Farewell Flourish: Wichita State Won MVC Tournament in Last Year as Member

Wichita State, headed for the AAC as a new member next season, bowed out of the Missouri Valley Conference in style by capturing the league tournament championship. Amid all of the conference musical chairs, this feat has been achieved 14 times thus far in the 21st Century, including five years ago in the MVC by Creighton.

Four teams slammed the door shut on their way out of conferences in 2005 with success in this category. La Salle (1983 and 1992 and Louisville (2005 and 2014) did it twice in a 10-year span. Louisville's title in 2014 occurred in the Cardinals' lone campaign as an AAC member.

Following is a chronological look at league tournament champions in their final season as a member of a non-disbanding alliance before bidding adieu and promptly joining another league:

Year Conference Departing School Title Coach New League
1932 Southern Georgia Vernon Smith Southeastern
1953 Southern Wake Forest Murray Greason Atlantic Coast
1980 Eastern 8 Villanova Rollie Massimino Big East
1982 East Coast St. Joseph's Jim Boyle Atlantic 10
1982 Eastern 8 Pittsburgh Roy Chipman Big East
1982 Trans America Athletic Northeast Louisiana Mike Vining Southland
1983 East Coast La Salle Lefty Ervin Metro Atlantic
1987 Southland Louisiana Tech Tommy Joe Eagles American South
1989 ECAC North Atlantic Siena Mike Deane Metro Atlantic
1991 Atlantic 10 Penn State Bruce Parkhill Big Ten
1991 Metro Florida State Pat Kennedy Atlantic Coast
1991 Southwest Arkansas Nolan Richardson Southeastern
1992 Metro Atlantic Athletic La Salle Speedy Morris Midwestern Collegiate
1994 Mid-Continent Wisconsin-Green Bay Dick Bennett Midwestern Collegiate
1996 Big West San Jose State Stan Morrison Western Athletic
1998 Trans America Athletic College of Charleston John Kresse Southern
1999 Western Athletic Utah Rick Majerus Mountain West
2001 America East Hofstra Jay Wright Colonial Athletic Association
2001 Big Sky Cal State Northridge Bobby Braswell Big West
2005 Atlantic Sun Central Florida Kirk Speraw Conference USA
2005 Big West Utah State Stew Morrill Western Athletic
2005 Conference USA Louisville Rick Pitino Big East
2005 Western Athletic Texas-El Paso Doc Sadler Conference USA
2012 Atlantic Sun Belmont Rick Byrd Ohio Valley
2012 Big 12 Missouri Frank Haith Southeastern
2013 Big West Pacific Bob Thomason West Coast
2013 Missouri Valley Creighton Greg McDermott Big East
2014 AAC Louisville Rick Pitino Atlantic Coast
2014 Atlantic Sun Mercer Bob Hoffman Southern Conference
2014 Conference USA Tulsa Danny Manning AAC
2017 Missouri Valley Wichita State Gregg Marshall AAC

NOTE: South Carolina, coached by Frank McGuire, captured the 1971 ACC Tournament and Southwestern Louisiana, coached by Bobby Paschal, won the 1982 Southland Tournament before they left their leagues to become independents.

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopers Make Their Mark on April 26 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopers had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is an April 26 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

APRIL 26

  • Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading basketball scorer in 1945-46) collected two homers and five RBI against the Cincinnati Reds in a 1957 game.

  • Philadelphia Phillies LF Harry Anderson (averaged 7.7 ppg and 8.9 rpg for West Chester PA in 1951-52) went 4-for-4 against the Pittsburgh Pirates in the nightcap of a 1959 twinbill.

  • Cleveland Indians player-manager Lou Boudreau (leading scorer for Illinois' 1937 Big Ten Conference co-champion) banged out five hits, including a pair of doubles and pair of triples, in a 12-11, 14-inning victory against the Chicago White Sox in 1948.

  • Arizona Diamondbacks 1B Tony Clark (San Diego State's leading scorer in WAC games in 1991-92) cracked two homers for the second time in an eight-game span in 2007.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates SS Dick Groat (two-time All-American with Duke in 1950-51 and 1951-52 when finishing among nation's top five scorers each season) amassed four hits and five RBI in a 9-2 triumph against the Philadelphia Phillies in the opener of a 1959 doubleheader.

