On This Date: Ex-College Hoopsters Make Their Mark on May 24 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 24 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 24

  • Detroit Tigers 1B Dale Alexander (starting basketball center for Milligan TN in mid-1920s) whacked two homers in an 8-7 defeat against the Chicago White Sox in 1930.

  • RHP Elden Auker (All-Big Six Conference first five selection with Kansas State in 1931-32) pitched the first night game in St. Louis in 1940 when Cleveland Indians Hall of Fame P Bob Feller defeated the Browns, 3-2.

  • Chicago Cubs 2B Glenn Beckert (three-year letterman for Allegheny PA) went 4-for-4 in a 4-3 win against the Cincinnati Reds in the nightcap of a 1967 twinbill.

  • Subbing for Chicago Cubs Hall of Fame 1B Ernie Banks, Leo Burke (averaged 9.2 ppg for Virginia Tech in 1952-53 and 1953-54) went 3-for-3 with two extra-base hits against the Cincinnati Reds in the nightcap of a 1964 doubleheader.

  • Philadelphia Athletics C Mickey Cochrane (Boston University player in early 1920s) went 4-for-4 against the Washington Senators in 1929. Eight years later with the Detroit Tigers, Cochrane collected four hits against the Senators in 1937.

  • St. Louis Cardinals CF Taylor Douthit (California letterman from 1922 through 1924) went 4-for-4 against the Cincinnati Reds in the nightcap of a 1931 twinbill.

  • Philadelphia Phillies rookie 2B Denny Doyle (averaged 2.7 ppg for Morehead State in 1962-63) banged out four hits against the St. Louis Cardinals in a 1970 game. The next year, Doyle's two-run homer gave Philly a 2-1 victory against the Cincinnati Reds in 1971.

  • Davey Johnson (averaged 1.7 ppg with Texas A&M in 1961-62) replaced Tony Perez as manager of the Cincinnati Reds in 1993.

  • Chicago White Sox RHP Ted Lyons (two-time All-SWC first-team selection for Baylor in the early 1920s) surrendered 24 hits in going the distance in a 21-inning, 6-5 defeat against the Detroit Tigers in 1929. In 1946, 45-year-old Lyons relinquished the mound to become manager of the White Sox. In his last 28 appearances, he hurled complete games.

  • St. Louis Browns rookie RHP Dave Madison (LSU letterman from 1939-40 through 1942-43) didn't yield a run in his first eight relief appearances in 1952.

  • New York Giants RHP Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) defeated the St. Louis Cardinals 24 consecutive times until losing to the Cards, 3-1, in 1909.

  • Atlanta Braves rookie RHP Ron Reed (Notre Dame's leading rebounder in 1963-64 and 1964-65) won his sixth straight start in 1968.

  • 1B Howie Schultz (Hamline MN product played and coached professional basketball) awarded on waivers from the Philadelphia Phillies to the Cincinnati Reds in 1948.

  • In the midst of five straight starts yielding fewer than three earned runs, Pittsburgh Pirates LHP Bob Veale (scored 1,160 points from 1955-56 through 1957-58) tossed a three-hit shutout against the Montreal Expos in 1970.

  • San Diego Padres OF Will Venable (All-Ivy League first-team selection as junior and second-team choice as senior averaged 9.3 ppg under Princeton coach John Thompson III from 2001-02 through 2004-05) supplied four hits and scored three runs against the Los Angeles Dodgers in 2015.

  • 1B-OF Preston Ward (second-leading scorer for Southwest Missouri State in 1946-47 and 1948-49) contributed a triple and homer in helping the Pittsburgh Pirates snap an 11-game losing streak with a 15-1 romp over the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1955.

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopsters Make Their Mark on May 23 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 23 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 23

  • RHP Mike Barlow (Syracuse basketball substitute from 1967-68 through 1969-70) shipped by the Oakland Athletics to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1975 to complete an earlier trade.

  • Chicago Cubs RF Frankie Baumholtz (MVP in 1941 NIT and first player in Ohio University history to score 1,000 career points) contributed four hits against the Milwaukee Braves in 1953.

  • Chicago Cubs 2B Glenn Beckert (three-year letterman for Allegheny PA) collected four hits for the second time in a four-game span in 1971.

  • Philadelphia Athletics 3B Buddy Blair (LSU letterman from 1932-33 through 1934-35) banged a career-high four hits in a 4-3 win against the Boston Red Sox in 1942.

  • RHP Ray Burris (played for Southwestern Oklahoma State) traded by the Chicago Cubs to the New York Yankees for P Dick Tidrow in 1979.

  • 3B Alvin Dark (letterman for LSU and USL in mid-1940s) went 3-for-3 against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1958 en route to hitting safely in his first 11 games with the Chicago Cubs.

  • Baltimore Orioles LHP Mike Flanagan (averaged 13.9 ppg for UMass' freshman squad in 1971-72) tossed a two-hit shutout against the Detroit Tigers in 1978.

  • INF Howard Freigau (played for Ohio Wesleyan) traded by the St. Louis Cardinals to the Chicago Cubs in 1925.

  • Boston Red Sox C Bob Garbark (four-year letterman graduated from Allegheny PA in 1932) went 4-for-4 against the St. Louis Browns in 1945.

  • St. Louis Cardinals RHP Bob Gibson (Creighton's leading scorer and rebounder in 1955-56 and 1956-57) fanned 16 Philadelphia Phillies batters in a 3-1 victory in 1970.

  • In the midst of hitting safely in 33 of his first 37 MLB games in 1936, Brooklyn Dodgers rookie 1B Buddy Hassett (played for Manhattan teams winning school-record 17 consecutive contests in 1930 and 1931) smacked his initial homer.

  • New York Yankees LF Charlie Keller (three-year letterman with Maryland from 1934-35 through 1936-37) cracked three extra-base hits against the Boston Red Sox in 1941.

  • In 1911, New York Giants RHP Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) defeated the Cincinnati Reds for the 18th consecutive time.

  • INF Dan Monzon (played for Buena Vista IA in mid-1960s) traded by the Minnesota Twins to the Montreal Expos in 1974.

  • New York Yankees 3B Graig Nettles (shot 87.8% from free-throw line for San Diego State in 1963-64) drilled two homers against the Texas Rangers in 1975.

  • RHP Curly Ogden (competed as center for Swarthmore PA in 1919, 1920 and 1922) purchased from the Philadelphia Athletics by the Washington Senators in 1924.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates RHP Elmer Ponder (Oklahoma letterman in 1913-14 and 1915-16) tossed a five-hit shutout against the Brooklyn Robins in 1920.

  • Chicago Cubs SS Paul Popovich (teammate of Jerry West for West Virginia's 1960 NCAA playoff team) went 3-for-3 and knocked in the decisive run with a double off Tug McGraw in the bottom of the eighth inning of a 2-1 victory against the New York Mets in 1972.

  • New York Yankees rookie LHP Dennis Rasmussen (sixth-man for Creighton averaged 5.1 ppg from 1977-78 through 1979-80) secured his first MLB victory, yielding only two hits and fanning 10 Seattle Mariners batters over eight innings in 1984.

  • Baltimore Orioles RHP Robin Roberts (Michigan State's runner-up in scoring in 1945-46 and 1946-47) fired a two-hitter (both by light-hitting SS Eddie Brinkman/.224 career batting average) in a 6-0 victory over the Washington Senators in 1963.

  • LHP Paul Splittorff (runner-up in scoring and rebounding for Morningside IA in 1967-68) toiled 11 shutout innings for the Kansas City Royals before they edged the Minnesota Twins, 1-0, in 15 frames in 1981.

  • St. Louis Cardinals 1B Bill White (played two years for Hiram OH in early 1950s) collected four hits and five RBI against the San Francisco Giants in 1961. The next year, White went 4-for-4 against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1962.

  • Bobby Winkles (led Illinois Wesleyan in scoring in 1950-51) stepped down as manager of the Oakland A's in 1978 although they were leading the A.L. Western Division.

Lost in Shuffle: Spotlight on Legends Completely Obscures Predecessors

A total of 40 current NCAA Division I schools feature all-time winningest coaches boasting in excess of 400 triumphs. The length of tenure necessary to win so many games makes it almost impossible to remember their predecessors. Anyone who can name 1/4 of the mentors they succeeded goes straight to the Trivia Hall of Fame.

Billy Donovan's success with the Oklahoma City Thunder after departing Florida triggered a question as to what other individuals are completely overshadowed as successor to a coaching legend. Donovan combined with fellow record holders Phog Allen, Dale Brown, Gale Catlett, Denny Crum, Ed Diddle, Hec Edmundson, Jack Friel, Don Haskins, Lou Henson, Hank Iba, Frank Keaney, Bob Knight, Bob McKillop, Ray Meyer, Lute Olson, Alex Severance, Norm Stewart, Bob Thomason, John Thompson Jr., Gary Williams, John Wooden and Ned Wulk for more than 12,500 victories at their respective schools where they established new standards. Who would have thought such achievements were in store after their predecessors collaborated to go more than 300 games below .500 over a collective 100-plus seasons?

One of the predecessor names in particular should surprise you. Incredibly, the only one of Kansas' 10 head coaches with a career losing record is the inventor of the sport (Dr. James Naismith). Naismith is among the following coaches who were succeeded by individuals posting more than 400 wins to become the all-time winningest mentor at the same institution:

School All-Time Winningest Coach Predecessor (W-L Record During Tenure)
Arizona Lute Olson (590 victories) Ben Lindsey (4-25 in 1982-83)
Arizona State Ned Wulk (405) Bill Kajikawa (88-137 from 1948-49 through 1956-57)
Butler Tony Hinkle (549) Harlan O. "Pat" Page (94-29 from 1920-21 through 1925-26)
California Clarence "Nibs" Price (449) Earl Wright (60-20 from 1920-21 through 1923-24)
Connecticut Jim Calhoun (626) Dom Perno (139-114 from 1977-78 through 1985-86)
Davidson Bob McKillop (495) Bobby Hussey (107-126 from 1981-82 through 1988-89)
Dayton Don Donoher (437) Tom Blackburn (352-141 from 1947-48 through 1963-64)
DePaul Ray Meyer (724) Bill Wendt (23-20 in 1940-41 and 1941-42)
Duke Mike Krzyzewski (945) Bill E. Foster (113-64 from 1974-75 through 1979-80)
Florida Billy Donovan (467) Lon Kruger (104-80 from 1990-91 through 1995-96)
Georgetown John Thompson Jr. (596) Jack Magee (69-80 from 1966-67 through 1971-72)
Houston Guy Lewis (592) Alden Pasche (135-116 from 1945-46 through 1955-56)
Illinois Lou Henson (421) Gene Bartow (8-18 in 1974-75)
Indiana Bob Knight (659) Lou Watson (62-60 from 1965-66 through 1968-69 and 1970-71)
Kansas Phog Allen (590) Dr. James Naismith (55-60 from 1899 through 1907)
Kentucky Adolph Rupp (875) John Mauer (40-14 from 1927-28 through 1929-30)
Louisiana State Dale Brown (448) Press Maravich (76-86 from 1966-67 through 1971-72)
Louisville Denny Crum (675) Howard Stacey (12-8 in 1970-71)
Maryland Gary Williams (461) Bob Wade (36-50 from 1986-87 through 1988-89)
Missouri Norm Stewart (634) Bob Vanatta (42-80 from 1962-63 through 1966-67)
Niagara Taps Gallagher (465) Bill McCarthy (44-35 from 1927-28 through 1930-31)
North Carolina Dean Smith (879) Frank McGuire (164-58 from 1952-53 through 1960-61)
Oklahoma State Hank Iba (655) Harold James (13-41 from 1931-32 through 1933-34)
Oregon State Slats Gill (599) Robert Hager (115-53 from 1922-23 through 1927-28)
Pacific Bob Thomason (414) Tom O'Neill (51-110 from 1982-83 through 1987-88)
Princeton Pete Carril (514) Butch van Breda Kolff (103-31 from 1962-63 through 1966-67)
Purdue Gene Keady (512) Lee Rose (50-18 in 1978-79 and 1979-80)
Rhode Island Frank Keaney (403) Fred Murray (9-8 in 1920-21)
St. John's Lou Carnesecca* (526) Frank Mulzoff (56-27 from 1970-71 through 1972-73)
Syracuse Jim Boeheim (965) Roy Danforth (148-71 from 1968-69 through 1975-76)
Temple John Chaney (516) Don Casey (151-94 from 1973-74 through 1981-82)
Texas A&M Shelby Metcalf (438) Bobby Rogers (92-52 from 1957-58 through 1962-63)
Texas-El Paso Don Haskins (719) Harold Davis (18-30 in 1959-60 and 1960-61)
UCLA John Wooden (620) Wilbur Johns (93-120 from 1939-40 through 1947-48)
UNLV Jerry Tarkanian (509) John Bayer (44-36 from 1970-71 through 1972-73)
Villanova Alex Severance (413) Doc Jacobs (62-56 from 1929-30 through 1935-36)
Washington Hec Edmundson (488) Stub Allison (7-8 in 1919-20)
Washington State Jack Friel (495) Karl Schlademan (18-27 in 1926-27 and 1927-28)
West Virginia Gale Catlett (439) Joedy Gardner (59-53 from 1974-75 through 1977-78)
Western Kentucky Ed Diddle (759) L.T. Smith (3-1 in 1922)

*Carnesecca succeeded Joe Lapchick when he served his first stint with St. John's from 1965-66 through 1969-70

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopsters Make Their Mark on May 22 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 22 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 22

  • Chicago Cubs 1B George Altman (appeared in 1953 and 1954 NAIA Basketball Tournament with Tennessee State) swatted two homers in a 4-3 win against the Atlanta Braves in the nightcap of a 1966 doubleheader.

  • Seattle Mariners 1B Bruce Bochte (starting forward for Santa Clara's NCAA playoff team in 1969-70) went 4-for-4 and chipped in with six RBI in a 12-11 win against the Kansas City Royals in 1979.

  • 1B Bill Davis (averaged 12.5 ppg in 1963-64 for a Minnesota team including eventual NBA standouts Archie Clark and Lou Hudson) traded by the San Diego Padres to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1969.

  • 1B-LF Dick Gernert (Temple letterman in 1948-49) was one of four Boston Red Sox players to wallop a homer in the sixth inning of an 11-0 victory over the Cleveland Indians in 1957.

  • Baltimore Orioles RHP Dick Hall (averaged 13.5 ppg from 1948-49 through 1950-51 with Swarthmore PA Southern Division champions in Middle Atlantic States Conference) notched his fourth relief win of the month in 1964.

  • San Francisco Giants C Tom Haller (backup forward for Illinois in 1956-57 and 1957-58 under coach Harry Combes) banged out four hits against the Houston Astros in the opener of a 1965 doubleheader.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates 3B Lee Handley (Bradley letterman from 1932-33 through 1934-35) went 4-for-4 against the New York Giants in 1939.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers 1B Gil Hodges (played for St. Joseph's IN in 1943 and Oakland City IN in 1947 and 1948) collected two homers and six RBI against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1951. Twelve years later, Hodges became manager of the Washington Senators in 1963 after his acquisition from the New York Mets for OF Jimmy Piersall.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers rookie RF Frank Howard (two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection when leading Ohio State in scoring and rebounding in 1956-57 and 1957-58) contributed four hits against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1960.

