobby Braswell joined Joe Harrington's staff directly with Lucious Harris in 1989, which was one year after Tyrone Mitchell transferred from Arizona. Harris became the Big West Conference's all-time leading scorer. Mitchell led Long Beach State in assists in 1989-90 and 1990-91. Braswell coached Cal State Northridge, his alma mater, for 17 seasons from 1996-97 through 2012-13.

LOUISIANA-MONROE: Mike Vining joined Lenny Fant's staff three years after Calvin Natt and Jamie Mayo enrolled in 1975, which was one year before high school teammates Kenny Natt and Eugene Robinson arrived on campus at what was then called Northeast Louisiana. Calvin Natt, a second-team consensus All-American as a senior, is the school's all-time leading scorer and rebounder. He was a first-round draft choice of the Nets in 1979 and played 10 seasons in the NBA with four different teams. Mayo is one of the school's all-time leaders in assists. Kenny Natt, who led NLU in scoring in his senior season, was a second-round draft choice of the Pacers in 1980 and played briefly in three seasons with three different NBA teams. Robinson is the school's all-time leader in field-goal percentage and led the team in rebounding his senior season. Vining went on to become the school's all-time winningest head coach, compiling a 401-303 record (.570) in 24 seasons from 1981-82 through 2004-05.

LOUISIANA STATE: Ron Abernathy joined Dale Brown's staff directly with Rudy Macklin in 1976. Macklin, a second-team consensus All-American in 1981, is the Tigers' all-time leading rebounder and second in career scoring (behind NCAA all-time leader Pete Maravich). Macklin, a third-round draft choice of the Atlanta Hawks in 1981, also played briefly for the New York Knicks in his three-year NBA career. Abernathy became coach at Tennessee State for two seasons in the early 1990s. . . . Rick Huckabay joined Brown's staff directly with Howard Carter in 1979. Carter, the Tigers' No. 3 all-time scorer, was a first-round draft choice of the Denver Nuggets in 1983. He also played briefly with the Dallas Mavericks in his two-year NBA career. Huckabay went on to become Marshall's coach for six seasons, directing the Thundering Herd to the NCAA Tournament three times in the mid-1980s. . . . Gary Duhe joined Brown's staff two years after Derrick Taylor enrolled in 1981. Taylor, who ranks among the Tigers' top 10 in career scoring and assists, was a fourth-round draft choice of the Indiana Pacers in 1986. . . . Mike Mallett joined LSU's athletic department as an aide directly with Nikita Wilson in 1983. Wilson, who ranks 10th in career scoring for the Tigers, was a second-round draft choice of the Portland Trail Blazers in 1987. . . . Jim Childers joined Brown's staff directly with Stanley Roberts in 1989. Roberts was the Tigers' No. 2 scorer and rebounder (behind Shaquille O'Neal) in his only season with them before turning pro. Roberts was a longtime backup center in the NBA after spending one year in Spain.

LOUISIANA TECH: Johnny Simmons joined Keith Richard's staff directly with Antonio "Tiger" Meeking in 1999. Meeking was the Bulldogs' leading rebounder and No. 3 scorer en route to becoming Sun Belt Conference Freshman of the Year. He was an All-WAC first-team selection as a senior in 2002-03 when he averaged 17.9 ppg and 7.3 rpg, finishing his career with 13.5 ppg and 7.1 rpg while shooting 52.1% from the floor.

LOUISVILLE: Wade Houston joined Denny Crum's staff directly with Darrell Griffith and Bobby Turner in 1976. Griffith, a first-team consensus All-American as a senior, is the Cardinals' all-time leading scorer. Griffith played 10 seasons with the Utah Jazz after being its first-round draft choice in 1980. Turner was a two-year starter before succumbing to scholastic shortcomings. Houston eventually coached Tennessee for five seasons from 1989-90 through 1993-94 where his son, Allan, became the Volunteers' all-time leading scorer. . . . Scott Davenport joined Crum's staff in guard DeJuan Wheat's senior season (All-American in 1996-97). Wheat, a second-round draft choice of the Los Angeles Lakers, finished runner-up to Griffith in career scoring at UL with 2,183 points (16.1 ppg). . . . Kevin Keatts joined Rick Pitino's staff shortly before guard Luke Hancock transferred from George Mason and redshirted during the 2011-12 campaign before becoming Final Four Most Outstanding Player in 2013. Hancock had played for Keatts at Hargrave Military Academy (Va.). The next season, forward Montrezl Harrell aligned with the Cardinals after the Hargrave product de-committed from Virginia Tech following coach Seth Greenberg's firing.