  • Cleveland Indians rookie RHP Wynn Hawkins (Little All-American was all-time leading scorer for Baldwin-Wallace OH upon graduation in 1957) toiled 11 innings in outdueling Jim Bunning in a 2-1 win against the Detroit Tigers in 1960.

  • Cleveland Indians RHP Oral Hildebrand (Butler hoops All-American in 1928-29 and 1929-30) fired a one-hitter against the St. Louis Browns in 1933, giving him back-to-back shutouts.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers 1B Gil Hodges (hooper for St. Joseph's IN in 1943 and Oakland City IN in 1947 and 1948) contributed five RBI against the St. Louis Cardinals in a 1959 game.

  • Detroit Tigers CF Harvey Kuenn (briefly played hoops for Wisconsin in 1951-52 after competing on JV squad previous season) collected four hits against the Kansas City Athletics in a 1959 contest.

  • Chicago Cubs LF Bill Nicholson (Washington College MD hoops guard for two years in mid-1930s) provided five RBI against the Cincinnati Reds in a 1940 game. Two years later in a 1942 outing, Nicholson amassed two triples and five RBI against the Reds.

  • First appearance of the 1933 campaign for New York Giants RHP Roy Parmelee (Eastern Michigan hoops letterman in 1924-25 and 1925-26) resulted in a one-hitter against the Philadelphia Phillies.

  • OF Curtis Pride (led William & Mary in steals three times and assists twice from 1986-87 through 1989-90) shipped by the New York Mets to the Boston Red Sox as part of a conditional deal in 2000.

  • Baltimore Orioles DH Ken Singleton (Hofstra freshman hoops squad in mid-1960s) supplied three extra-base hits against the Boston Red Sox in 1981.

  • Montreal Expos 2B Gary Sutherland (averaged 7.4 ppg with USC in 1963-64) went 4-for-4 against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1969.

  • RHP Cecil Upshaw (led Centenary in scoring as junior while averaging 13.7 ppg and 6 rpg from 1961-62 through 1963-64) traded by the Cleveland Indians to the New York Yankees in 1974.

  • New York Giants rookie 1B Babe Young (Fordham hoops letterman in 1935-36) manufactured multiple hits in his fifth consecutive contest in 1940.

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopers Make Their Mark on April 25 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopers had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is an April 25 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

APRIL 25

  • New York Yankees P Jim Beattie (Dartmouth's top rebounder in 1974-75 when selected basketball team MVP and honorable mention All-Ivy League) won his MLB debut in 1978 (4-3 against Baltimore Orioles).

  • Chicago Cubs 2B Glenn Beckert (three-year hoops letterman for Allegheny PA) banged out four hits against the Houston Astros in a 1970 game.

  • Texas Rangers RHP Jim Bibby (Fayetteville State NC backup player and brother of UCLA All-American Henry Bibby) tossed a four-hit shutout against the Boston Red Sox in 1974.

  • Detroit Tigers 2B Frank Bolling (averaged 7.3 ppg for Spring Hill AL in 1950-51) collected four hits and four RBI against the Cleveland Indians in a 1954 contest.

  • In a 1969 game, Montreal Expos 1B Donn Clendenon (four-sport letterman with Morehouse GA) contributed four hits against his original team (Pittsburgh Pirates).

  • Two weeks after helping the Boston Celtics capture the 1961 NBA title, RHP Gene Conley (All-PCC first-team selection led North Division in scoring in 1949-50 as Washington State sophomore) earned his first A.L. victory (6-1 for the Boston Red Sox over the Washington Senators).

  • Cleveland Indians RF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union team winning 1943 CIAA title) tied MLB record by striking out five times in a single game (at Detroit in 1948).

  • LF David Justice (led Thomas More KY in assists in 1984-85) went deep twice for the Cleveland Indians as they hit a team-record eight homers in an 11-4 triumph over the Milwaukee Brewers in 1997.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers LHP Fred Kipp (two-time all-league selection as four-year hoops letterman for Emporia State KS from 1950 through 1953) won his first MLB start (5-3 against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1958).

  • New York Giants CF Hank Leiber (Arizona hooper in 1931) supplied five RBI against the Boston Braves in a 1936 contest.