  • 3B Jerry Lumpe (member of Southwest Missouri State's 1952 NAIA Tournament championship team) notched the New York Yankees only hit (a single) in a 5-0 setback against knuckleballer Hoyt Wilhelm of the Baltimore Orioles in 1959. The next year as a Kansas City Athletics 2B in 1960, Lumpe launched two homers against his original team (Yankees).

  • Chicago White Sox RHP Ted Lyons (two-time All-SWC first-team selection with Baylor in the early 1920s) beat the Washington Senators, 9-2, in 1938 for his 200th career victory.

  • In 1965, Detroit Tigers rookie RF Jim Northrup (second-leading scorer and third-leading rebounder for Alma MI in 1958-59) jacked his first MLB homer (off Hall of Famer Robin Roberts of Baltimore Orioles).

  • Montreal Expos LF Curtis Pride (led William & Mary in steals three times and assists twice while averaging 5.6 ppg and 3.1 apg from 1986-87 through 1989-90) went 3-for-3 against the New York Mets in 2001.

  • Baltimore Orioles RF Ken Singleton (Hofstra freshman squad in mid-1960s) smacked a game-ending grand slam in the bottom of the ninth inning against the Detroit Tigers in 1976.

  • Utilityman Jimmy Stewart (All-Volunteer State Athletic Conference selection for Austin Peay State in 1959-60 and 1960-61) purchased from the Chicago Cubs by the Chicago White Sox in 1967.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates LHP Bob Veale (scored 1,160 points from 1955-56 through 1957-58 with Benedictine KS) tossed his second shutout of the month in 1966.

  • Kansas City Royals RHP Chris Young (All-Ivy League first-team selection as Princeton's leading scorer and rebounder in 1999-00) won first four decisions and compiled 0.78 ERA through his first 10 outings of 2015 campaign.

Mark Among Few Good Men: Gonzaga Bench Boss Dominates in WCC Play

A principal reason Jerry Tarkanian became a Hall of Famer was the fact he is the only coach in NCAA Division I history to win more than 90% of his assignments for a school in a single conference including both regular season and postseason league tourney (229-19 mark in PCAA/Big West with UNLV in a 10-year span from 1982-83 through 1991-92).

Among active coaches, Gonzaga's Mark Few extended his stunning string of 17 consecutive NCAA playoff appearances in as many seasons with the Zags. But what is equally impressive is his domination of the West Coast Conference not only in regular-season competition (230-28) but also in league tournament action (36-4). Few isn't expected to fall much, if any, from list of league rulers in the near future. Ditto winning percentage overall through 17 campaigns as Few (.808) ranks fourth at this juncture in his career behind legendary Clair Bee (.850), Adolph Rupp (.824) and Tarkanian (.813). Despite never reaching the Final Four, how in the name of James Naismith has Few never been anointed national coach of the year?

John Calipari is the only coach to win 80% of his league assignments in two conferences with different schools. But if Few remains at his present success level, Calipari could tack on another 105 consecutive SEC triumphs via five additional unbeaten regular seasons and league tourney titles in succession with Kentucky and still be behind Few in conference domination.

Brad Stevens won 80.8% of Butler's Horizon League games in five seasons but fell just short of meeting the minimum of 100 decisions in a single conference on the following list before subsequently moving on to the Atlantic 10 and NBA's Boston Celtics. Stevens has had a better pro career than Tarkanian, who compiled a 9-11 record in a brief stint with the San Antonio Spurs at the start of the 1992-93 campaign. Few ranks third, also behind North Carolina State's Everett Case, among the following coaches who have won more than 75% of their games in a single conference including participation in league tourney play:

Coach School Conference Seasons Regular-Season League Tourney Overall Pct.
Jerry Tarkanian UNLV PCAA/Big West 1983-92 205-17 24-2 229-19 .923
Everett Case North Carolina State Southern 1947-53 87-11 20-1 107-12 .899
Mark Few Gonzaga West Coast 2000-16 230-28 36-4 266-32 .893
Adolph Rupp Kentucky SEC 1933-72 397-75 57-6 454-81 .849
Roy Williams Kansas Big 12 1997-2003 94-18 14-4 108-22 .831
Gregg Marshall Winthrop Big South 1999-2007 104-24 19-2 123-26 .826
Bill Self Kansas Big 12 2004-16 179-39 27-6 206-45 .821
John Calipari Memphis C-USA 2001-09 117-25 17-5 134-30 .817
John Calipari Kentucky SEC 2010-16 95-25 16-3 111-28 .799
Rick Majerus Utah Western Athletic 1991-99 118-30 15-6 133-36 .787
Eddie Sutton Arkansas Southwest 1975-85 139-35 13-7 152-42 .784
Bob Huggins Cincinnati C-USA 1996-2005 123-33 16-6 139-39 .781
Pete Gillen Xavier Midwestern Collegiate 1986-94 83-25 17-4 100-29 .775
Vic Bubas Duke ACC 1960-69 106-32 22-6 128-38 .771
Stew Morrill Utah State Big West 1999-2005 91-28 13-3 104-31 .770
Charlie Spoonhour SW Missouri State Mid-Continent 1984-90 73-21 9-4 82-25 .766
Lute Olson Arizona Pacific-10 1984-2007 328-102 16-6 344-108 .761
Joe Williams Furman Southern 1971-78 67-25 18-3 85-28 .752
Denny Crum Louisville Metro 1977-95 173-59 33-9 206-68 .752

NOTES: Huggins (West Virginia), Marshall (Wichita State) and Williams (North Carolina) are active coaches currently employed by other schools. . . . UCLA's John Wooden won 81% of his games in the PCC/AAWU/Pacific-8 from 1948-49 through 1974-75 but none of those contests included conference tournament competition.

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopsters Make Their Mark on May 21 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Former Duke basketball All-Americans Dick Groat and Billy Werber provided big MLB performances on this date. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 21 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 21

  • Toronto Blue Jays 2B Danny Ainge (three-time Brigham Young All-American and national basketball player of year as senior in 1980-81) stroked three hits and scored three runs against the Cleveland Indians in his MLB debut in 1979.

  • LF Ethan Allen (Cincinnati letterman in 1924-25 and 1925-26) traded by the Philadelphia Phillies to the Chicago Cubs in 1936.

  • Seattle Mariners RHP Jim Beattie (Dartmouth's top rebounder in 1974-75 when selected team MVP and honorable mention All-Ivy League) notched his third victory in 11 days in 1980.

  • Hall of Fame C Mickey Cochrane (Boston University hoopster in early 1920s) clobbered three homers as a Philadelphia Athletics rookie in a 20-4 rout of the St. Louis Browns in 1925. Six years later, Cochrane collected five hits and four RBI against the Detroit Tigers in 1931.

  • New York Giants 2B Pat Crawford (Davidson captain in early 1920s) contributed two extra-base hits and four RBI for the second time in a 10-game span in 1930.

  • Atlanta Braves 3B Darrell Evans (member of Jerry Tarkanian-coached Pasadena City CA club winning 1967 state community college crown) homered twice in a 1975 game against the Montreal Expos.

  • In 1962, Pittsburgh Pirates SS Dick Groat (two-time All-American with Duke in 1950-51 and 1951-52 when finishing among nation's top five scorers each season) went 4-for-4 against the Chicago Cubs in the midst of a career-high 15-game hitting streak.

  • San Diego Padres RF Tony Gwynn (All-WAC second-team selection with San Diego State in 1979-80 and 1980-81) went 4-for-4 against the Philadelphia Phillies en route to a N.L.-high 211 hits in 1986.

  • New York Yankees LHP Steve Hamilton (Morehead State's leading scorer and rebounder in 1956-57 and 1957-58) registered a save by getting the last two outs to preserve a 2-0 shutout against the Washington Senators in 1970 after starter Mel Stottlemyre issued 11 walks.

  • Cleveland Indians RHP Wynn Hawkins (Little All-American was all-time leading scorer for Baldwin-Wallace OH upon graduation in 1957) hurled his lone MLB shutout (9-0 against Minnesota Twins in opener of 1961 twinbill).

  • INF-OF Rick Herrscher (led SMU with 17.5 ppg in 1957-58 when he was an All-SWC first-team selection) shipped by the Milwaukee Braves to the New York Mets in 1962 to complete an earlier deal.

  • Boston Red Sox C Duane Josephson (led Northern Iowa in scoring in 1962-63 and 1963-64 under coach Norm Stewart) jacked two homers in an 8-4 victory against the Baltimore Orioles in 1971.

  • Cincinnati Reds RF Danny Litwhiler (member of JV squad with Bloomsburg PA three years in mid-1930s) smacked a pinch three-run homer to break a 6-6 deadlock against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1950.

  • CF Don Lock (led Wichita State in field-goal percentage in 1956-57 and 1957-58) ended an 18-inning marathon in 1967 when his two-out single gave the Philadelphia Phillies a 2-1 win against the Cincinnati Reds.

  • San Francisco Giants LF Terrell Lowery (two-time All-WCC first-team selection and league-leading scorer for Loyola Marymount in 1990-91 and 1991-92) banged out five hits, including three doubles, in a 16-10 victory against the Milwaukee Brewers in 2000.

  • Boston Red Sox 1B Ed Morgan (Tulane letterman from 1923-24 through 1925-26) had five hits against the Chicago White Sox in 1934.

  • Hall of Fame RHP Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) signed by Baltimore Orioles in 1962 after he was released by the New York Yankees.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers INF Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in Pacific Coast Conference both of his seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) supplied six RBI in a 15-6 romp over the St. Louis Cardinals in 1949.

  • Boston Red Sox 3B Billy Werber (first Duke All-American in 1929-30) collected three stolen bases and scored four runs against the Chicago White Sox in 1934.

  • RHP Jim Wilson (letterman for San Diego State's 1942 NAIA Tournament participant) traded by the Baltimore Orioles to the Chicago White Sox in 1956.

Looks Are Deceiving: H.S. Player Rankings Are Little More Than Media Hype

Loyalists for big-name schools are counting on remaining or returning to elite status next season. Typically, the follow-the-pack national media falls in lockstep predicting most of them will be back to at least near the top of the national polls. But welfare writers (accepting guesswork handouts from well-meaning but ineffectual middle men) better hope the recruiting gurus ranking high school hotshots emerge from a sorry slump. A textbook example is Buddy Hield, who wasn't a Top 100 recruit in 2012 but emerged as national player of the year as a Oklahoma senior. Meanwhile, at least Michigan State's Denzel Valentine, who shared national POY awards with Hield, ranked among the consensus Top 100 prospects in 2012 by RSCI (88th) but was outside the Top 100 by 247Sports (105th). NCAA consensus first-team All-American Malcolm Brogdon of Virginia ranked in the 90s in 2011 by RSCI and 247Sports.

What good are prep player rankings if the brainiac analysts can't come close to pinpointing a prospect who will become a college All-American in a couple of years? Three seasons ago provided ample evidence of rating ineptitude when four of the five NCAA unanimous All-American first-team selections, including national player of the year Trey Burke (Michigan), weren't ranked among the consensus Top 100 H.S. recruits assembled by RSCI the years they left high school. First-teamer Kelly Olynyk (Gonzaga) and Final Four MOP Luke Hancock (Louisville) weren't among the top 100 in 2009. First-teamers Doug McDermott (Creighton) and Victor Oladipo (Indiana) plus honorable mention All-American Russ Smith (leading scorer for NCAA champion Louisville) weren't among the top 100 in 2010.

The player pimps certainly are out of credibility. Burke, McDermott, Kaminsky and Hield pooled their previously overlooked assets to assemble a string of four straight national POY honorees. Burke wasn't included among the consensus top 100 in 2011 although every scout in this burgeoning charade saw him play on the same high school squad with eventual Ohio State All-American Jared Sullinger. Ditto McDermott with regal recruit Harrison Barnes (North Carolina).

Media hacks as confused as Bruce Jenner, apparently incapable of calculating the difference between AAU-pickup street ball and genuine team ball, should be deep-sixed when you compare Hield and Valentine against the following list of mediocre players ranked among the consensus Top 40 recruits in 2012: Chaquille Cleare (averaged 3.5 ppg for Maryland and Texas), DaJuan Coleman (4.8 ppg/Syracuse), Grant Jerrett (5.2 ppg/Arizona), Omar Calhoun (6 ppg/Connecticut) and Amile Jefferson (6.1 ppg/Duke). Exhibits A and B for the miscalculations are Nerlens Noel and Jahlil Okafor as the previous prime prospects are already on the Philadelphia 76ers' trading block.

As a cautionary measure, pore over this information again the next time some lazy broadcaster needing a drool bucket begins slobbering over a pimple-faced teenager without ever seeing him play firsthand and only using recruiting services as a resource. The dopey devotees intoxicated by recruiting services should simply be ignored for accepting as gospel player rankings dwelling on wingspans, weight reps, Soul Train dance moves and carnival-like dunk contests. How about focusing solely on whether they'll continue to improve against comparable athletes, boast the proper attitude to learn to fit in with teammates in a me-myself-and-I generation and make a major bottom-line impact on the game rather than strut-your-stuff swagger? When pass is considered a dirty four-letter word, the chronic over-hyping doesn't appear as if it will end anytime soon.

When Karl-Anthony Towns (Minnesota Timberwolves) and Willie Cauley-Stein (Sacramento Kings) became the seventh and eighth Kentucky product in a six-year span among the NBA's top eight draft picks, the gifted group may have pooled credit-hour resources for a single shared diploma (hopefully not useless AFAS). The pair of 2015-16 rookies and six of the other early Big Blue picks - including DeMarcus Cousins (Sacramento Kings), Anthony Davis (New Orleans Pelicans), Brandon Knight (Phoenix Suns), Noel (Sixers), Julius Randle (Los Angeles Lakers) and John Wall (Washington Wizards) - on seven different NBA teams combined for a paltry 183-391 record this season (.318), a winning percentage even lower than John Calipari's 72-112 worksheet (.391) in three seasons coaching the New Jersey Nets in the late 1990s. UK provided 22 undergraduate selections in the previous six years, averaging three first-round picks annually while combining to earn in excess of $85 million this campaign. But if winning on the NBA hardwood is more vital than the draft lottery, UK hasn't been more valuable. With Michael Kidd-Gilchrist (Charlotte Hornets) missing majority of past campaign because of an injured right shoulder, none of those 22 UK Calipari-coached undergrad draft choices started for a 2016 NBA postseason participant - 20 of them ranking among the top 26 recruits by RSCI from 2007 through 2014 (all but Cauley-Stein and Eric Bledsoe). Does anyone really believe 2016 UK undergrad defectors/projected Top 20 picks Jamal Murray, Skal Labissiere and Tyler Ulis will be premier playoff performers in the NBA next season?

Two-time NBA Most Valuable Player and three-point shooting sensation Stephen Curry (Davidson) is perhaps the premier collegian thus far this century. If you've got a life, you don't have time to go over all of the no-names ranked better than Curry when he graduated from high school in 2006. You'd have an easier task competing in the national spelling bee, trying to size up all of the issues involving Tulsa coach Frank Haith's checking account when he was at Miami (Fla.), discerning how much Roy Williams "earned" in academic progress bonuses at North Carolina or believing Rick Pitino's Sgt. "I-Know-Nothing" Schultz routine at Louisville regarding recruiting regaling.