MASSACHUSETTS: Ray Wilson joined Jack Leaman's staff one year after Julius Erving enrolled in 1968. Erving, the Minutemen's all-time leading scorer when he left college as an undergraduate in 1971, became MVP in both the ABA and NBA. Nine-time first-team All-Pro played 11 seasons in the NBA with the Philadelphia 76ers after five years in the ABA with the Virginia Squires and New York Nets. Wilson succeeded Leaman as UMass' head coach for two seasons in the early 1980s.

MEMPHIS: Lamont Peterson, Tyreke Evans' personal trainer was hired by John Calipari as an administrative assistant prior to Evans' lone season in 2008-09, spurring the NCAA to prohibit schools from hiring "associates" of recruits for non-coaching positions. . . . Keelon Lawson joined Josh Pastner's staff one year before son K.J. for 2015-16 campaign.

MICHIGAN: Bill Frieder joined Johnny Orr's staff one year after Wayman Britt enrolled in 1972. Britt, the Wolverines' all-time leader in assists when his eligibility expired, was the Los Angeles Lakers' fourth-round draft choice in 1976. Frieder succeeded Orr in 1980 and coached Michigan for nine seasons before accepting a similar position at Arizona State. . . . Perry Watson joined Steve Fisher's staff in 1991 directly with Jalen Rose, the leading scorer for the Wolverines' Fab Five Final Four team in 1992. Rose left for the NBA as an undergraduate while Watson coached the University of Detroit for 15 seasons from 1993-94 through 2007-08.

MINNESOTA: Jessie Evans joined Jim Dutcher's staff two years before swingman Trent Tucker enrolled in 1978. Tucker averaged 12.6 points per game in his career with the Golden Gophers before becoming a first-round draft choice of the New York Knicks in 1982 (sixth pick overall). Evans went on to coach Southwestern Louisiana, which is now known as Louisiana-Lafayette, and San Francisco.

MISSISSIPPI: Wayne Brent joined Rod Barnes' staff two years before his Provine Posse - academic redshirt Aaron Harper, freshman Justin Reed and J.C. transfer David Sanders - accounted for three of the Rebels' top six scorers in powering them to their first Sweet 16 appearance in school history and all-time winningest season (27-8 in 2000-01 as Barnes was named national coach of year). Reed became an All-SEC selection the next three seasons and Brent went on to become coach for Jackson State.

MISSOURI: Rich Grawer joined Norm Stewart's staff two years after Mark Dressler enrolled in 1978, which was one year before former high school teammate Steve Stipanovich arrived on campus. Dressler was the "super sub" for three Big Eight Conference championship teams. Stipanovich, a second-team consensus All-American as a senior, ranks No. 2 among the Tigers' all-time leading rebounders and is No. 4 in scoring. Stipanovich, the second pick overall in the 1983 draft, played five seasons with the Indiana Pacers before his pro career was curtailed by a knee ailment. Grawer went on to coach Saint Louis for 10 seasons from 1982-83 through 1991-92. . . . Rob Fulford joined Kim Anderson's staff in 2014 directly with wing Montaque "Teki" Gill-Caesar.

NEBRASKA: Arden Reid joined Danny Nee's staff in 1987 directly with his son, Beau, a forward who was the Huskers' top scorer as a sophomore before suffering a severe knee injury prior to the next season. . . . Cleo Hill Jr., the son of a former St. Louis Hawks guard, joined Nee's staff one year before forward Kenny Booker and junior college center George Mazyck, who started his college career with Missouri. Hill was an assistant at Mt. Zion Academy in Durham, N.C.