  • Only 14 games into the 1982 season, New York Yankees owner George Steinbrenner fired manager Bob Lemon and replaced him with Gene Michael (Kent State's leading scorer with 14 ppg in 1957-58), the man Lemon succeeded the previous September.

  • 3B Graig Nettles (shot 87.8% from free-throw line for San Diego State in 1963-64) put the Minnesota Twins ahead with a three-run pinch homer in the eighth inning but they wound up losing at Chicago, 6-5, in 1969.

  • RHP Joe Niekro (averaged 8.9 ppg and 3.8 rpg for West Liberty WV from 1963-64 through 1965-66) traded by the Chicago Cubs to the San Diego Padres in 1969.

  • En route to hitting safely in seven of his first nine pinch-hit appearances with the San Diego Padres, utilityman Gary Sutherland (averaged 7.4 ppg with USC in 1963-64) socked a homer against the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1977.

  • Atlanta Braves RHP Cecil Upshaw (Centenary's leading scorer as junior in 1962-63) secured his fifth relief victory in the first month of 1971 campaign.

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopers Make Their Mark on April 24 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopers had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history. Former Alabama hoops lettermen Riggs Stephenson and Jim Tabor had significant MLB games with their bats on this date.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is an April 24 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

APRIL 24

  • San Diego Padres SS Bill Almon (averaged 2.5 ppg in half a season for Brown's 1972-73 basketball team ending school's streak of 12 straight losing records) contributed four hits for the second time in four days in 1978.

  • Philadelphia Phillies LF Morrie Arnovich (Wisconsin-Superior hooper in early 1930s) went 4-for-4, including three doubles, in a 7-3 win against Brooklyn in 1937.

  • Baltimore Orioles rookie 2B Marv Breeding (Samford hooper in mid-1950s) went hitless for the only time in his first 12 MLB games.

  • Boston Braves SS Dick Culler (#9 jersey retired by High Point for Little All-American in 1935 and 1936) went 4-for-4 in an 8-6 win against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1945.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers rookie SS Ben Geraghty (Villanova hoops letterman from 1933-34 through 1935-36) supplied his fourth straight multiple-hit game in 1936.

  • Oakland Athletics rookie 3B Wayne Gross (led Cal Poly Pomona in assists in 1974-75) went 4-for-4 with four RBI against the Chicago White Sox in the nightcap of a 1977 doubleheader.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers LHP Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman hoops squad in 1953-54) tied a MLB record by striking out 18 batters in a nine-inning game at Chicago in 1962.

  • Toronto Blue Jays RHP Dave Lemanczyk (averaged 4.5 ppg and 3.5 rpg for Hartwick NY teams compiling 51-21 record from 1969-70 through 1971-72) tossed a one-hitter against the Texas Rangers. It was one of three shutouts for him in 1979.

  • LF Danny Litwhiler (member of hoops JV team with Bloomsburg PA in mid-1930s) collected four of 22 hits by the Boston Braves and chipped in with four RBI in a 14-5 victory over the New York Giants in 1947. Johnny Mize, who later had a basketball arena named after him at Piedmont College GA, socked three successive homers for the Giants. Five years earlier with the Philadelphia Phillies, Litwhiler went 4-for-4 against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1942.

  • Kansas City Athletics 2B Jerry Lumpe (member of Southwest Missouri State's 1952 NAIA Tournament hoops championship team) provided his fifth multiple-hit game in as many outings to start the 1960 campaign en route to compiling a .471 average while hitting safely in his first 13 contests of the season.

  • San Diego Padres RHP Roger Mason (multiple-year hoops letterman in late 1970s for Saginaw Valley State MI) didn't allow an earned run through his first nine relief appearances in 1993.

  • New York Yankees SS Gene Michael (led Kent State in scoring with 14 ppg in 1957-58) contributed a career-high four RBI against the Minnesota Twins in 1971.

  • Washington Senators rookie CF Irv Noren (player of year for California community college hoops state champion Pasadena City in 1945) went hitless for the only time in his first 13 MLB starts in 1950.

  • Oakland Athletics CF Billy North (played hoops briefly for Central Washington in 1967-68) stole three bases against the Chicago White Sox in the nightcap of a 1977 twinbill.

  • RHP John Pyecha (led Appalachian State in scoring, rebounding and field-goal shooting in 1951-52 and 1954-55) lost his only MLB pitching appearance with the Chicago Cubs in 1954.