Rating recruits - the ultimate sports distortion foisted upon dupes - is akin to believing government grifters telling the gullible masses taxpayer-financed Muslim extremist terrorism is workplace violence or fueled by a largely-unseen movie (such as Shrillary Rotten lying about video in front of caskets at Andrews AFB duplicating her honesty when describing dodging Bosnian bullets). Pilfering a propaganda-like phrase spun during the institutionalizing of political correctness to the detriment of the safety of the American people, the player ratings are authentic "man-made disasters." They need to make a dramatic turnaround comparable to the White House's post-marathon bombing appeasing administration lauding Cambridge/Boston area police after previous exploitation portraying them as "acting stupidly" when it suited their agenda. Amid the insulting misinformation overload, it might be time to visit Rev. Wrong's church and see if he is recruiting susceptible supporters by telling his captive audience "America's Chechens have come home to roost." Truth-escape artists and opponents of Tsarnaev receiving a death-penalty sentence can simply deny you ever heard or read such impudence.

The same play-dumb mindset comparable to the Benghazi stonewalling, VA executive comparing veteran care waits to long lines at Disney theme park, IRS conservative-group targeting and general incompetence, Shrillary's State Department IT chief unable to provide his emails or being willing to talk to investigators plus fondness for determining transgender dumping grounds applies to entitlement-era "ridiculists" stemming from recruiting service player ratings. Resembling Jason Collins' long-time fiancée, you look like a full-fledged fool by putting a significant amount of stock in these breathless rush-to-judgment projections spawning a slew of blue-chippers turned prima donnas. But don't muzzle 'em with a jock jihad or sound as lucid as the buffoonish Bomb Mom. Just give the sane a barf bag when clueless adults hold their collective breath to see if coddled scholar dons their alma mater's cap on TV announcing a college choice. Why can't we simply wait until the impressionable teenagers compete in an actual game on both ends of a college court against comparable athletes before rendering assessments on their ability at the next level?

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopsters Make Their Mark on May 20 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 20 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 20

  • Chicago Cubs 2B Glenn Beckert (three-year basketball letterman for Allegheny PA) stroked an inside-the-park HR in a 20-3 romp over the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1967. RF Ted Savage (led Lincoln MO in scoring average in 1955-56) rounded out the Cubbies' scoring by stealing home in the seventh inning, prompting Dodgers P Don Drysdale to wave a white handkerchief of surrender.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates LF Carson "Skeeter" Bigbee (Oregon letterman in 1915) provided three extra-base hits among his four safeties against the New York Giants in 1922.

  • SS Alvin Dark (letterman for LSU and USL during World War II) traded by the St. Louis Cardinals to Chicago Cubs in 1958.

  • St. Louis Cardinals SS Charlie Gelbert (scored at least 125 points each of last three seasons in late 1920s for Lebanon Valley PA) collected five RBI against the Chicago Cubs in 1930.

  • Oakland Athletics rookie 3B Wayne Gross (led Cal Poly Pomona in assists in 1974-75) contributed five RBI against the Seattle Mariners in 1977.

  • RHP Rich Hand (averaged 6.2 ppg for Puget Sound WA in 1967-68) traded by the Texas Rangers to the California Angels in 1973.

  • Washington Senators LF Frank Howard (two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection when he led Ohio State in scoring and rebounding in 1956-57 and 1957-58) hammered two homers against the Baltimore Orioles in 1967.

  • Cleveland Indians 2B Jerry Kindall (averaged 6.9 ppg for Minnesota as junior in 1955-56) clubbed two homers against the Detroit Tigers in the opener of a 1962 doubleheader.

  • Detroit Tigers LF Don Lund (Michigan starter in 1943-44 and 1944-45) delivered four hits against the New York Yankees in 1953.

  • St. Louis Cardinals RHP Lindy McDaniel (played for Oklahoma's 1954-55 freshman squad) tossed a shutout against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1958.

  • In the midst of a 14-game hitting streak, Cleveland Indians RF Ed Morgan (Tulane letterman from 1923-24 through 1925-26) manufactured four RBI against the Chicago White Sox in the nightcap of a 1930 doubleheader.

  • Chicago Cubs RHP Claude Passeau (played for Millsaps MS in late 1920s and early 1930s) saw his record of 273 consecutive errorless chances come to an end in 1946.

  • RF Ted Tappe (leading scorer in 1949 NJCAA Tournament was Washington State's third-leading scorer the next year), batting just before Hall of Famer Ernie Banks in the Chicago Cubs' lineup, ripped a homer in his second straight contest in 1955.

  • C Birdie Tebbetts (played for Providence in 1932) traded by the Detroit Tigers to the Boston Red Sox in 1947.

  • In the midst of seven straight seasons hurling more than 200 innings, Pittsburgh Pirates LHP Bob Veale (scored 1,160 points from 1955-56 through 1957-58 for Benedictine KS) won his first six decisions in 1967.

  • Washington Senators RHP Monte Weaver (played center for Emory & Henry VA in mid-1920s) hurled a five-hit shutout against the Chicago White Sox in 1933.

  • New York Giants rookie 1B Bill White (played two years with Hiram OH in early 1950s) went 5-for-7 in 1956 doubleheader sweep of the St. Louis Cardinals. Three years later as member of Cards, White supplied three hits for the third time in a four-game span in 1959.

  • In the midst of a career-high 20-game hitting streak, San Francisco Giants CF Randy Winn (Santa Clara backcourtmate of eventual two-time NBA Most Valuable Player Steve Nash in 1993-94) registered his third three-hit outing in a span of six contests in 2007.

  • Boston Braves 3B Chuck Workman (two-time All-MIAA first-five selection was leading scorer in 1937 when Central Missouri won inaugural NAIA Tournament) contributed three hits in both ends of a 1945 doubleheader split against the Cincinnati Reds.

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopsters Make Their Mark on May 19 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 19 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 19

  • Cleveland Indians 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading basketball scorer in 1945-46) contributed two homers and six RBI in a 7-6 loss against the Minnesota Twins in the nightcap of a 1963 twinbill.

  • Chicago Cubs 2B Glenn Beckert (three-year letterman for Allegheny PA) had his 26-game hitting streak snapped by Ken Brett of the Philadelphia Phillies in 1973.

  • Tossing his second shutout in less than three weeks in 1981, Pittsburgh Pirates RHP Jim Bibby (Fayetteville State NC backup player and brother of UCLA All-American Henry Bibby) hurled a one-hitter against the Atlanta Braves.

  • Milwaukee Braves 2B Frank Bolling (averaged 7.3 ppg for Spring Hill AL in 1950-51) banged out four hits against the Chicago Cubs in the opener of a 1963 doubleheader.

  • LF Bob Cerv (ranked fourth on Nebraska's career scoring list in 1949-50 when finishing his career) traded by the Kansas City Athletics to the New York Yankees in 1960.

  • Cincinnati Reds 1B George Crowe (four-year letterman from 1939-40 through 1942-43 for Indiana Central after becoming first high school player named state's Mr. Basketball) collected four hits and four RBI in an 8-7 win against the Pittsburgh Pirates in the opener of a 1957 twinbill.

  • San Francisco Giants 3B Darrell Evans (member of Jerry Tarkanian-coached Pasadena City CA club winning 1967 state community college crown) homered twice in a 1978 game against the Los Angeles Dodgers.

  • RHP Mark Freeman (averaged 3.6 ppg for LSU as a senior in 1950-51) traded by the New York Yankees to the Chicago Cubs in 1960.

  • In 1968, LHP Joe Gibbon (two-time All-SEC forward for Ole Miss was nation's second-leading scorer as senior in 1956-57) yielded his only earned run in first 13 relief appearances with the San Francisco Giants.

  • In 1933, Chicago White Sox RHP Paul Gregory (Mississippi State letterman in 1929-30) tossed his second complete-game victory in three weeks when allowing only one run.

  • Raising his batting average to .306, Chicago White Sox 1B Ron Jackson (second-team All-Mid-American Conference choice from 1951-52 through 1953-54 led Western Michigan in scoring and rebounding his last two seasons) extended hitting streak to a career-high 10 games but finished the 1956 campaign with a .214 mark.

  • Philadelphia Phillies RF Danny Litwhiler (member of JV team with Bloomsburg PA in mid-1930s) went 4-for-4 against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1942.

  • Cleveland Indians CF Kenny Lofton (Arizona's leader in steals for 1988 Final Four team compiling 35-3 record) went 4-for-4 against the Baltimore Orioles in 1993.

  • LF Irv Noren (player of the year for California community college state champion Pasadena City in 1945) traded by the St. Louis Cardinals to the Chicago Cubs in 1959.

  • Chicago Cubs RHP Claude Passeau (played for Millsaps MS in late 1920s and early 1930s) pounded a grand slam in a 14-1 romp over the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1941.

  • In the midst of surrendering fewer than three earned runs in 15 of 17 starts from late April to early July, Cleveland Indians RHP Sonny Siebert (team-high 16.7 ppg for Missouri in 1957-58 as All-Big Eight Conference second-team selection) tossed a one-hit shutout against the Baltimore Orioles in the nightcap of a 1968 doubleheader.

  • Detroit Tigers 2B Gary Sutherland (averaged 7.4 ppg with USC in 1963-64) smacked two homers against the Minnesota Twins in 1975.

  • San Diego Padres RF Will Venable (All-Ivy League first-team selection as junior and second-team choice as senior averaged 9.3 ppg under Princeton coach John Thompson III from 2001-02 through 2004-05) scored four runs and supplied three extra-base hits in a 10-5 win against the Los Angeles Dodgers in 2010.

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopsters Make Their Mark on May 18 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 18 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 18

  • In 1958, Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading basketball scorer in 1945-46) smacked two homers against his original team (Cincinnati Reds).

  • Cincinnati Reds CF Ethan Allen (Cincinnati letterman in 1924-25 and 1925-26) went 4-for-4 in a 7-6 win against the Brooklyn Robins in 1928.

  • Chicago Cubs RF George Altman (appeared in 1953 and 1954 NAIA Tournament with Tennessee State) provided two homers for the second time in three games in 1962.

  • OF Brant Alyea (Hofstra's leading scorer and rebounder in 1960-61 after being runner-up in both categories the previous season) traded by the Oakland Athletics to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1972.

  • New York Yankees RHP Jim Beattie (Dartmouth's top rebounder in 1974-75 when selected team MVP and honorable mention All-Ivy League) hurled a four-hit shutout against the Boston Red Sox in 1979.

  • Detroit Tigers 2B Frank Bolling (averaged 7.3 ppg for Spring Hill AL in 1950-51) scored five runs in a 14-2 victory against the Boston Red Sox in 1959.

  • Detroit Tigers 1B Tony Clark (San Diego State's leading scorer in WAC games in 1991-92) stroked four hits against the Kansas City Royals in 1997.

  • Boston Red Sox RHP Gene Conley (All-Pacific Coast Conference first-team selection led the North Division in scoring as Washington State sophomore in 1949-50) tossed a four-hit shutout against the Detroit Tigers in 1961.

  • In 1985, Detroit Tigers 1B Darrell Evans (member of Jerry Tarkanian-coached Pasadena City CA club winning 1967 state community college crown) homered in his fourth consecutive contest, going 4-for-4 for the second time in that span.

  • OF Hoot Evers (starter for Illinois in 1939-40) awarded on waivers from the Boston Red Sox to the New York Giants in 1954.

  • Chicago White Sox RHP Eddie Fisher (played for Oklahoma's 1954-55 freshman squad) posted his sixth save in as many relief appearances in a seven-day span in 1965.

  • Boston Red Sox 1B Dick Gernert (Temple letterman in 1948-49 swatted two homers in an 8-4 win against the Baltimore Orioles in 1958.

  • Philadelphia Phillies 1B Harvey Hendrick (Vanderbilt letterman in 1918) went 4-for-4 for the second time in a five-game span in 1934. Five years earlier in the midst of a career-high 25-game hitting streak for the Brooklyn Robins, Hendrick homered in back-to-back contests against the Phillies in 1929.

  • Washington Senators LF Frank Howard (two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection when All-American led Ohio State in scoring and rebounding in 1956-57 and 1957-58) tied an A.L. record with a homer in six consecutive contests in 1968.

  • New York Giants OF Monte Irvin (played for Lincoln PA 1 1/2 years in late 1930s) clobbered a grand slam in a rain-shortened, 10-4 triumph over the Chicago Cubs in 1950.

  • New York Yankees LF Charlie Keller (three-year letterman with Maryland from 1934-35 through 1936-37) contributed three extra-base hits against the St. Louis Browns in 1948.

  • Chicago Cubs SS Don Kessinger (three-time All-SEC selection for Mississippi from 1961-62 through 1963-64 collected four hits and scored four runs in a 1970 game against the Cincinnati Reds.

  • Washington Senators CF Don Lock (led Wichita State in field-goal percentage in 1956-57 and 1957-58 under coach Ralph Miller) smashed back-to-back homers against the Detroit Tigers in 1964.

  • LF Jerry Martin (1971 Southern Conference MVP after he was Furman's runner-up in scoring the previous season), pinch-hitting for Richie Hebner, slapped a game-winning, three-run homer for the Philadelphia Phillies in an 8-5 victory against the Houston Astros in 1978.

  • Chicago Cubs RF Bill Nicholson (Washington College MD guard for two years in mid-1930s) amassed five RBI against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1945.

  • New York Yankees RF Dave Winfield (starting forward for Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) whacked two homers against the Oakland Athletics in a 2-1 win in 1987.

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopsters Make Their Mark on May 17 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 17 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 17

  • Milwaukee Brewers 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading basketball scorer in 1945-46) collected a homer among his four hits in a 9-4 triumph against the New York Giants in 1955.

  • Philadelphia Phillies LF Morrie Arnovich (played for Wisconsin-Superior in early 1930s) went 5-for-5, raising his batting average to .426, in a 7-3 win against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1939.

  • Chicago Cubs 2B Glenn Beckert (three-year letterman for Allegheny PA) went 4-for-4 against the St. Louis Cardinals in the midst of a 26-game hitting streak in 1973.

  • 1B-OF Larry Biittner (runner-up in scoring and rebounding for Buena Vista IA in 1966-67) traded with RHP Steve Renko (averaged 9.9 ppg and 5.8 rpg as a Kansas sophomore in 1963-64) by the Montreal Expos to the Chicago Cubs for 1B Andre Thornton in 1976. The next year, Biittner belted two of the Cubs' seven homers in a 23-6 romp over the San Diego Padres.

  • Detroit Tigers 2B Frank Bolling (averaged 7.3 ppg for Spring Hill AL in 1950-51) swatted a homer in his third consecutive contest in 1958.

  • Detroit Tigers 1B Tony Clark (San Diego State's leading scorer in WAC games in 1991-92) socked two homers for the second time in a six-game span in 1997.

  • New York Mets 1B Donn Clendenon (four-sport letterman with Morehouse GA) clubbed two homers against the Atlanta Braves in 1971.

  • California Angels OF Billy Cowan (Utah letterman from 1957-58 through 1959-60 was co-captain of NCAA playoff team as senior) hit safely for the fourth time in a span of five pinch-hit appearances in 1970.