NEW MEXICO: Ron Garcia, Kenny Thomas' high school assistant coach in Albuquerque, joined Dave Bliss' staff one year after Thomas enrolled in 1995. Thomas, a third-team All-American as a junior, is the Lobos' all-time leading rebounder and No. 2 scorer. He was a first-round NBA draft choice of the Houston Rockets. . . . Brian O'Neill joined Bliss' staff one year before center R.T. Guinn enrolled in 1999. Guinn was the Lobos' third-leading rebounder (4.8 rpg) as a freshman. O'Neill and Guinn subsequently moved with Bliss to Baylor. . . . Indiana-based prep coach Alan Huss joined Craig Neal's staff two years after Sudanese center Obji Aget enrolled and directly with Sam Logwood in 2014 after the wing was granted a release from his grant-in-aid by Auburn following a coaching change.

NEW ORLEANS: Joey Stiebing joined Tim Floyd's staff directly with Melvin Simon in 1990, which was one year after high school teammate Darren Laiche enrolled and two years before high school teammates Gerald Williams and Dedric Willoughby arrived on campus. Simon, hailed as the top freshman prospect in the country who didn't attend a school in a high-profile conference that year, finished his career as the Privateers' No. 2 rebounder and No. 4 scorer. Laiche was a spot starter as a swingman. Williams was a starter after playing for Tyler (Tex.) Junior College. Willoughby became a star for Iowa State after transferring there with Floyd before playing for Floyd with the Chicago Bulls. Stiebing was promoted to head coach at UNO and guided the Privateers for four seasons from 1997-98 through 2000-01.

NORTH CAROLINA STATE: Mark Phelps joined Herb Sendek's staff directly with Damon Thornton in 1996, which was one year before former high school teammate Kenny Inge arrived on campus. Thornton and Inge were the top two rebounders for the Wolfpack for two seasons. Phelps went on to coach Drake for five seasons from 2008-09 through 2012-13.

NORTH TEXAS: Jimmy Gales joined Bill Blakeley's staff one year after Kenneth Williams enrolled in 1974. Williams, the Eagles' all-time leading rebounder, led the nation in rebounding as a senior (14.7 rpg in 1977-78). Gales eventually coached North Texas for seven seasons from 1986-87 through 1992-93.

OKLAHOMA: Mike Mims joined Billy Tubbs' staff one year before Wayman Tisdale enrolled in 1983. Tisdale, a first-team consensus All-American three straight seasons from 1982-83 through 1984-85, is the Sooners' all-time leader in scoring (2,661 points), rebounding (1,048) and field-goal shooting (57.8%) despite leaving school a year early. Tisdale, the second pick overall in 1985 draft, played 12 seasons in the NBA with the Indiana Pacers, Sacramento Kings and Phoenix Suns.

OKLAHOMA STATE: Steve Henson joined Leonard Hamilton's staff directly with Royce Jeffries in 1986. In his senior season, Jeffries was the Cowboys' No. 2 scorer and rebounder (behind Byron Houston).

OLD DOMINION: James Johnson, who went on to become Virginia Tech's coach, joined the staff of Jeff Capel Jr. directly with guard Michael Williams in 1997 from Hargrave Military Institute. Williams averaged 7 points per game in his four-year career and was the Monarchs' runner-up in assists as a sophomore.

PROVIDENCE: Nick Macarchuk joined Dave Gavitt's staff three years after Ernie DiGregorio enrolled in 1969. DiGregorio, a first-team consensus All-American as a senior, is the Friars' all-time assists leader (7.7 per game) and among Top 10 in scoring (1,760 points). DiGregorio, the third pick overall in 1973 draft, played five seasons in the NBA with three different teams. Macarchuk went on to coach Canisius for 10 seasons and Fordham for 12 seasons before accepting a similar position at Stony Brook. . . . Jimmy Adams joined Gavitt's staff two years after Marvin Barnes enrolled in 1970. Barnes, a first-team consensus All-American as a senior when he led the nation in rebounding, is the Friars' all-time leading rebounder (1,592) and is fourth in scoring (1,839 points). Barnes, the second pick overall in the 1974 NBA draft, played four seasons in the NBA with four different teams after spending two years with the ABA's Spirits of St. Louis.

RHODE ISLAND: Jerry DeGregorio, who coached Lamar Odom at St. Thomas Aquinas H.S. in New Britain, Conn., was on Jim Harrick's staff. Odom left the Rams after only one season to become the fourth pick overall in the 1999 NBA draft by the Los Angeles Clippers. DeGregorio was promoted to head coach after Harrick departed for Georgia.