  • New York Yankees 3B Red Rolfe (played hoops briefly with Dartmouth in 1927-28 and 1929-30) ripped two homers against the Philadelphia Athletics in a 1940 game.

  • New York Giants RHP Hal Schumacher (multiple-sport athlete for St. Lawrence NY in early 1930s) and Hall of Fame teammate Mel Ott each socked two homers against the Philadelphia Phillies in a 1934 game.

  • Baltimore Orioles RF Ken Singleton (Hofstra freshman hoops squad in mid-1960s) smacked two homers against the California Angels in 1979 in the midst of seven multiple-hit outings in an eight-game span.

  • Chicago Cubs LF Riggs Stephenson (Alabama hoops letterman in 1920) clubbed three doubles for the second time in a six-game span in 1932.

  • Boston Red Sox rookie 3B Jim Tabor (Alabama hoops letterman in 1936-37) tallied four hits for the first of four times in a 30-game span to early June in 1939.

  • Chicago White Sox LHP Matt Thornton (averaged 5.8 ppg and 2.4 rpg for Grand Valley State MI from 1995-96 through 1997-98) yielded his only run in 12 relief appearances during the month in 2012.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates CF Bill Virdon (Drury MO hooper in 1949) went 4-for-4 against the New York Mets in a 1964 game.

  • Boston Red Sox SS Billy Werber (first Duke hoops All-American in 1929-30) went 4-for-4 against the Washington Senators in a 1934 contest.

  • San Diego Padres RF Dave Winfield (starting forward for Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) collected four hits and five RBI against the Los Angeles Dodgers in a 1975 outing.

Big Shoes to Fill: Time Will Tell for Successors at APSU and San Diego State

Time will tell if it was worth the wait for hand-picked San Diego State successor Brian Dutcher after serving as an aide to Steve Fisher for more than a quarter century (including last seasons with Aztecs). Much is made of the struggles for an individual when succeeding a coaching legend such as active mentors Temple's Fran Dunphy (followed John Chaney), Louisville's Rick Pitino (Denny Crum), Purdue's Matt Painter (Gene Keady), Maryland's Mark Turgeon (Gary Williams) and Florida's Michael White (Billy Donovan). But only eight of the successors on the following list posted losing marks during their tenures compared to twice as many of the predecessors.

Syracuse, where Mike Hopkins previously was coach-in-waiting to replace Jim Boeheim, was likely the next example showing how celebrated coaches lay a solid foundation that can't possibly be messed up. But Hopkins got antsy waiting for Boeheim to finally hang 'em up and chose to become Washington's bench boss. Pitino joined Gene Bartow, John Brady, Mike Davis, Bill Guthridge, Joe B. Hall, Dick Harp, Jack Kraft, Pete Newell, John Oldham and Lou Rossini as coaches who took teams from the same institution to the Final Four after replacing an icon.

Matt Figger, an assistant under Frank Martin for 10 seasons at Kansas State and South Carolina, hopes some of Martin's magic rubs off on him at Austin Peay after replacing retiring Dave Loos (402- wins in 27 seasons). Naturally, it's not all peaches and cream inheriting a stable program. Before guiding South Florida to the NCAA playoffs in 2012, Stan Heath compiled a modest 82-71 record with Arkansas in five seasons from 2002-03 through 2006-07 after succeeding Nolan Richardson. Richardson (389-169 mark with the Hogs from 1986-2002) and Fisher (386-209 with SDSU from 2002-17) and their successors didn't quite make the following list regarding the level of success for successors of legends who won more than 400 games for a single school:

Coaching Legend School Record Tenure Successor Record Tenure
Phog Allen Kansas 588-218 1908, 09 & 20-56 Dick Harp 121-82 1957-64
Dale Brown Louisiana State 448-301 1973-97 John Brady 192-139 1998-2008
Howard Cann NYU 409-232 1924-58 Lou Rossini 185-137 1959-71
Lou Carnesecca St. John's 526-200 1966-70 & 74-92 Brian Mahoney 56-58 1993-96
Pete Carril Princeton 514-261 1968-96 Bill Carmody 92-25 1997-2000
Gale Catlett West Virginia 439-276 1979-2002 John Beilein 104-60 2003-07
John Chaney Temple 516-253 1983-2006 Fran Dunphy 230-136 2007-17
Denny Crum Louisville 675-295 1972-2001 Rick Pitino 416-143 2002-17
Ed Diddle Western Kentucky 759-302 1923-64 John Oldham 146-41 1965-71
Don Donoher Dayton 437-275 1964-89 Jim O'Brien 61-87 1990-94
Billy Donovan Florida 467-186 1997-2015 Michael White 48-24 2016 & 2017
Hec Edmundson Washington 488-195 1921-47 Art McLarney 53-36 1948-50
Fred Enke Arizona 511-318 1926-61 Bruce Larson 137-148 1962-72
Jack Friel Washington State 495-377 1929-58 Marv Harshman 155-181 1959-71
Taps Gallagher Niagara 465-261 1932-43 & 47-65 Jim Maloney 35-38 1966-68
Slats Gill Oregon State 599-392 1929-64 Paul Valenti 91-82 1960 & 65-70
Don Haskins Texas-El Paso 719-353 1962-99 Jason Rabedeaux 46-46 2000-02
Lou Henson Illinois 421-226 1976-96 Lon Kruger 81-48 1997-2000
Tony Hinkle Butler 549-384 1927-70 George Theofanis 79-105 1971-77
Nat Holman CCNY 423-190 1920-60 Dave Polansky* N/A N/A
Hank Iba Oklahoma State 655-316 1935-70 Sam Aubrey 18-60 1971-73
Gene Keady Purdue 512-270 1981-2005 Matt Painter 265-142 2006-17
Frank Keaney Rhode Island 403-124 1922-48 Robert "Red" Haire 57-42 1949-52
Bob Knight Indiana 659-242 1972-2000 Mike Davis 115-79 2001-06
Guy Lewis Houston 592-279 1957-86 Pat Foster 142-73 1987-93
Dave Loos Austin Peay State 402-392 1991-2017 Matt Figger TBD since 2018
Shelby Metcalf Texas A&M 438-306 1964-90 Kermit Davis Jr. 8-21 1991
Ray Meyer DePaul 724-354 1943-84 Joey Meyer 231-158 1985-97
Lute Olson Arizona 590-192 1984-2007 Kevin O'Neill 19-15 2008
Clarence "Nibs" Price California 449-294 1925-54 Pete Newell 119-44 1955-60
Adolph Rupp Kentucky 875-190 1931-72 Joe B. Hall 297-100 1973-85
Alex Severance Villanova 413-201 1937-61 Jack Kraft 238-95 1962-73
Dean Smith North Carolina 879-254 1962-97 Bill Guthridge 80-28 1998-2000
Norm Stewart Missouri 634-333 1968-99 Quin Snyder 126-91 2000-06
Jerry Tarkanian UNLV 509-105 1974-92 Rollie Massimino 36-21 1993 & '94
John Thompson Jr. Georgetown 596-239 1973-99 Craig Esherick 103-74 1999-2004
Gary Williams Maryland 461-252 1990-2011 Mark Turgeon 138-67 2012-17
John Wooden UCLA 620-147 1949-75 Gene Bartow 51-10 1976 & '77
Ned Wulk Arizona State 405-273 1958-82 Bob Weinhauer 44-45 1983-85

*CCNY de-emphasized its program after the 1952-53 season.

NOTE: Olson formally announced his retirement less than a month before the 2008-09 season when the Wildcats compiled a 21-14 record under Russ Pennell.

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopers Make Their Mark on April 23 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopers had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history. Former Illinois Wesleyan hoopers Bill Conroy and Cal Neeman had significant performances as MLB catchers on this date.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is an April 23 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

APRIL 23

  • New York Giants LF Ethan Allen (Cincinnati basketball letterman in 1924-25 and 1925-26) went 4-for-4 in a 7-2 loss against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1932.

  • Milwaukee Braves rookie LF Howie Bedell (averaged 3.5 ppg and 3.5 rpg for West Chester PA in 1955-56) banged out a career-high three safeties against the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1962. Bedell hit safely in his first eight MLB games earlier in the month.

  • Seattle Mariners LF Bruce Bochte (starting forward for Santa Clara's NCAA playoff team in 1969-70) went 4-for-4 against the Minnesota Twins in a 1982 contest.