  • Boston Braves SS Dick Culler (#9 jersey retired by High Point for Little All-American in 1935 and 1936) went 4-for-4 in a 3-2 victory against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1947.

  • Detroit Tigers CF Hoot Evers (starter for Illinois in 1939-40) broke up a scoreless duel with a two-run homer in the ninth inning against the Philadelphia Athletics in 1947.

  • Boston Red Sox 1B Dick Gernert (Temple letterman in 1948-49 when averaging 2.7 ppg) went 4-for-4 in a 10-1 triumph against the Detroit Tigers in 1959.

  • San Francisco Giants RHP Ed Halicki (NAIA All-American third-team choice in 1971-72 when leading Monmouth in scoring with 21 ppg after setting school single-game rebounding record with 40 the previous season) hurled his second straight two-hitter in 1979.

  • 1B Ron Jackson (All-MAC second-team choice from 1951-52 through 1953-54 led Western Michigan in scoring his last two seasons) traded by the Boston Red Sox to the Milwaukee Braves for INF Ray Boone in 1960.

  • Atlanta Braves CF Kenny Lofton (Arizona's leader in steals for 1988 Final Four team compiling a 35-3 record) supplied his third five-hit game of the 1997 campaign in an 11-6 triumph against the St. Louis Cardinals. Three years earlier with the Cleveland Indians, Lofton smacked two homers against the Milwaukee Brewers in 1994.

  • RHP Ted Lyons (two-time All-SWC first-team selection for Baylor in the early 1920s) started the first of eight straight doubleheader openers for the Chicago White Sox in 1942.

  • Washington Senators 1B Sam Mele (NYU's leading scorer in 1943 NCAA playoffs) supplied two triples among his four hits in 1951 game against the Detroit Tigers.

  • CF Billy North (played four games with Central Washington in 1967-68) traded by the Oakland Athletics to the Los Angeles Dodgers for OF Glenn Burke in 1978.

  • CF Jim Northrup (second-leading scorer and third-leading rebounder for Alma MI in 1958-59) drilled a game-winning grand slam in the bottom of the ninth inning to give the Detroit Tigers a 7-3 victory over the Washington Senators. It was one of Northrup's five grand slams in 1968.

  • In 1935, New York Giants RHP Roy Parmelee (Eastern Michigan letterman in 1924-25 and 1925-26) lost for the only time in his first 10 decisions to early July.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers 2B Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in Pacific Coast Conference both of his seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) supplied three extra-base safeties against the Chicago Cubs in 1949, triggering a streak where he had multiple-hit outings in 2/3 of his next 39 contests en route to a N.L.-high .342 batting average. Two years later, Robinson went 4-for-4 against the Cubs in 1951.

  • Chicago Cubs SS Roy Smalley Jr. (one of top scorers for Drury MO in 1942-43 and 1943-44) went 4-for-5 against the Pittsburgh Pirates in a 1953 doubleheader.

  • LHP Eric Stults (played for 1999 NAIA D-II Tournament runner-up and 2000 NCCAA Tournament titlist with Bethel IN) awarded on waivers from the Chicago White Sox to the San Diego Padres in 2012.

  • CF Bill Virdon (played for Drury MO in 1949) traded by the St. Louis Cardinals to the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1956 only one year after being named N.L. Rookie of the Year. He finished runner-up in the N.L. batting race with a .319 mark (.211 for Cards and .334 for Pirates).

  • Chicago Cubs CF Cy Williams (Notre Dame forward in 1909-10) went 4-for-4 with five RBI in a 7-2 win against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1916.

  • New York Yankees LF Dave Winfield (starting forward for Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) cracked two homers against the Detroit Tigers in 1983.

  • In the midst of a career-high 20-game hitting streak in 2007, San Francisco Giants CF Randy Winn (Santa Clara backcourtmate of eventual two-time NBA Most Valuable Player Steve Nash in 1993-94) drove in the decisive run in the 12th inning of a 2-1 triumph against the Houston Astros.

  • In 1925, Washington Senators LHP Tom Zachary (Guilford NC letterman in 1916) yielded the 3,000th hit of Cleveland Indians OF Tris Speaker's Hall of Fame career.

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopsters Make Their Mark on May 16 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Springfield, MO-area small college Drury had two former hoopers - Roy Smalley Jr. and Bill Virdon - impact MLB on this date. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 16 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 16

  • Chicago Cubs RF Frankie Baumholtz (MVP in 1941 NIT and first player in Ohio University history to score 1,000 career points) banged out three extra-base hits in a 14-4 rout of the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1951.

  • Cleveland Indians SS Lou Boudreau (leading scorer for Illinois' 1937 Big Ten Conference co-champion) went 4-for-4 against the Chicago White Sox in the nightcap of a 1948 twinbill.

  • St. Louis Cardinals CF Taylor Douthit (California letterman from 1922 through 1924) amassed five hits and four RBI in a 9-8 win against the Chicago Cubs in 1930.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers RF-C Joe Ferguson (played in 1967 NCAA playoffs with Pacific) furnished four hits, including a game-winning homer, in an 8-6 triumph against the Cincinnati Reds in 1973.

  • St. Louis Cardinals SS Charlie Gelbert (scored at least 125 points each of last three seasons in late 1920s for Lebanon Valley PA) went 5-for-5 and scored four runs in 9-8 victory against the Chicago Cubs in 1930.

  • Cleveland Indians rookie RF Jim Gleeson (captain and all-league honoree graduated in 1933 from Rockhurst MO) registered four hits in a 10-3 victory against the Brooklyn Dodgers in the opener of a 1940 doubleheader.

  • Utilityman Chuck Harmon (freshman starter was Toledo's second-leading scorer for 1943 NIT runner-up) traded by the Cincinnati Reds to the St. Louis Cardinals for INF Alex Grammas and OF Joe Frazier in 1956.

  • Washington Senators LF Frank Howard (two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection when leading Ohio State in scoring and rebounding in 1956-57 and 1957-58) notched his third two-homer contest in a four-game span in 1968.

  • Atlanta Braves 1B Davey Johnson (averaged 1.7 ppg for Texas A&M in 1961-62) smacked two homers against the San Diego Padres in 1974.

  • Atlanta Braves RF David Justice (led Thomas More KY in assists in 1984-85) stroked three extra-base hits against the Colorado Rockies in 1995.

  • Boston Braves RHP Andy Karl (Manhattan letterman from 1933 through 1935) sustained his first defeat of the 1947 season after failing to allow a run in first six relief appearances.

  • Chicago Cubs SS Don Kessinger (three-time All-SEC selection for Mississippi from 1961-62 through 1963-64 while finishing among nation's top 45 scorers each year) went 4-for-4 against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1972.

  • A bases-loaded pinch triple by Rick Leach (averaged 15.5 ppg for Michigan's JV squad in 1975-76) put the Toronto Blue Jays ahead to stay in an 8-7 triumph against the Minnesota Twins in 1984.

  • New York Giants RHP Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) had his string of 47 straight innings without issuing a walk end against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1913.

  • St. Louis Cardinals RHP Lindy McDaniel (played for Oklahoma's 1954-55 freshman squad) fired a four-hit shutout against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1957.

  • New York Yankees 3B Graig Nettles (shot 87.8% from free-throw line for San Diego State in 1963-64) whacked two homers against the Detroit Tigers in 1979.

  • Philadelphia Phillies LHP Eppa Rixey (Virginia letterman in 1912 and 1914) hurled a 15-inning complete game at Cincinnati and won, 3-2, via his sacrifice fly in 1920.

  • Detroit Tigers RHP Jeff Robinson (two-time NAIA All-District 3 honoree in early 1980s left Azusa Pacific CA as school's No. 9 all-time scorer) hurled a four-hit shutout against the Texas Rangers in 1990.

  • Cincinnati Reds RHP Jeff Shaw (freshman guard for Rio Grande OH squad compiling 31-5 record and reaching second round of 985 NAIA Tournament) allowed his only earned run in 13 relief appearances during the month in 1997.

  • RHP Sonny Siebert (team-high 16.7 ppg for Missouri in 1957-58 as All-Big Eight Conference second-team selection) traded by the San Diego Padres to the Oakland Athletics in 1975.

  • Washington Senators RHP Dave Sisler (All-Ivy League second-team selection for Princeton's first NCAA Tournament team in 1952) didn't allow an earned run in his first 12 relief appearances of the 1961 campaign.

  • In his debut with the Milwaukee Braves, SS Roy Smalley Jr. (one of top scorers for Drury MO in 1942-43 and 1943-44) smacked a pinch homer against the New York Giants in the nightcap of a 1954 doubleheader.

  • Washington Senators rookie RHP Dave Stenhouse (three-time All-Yankee Conference selection for Rhode Island from 1952-53 through 1954-55), lowering his ERA to 0.88 through initial seven outings, won first three MLB starts in 1962.

  • Cincinnati Reds utilityman Jimmy Stewart (All-VSAC selection for Austin Peay's NCAA DII Tournament teams in 1959-60 and 1960-61) contributed a pinch-hit, three-run homer against the New York Mets in 1969.

  • Boston Red Sox rookie 3B Jim Tabor (Alabama letterman in 1936-37) knocked in five runs against the Chicago White Sox in 1939.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates CF Bill Virdon (played for Drury MO in 1949) stroked two triples against the Milwaukee Braves in a 1962 game.

  • 1B-OF Preston Ward (second-leading scorer for Southwest Missouri State in 1946-47 and 1948-49) traded by the Pittsburgh Pirates to the Cleveland Indians in 1956.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers LHP Tom Zachary (Guilford NC letterman in 1916) hurled a 13-inning shutout against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1935 after allowing one earned run in each of his previous two complete-game starts.

Ex-Brown Hooper Joe Paterno Back in NCAA Football Child Abuse Headlines

If you had a pulse in the last few years, you know Joe Paterno became the only major-college coach to reach the 400-win plateau before he was fired by Penn State trustees after the arrest of long-time assistant coach Jerry Sandusky on child sexual abuse charges. But what you might not know is Paterno, who died 2 1/2 months after his dismissal, was a basketball letterman for Brown in the late 1940s. Paterno's scoring average of 7.3 points per game in 1947-48 was second highest on the team.

The NCAA, usually more concerned with highest bidders and vital politically-correct issues such as Indian nicknames and transgender restrooms, had no choice in the wake of the scandal other than slapping Penn State with serious sanctions resembling a major earthquake hitting 7.3 on the Richter Scale. But similar to Paterno going overboard in trying to preserve a "success with honor" image, the rush-to-judgment NCAA seemingly embarked upon a slippery slope with its timely and wide-ranging penalties. After everything subsequently surfacing, it was risky recently for PSU's president to step out on a think limb saying he was appalled by media coverage surrounding allegations Joe Pa knew about Sandusky's subterfuge as far back as the mid-1970s.

It was also disconcerting when a TV ban was shunned in favor of unilateral action dictating that something didn't occur on the field or court such as negating Paterno's victories since the late 1990s. The NCAA tried this history-revisionist sanitizing in basketball in the 1970s by acting as if Centenary's Robert Parish and Minnesota's Mychal Thompson didn't exist - ignoring their statistics - because those schools were on probation. The NCAA's "Grand Experiment" ploy discounted Parish's achievements, but CollegeHoopedia.com lists him as the nation's top rebounder in 1974-75 and 1975-76 and will continue to cite Paterno as the all-time winningest football coach in his Brown University basketball bio. What's next for the NCAA, pretending Thompson's son (Klay) didn't play for Washington State and become an NBA splash-brother teammate of Stephen Curry?

Moreover, a total of 11 Final Four teams have had their NCAA Tournament participation vacated. But how many more achievements would have been vacated if the NCAA truly addressed scholastic fraud and feckless drug testing with investigators as competent as former FBI director Louis Freeh? Shouldn't the NCAA also go back in time and vacate the Nittany Lions' 2001 Sweet 16 appearance after leading rebounder and second-leading scorer Gyasi Cline-Heard tainted the team by being sentenced to 16 years in federal prison after pleading guilty to charges of conspiring to distribute crack cocaine?

Mark Emmert, who previously called Paterno the "definitive role model," seemed to be on a self-promotion "Star Trek" of sorts, going where no NCAA president has gone before. But what truly would have been unprecedented would have been penalizing one of his peers in the egghead old boys club. Why didn't Emmert also pummel ex-PSU president Graham Spanier by piously reducing number of graduates during his tenure, reducing his fund-raising prowess, fining him a portion of his pension, etc.? At least Kenneth Starr, the former independent counsel who assembled a report serving as the basis for President Bill Clinton's impeachment in 1998, was removed as Baylor's president and the football coach dismissed in the aftermath of a probe finding the university mishandled accusations of sexual assault against FB players.

The depravity exhibited by Sandusky, one of the latest best arguments against human cloning, was repulsive and warranted a harsh response. But don't stop there in trying to drain the swamp of a culture of corruption. After all, the NCAA ran the risk of having egg on its face when Penn State players, aware of vultures circling before the Nittany Lions' body was cold, succumbed to a pervasive sense of entitlement and transferred to recent renegade football programs. If you don't think recruiting is cut-throat, remember the looters and grave robbers descending upon Unhappy Valley like flies on a corpse. Does the NCAA really believe its image is improved when standout RB Silas Redd transferred to USC?

Delusional comes to mind if you don't think PSU boasts more academic integrity among its revenue-producing sports than 90% of the members of power conferences. Since the NCAA treated Freeh's work as gospel, it seemed the governing body should have used a portion of the first installment of the $60 million fine and promptly dispatch him and an optometrist to Syracuse's Hoop Kingdom to separate fact from fiction. Either Jim Boeheim saw a former ball boy in his longtime assistant's hotel room on the road or he didn't. Maybe the bespectacled coach can prove he was in a zone staying in his own room reading how to improve the school's drug-testing policy. Funding could have also helped provide clarity regarding bogus classes at North Carolina and recruiting regaling at Louisville.

Keeping in mind a striking number of shameless coaches would be electrocuted if they took a polygraph test, more questions were raised than answered with the NCAA's display of unilateral power. Unless the excessive number of liberal lunatics in academia also blame all of their woes past, present and future on dogmatic Donald J. Trump, the NCAA is positioning itself to pick winners and losers akin to stimulus money from the Obama Administration. How far will the NCAA's reach be under the following set of theoretical circumstances?

  • How many championship trophies could be confiscated if there are deathbed confessions acknowledging booster Sam Gilbert's influence during UCLA's glory days under legendary coach John Wooden?

  • Will Coach K's victory total be modified downward like Paterno if it is unearthed years from now that recruiting visits to Duke perhaps were sex-capades comparable to the albeit embellished lacrosse boys gone wild or are we supposed to believe this activity only occurs at The Ville dormitories? It could "never" happen, but what if an underachieving McDonald's All-American is more concerned with making a $100,000 Happy Deal for some bling at an upscale New York jewelry store?

  • What if there was an erosion of academics for athletes at North Carolina making their diplomas worthy of a sheet of Charmin stemming from funneling many of them toward some scholarly major called African & Afro-American Studies?

  • What if Kentucky earns a spot in the Guinness Book of World Records for most times going on probation?

  • How many times does a prominent coach need to be caught with his pants down before the NCAA intervenes?