RICHMOND: Gary DeCesare joined Jerry Wainwright's staff directly with point guard Daon Merritt in 2003. Merritt was a part-time starter as a freshman for the Spiders despite missing all of his high school senior season because of a broken foot. He averaged 11.1 ppg and 4.3 apg as a sophomore with the Spiders in 2004-05 before transferring to South Alabama.

ROBERT MORRIS: Jim Elias joined Matt Furjanic's staff two years after Chipper Harris enrolled in 1980. Harris is the Colonials' No. 2 all-time leading scorer (1,942 points) and ranks among the top five in career assists.

ST. JOHN'S: Darren Savino, a local assistant high school coach, joined Fran Fraschilla's staff in 1996 one year before celebrated center James Felton enrolled. Embattled Felton was booted off the squad for repeated violations before his freshman semester was over. . . . Dermon Player, an assistant high school coach in the Bronx, joined Mike Jarvis' staff in 1998 directly with Anthony Glover and two years after Chudney Gray enrolled. Player also coached in the Riverside Church program, where many New York standouts play, including Red Storm playmaker Erick Barkley, who became an NBA first-round draft choice in 2000 after his sophomore season. In 1999-00, Gray averaged 8 ppg, 2.9 rpg, 2.8 apg and 1.3 spg as a senior while Glover contributed 10.2 ppg, 5.2 rpg and 1.5 spg as a sophomore. Glover was the school's leading rebounder and second-leading rebounder as a junior and senior.

SAINT LOUIS: Dick Versace joined Bob Polk's staff directly with Leartha Scott in 1973. Scott was the Billikens' No. 2 scorer as a freshman with 12.4 ppg before encountering academic problems and transferring to Wisconsin-Parkside. Scott was a fourth-round pick of the Golden State Warriors in the 1977 NBA draft. Versace eventually coached Bradley for eight seasons from 1978-79 through 1985-86 before heading to the NBA and coaching the Indiana Pacers a couple of years. . . . Mitch Haskins joined Ron Coleman's staff directly with Ricky Frazier in 1977. Frazier, the Billikens' leading scorer as a freshman before transferring to Missouri, was a second-round draft choice of the Chicago Bulls in 1982. . . . Lee Winfield, Darryl Anderson's high school assistant coach, joined Rich Grawer's staff two years after Anderson enrolled in 1980 when Ron Ekker was coach. Anderson averaged 7.2 ppg in his four seasons. Winfield went on become an assistant with Missouri when his versatile son, Julian, led the Tigers in a variety of categories (rebounding and field-goal percentage in 1994-95 and assists in 1995-96). . . . Larry Hughes, the Bills' standout who was C-USA Freshman of the Year in 1997-98 (20.9 ppg, 5.1 rpg, 2.2 spg) for coach Charlie Spoonhour, rejoined SLU assistant Derek Thomas, who had coached Hughes early in his career at a local high school. Prep teammate Justin Tatum joined SLU's roster the next season after sitting out a year because of academic deficiencies. Tatum finished his career with 8.2 ppg and 5.3 rpg. Thomas subsequently accepted similar assistant positions at Minnesota and UNLV before becoming head coach at Western Illinois for five seasons from 2003-04 through 2007-08.

SAN DIEGO STATE: Jim Tomey joined Steve Fisher's staff one year before Chris Walton enrolled for his freshman campaign in 2000-01. Chris, one of four sons of former national player of the year Bill Walton (UCLA) to play Division I basketball, averaged 5.1 ppg and 3.4 rpg in his four-year career with the Aztecs.

SAN FRANCISCO: Don Risley joined Bob Gaillard's staff directly with Bill Cartwright in 1975. Cartwright, a second-team consensus All-American as a sophomore and senior, is the Dons' all-time leading scorer (2,116 points) and is third in rebounding (1,137). Cartwright, the third overall pick in the 1979 draft, played 15 seasons with the New York Knicks, Chicago Bulls and Seattle SuperSonics.