  • Why doesn't the NCAA establish parameters regarding "exceptions" - scholastically suspect "studs" who don't meet a school's normal admission standards but secure entry because of their special talent?

  • Should the NCAA refuse to grant Final Four press credentials to local media that didn't uncover major basketball program transgressions going on right under their noses?

  • Should the NCAA, since there doesn't appear to be any statute of limitations, refuse to conduct business with ESPN and its parade of pitchmen until the cable network takes down its "statue" of former commentator Jim Valvano for one of Michael Sam kissing or Bruce Jenner entering restroom of choice? The Nationwide Leader has a "Jimmy V Week" culminating with an early-season two-night classic to enhance cancer research fundraising for a foundation named after an individual who joins John Calipari (UMass/Memphis) and Jerry Tarkanian (Long Beach State/UNLV) as the only coaches to have multiple schools under their watch forced to vacate NCAA playoff participation. Despite not boasting Freeh's resume, a private attorney retained by N.C. State was convinced that the institution could successfully sue Valvano for failing to ensure the academic progress of his student-athletes. Previously, Valvano ran afoul of the NCAA at Iona.

  • Should the NCAA enter the political process by finding out what Pennsylvania politicians linked to Penn State school knew about Sandusky and when did they know it as governor and state attorney general?

Amid the PSU controversy, comedian Albert Brooks tweeted that the Paterno statue should have been left up but eternally "have him look the other way." Elsewhere, an artist removed a halo painted above a local mural of Joe Pa.

How many other schools and media outlets have been "looking the other way" or hero worshiping a false idol? And where should the NCAA's monitoring and oversight obligations begin and end? Can anyone say with a straight face it ain't so?

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopsters Make Their Mark on May 15 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Ex-Bucknell hoopers Bob Keegan and Christy Mathewson were premium pitchers on this date. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 15 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 15

  • Chicago Cubs RF George Altman (appeared in 1953 and 1954 NAIA Tournament with Tennessee State basketball team) made an eighth-inning leaping catch in 1960 to help preserve Don Cardwell's no-hitter against the St. Louis Cardinals. It was Cardwell's first start for the Cubbies after he was acquired from the Philadelphia Phillies.

  • Kansas City Athletics LF Bob Cerv (ranked fourth on Nebraska's career scoring list in 1949-50 when finishing his career) blasted three homers against the Detroit Tigers in a 1960 doubleheader.

  • Cincinnati Reds 1B George Crowe (four-year letterman from 1939-40 through 1942-43 for Indiana Central after becoming first high school player named state's Mr. Basketball) collected five RBI in a 9-4 win against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1958.

  • RHP George Earnshaw (Swarthmore PA participant in 1922) purchased from the Chicago White Sox by the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1935.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers C Joe Ferguson (played in 1967 NCAA playoffs with Pacific) furnished two homers and five RBI against the Houston Astros in 1974.

  • Hall of Fame C Rick Ferrell (played for Guilford NC in mid-1920s) traded by the Washington Senators to the St. Louis Browns in 1941.

  • Philadelphia Athletics 2B Gene Handley (Bradley letterman in 1932-33 and 1933-34) had four hits in a 14-inning game against the Detroit Tigers in 1947.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers 1B Gil Hodges (played for St. Joseph's IN in 1943 and Oakland City IN in 1947 and 1948) homered twice against the Chicago Cubs in 1951.

  • Atlanta Braves RF David Justice (led Thomas More KY in assists in 1984-85) sidelined for the remainder of the 1996 campaign after dislocating his right shoulder swinging at a pitch.

  • Chicago White Sox RHP Bob Keegan (Bucknell letterman in 1941-42 and 1942-43) went the first 21 2/3 innings of the 1956 season without yielding an earned run.

  • Chicago Cubs SS Don Kessinger (three-time All-SEC selection for Mississippi from 1961-62 through 1963-64 while finishing among nation's top 45 scorers each year) contributed five hits against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1974.

  • New York Giants RHP Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) tossed his third straight shutout in 1901.

  • In 1984, Philadelphia Phillies 1B Len Matuszek (starter for Toledo's 18-7 team in 1975-76) smashed a homer in his fourth game out of the last five contests.

  • The first MLB victory for San Francisco Giants rookie LHP Phil Nastu (averaged 13.6 ppg and 4.2 rpg as senior for Bridgeport CT 1976 DII Elite Eight team compiling 24-5 record) ended up as his lone complete game (8-1 nod over Houston Astros in 1979).

  • New York Yankees LF Irv Noren (player of year for California junior college state champion Pasadena City in 1945) stroked an inside-the-park grand slam in an 8-4 win over the Kansas City Athletics in 1955.

  • 2B Marv Olson (all-conference selection was team MVP for Luther IA) traded by the Boston Red Sox to the New York Yankees in 1933 but never played for the Bronx Bombers.

  • RHP Nels Potter (leading scorer during two years he attended Mount Morris IL in early 1930s) purchased from the St. Louis Browns by the Philadelphia Athletics for $17,500 in 1948.

  • Kansas City Athletics 1B Norm Siebern (member of Southwest Missouri State squads capturing back-to-back NAIA Tournament titles in 1952 and 1953) smashed two homers against the Cleveland Indians in a 1962 game.

  • San Diego Padres RF Will Venable (All-Ivy League first-team selection as junior and second-team choice as senior averaged 9.3 ppg under Princeton coach John Thompson III from 2001-02 through 2004-05) banged out four hits in a 6-1 win against the Washington Nationals in 2012.

  • Chicago White Sox RHP Jim Wilson (letterman for San Diego State's 1942 NAIA Tournament participant) tossed his second of back-to-back shutouts en route to an AL-leading five whitewashes in 1957.

  • Minnesota Twins DH Dave Winfield (starting forward for Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) smacked two homers against the Boston Red Sox in 1993.

Barry Barry Good: Rick's Kids Leave Major Family Legacy Coast-to-Coast

"You don't choose your family. They are God's gift to you, as you are to them." - Desmond Tutu

At first glance to God-fearing fans, it appeared as if Grant's Army was retreating after Jerian Grant exited Notre Dame because of academic shortcomings. But Jerian's departure was somewhat offset in the giving Grant household by the emergence of brother Jerami as Syracuse's leading rebounder. Combined with older brother Jerai, the leading rebounder for Clemson's 2011 NCAA playoff team, and father Harvey, an All-American for Oklahoma's 1988 NCAA Tournament runner-up, the "College Grants" rank among the top five hoop families in NCAA annals regarding a legacy list; especially since Jerian followed through on his promise to return to the Irish and if youngest son Jaelin is comparable to his brothers when he arrives on the college scene.

The Grant clan could march past Rick Barry's brood as the "First Family of Hoops" although the Barrys have impacted power conferences from sea to shining sea - ACC, Big Eight (predecessor to Big 12), Pacific-10/12 and SEC (after Canyon Barry aligned with the Gators). It seems only fitting that Canyon, the latest contributor from the highest-rated hoop nuclear family, majors in nuclear engineering.

Elsewhere, it appeared somewhat ridiculous for a power conference school such as Indiana to offer a scholarship to an eighth-grader (Eron Gordon) several years ago. But that is before examining his family tree. His father, Eric Sr., averaged 14.1 points per game with Liberty from 1981-82 through 1983-84, leading the Flames in scoring as a senior with 18.1 ppg before the school moved up to the NCAA Division I level later in the decade. Oldest brother Eric Jr. led the Big Ten Conference in scoring as a freshman All-American in his lone season with IU in 2007-08 before moving on to the NBA. Older brother Evan was named to the Big South Conference All-Freshman team with Liberty in 2009-10 before becoming an all-league second-team selection as a sophomore prior to transferring to Arizona State and moving on again to Eric Jr.'s old stomping grounds with the Hoosiers. If Eron lives up to billing, the Gordons could become one of the most influential families in college basketball history.

Hoopdom's "Focus on the Family" also concentrated on the Plumlees after youngest brother Marshall Plumlee finally overcame his foot problems and improved as much as Duke siblings Mason and Miles. They combine with their father, former Tennessee Tech frontcourter Perky, to comprise one of the all-time premier family units. Mason became the Blue Devils' go-to plumb line to keep them on the straight and narrow seasons ago after forgoing leaving school early for the NBA.

Until we have a final reading on the Gordons, following are a dynamic dozen nuclear-power families. The "HoopDaddys" comprised of college players who had at least three sons also go on to compete in a significant way at a similar level include:

BARRY BARRY GOOD
1. Barry - Father Rick Barry, a first-team All-American as a senior when he led the nation in scoring, averaged 29.8 ppg and 16.5 rpg for Miami (FL) from 1962-63 through 1964-65. Son Scooter averaged 3.3 ppg for Kansas' 1988 NCAA titlist before leading the Jayhawks with 5.7 apg the next season. Son Jon, a junior college transfer, averaged 14.4 ppg, 3.6 rpg and 4.5 apg for Pacific and Georgia Tech in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Son Brent averaged 12.1 ppg, 3.7 rpg and 3.3 apg for Oregon State from 1991-92 through 1994-95. Son Drew, an All-ACC second-team selection as a senior, averaged 10.7 ppg, 4.1 rpg and 6.2 apg for Georgia Tech from 1992-93 through 1995-96, leading the ACC in assists each of his last three seasons. Son Canyon averaged 9.4 ppg and 2.7 rpg in the College of Charleston's debut season in the CAA as a redshirt freshman and leading the Cougars in scoring in an injury-plagued season before eventually transferring to Florida. Jon, an All-ACC third-team selection as a junior in 1991-92, and Brent, an All-Pacific-10 Conference choice as a senior, were late bloomers who went on to have productive NBA careers. Rick, Jon and Brent were NBA first-round draft choices while Drew was a second-round pick. Bruce Hale, Rick's father-in-law and a Santa Clara alumnus, coached him at Miami (FL) after playing five years in the NBA.

WALTON MOUNTAIN GANG
2. Walton - Father Bill Walton, a three-time national player of the year, averaged 20.3 ppg and 15.7 rpg for UCLA from 1971-72 through 1973-74. Son Adam lettered with LSU before incurring a rest-of-season suspension in Dale Brown's final year as coach in 1996-97 and subsequently transferring to a small college in California. Son Nate was an All-Ivy League first-team selection for Princeton as a senior in 2000-01, becoming the fourth player in school history with two seasons of at least 100 assists. Son Luke, a two-time All-Pacific-10 Conference choice, averaged 9.1 ppg, 5.1 rpg and 4.5 apg for Arizona from 1999-2000 through 2002-03. Son Chris finished among the top 15 in the Mountain West Conference in assists and rebounding as a junior in 2003-04 for San Diego State, finishing his four-year career with averages of 5.1 ppg and 3.4 rpg.

PRICE IS RIGHT CONTROL
3. Price - Father Dennis Price, an All-Big Eight Conference second-team selection as a junior, averaged 10.9 ppg for Oklahoma from 1957-58 through 1959-60. Son Mark, a three-time All-ACC first-team selection and All-American, averaged 17.4 ppg and 4 apg for Georgia Tech from 1982-83 through 1985-86. Son Matt scored 23 points in 18 games as a freshman for Appalachian State in 1984-85. Son Brent, an All-Big Eight Conference first-team selection as a senior, averaged 18 ppg and 5.8 apg for Oklahoma in 1990-91 and 1991-92 after transferring from South Carolina, where he averaged 12.6 ppg and 3.5 apg in 1987-88 and 1988-89.

GRANT'S ARMY MARCHES ON
4. Grant - Father Harvey Grant was an All-American in 1988 as the leading rebounder and second-leading scorer for Oklahoma's NCAA Tournament runner-up. Eldest son Jerai was the leading rebounder for Clemson's 2011 NCAA playoff squad. Son Jerian was Notre Dame's three-time leader in scoring average. Son Jerami was the leading rebounder for Syracuse's inaugural ACC club in 2013-14 before leaving school after sophomore season and becoming a second-round pick in the NBA draft by the Philadelphia 76ers.

JACOBSENS TESTAMENT TO GREAT BLESSINGS
5. Jacobsen - Father Von Jacobsen, who led San Diego State in scoring as a sophomore and junior, averaged 15.4 ppg and 4.9 rpg from 1968-69 through 1970-71. Son Adam averaged 12.6 ppg, 2.9 rpg and 3.6 apg as a three-time All-Big West Conference second-team selection with Pacific from 1993-94 through 1997-98. Son Brock averaged 8.4 ppg, 3 rpg and 2.8 apg for San Diego from 1995-96 through 1998-99. Son Casey, an All-American for Stanford as a junior before declaring early for the NBA draft, averaged 18.1 ppg and 3.8 rpg from 1999-00 through 2001-02. The trio of brothers combined for 625 three-pointers.

HIGH ON HAARLOW
6. Haarlow - Father Bill Haarlow Jr., a three-time All-Western Conference selection for the University of Chicago from 1933-34 through 1935-36, was the league's third-leading scorer as a sophomore (9.9 ppg), leading scorer as a junior (13) and second-leading scorer as a senior (12.6). He had three sons play for Princeton in the 1960s - A. William III averaged 10.8 ppg and 5 rpg in 1962-63, Bob averaged 8.5 ppg and 4.4 rpg from 1963-64 through 1965-66 (second-leading scorer for the Tigers' 1965 Final Four team as a teammate of All-American Bill Bradley) and John averaged 12.6 ppg and 7.3 rpg from 1965-66 through 1967-68 (All-Ivy League second-team selection as a junior). With Bill Jr. cited on CollegeHoopedia.com's comprehensive list of all-time All-Americans, the Haarlows might have been the initial most impactful family on the sport.

PATERNO INFLUENCE
7. Paterno - Father Bill Paterno averaged 3.4 ppg with St. Francis (N.Y.) in 1948-49 and 1949-50 after scoring 18 points in nine games in 1947-48. Son Billy averaged 9.8 ppg and 4.7 rpg for Notre Dame from 1973-74 through 1976-77 under coach Digger Phelps, finishing team runner-up in scoring to All-American Adrian Dantley as a sophomore with 13.3 ppg. Son Mike averaged 3.1 ppg for Monmouth in 1987-88. Son Joe averaged 14.6 ppg and 5.1 rpg with Fordham from 1985-86 through 1988-89, leading the Rams in scoring in three seasons and finishing his career as their all-time second-leading scorer. Son Steve averaged 10.8 ppg and 3.6 rpg with Marist from 1987-88 through 1990-91, leading the Red Foxes in scoring as a junior before finishing runner-up as a senior.

TOASTING THE RAIVIOS
8. Raivio - Father Rick Raivio, a three-time All-WCAC selection who led Portland in field-goal shooting all four seasons, finished as the Pilots' all-time leading rebounder (910/9.4 rpg) while averaging 17.2 ppg before becoming a fifth-round draft choice by the Los Angeles Lakers. Son Derek, the WCC co-player of the year as a Gonzaga senior (18 ppg and nation-leading 96.1 FT%), averaged 11.5 ppg and 2.8 apg while shooting 41.6% from beyond the arc from 2003-04 through 2006-07 with Gonzaga en route to becoming the #2 all-time free-throw shooter in DI history (92.7%). Son Nik, a J.C. recruit, was an All-WCC selection as a junior with Portland in 2008-09 when he averaged 16 ppg and 6.5 rpg before heading overseas to play professionally after finishing his Pilots' career with 14.3 ppg and 5.3 rpg. Son Matt averaged 9.4 ppg, 2.8 rpg and 2.8 apg for Simon Fraser (Vancouver) in 2011-12 and 2012-13 after transferring from Santa Rosa (CA) JC.