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA: Rudy Washington joined Bob Boyd's staff one year before Leonel Marquetti and Maurice Williams enrolled in 1978. Marquetti, who transferred to Hampton (Va.) Institute after two seasons with the Trojans, was a ninth-round draft choice as an undergraduate by the Spurs in 1981. Williams, whose last-second basket beat UCLA in Pauley Pavilion in 1981, was a two-year All-Pacific-10 first-team forward. Washington went on to coach Drake for six seasons from 1990-91 through 1995-96 before becoming executive director of the Black Coaches Association.

SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI: Former New Mexico/San Francisco player Billy Reid joined Larry Eustachy's staff directly with guard Sai'Quon Stone from Laurinburg Prep in 2006. Stone was the No. 2 scoring freshman in Conference USA in 2006-07 with 10.2 ppg before leading the Eagles in rebounding as a sophomore with 5.8 rpg.

SOUTH FLORIDA: Terrelle Woody, an aide/personal trainer at the private Maryland prep school home schooler Augustus Gilchrist played for as a senior, joined Stan Heath's staff directly with Gilchrist in 2008 when the 6-10 center transferred from Maryland. Gilchrist averaged 10.2 ppg and 4.4 rpg in 2008-09 and 13.4 ppg and 5.9 rpg in 2009-10.

TENNESSEE: Ray Grant joined Jerry Green's staff directly with Vincent Yarbrough in 1998. Yarbrough's brother, backup guard Del Baker, aligned with the Volunteers the previous year. Yarbrough, a three-time All-SEC selection, finished his career with 13.7 ppg and 6.8 rpg.

TEXAS A&M: John Reese joined Billy Kennedy's staff in 2011 one year before his son, J-Mychal, arrived and averaged 6.2 ppg as a freshman. Father left the Aggies' program midway through the 2013-14 campaign after his sophomore son was booted from the squad reportedly for multiple violations of team rules involving drug use.

TOWSON: Kenny Johnson joined Pat Skerry's staff directly with Deon Jones in 2011 although Jones had transferred from Johnson's high school in Virginia to one in Delaware his final two prep seasons. Jones started every game as a freshman, averaging 7 ppg and 4.5 rpg, before Johnson departed for a similar position at Indiana.

TULANE: Brock Kantrow joined Perry Clark's staff one year before Nick Sinville enrolled in 2000 as a transfer from Minnesota. With the Green Wave, Sinville averaged 9.5 ppg and 5.5 rpg as a junior in 2001-02 and 8.4 ppg and 4.7 rpg as a senior in 2002-03.

UAB: Joe Evans joined Gene Bartow's staff three years after Eddie Collins enrolled in 1984, which was two years before former high school teammate Larry Rembert arrived on campus. Collins, a two-year starter, was selected to the All-Sun Belt Conference Tournament team in his junior season. Rembert, a three-year starter, led the Blazers in rebounding in his sophomore and senior seasons. . . . Jim Armstrong helped monitor UAB's strength and fitness program for Bartow when Alan Ogg enrolled. Ogg, who set school and Sun Belt single-season and career blocked shot records and led the Blazers in rebounding in 1989-90, was on the Miami Heat's roster a couple of seasons. . . . Robert Scott joined Murry Bartow's staff one year before LeAndrew Bass and Myron Ransom enrolled in 1997. Scott subsequently moved on to a similar position at his alma mater (Alabama). Bass and Ransom combined for 20.3 ppg and 9.4 rpg as juniors in 1999-00.

UNLV: George McQuarn joined Jerry Tarkanian's staff three years after Lewis Brown enrolled in 1973. Brown, who ranks second in school history in rebounding (behind Sidney Green), was a fourth-round draft choice of the Milwaukee Bucks in 1977. Brown played briefly with the Washington Bullets in the 1980-81 campaign. McQuarn eventually coached Cal State Fullerton for eight seasons from 1980-81 through 1987-88.

UTAH: Kerry Rupp joined Rick Majerus' staff one year after center-forward Lance Allred enrolled in 1999. Allred started six games in 2001-02 for the Utes. Rupp, who compiled a 24-9 record as the Utes' interim coach in 2003-04 when Majerus was sidelined for health reasons, eventually coached Louisiana Tech for four seasons from 2007-08 through 2010-11.

UTAH STATE: Jim Harrick joined Dutch Belnap's staff one year before Mike Santos and high school teammate Oscar Williams enrolled in 1974. Santos, the Aggies' fourth-leading all-time scorer when his eligibility expired, was a third-round draft choice of the Buffalo Braves in 1978. Williams still holds school assists records for a game, season and career. Harrick went on to direct four different schools to multiple NCAA Tournament appearances (Pepperdine, UCLA, Rhode Island and Georgia).

VILLANOVA: Jimmy Salmon joined Steve Lappas' staff directly with star forward Tim Thomas, who averaged 16.9 ppg and 6 rpg in 1996-97 as a freshman before turning pro early and becoming the seventh pick overall in the NBA draft.

VIRGINIA: Richard Schmidt joined Terry Holland's staff directly with Jeff Lamp and Lee Raker in 1977. Lamp, a consensus second-team All-American as a senior, is the Cavaliers' all-time No. 2 scorer (behind Bryant Stith). Lamp, a first-round draft choice of the Portland Trail Blazers in 1981, played six years in the NBA with four different teams. Raker, the seventh-leading scorer in school history when his eligibility expired, was a fourth-round draft pick of San Diego. Schmidt was head coach with Tampa for 25 seasons after the school resurrected its basketball program in 1983-84.

VIRGINIA TECH: Bob Schneider joined Charlie Moir's staff directly with his son, Jeff Schneider, in 1978. Jeff was the 11th-leading scorer in the Hokies' history when his eligibility expired. Jeff Schneider went on to coach Cal Poly for six seasons from 1995-96 to 2000-01.

WESTERN CAROLINA: Terry Rogers joined Phil Hopkins' staff directly with his son, Casey Rogers, and prep teammate Cory Largent in 1998. They both started in their initial seasons. Casey was named Southern Conference Freshman of the Year after leading all league freshmen in scoring and finishing second in the entire conference in assists. Casey averaged 10.2 ppg, 3.3 rpg and 5.7 apg while Largent contributed 12 ppg and 4.3 rpg in their four-year careers with the Catamounts.

WYOMING: Alumnus Tom Asbury joined Don DeVoe's staff one year after Joe Fazekas in 1976-77. After lettering one year with the Cowboys, Fazekas transferred to Idaho State, where he led the Bengals in scoring, rebounding, both shooting categories and blocked shots in 1979-80. He is the father of eventual Nevada All-American Nick Fazekas. Asbury went on to coach Pepperdine and Kansas State.

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on April 26 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is an April 26 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

APRIL 26

  • Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading basketball scorer in 1945-46) collected two homers and five RBI against the Cincinnati Reds in 1957.

  • Philadelphia Phillies LF Harry Anderson (averaged 7.7 ppg and 8.9 rpg for West Chester PA in 1951-52) went 4-for-4 against the Pittsburgh Pirates in the nightcap of a 1959 twinbill.

  • Cleveland Indians player-manager Lou Boudreau (leading scorer for Illinois' 1937 Big Ten Conference co-champion) banged out five hits, including a pair of doubles and pair of triples, in a 12-11, 14-inning victory against the Chicago White Sox in 1948.

  • Arizona Diamondbacks 1B Tony Clark (San Diego State's leading scorer in WAC games in 1991-92) cracked two homers for the second time in an eight-game span in 2007.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates SS Dick Groat (two-time All-American with Duke in 1950-51 and 1951-52 when finishing among nation's top five scorers each season) amassed four hits and five RBI in a 9-2 triumph against the Philadelphia Phillies in the opener of a 1959 doubleheader.

  • Cleveland Indians rookie RHP Wynn Hawkins (Little All-American was all-time leading scorer for Baldwin-Wallace OH upon graduation in 1957) toiled 11 innings in outdueling Jim Bunning in a 2-1 win against the Detroit Tigers in 1960.

  • Cleveland Indians RHP Oral Hildebrand (Butler All-American in 1928-29 and 1929-30) fired a one-hitter against the St. Louis Browns in 1933, giving him back-to-back shutouts.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers 1B Gil Hodges (played for Oakland City IN in 1947 and 1948) contributed five RBI against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1959.

  • Detroit Tigers CF Harvey Kuenn (played briefly for Wisconsin in 1951-52 after competing on JV squad previous season) collected four hits against the Kansas City Athletics in 1959.