ROCKY MOUNTAIN HIGH
9. Pollard - Father Pearl Pollard (6-9), a second-team All-Skyline Conference choice as a senior, averaged 10.5 ppg and 7.9 rpg for Utah from 1956-57 through 1958-59 with three national postseason tournament teams, leading the Utes in scoring and rebounding as a senior. Son Carl, 7-2, played briefly for BYU as a freshman in 1983-84 before redshirting in 1984-85, going on a two-year Mormon mission and transferring with a brother to Southern California, where he didn't play prior to competing with Southern Utah in 1989-90 and averaging 1.5 ppg and 2.9 rpg. Son Alan, 6-9, averaged 5.6 ppg and 5.3 rpg while splitting four seasons between Brigham Young and USC from 1984-85 through 1988-89, leading BYU in rebounding as a freshman. Son Mark, 6-11, played briefly for San Diego State in 1990-91 before also leaving at the same time with a brother. Son Neal, 7-0, redshirted at San Diego State in 1988-89 before going on a Mormon mission to New England, playing three games with the Aztecs in 1991-92 and transferring to Utah State, where he didn't play. Son Scot, 6-11, averaged 9.4 ppg, 6.6 rpg and 1.7 bpg for four Kansas teams reaching NCAA playoff regional semifinals from 1993-94 through 1996-97 before becoming an NBA first-round draft choice.

CAN'T FOIL THE DOYLES
10. Doyle - Father Dan Doyle averaged 13.7 ppg and 12.2 rpg for Belmont Abbey (N.C.) in his four-year career. He was selected by the Detroit Pistons in 5th round of 1961 NBA draft (44th pick overall) after pacing Al McGuire-coached teams in scoring average his final three seasons and rebounding as a junior and senior. Son Danny averaged 7.4 ppg and 2.1 rpg with Iona from 1989-90 through 1993-94, leading the Gaels in assists and steals as a senior. Son Joe led then-DII Sacred Heart in scoring, assists and steals as a senior in 1996-97. Son Tim played sparingly for St. John's in 2002-03 before transferring to Northwestern, where he averaged 8.1 ppg, 3.5 rpg, 3.7 apg and 1.3 spg from 2004-05 through 2006-07, leading the Wildcats in assists his last two seasons and in steals as a senior.

PLUMB LINE PLUMS
11. Plumlee - Father Millard (nicknamed "Perky") was a 6-8 backup frontcourter who averaged 3.6 ppg and 3 rpg while shooting 58% from the floor for Tennessee Tech from 1980-81 through 1982-83. Sons Miles (4.8 ppg and 4.8 rpg from 2008-09 through 2011-12), Mason (two-time All-ACC selection; 9.8 ppg, 7.7 rpg and 1.4 bpg from 2009-10 through 2012-13) and Marshall (1.2 ppg and 1.8 rpg from 2011-12 to 2014-15 prior to starting entire senior season while averaging 8.3 ppg and 8.6 rpg) all attended Duke.

HUGGY BEARS ALL
12. Huggins - Father Charlie Huggins was an All-WVIAC first-team selection for Alderson-Broaddus (W. Va.) in 1957-58 after transferring from West Virginia. Son Bob averaged 8.4 ppg and 2.8 rpg while shooting 45.9% from the floor and 79.4% from the free-throw line with West Virginia in the mid-1970s after transferring from Ohio University. Son Harry was a two-year letterman for Texas Lutheran in the late 1970s after transferring from Rice. Son Larry averaged 5.6 ppg, 2 rpg and 2.1 apg while shooting 46.3% from the floor and 79.3% from the free-throw line as a captain for Ohio State in the early 1980s.

HONORABLE MENTION
Christensen - Father Harold, a member of Brigham Young's 1951 NIT championship team, averaged 7.8 ppg and 4.4 rpg. He was chosen by the Minneapolis Lakers in 1953 NBA draft before having three sons play for the Cougars - Craig averaged 5.1 ppg in half a season in 1981-82, Kurt averaged 4.5 ppg in 1992-93 and 1993-94, and Todd averaged 5.8 ppg in 1995-96, 1998-99 and 1999-00.

Fife - Father Dan Fife, a 10th-round draft choice by the Milwaukee Bucks before pitching briefly for the Minnesota Twins, averaged 12.6 ppg and 4.9 rpg for Michigan from 1968-69 through 1970-71. Son Dugan, overlooked during the Fab Five era, averaged 4.6 ppg and 2 rpg for Michigan from 1992-93 through 1995-96. Son Jeremy led Grand Valley State (MI) in assists in 1996-97 and 1997-98. Son Dane averaged 5.6 ppg, 2.6 rpg, 2.3 apg and 1.4 spg while shooting 38.2% from three-point range for Indiana from 1998-99 through 2001-02 before becoming a DI head coach with IUPU-Fort Wayne.

McGee - Father Anthony McGee led Long Beach State in scoring in 1975-76 with 14.8 ppg before contributing 4.5 ppg for the 49ers' NCAA playoff team the next season. Son Tony averaged 4 ppg for Eastern Washington in 1997-98 and 1998-99. Son Antoine averaged 1.4 ppg and 1.7 apg with Colorado from 2002-03 through 2005-06. Son Andre averaged 5.2 ppg and 1.8 apg while shooting 36.5% from beyond the arc with Louisville from 2005-06 through 2008-09, leading the Cardinals in three-point field-goal shooting as a junior (39.4%), before gaining national recognition as a UL rogue assistant coach.

Woolridge - Father Orlando averaged 10.6 ppg and 5 rpg with Notre Dame from 1977-78 through 1980-81. Son Zach played sparingly for Princeton from 2005-06 through 2007-08 (23 points in 14 games). Son Renaldo averaged 3.2 ppg and 2.3 rpg for Tennessee from 2008-09 through 2011-12 before transferring to USC (20 points in 20 games in 2012-13). Son Royce played sparingly for Kansas in 2010-11 (nine points in 16 games) before transferring to Washington State (9.2 ppg in 2012-13 and 2013-14) and Grand Canyon (12.9 ppg in 2014-15). Orlando and Renaldo played in games where their teams defeated the nation's #1-ranked club.

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopsters Make Their Mark on May 14 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Ex-Fordham hoopers Frankie Frisch and Babe Young were full of extra-base hits on this date. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 14 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 14

  • In 1977, RHP Jim Colborn (attended Whittier CA in mid-1960s before studying for master's at Edinburgh where he was All-Scotland in basketball) hurled the first no-hitter at Royals Stadium by a Kansas City pitcher (6-0 win against Texas Rangers).

  • New York Giants SS Alvin Dark (letterman for LSU and USL in mid-1940s) went 5-for-5 in a 1954 game against the Chicago Cubs.

  • San Francisco Giants 3B Darrell Evans (member of Jerry Tarkanian-coached Pasadena City CA club winning 1967 state community college crown) homered twice for the second time in a six-game span in 1983.

  • Boston Red Sox RHP Boo Ferriss (Mississippi State letterman in 1941) threw only 78 pitches in a 3-0 shutout against the Chicago White Sox in 1946.

  • Baltimore Orioles LHP Mike Flanagan (averaged 13.9 ppg for UMass' freshman squad in 1971-72) fired his first MLB shutout, a five-hitter against the Oakland Athletics in 1977. Four years later, Flanagan hurled his second whitewash in a little over two weeks in 1981.

  • St. Louis Cardinals 2B Frankie Frisch (Fordham captain) supplied three extra-base hits against the New York Giants in 1930.

  • One of five victories by Kansas City Royals RHP Rich Gale (led New Hampshire with 7.2 rpg in 1975-76) during the month in 1979 was a five-hit shutout against the Seattle Mariners.

  • Detroit Tigers 1B Hank Greenberg (enrolled at NYU on hoop scholarship in 1929 but attended college only one semester) whacked two homers against the St. Louis Browns in the opener of a 1939 doubleheader.

  • Philadelphia Phillies 1B Davey Johnson (averaged 1.7 ppg for Texas A&M in 1961-62) jacked two homers against the San Diego Padres in 1977.

  • Detroit Tigers RF Rusty Kuntz (played J.C. hoops for Cuesta CA) registered two extra-base hits among his three safeties against the Seattle Mariners in 1984.

  • SS Doc Lavan (played for Hope MI from 1908 through 1910) purchased from the Washington Senators by the St. Louis Cardinals in 1919.

  • Chicago White Sox RHP Ted Lyons (two-time All-SWC first-team selection for Baylor in early 1920s) hurled a shutout against the New York Yankees. The whitewash was one of four triumphs for Lyons in a 12-day span in 1925.

  • Mel McGaha (first Arkansas player to earn four letters from 1943-44 through 1946-47) fired as manager of the Kansas City Athletics by owner Charlie Finley in 1965.

  • New York Yankees 3B Graig Nettles (shot 87.8% from free-throw line for San Diego State in 1963-64) smashed two homers against the California Angels in 1977.

  • Chicago Cubs rookie SS Paul Popovich (teammate of Jerry West for West Virginia's 1960 NCAA playoff team) stroked four hits and scored three runs in a 6-3 victory against the Los Angeles Dodgers in the nightcap of a 1967 twinbill.

  • OF Ted Savage (led Lincoln MO in scoring average in 1955-56) purchased from the St. Louis Cardinals by the Chicago Cubs in 1967.

  • 1B Dick Siebert (played for Concordia-St. Paul MN in 1929 and 1930) traded by the St. Louis Cardinals to the Philadelphia Athletics in 1938.

  • Chicago Cubs rookie 2B Wayne Terwilliger (two-year letterman for Western Michigan averaged 5.6 ppg in final season in 1947-48) stroked two doubles in each end of a 1950 doubleheader against the Pittsburgh Pirates.

  • Minnesota Twins DH Dave Winfield (starting forward for Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) collected two homers and five RBI against the Baltimore Orioles in 1994.

  • PH Babe Young (Fordham letterman in 1936) contributed a double and triple in a 10-run, eighth-inning explosion propelling the New York Giants to a 12-6 triumph against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1942.

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopsters Make Their Mark on May 13 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 13 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 13

  • Cincinnati Reds LF Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading basketball scorer in 1945-46) socked two homers against the St. Louis Cardinals in the opener of a 1951 twinbill.

  • OF-1B Beau Bell (Texas A&M two-year letterman in early 1930s) traded by the St. Louis Browns to the Detroit Tigers in a 10-player deal in 1939.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers RHP Ownie Carroll (Holy Cross letterman in 1922), in the midst of winning five straight decisions, didn't allow an earned run in a 10-inning, 1-1 tie against the Cincinnati Reds in 1933.

  • OF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) purchased from the Detroit Tigers by the Chicago White Sox in 1959.

  • RF Hoot Evers (starter for Illinois in 1939-40) traded by the Cleveland Indians to the Baltimore Orioles in 1956.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers RF Joe Ferguson (played in 1967 NCAA playoffs with Pacific) smacked a homer in his third consecutive contest against the Montreal Expos in 1979.

  • Boston Red Sox rookie RHP Boo Ferriss (Mississippi State letterman in 1941) set an A.L. record for scoreless innings at the start of a MLB career by reaching 22 shutout frames before allowing a tally in 1945. Ferriss struck out Detroit Tigers 1B Rudy York four times - all on called third strikes in an 8-2 win in the opener of a doubleheader.

  • St. Louis Cardinals SS Charlie Gelbert (scored at least 125 points each of last three seasons in late 1920s for Lebanon Valley PA) contributed four hits in an 8-7 victory against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1932.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates SS Dick Groat (two-time All-American with Duke in 1950-51 and 1951-52 when finishing among nation's top five scorers each season) went 6-for-6 (including three doubles) in an 8-2 triumph over the Milwaukee Braves in 1960.

  • In 1984, 3B Wayne Gross (led Cal Poly Pomona in assists in 1974-75) knocked in all of the Baltimore Orioles' runs in a 5-1 win against his former team (the Oakland Athletics).

  • Chicago Cubs RF Harvey Hendrick (Vanderbilt letterman in 1918) banged out four hits in a 7-5 victory against the Philadelphia Phillies in the opener of a 1933 doubleheader.

  • Cleveland Indians 1B Doug Howard (second-team All-WAC choice for Brigham Young in 1968-69 and 1969-70) delivered a career-high three hits against the Boston Red Sox in 1976.

  • New York Yankees LF Charlie Keller (three-year letterman with Maryland from 1934-35 through 1936-37) clobbered two homers against the St. Louis Browns in 1947.

  • C Cal Neeman (Illinois Wesleyan's leading scorer in 1947-48 and 1948-49) traded by the Chicago Cubs to the Philadelphia Phillies in a four-player swap in 1960.

  • Philadelphia Phillies RHP Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) yielded a lead-off HR before retiring the next 27 Cincinnati Reds batters to prevail, 8-1, in 1954.

  • Baltimore Orioles LF Larry Sheets (All-ODAC selection in 1981-82 and 1982-83 with Eastern Mennonite VA) socked two homers against the Kansas City Royals in 1987.

  • Baltimore Orioles DH Ken Singleton (Hofstra freshman squad in mid-1960s) cracked two homers against the Texas Rangers in a 1983 game.

  • In 1940, Cincinnati Reds 3B Billy Werber (first Duke All-American in 1929-30) became the only player to hit four consecutive doubles in a game in each league (14-inning, 8-8 tie with St. Louis Cardinals).

  • In the midst of an eight-game hitting streak, Chicago Cubs RF Bob Will (all-league athlete was captain for Mankato State MN in 1954-55) supplied three hits against the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1961.

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopsters Make Their Mark on May 12 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 12 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 12

  • In 1984, Seattle Mariners RHP Jim Beattie (Dartmouth's top rebounder in 1974-75 when selected basketball team MVP and honorable mention All-Ivy League) registered his second shutout in last four starts.

  • Baltimore Orioles CF Al Bumbry (Virginia State's runner-up in scoring with 16.7 ppg as freshman in 1964-65) suffered a broken leg sliding into second base, missing most of the remainder of the 1978 season.

  • Milwaukee Braves RHP Gene Conley (All-Pacific Coast Conference first-team selection led North Division in scoring as Washington State sophomore in 1949-50) toiled 12 innings in prevailing, 2-1, ending the Dodgers' streak from the start of the 1955 season of 25 consecutive contests where they led at some point in the game. It was one of five straight wins for Conley during the month following a setback when he went 11 1/3 innings at Brooklyn.

  • CF Billy Cowan (Utah letterman from 1957-58 through 1959-60 was co-captain of NCAA playoff team as senior) rapped a game-winning, two-run single in the bottom of the ninth inning to give the California Angels a 6-5 win against the Boston Red Sox in 1970.

  • In 1940, Cincinnati Reds CF Harry Craft (four-sport letterman with Mississippi College in early 1930s) contributed three hits in a game against the St. Louis Cardinals for the second straight day.

  • In 1930, Philadelphia Athletics RHP George Earnshaw (Swarthmore PA participant in 1922) committed three balks and Cleveland Indians counterpart Milt Shoffner had five balks (three in third inning).

  • Los Angeles Dodgers RF Joe Ferguson (played in 1967 NCAA playoffs with Pacific) jacked a homer in his third consecutive contest against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1976.

  • St. Louis Cardinals 2B Frankie Frisch (Fordham captain) supplied four hits against the Brooklyn Robins in 1929.

  • LHP Johnny Gee (sixth-leading scorer in Big Ten Conference for Michigan's 16-4 team in 1936-37) purchased from the Pittsburgh Pirates by the New York Giants in 1944.

  • Boston Red Sox LF Dick Gernert (Temple letterman in 1948-49 when averaging 2.7 ppg) contributed two homers and six RBI but it wasn't enough to prevent a 12-9 reversal against the Washington Senators in 1956.

  • St. Louis Cardinals RHP Bob Gibson (Creighton's leading scorer and rebounder in 1955-56 and 1956-57) struck out the side on nine pitches in the seventh inning against the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1969.

  • After seven scoreless relief appearances, Philadelphia Phillies RHP Dallas Green (Delaware's runner-up in scoring and rebounding in 1954-55) made his first start of 1963 campaign. The next year, Green yielded his only run covering first eight relief stints of 1964.

  • Washington Senators 3B Chuck Hinton (played multiple sports for Shaw NC before serving two years in U.S. Army in mid-1950s) hammered a homer for the Nats' lone safety in the nightcap of a 1963 twin bill at Boston.

  • New York Mets 1B Gil Hodges (played for St. Joseph's IN in 1943 and Oakland City IN in 1947 and 1948) hit a ninth-inning, game-ending HR in the nightcap of a 1962 doubleheader. Teammate Hobie Landrith did the same thing in the opener against the Milwaukee Braves.

  • Baltimore Orioles RHP Ben McDonald (started six games as 6-6 freshman for Louisiana State in 1986-87 under coach Dale Brown) squared off against 6-10 Randy Johnson of the Seattle Mariners in 1991 in the tallest starting pitching matchup in MLB history.

  • St. Louis Cardinals rookie CF Wally Moon (averaged 4.3 ppg with Texas A&M in 1948-49 and 1949-50) notched his second five-hit game and scored five runs in a 13-5 pounding of the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1954.

  • Chicago Cubs RF Ted Tappe (leading scorer in 1949 NJCAA Tournament was Washington State's third-leading scorer the next year) opened the game's scoring with an RBI double and closed scoring with a homer off Vern Law when Sam Jones no-hit the Pittsburgh Pirates, 4-0, in 1955.

  • Washington Senators 2B Wayne Terwilliger (two-year letterman for Western Michigan averaged 5.6 ppg in final season in 1947-48) stroked four hits against the Detroit Tigers in 1953.

  • SS Billy Werber (first Duke All-American in 1929-30) purchased from the New York Yankees by the Boston Red Sox in 1933.

  • Boston Braves 3B Chuck Workman (two-time All-MIAA first-five selection was leading scorer when Central Missouri won inaugural NAIA Tournament in 1937) slugged a homer in his third consecutive contest in 1945.

  • LHP Tom Zachary (Guilford NC letterman in 1916) awarded on waivers from the New York Yankees to the Boston Braves in 1930.

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopsters Make Their Mark on May 11 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 11 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 11

  • Cincinnati Reds LF Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading basketball scorer in 1945-46) cracked two homers against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1952.

  • St. Louis Browns RF Beau Bell (two-year letterman for Texas A&M in early 1930s) went 4-for-4 in a 7-5 win against the Washington Senators in 1937.

  • OF-1B Bruce Bochte (starting forward for Santa Clara's 1970 NCAA playoff team) traded by the California Angels to the Cleveland Indians in 1977.

  • Cleveland Indians SS Lou Boudreau (leading scorer for Illinois' 1937 Big Ten Conference co-champion) went 4-for-4 against the Philadelphia Athletics in 1950.

  • Hall of Fame C Rick Ferrell (Guilford NC player in mid-1920s) traded by the St. Louis Browns to the Boston Red Sox in 1933.

  • Detroit Tigers 1B Hank Greenberg (enrolled at NYU on hoop scholarship in 1929 but attended college only one semester) socked a homer in his third consecutive contest in 1935.

  • Frank Howard (two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection when he led Ohio State in scoring and rebounding in 1956-57 and 1957-58) hammered two homers for the Washington Senators but they weren't enough to prevent a 6-5 defeat at Seattle in 1969.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers LHP Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54), continuing his comeback from a circulatory ailment in his left index finger, hurled a no-hitter against the San Francisco Giants in 1963.

  • INF Vance Law (averaged 6.8 ppg for Brigham Young from 1974-75 through 1976-77) contributed a 10th-inning squeeze bunt to give the Chicago Cubs a 1-0 victory against the San Diego Padres in 1988.

  • OF Danny Litwhiler (member of JV squad with Bloomsburg PA three years in mid-1930s) traded by the Boston Braves to the Cincinnati Reds in 1948.

  • Washington Senators OF Don Lock (led Wichita State in field-goal percentage in 1956-57 and 1957-58 under coach Ralph Miller) banged out four hits against the California Angels in 1966.

  • New York Yankees SS Gene Michael (led Kent State in scoring with 14 ppg in 1957-58) generated his fifth two-hit outing in first seven games of the month in 1973.

  • In the midst of a career-high 24-game hitting streak in 1957, St. Louis Cardinals LF Wally Moon (averaged 4.3 ppg with Texas A&M in 1948-49 and 1949-50) homered in four consecutive contests. Moon assembled a 20-game hitting string later in the season.

  • Boston Red Sox 1B Ed Morgan (Tulane letterman from 1923-24 through 1925-26) manufactured four hits against the Cleveland Indians in 1934.

  • Philadelphia Phillies rookie LF Ted Savage (led Lincoln MO in scoring average in 1955-56) stroked four hits against the Chicago Cubs in 1962. Nine years later, Savage was traded by the Milwaukee Brewers to the Kansas City Royals in 1971.

  • Boston Red Sox 3B Jim Tabor (Alabama letterman in 1936-37) knocked in five runs against the New York Yankees in a 1941 game.

  • Philadelphia Phillies CF Cy Williams (Notre Dame forward in 1909-10) contributed three homers and seven RBI against the St. Louis Cardinals in a 1923 game.

  • RF Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972), citing a no-trade clause in his contract with the New York Yankees, refused to report to the Angels after being traded in 1990. Five days later, he accepted the deal.

  • RF Randy Winn (Santa Clara backcourtmate of eventual two-time NBA Most Valuable Player Steve Nash in 1993-94) whacked a two-out, two-run homer in the ninth inning to give Tampa Bay a 6-4 victory over the Baltimore Orioles in 2002, snapping the Devil Rays' 15-game losing streak.

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopsters Make Their Mark on May 10 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 10 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 10

  • Baltimore Orioles 2B Jerry Adair (one of Oklahoma State's top three basketball scorers in 1956-57 and 1957-58 while ranking among nation's top 12 free-throw shooters each season) jacked two homers against the Minnesota Twins in 1961.

  • Cleveland Indians RHP Jim Bibby (Fayetteville State NC backup player and brother of UCLA All-American Henry Bibby) hurled a 1-0 shutout against the Milwaukee Brewers in the opener of a 1977 doubleheader.

  • Cleveland Indians SS Lou Boudreau (leading scorer for Illinois' 1937 Big Ten Conference co-champion) banged out two hits in six straight games in 1942.

  • 1B Donn Clendenon (four-sport letterman with Morehouse GA) went hitless in his first 18 at-bats with the St. Louis Cardinals until stroking two safeties against the Houston Astros in 1972.

  • Philadelphia Athletics C Mickey Cochrane (five-sport athlete with Boston University) collected four hits against the St. Louis Browns in 1928.

  • St. Louis Cardinals RF Grant Dunlap (Pacific letterman in 1942-43 and 1946-47) hammered a pinch-hit homer against the Cincinnati Reds in 1953. The circuit clout was Dunlap's lone MLB round-tripper.

  • Brooklyn Robins 2B Jake Flowers (member of 1923 "Flying Pentagon" championship squad for Washington College MD) contributed four hits against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1930.

  • 1B-OF Dick Gernert (letterman with Temple in 1948-49 when he averaged 2.7 ppg) traded by the Detroit Tigers to the Cincinnati Reds in 1961.

  • The first MLB shutout suppolied by Kansas City Athletics RHP Dick Hall (averaged 13.5 ppg from 1948-49 through 1950-51 with Swarthmore PA Southern Division champions in Middle Atlantic States Conference), 10-0 against the Baltimore Orioles, was one of three complete-game triumphs for him this month in 1960.

  • Utilityman Chuck Harmon (freshman starter was Toledo's second-leading scorer for 1943 NIT runner-up) traded by the St. Louis Cardinals to the Philadelphia Phillies in 1957.

  • Milwaukee Braves SS Johnny Logan (played for Binghamton in 1948-49) went 4-for-4 with five RBI in a 10-5 win against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1957.

  • Boston Red Sox OF Rip Repulski (started a few games for St. Cloud State MN) ripped a grand slam against the Chicago White Sox in 1960.

  • 1B Howie Schultz (Hamline MN product played and coached professional basketball) purchased from the Brooklyn Dodgers by the Philadelphia Phillies for $50,000 in 1947.

  • 3B John Werhas (led Southern California in scoring average in 1958-59 and 1959-60) traded by the Los Angeles Dodgers to the California Angels for fellow USC product Len Gabrielson in 1967.

  • San Francisco Giants OF Randy Winn (Santa Clara backcourtmate of eventual two-time NBA Most Valuable Player Steve Nash in 1993-94) collected four hits and scored four runs in a 7-5 win against the Los Angeles Dodgers in a 2009 game. The next day, Winn chipped in with three hits and three runs against the Washington Nationals.

Tourney Journey: What is Titlist Villanova's Longest NCAA Playoff Dry Spell?

Champion Villanova is one of 11 universities never to miss the NCAA playoffs at least 10 straight seasons after their tournament debut. Nova's longest tournament famine since a nine-year dry spell in the 1940s is five seasons. A total of 46 schools have appeared more than 20 times in the NCAA tourney through 2016 - Kentucky (56), North Carolina (47), UCLA (47), Kansas (45), Louisville (41), Duke (40), Indiana (39), Syracuse (38), Villanova (36), Notre Dame (35), Arizona (33), Connecticut (33), Texas (33), Temple (32), Marquette (31), Ohio State (31), Arkansas (30), Cincinnati (30), Georgetown (30), Illinois (30), Michigan State (30), Oklahoma (30), Brigham Young (29), St. John's (29), Utah (29), Kansas State (28), Purdue (28), Oklahoma State (27), West Virginia (27), Maryland (26), Memphis (26), Michigan (26), Missouri (26), North Carolina State (26), Pittsburgh (26), Xavier (26), Iowa (25), Princeton (24), Penn (23), Western Kentucky (23), DePaul (22), New Mexico State (22), Wake Forest (22), Wisconsin (22), Louisiana State (21) and Saint Joseph's (21).

Notre Dame, compiling a losing record in the NCAA playoffs (37-39), is the only one of the 22 institutions with at least 30 appearances never to win a Final Four game. The Fighting Irish's only F4 trip was in 1978 when they lost in the national semifinals against Duke (90-86) before bowing in the national third-place contest against Arkansas (71-69).

Among the schools with more than 20 appearances, Kansas State was the only one other than Kentucky never to be shut out of the tourney as long as five years after its maiden voyage until K-State was denied 11 consecutive campaigns through 2007. DePaul, missing the last 12 years, has the longest active NCAA Tournament dry spell among the following 46 universities with more than 20 appearances:

Years School NCAA Debut Longest NCAA Dry Spell Coach(es) During Playoff Drought
3 Kentucky 1942 1989 through 1991 Eddie Sutton and Rick Pitino
5 UCLA 1950 1957 through 1961 John Wooden
6 Princeton 1952 1970 through 1975/2005 through 2010 Pete Carril/Joe Scott and Sydney Johnson
7 Brigham Young 1950 1958 through 1964 Stan Watts
7 Louisville 1951 1952 through 1958 Peck Hickman
7 Purdue 1969 1970 through 1976 George King and Fred Schaus
8 Syracuse 1957 1958 through 1965 Marc Guley and Fred Lewis
9 Kansas 1940 1943 through 1951 Phog Allen and Howard Engleman
9 Marquette 1955 1984 through 1992 Rick Majerus, Bob Dukiet and Kevin O'Neill
9 Ohio State 1939 1951 through 1959 Floyd Stahl and Fred Taylor
9 Villanova 1939 1940 through 1948 Alex Severance
10 Connecticut 1951 1980 through 1989 Dom Perno and Jim Calhoun
10 Memphis 1955 1963 through 1972 Dean Ehlers, Moe Iba and Gene Bartow
10 New Mexico State 1952 1980 through 1989 Weldon Drew and Neil McCarthy
10 North Carolina 1941 1947 through 1956 Tom Scott and Frank McGuire
10 North Carolina State 1950 1992 through 2001 Les Robinson and Herb Sendek
10 Notre Dame 1953 1991 through 2000 Digger Phelps, John MacLeod and Matt Doherty
10 Saint Joseph's 1959 1987 through 1996 Jim Boyle, John Griffin and Phil Martelli
10 Utah 1944 1967 through 1976 Jack Gardner, Bill E. Foster and Jerry Pimm
11 Duke 1955 1967 through 1977 Vic Bubas, Bucky Waters, Neill McGeachy and Bill E. Foster
11 Kansas State 1948 1997 through 2007 Tom Asbury, Jim Wooldridge and Bob Huggins
11 St. John's 1951 1962 through 1972 Joe Lapchick, Lou Carnesecca and Frank Mulzoff
11 Temple 1944 1945 through 1955 Josh Cody and Harry Litwack
12 DePaul 1943 2005 through 2016 Dave Leitao, Jerry Wainwright and Oliver Purnell
12 Indiana 1940 1941 through 1952 Branch McCracken and Harry Good
12 Texas 1943 1948 through 1959 Jack Gray, Thurman Hull and Marshall Hughes
13 Iowa 1955 1957 through 1969 Bucky O'Connor, Sharm Scheuerman and Ralph Miller
14 Cincinnati 1958 1978 through 1991 Gale Catlett, Ed Badger, Tony Yates and Bob Huggins
14 Maryland 1958 1959 through 1972 Bud Millikan, Frank Fellows and Lefty Driesell
14 Wake Forest 1939 1963 through 1976 Bones McKinney, Jack Murdock, Jack McCloskey and Carl Tacy
14 West Virginia 1955 1968 through 1981 Bucky Waters, Sonny Moran, Joedy Gardner and Gale Catlett
15 Michigan 1948 1949 through 1963 Ernie McCoy, Bill Perigo and Dave Strack
15 Pittsburgh 1941 1942 through 1956 Doc Carlson and Bob Timmons
16 Penn 1953 1954 through 1969 Howie Dallmar, Ray Stanley, Jack McCloskey and Dick Harter
17 Illinois 1942 1964 through 1980 Harry Combes, Harv Schmidt, Gene Bartow and Lou Henson
17 Oklahoma State 1945 1966 through 1982 Hank Iba, Sam Aubrey, Guy Strong, Jim Killingsworth and Paul Hansen
18 Arkansas 1941 1959 through 1976 Glen Rose, Duddy Waller, Lanny Van Eman and Eddie Sutton
18 Michigan State 1957 1960 through 1977 Forddy Anderson, John Benington, Gus Ganakas and Jud Heathcote
19 Western Kentucky 1940 1941 through 1959 Ed Diddle
21 Xavier 1961 1962 through 1982 Jim McCafferty, Don Ruberg, George Krajack, Dick Campbell, Tay Baker and Bob Staak
24 Arizona 1951 1952 through 1975 Fred Enke, Bruce Larson and Fred Snowden
24 Louisiana State 1953 1955 through 1978 Harry Rabenhorst, Jay McCreary, Frank Truitt, Press Maravich and Dale Brown
31 Georgetown 1943 1944 through 1974 Ken Eagles, Elmer Ripley, Buddy O'Grady, Harry Jeannette, Tommy Nolan, Tom O'Keefe, Jack Magee and John Thompson Jr.
31 Missouri 1944 1945 through 1975 George Edwards, Sparky Stalcup, Bob Vanatta and Norm Stewart
31 Oklahoma 1939 1948 through 1978 Bruce Drake, Doyle Parrack, Bob Stevens, John MacLeod, Joe Ramsey and Dave Bliss
46 Wisconsin 1941 1948 through 1993 Bud Foster, John Erickson, John Powless, Bill Cofield, Steve Yoder and Stu Jackson

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopsters Make Their Mark on May 9 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 9 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 9

  • Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading basketball scorer in 1945-46) clobbered two homers against the Chicago Cubs in 1961.