  • Chicago Cubs LF Bill Nicholson (Washington College MD guard for two years in mid-1930s) provided five RBI against the Cincinnati Reds in 1940. Two years later, Nicholson amassed two triples and five RBI against the Reds in 1942.

  • First appearance of the 1933 campaign for New York Giants RHP Roy Parmelee (Eastern Michigan letterman in 1924-25 and 1925-26) resulted in a one-hitter against the Philadelphia Phillies.

  • OF Curtis Pride (led William & Mary in steals three times and assists twice from 1986-87 through 1989-90) shipped by the New York Mets to the Boston Red Sox as part of a conditional deal in 2000.

  • Montreal Expos 2B Gary Sutherland (averaged 7.4 ppg with USC in 1963-64) went 4-for-4 against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1969.

  • RHP Cecil Upshaw (led Centenary in scoring as junior while averaging 13.7 ppg and 6 rpg from 1961-62 through 1963-64) traded by the Cleveland Indians to the New York Yankees in 1974.

Evans Gives Hurley Big Assist By Tagging Along With Him to Arizona State

If anyone knows the value of team chemistry and distributing the ball, it's NCAA all-time assists leader Bobby Hurley (1,076 scoring feeds with Duke from 1989-90 through 1992-93). One of his first significant moves as coach at Arizona State to help the Sun Devils possibly return to the NCAA playoffs was having Shannon Evans tag along with him from Buffalo. Evans sparked the Bulls to the NCAA tourney by averaging a team-high 4.6 apg in addition to contributing 15.4 ppg and 3.2 rpg.

Following is an alphabetical list of prominent players who transferred from one major college to another with the same head coach although he wasn't his father:

Player Pos. Head Coach First School Second School
Mike Aaman F Dan Hurley Wagner Rhode Island 13-14
Brent Arrington G Sean Woods Mississippi Valley State 12 Morehead State 14-15
Pasha Bains G Larry Shyatt Wyoming 99 Clemson 00
Bill Brigham F Mike Jarvis Boston University 89-90 George Washington 92-93
Anthony Buford G Bob Huggins Akron 88-90 Cincinnati 92
Adrian Crawford G Steve Robinson Tulsa 97 Florida State 99-01
Greg Davis F Dave Bliss New Mexico 98-99 Baylor 01-02
*Nate Erdmann G Kelvin Sampson Washington State 94 Oklahoma 96-97
Shannon Evans G Bobby Hurley Buffalo 14-15 Arizona State 17
Josh Fisher G Lorenzo Romar Pepperdine Saint Louis 01-04
Prince Fowler G Billy Tubbs Oklahoma 95 Texas Christian 97-99
John David Gardner G Brad Brownell UNC Wilmington 05 Wright State 08-10
Juan'ya Green G Joe Mihalich Niagara 12-13 Hofstra 15
R.T. Guinn C Dave Bliss New Mexico 00 Baylor 02
Kevin Henry G Dave Bliss New Mexico 98-00 Baylor 02
Denard Holmes F Abe Lemons Texas 82 Oklahoma City 85
Gary Hooker F Ron Greene Mississippi State 76-78 Murray State 80
Shawn James C Ron Everhart Northeastern 05-06 Duquesne 08
LeDarion Jones F Larry Shyatt Clemson 96-97 Wyoming 99-00
Thomas Kilgore G Ben Braun Eastern Michigan California 98-99
Mark Lyons G Sean Miller Xavier 09 Arizona 13
Daquein McNeil G Richard Pitino Florida International Minnesota 14-15
Mike Mitchell F Boyd Grant Fresno State 86-88 Colorado State 90
Nic Moore G Tim Jankovich Illinois State 12 Southern Methodist 14-15
Anthony Pendleton G George Raveling Iowa Southern California 88-89
Scoonie Penn G Jim O'Brien Boston College 96-97 Ohio State 99-00
Merle Rousey G Hank Iba Colorado 34 Oklahoma A&M 36-37
Malik Smith G Richard Pitino Florida International 13 Minnesota 14
Ameen Tanksley G-F Joe Mihalich Niagara 12-13 Hofstra 15
Robert Vaden G-F Mike Davis Indiana 05-06 UAB 08
Ross Varner F Lorenzo Romar Pepperdine Saint Louis 02
Pax Whitehead G-F Jan van Breda Kolff Cornell 93 Vanderbilt 95-97
Sean Wightman F Bob Donewald Illinois State 89 Western Michigan 91-93
Jason Williams G Billy Donovan Marshall 95-96 Florida 98
Dedric Willoughby G Tim Floyd New Orleans 93-94 Iowa State 96-97
Jack Worthington G Abe Lemons Texas 82-83 Oklahoma City 85-86

*Erdmann played for a junior college between four-year school stints.