  • In his final game with the California Angels, DH Bruce Bochte (starting forward for Santa Clara's NCAA playoff team in 1969-70) collected four hits in a 5-3 win against the Kansas City Royals in 1977.

  • New York Giants 2B Andy Cohen (Alabama letterman in 1924 and 1925) cracked a leadoff homer but they wound up losing to the Pittsburgh Pirates, 3-2, in 1929.

  • Houston Astros LHP Danny Coombs (Seton Hall's third-leading scorer and rebounder as sophomore in 1961-62) tossed his lone MLB shutout (two-hitter against Montreal Expos in 1970).

  • New York Giants SS Alvin Dark (letterman for LSU and USL in mid-1940s) amassed four hits and four RBI for the second time in a four-game span in 1951.

  • St. Louis Cardinals CF Taylor Douthit (California letterman from 1922 through 1924) stroked four hits against the Boston Braves in 1930.

  • Hall of Fame C Rick Ferrell (played for Guilford NC in mid-1920s) traded by the St. Louis Browns to the Boston Red Sox in 1933.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates 3B Lee Handley (Bradley letterman from 1932-33 through 1934-35) banged out four hits against the Boston Braves in 1938.

  • Cleveland Indians 1B Mike Hargrove (Northwestern Oklahoma State letterman) supplied five RBI against the Oakland Athletics in 1982.

  • Atlanta Braves RF David Justice (led Thomas More KY in assists in 1984-85) collected two homers and five RBI against the Colorado Rockies in 1993.

  • St. Louis Cardinals CF Lynn King (All-Missouri Valley Conference second-team selection with Drake from 1928-29 through 1930-31) collected a career-high three hits against the Chicago Cubs in 1936.

  • Wally Moon (averaged 4.3 ppg with Texas A&M in 1948-49 and 1949-50) reached base in his first six pinch-hit appearances for the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1965.

  • C Cal Neeman (Illinois Wesleyan's leading scorer in 1947-48 and 1948-49) purchased from the Philadelphia Phillies by the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1962.

  • INF-OF Mel Roach (averaged 9.3 ppg in 1952-53 in Virginia's final season prior to helping form ACC) traded by the Milwaukee Braves to the Chicago Cubs for OF-INF Frank Thomas in 1961.

  • In his first game outside of New York City, Brooklyn Dodgers 1B Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in Pacific Coast Conference both of his seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) collected two hits and scored two runs in a 6-5 loss at Philadelphia in 1947.

  • RHP Sonny Siebert (team-high 16.7 ppg for Missouri in 1957-58 as All-Big Eight Conference second-team selection) homered for the Cleveland Indians in the nightcap of a 1965 doubleheader against the Boston Red Sox.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers LHP Eric Stults (played for 1999 NAIA D-II Tournament runner-up and 2000 NCCAA Tournament titlist with Bethel IN) fired a four-hit shutout against the San Francisco Giants in 2009.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates RHP Kent Tekulve (played as freshman for Marietta OH in mid-1960s) won for the fourth time in first five relief appearances of the month in 1980.

  • New York Yankees CF Dave Winfield (starting forward for Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) delivered three extra-base hits against the Cleveland Indians in 1984.

Oh Canada: Murray Continues Parade of North-of-Border All-Americans

Amid Stanley Cup competition intensifying, the latest Canadian earning All-American status and showing the nation is more than a hockey hotbed was Kentucky guard Jamal Murray (Ontario). Canada's five-year basketball bounty had previously gone from Syracuse's Kris Joseph (Quebec) to Gonzaga's Kelly Olynyk (British Columbia) to three All-Americans two seasons ago in Iowa State's Melvin Ejim (Toronto), Michigan's Nik Stauskas (Ontario) and Kansas' Andrew Wiggins (Ontario) to Gonzaga guard Kevin Pangos (Ontario) in 2014-15. Oregon's Dillon Brooks (Ontario) is the best bet next season for Canadian streak to reach six seasons in a row.

Foreigners such as Oklahoma guard Buddy Hield (Bahamas), Utah center Jakob Poeltl (Austria) and Louisiana State swingman Ben Simmons (Australia) have been much more than bit players in a modern-day immigrant version of "Coming to America." If he doesn't have eligibility problems, will North Carolina State's Omer Yurtseven (center from Turkey) be the next overseas A-A? Following is an alphabetical list of hoop princes of sorts as Murray and Poeltl became 24th and 25th All-Americans who spent most or all of their formative years in a country outside mainland U.S.:

Foreigner Pos. College Native Country Year(s) All-American NBA Draft Status
Andrew Bogut* C Utah Australia 2005 1st pick overall by Milwaukee
Kresimir Cosic C Brigham Young Yugoslavia 1972 and 1973 66th by L.A. Lakers
Tim Duncan* C Wake Forest Virgin Islands 1995 through 1997 1st by San Antonio
Melvin Ejim F Iowa State Toronto, Ontario 2014 undrafted
Patrick Ewing* C Georgetown Jamaica 1982 through 1985 1st by New York
Adonal Foyle C Colgate West Indies 1997 8th by Golden State
Buddy Hield G Oklahoma Bahamas 2015 and 2016 to be determined
Al Horford F-C Florida Dominican Republic 2007 3rd by Atlanta
Kris Joseph F Syracuse Quebec 2012 51st by Boston
Jamal Murray G Kentucky Ontario 2016 to be determined
Dikembe Mutombo C Georgetown Zaire 1991 4th by Denver
Eduardo Najera F Oklahoma Mexico 2000 38th by Houston
Hakeem Olajuwon C Houston Nigeria 1983 and 1984 1st by Houston
Kelly Olynyk C Gonzaga British Columbia 2013 13th by Dallas
Kevin Pangos G Gonzaga Ontario 2015 undrafed
Jakob Poeltl C Utah Austria 2016 to be determined
Juan "Pepe" Sanchez G Temple Argentina 2000 undrafted
Detlef Schrempf F Washington Germany 1985 8th by Dallas
Rony Seikaly C Syracuse Greece 1988 9th by Miami
Doron Sheffer G Connecticut Israel 1996 36th by L.A. Clippers
Nik Stauskas G Michigan Ontario 2014 8th by Sacramento
Hasheem Thabeet C Connecticut Tanzania 2009 2nd by Memphis
Mychal Thompson F-C Minnesota Bahamas 1977 and 1978 1st by Portland
Greivis Vasquez G Maryland Venezuela 2010 28th by Memphis
Andrew Wiggins G-F Kansas Ontario 2014 1st by Cleveland

*Named National Player of the Year.

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopsters Make Their Mark on May 8 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 8 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 8

  • Jerry Adair (one of Oklahoma State's three leading basketball scorers in 1956-57 and 1957-58 while ranking among the nation's top 12 free-throw shooters each season) committed an eighth-inning miscue for the Baltimore Orioles against the Detroit Tigers in 1965, ending his MLB-record streaks for consecutive errorless games by a 2B (89) and consecutive chances handled without an error (438).

  • San Diego Padres RHP Mike Adams (played for Texas A&M-Kingsville in 1996-97) notched his fourth hold in nine days but was scored upon for the first time in last 16 relief appearances in 2011.

  • Philadelphia Phillies CF Ethan Allen (Cincinnati letterman in 1924-25 and 1925-26) supplied five RBI in a 13-6 triumph against the Chicago Cubs in 1934.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers C Ferrell Anderson (Kansas letterman in 1936-37 and 1937-38) furnished four hits in an 8-5 win against the Cincinnati Reds in 1946.

  • LF Bob Cerv (ranked fourth on Nebraska's career scoring list in 1949-50 when finishing his career) acquired from the Los Angeles Angels by the New York Yankees in 1961 for his third tour of duty in pinstripes.

  • Philadelphia Athletics C Mickey Cochrane (five-sport athlete with Boston University) collected three doubles against the Cleveland Indians in 1932.

  • Cincinnati Reds 1B George Crowe (four-year letterman from 1939-40 through 1942-43 for Indiana Central after becoming first high school player named state's Mr. Basketball) clobbered two homers in a 7-6 victory against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1957.

  • In 1948, Cleveland Indians RF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) whacked the longest home run at Washington's Griffith Stadium since Babe Ruth in 1922.

  • St. Louis Cardinals CF Taylor Douthit (California letterman from 1922 through 1924) contributed four hits against the Boston Braves in the first of six straight outings with multiple safeties in 1929.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates SS Dick Groat (two-time All-American with Duke in 1950-51 and 1951-52 when finishing among nation's top five scorers each season) provided three hits in each game of a 1955 doubleheader split against the New York Giants.

  • Philadelphia Phillies 1B Harvey Hendrick (Vanderbilt letterman in 1918) went 4-for-4 against the Chicago Cubs in 1934.

  • RHP Jay Hook (Northwestern's third-leading scorer with 10.7 ppg as a sophomore in 1955-56) traded by the New York Mets to the Milwaukee Braves in 1964.

  • Atlanta Braves 2B Davey Johnson (averaged 1.7 ppg for Texas A&M in 1961-62) delivered two homers and five RBI against the New York Mets in 1973.

  • LF "Sweet" Lou Johnson (Kentucky State teammate of legendary HBCU coach Davey Whitney averaged 5.7 ppg and 2 rpg in 1951-52) traded by the Milwaukee Braves with cash to the Detroit Tigers in 1963.

  • Chicago White Sox RHP Bob Keegan (Bucknell letterman in 1941-42 and 1942-43) yielded three homers to Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame OF Ted Williams in a 4-1 defeat in 1957.

  • Detroit Tigers SS Harvey Kuenn (played briefly for Wisconsin in 1951-52 after competing on JV squad previous season) registered his second four-hit outing in a six-game span in 1956.

  • Chicago Cubs 3B Vance Law (averaged 6.8 ppg for Brigham Young from 1974-75 through 1976-77) went 3-for-3 with six RBI against the San Francisco Giants in 1988.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates SS Johnny Logan (played for Binghamton in 1948-49) hit safely as a pinch-hitter for the third straight time in 1963.

  • Chicago Cubs CF Jerry Martin (1971 Southern Conference MVP after he was Furman's runner-up in scoring the previous season) stroked four hits against the Cincinnati Reds in 1979.

  • Baltimore Orioles RHP Ben McDonald (started six times as freshman forward for LSU in 1986-87 under coach Dale Brown) won his first seven starts in 1994.

  • Philadelphia Phillies RF Bill Nicholson (Washington College MD guard for two years in mid-1930s) provided five RBI against the Cincinnati Reds in the nightcap of a 1949 twinbill.

  • Boston Red Sox 2B Marv Olson (All-Iowa Conference selection in 1929-30 with Luther IA) manufactured four hits in a 7-5 win against the St. Louis Browns in 1932.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers C-OF Don Padgett (freshman in 1934 excelled in multiple sports for Lenoir-Rhyne NC) smacked a decisive three-run pinch homer in an 8-5 win against the Cincinnati Reds in 1946.

  • Philadelphia Athletics 3B Billy Werber (first Duke All-American in 1929-30) supplied five RBI in a 7-6 against the Detroit Tigers in 1938.

  • New York Giants rookie 1B Babe Young (Fordham letterman in 1935-36) collected four hits and four RBI against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1940.

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopsters Make Their Mark on May 7 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 7 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 7

  • Baltimore Orioles DH Al Bumbry (Virginia State's runner-up in basketball scoring with 16.7 ppg as freshman in 1964-65) provided four hits for the second time in a four-game span in 1975.

  • INF-OF Harvey Hendrick (Vanderbilt letterman in 1918) traded by the Brooklyn Robins to the Cincinnati Reds in 1931.

  • LF David Justice (led Thomas More KY in assists in 1984-85) jacked two homers while going 4-for-4 to help the Cleveland Indians erase a 9-1 deficit and defeat the Tampa Devil Rays, 20-11, in 1999. The next year, Justice provided three extra-base hits and five RBI against the Toronto Blue Jays in 2000.

  • In 1946, Philadelphia Athletics 1B Bruce Konopka (Southern California letterman in 1940-41) collected his third extra-base pinch-hit the first week of the month.

  • Detroit Tigers SS Harvey Kuenn (played briefly for Wisconsin in 1951-52 after competing on JV squad previous season) contributed four hits against the Chicago White Sox in 1955.

  • 1B Ed Morgan (Tulane letterman from 1923-24 through 1925-26) hit safely in first 14 starts of the 1934 campaign with the Boston Red Sox before he was blanked by the Detroit Tigers.

  • RHP Jack Ogden (competed with Swarthmore PA in 1918) traded by the Cincinnati Reds with Leo Durocher to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1933.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers 2B Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in Pacific Coast Conference both of his seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) amassed multiple-hit outings in 13 of first 19 games in 1951.

  • RHP Hal Schumacher (played for St. Lawrence NY) combined with New York Giants teammate Carl Hubbell to toss back-to-back shutouts in a 1932 doubleheader against the Cincinnati Reds.

  • Cleveland Indians rookie 3B Freddy Spurgeon (played for Kalamazoo MI in 1921-22) went 4-for-4 against the Chicago White Sox in 1925.

  • Chicago White Sox LHP Matt Thornton (averaged 5.8 ppg and 2.4 rpg for Grand Valley State MI from 1995-96 through 1997-98) fanned five Toronto Blue Jays in two innings as he went unscored upon in 10 relief appearances during the month in 2010.

  • 1B-OF Preston Ward (second-leading scorer for Southwest Missouri State in 1946-47 and 1948-49) tripled after three teammates walked to spur the Brooklyn Dodgers to a 9-5 victory at Chicago in 1948.

  • New York Giants 1B Bill White (played two years with Hiram OH in early 1950s) homered in his first MLB at-bat in 1956 (against St. Louis Cardinals).

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