NOTES: Aaman committed to Wagner before choosing to enroll with Hurley at Rhode Island, Fisher signed with Pepperdine but never played there before choosing to follow Romar to SLU, Kilgore never played for EMU after transferring there from Central Michigan, Lyons was an academic partial qualifier in 2008-09 and Pendleton signed with Iowa but never played for the Hawkeyes because of scholastic shortcomings. . . . Mitchell played two seasons at Fresno State under Grant's successor (Ron Adams). . . . Varner went on an LDS Mormon mission for two years between stints at Pepperdine and Saint Louis. . . . Jankovich is coach-in-waiting at SMU under Larry Brown.

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on April 25 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is an April 25 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

APRIL 25

  • New York Yankees P Jim Beattie (Dartmouth's top rebounder in 1974-75 when selected basketball team MVP and honorable mention All-Ivy League) won his MLB debut in 1978 (4-3 against the Baltimore Orioles).

  • Chicago Cubs 2B Glenn Beckert (three-year letterman for Allegheny PA) banged out four hits against the Houston Astros in 1970.

  • Texas Rangers RHP Jim Bibby (Fayetteville State NC backup player and brother of UCLA All-American Henry Bibby) tossed a four-hit shutout against the Boston Red Sox in 1974.

  • Detroit Tigers 2B Frank Bolling (averaged 7.3 ppg for Spring Hill AL in 1950-51) collected four hits and four RBI against the Cleveland Indians in 1954.

  • In 1969, Montreal Expos 1B Donn Clendenon (four-sport letterman with Morehouse GA) contributed four hits against his original team (the Pittsburgh Pirates).

  • Two weeks after helping the Boston Celtics capture the 1961 NBA title, RHP Gene Conley (All-PCC first-team selection led North Division in scoring in 1949-50 as Washington State sophomore) earned his first A.L. victory (6-1 for the Boston Red Sox over the Washington Senators).

  • Cleveland Indians RF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union team winning 1943 CIAA title) tied MLB record by striking out five times in a single game (at Detroit in 1948).

  • LF David Justice (led Thomas More KY in assists in 1984-85) went deep twice for the Cleveland Indians as they hit a team-record eight homers in an 11-4 triumph over the Milwaukee Brewers in 1997.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers LHP Fred Kipp (two-time all-league selection as four-year letterman for Emporia State KS from 1950 through 1953) won his first MLB start (5-3 against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1958).

  • New York Giants CF Hank Leiber (played for Arizona in 1931) supplied five RBI against the Boston Braves in 1936.

  • Only 14 games into the 1982 season, New York Yankees owner George Steinbrenner fired manager Bob Lemon and replaced him with Gene Michael (Kent State's leading scorer with 14 ppg in 1957-58), the man Lemon succeeded the previous September.

  • 3B Graig Nettles (shot 87.8% from free-throw line for San Diego State in 1963-64) put the Minnesota Twins ahead with a three-run pinch homer in the eighth inning but they wound up losing at Chicago, 6-5, in 1969.

  • RHP Joe Niekro (averaged 8.9 ppg and 3.8 rpg for West Liberty WV from 1963-64 through 1965-66) traded by the Chicago Cubs to the San Diego Padres in 1969.

  • En route to hitting safely in seven of his first nine pinch-hit appearances with the San Diego Padres, utilityman Gary Sutherland (averaged 7.4 ppg with USC in 1963-64) socked a homer against the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1977.

  • Atlanta Braves RHP Cecil Upshaw (Centenary's leading scorer as junior in 1962-63) secured his fifth relief victory in the first month of the 1971 campaign.

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