  • Boston Red Sox C Bill Conroy (Illinois Wesleyan hooper in early 1930s) collected a career-high three hits in a 1942 game against the Washington Senators.

  • In a celebrated fracas, New York Giants SS Alvin Dark (letterman for LSU and USL during World War II) confronted Jackie Robinson (Pacific Coast Conference leading scorer both seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) after the Brooklyn Dodgers' INF bowled over a Giants pitcher covering first base on a bunt in 1955. The previous year, Robinson swiped second, third and home in the sixth inning before doubling in the winning run in the 13th in a 6-5 decision over the Pittsburgh Pirates. Two years earlier, Dark delivered three extra-base hits against the Pirates in 1953.

  • Milwaukee Braves RF John DeMerit (Wisconsin letterman in 1956-57 when averaging 2.2 ppg and 2.1 rpg) contributed a career-high three hits in a 3-1 win against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1961.

  • A pinch-hit homer in the bottom of the 10th inning by Dick Gernert (Temple letterman in 1948-49 when averaging 2.7 ppg) tied the score for the Detroit Tigers in an eventual 3-2 victory against the Los Angeles Angels in 1961.

  • In 1960, Pittsburgh Pirates rookie LHP Joe Gibbon (two-time All-SEC forward for Ole Miss was nation's second-leading scorer as senior in 1956-57) won his first two MLB appearances.

  • San Diego Padres RF Tony Gwynn (All-WAC second-team selection with San Diego State in 1979-80 and 1980-81) went 5-for-5 and scored four runs against the Philadelphia Phillies in a 1994 outing.

  • In 1983, San Francisco Giants P Atlee Hammaker (averaged 5.3 ppg as freshman in 1976-77 and 4.9 ppg as sophomore in 1977-78 under East Tennessee State coach Sonny Smith) hurled his second of back-to-back shutouts en route to pacing the N.L. in ERA (2.25).

  • RHP Jay Hook (Northwestern's third-leading scorer as a sophomore with 10.7 ppg in 1955-56) posted the expansion New York Mets' first-ever victory (9-1 at Pittsburgh in 1962) after they dropped their initial nine contests.

  • Detroit Tigers rookie SS Harvey Kuenn (played briefly for Wisconsin in 1951-52 after competing on JV squad previous season) supplied his fourth three-hit game in first nine outings of the 1953 campaign.

  • St. Louis Cardinals SS Doc Lavan (Hope MI hooper from 1908 through 1910) delivered four hits against the Cincinnati Reds in a 1922 contest.

  • 3B Vance Law (averaged 6.8 ppg for Brigham Young from 1974-75 through 1976-77) hit safely in his first 16 games with the Chicago Cubs in 1988.

  • St. Louis Cardinals rookie CF Wally Moon (averaged 4.3 ppg with Texas A&M in 1948-49 and 1949-50) went 5-for-5 but the Milwaukee Braves won, 7-5, in 14 innings in 1954 when Hank Aaron hammered his first of 755 MLB homers.

  • First MLB homer for C Cal Neeman (Illinois Wesleyan's leading scorer in 1947-48 and 1948-49), a 10th-inning blast off the Milwaukee Braves' Lew Burdette, was the difference in a 3-2 win for the Chicago Cubs in 1957.

  • OF Ted Savage (led Lincoln MO in scoring average in 1955-56) involved in four-player swap going from the Chicago Cubs to the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1968.

  • Chicago Cubs LF Riggs Stephenson (Alabama hoops letterman in 1920) went 4-for-4 against the St. Louis Cardinals in a 1929 contest.

  • LHP Matt Thornton (averaged 5.8 ppg and 2.4 rpg for Grand Valley State MI from 1995-96 through 1997-98) held opponents scoreless in his first 25 relief appearances with the Washington Nationals until yielding a run against the St. Louis Cardinals in 2015.

  • St. Louis Cardinals 1B Bill White (two-year hooper with Hiram OH in early 1950s) went 4-for-4 against the Houston Colt .45's in a 1963 game.

  • New York Yankees RF Dave Winfield (starting forward for Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) smacked two homers against the Cleveland Indians in a 1987 contest.

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopers Make Their Mark on April 22 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopers had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is an April 22 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

APRIL 22

  • Cincinnati Reds OF Ethan Allen (Cincinnati basketball letterman in 1924-25 and 1925-26) provided four hits in a 9-4 triumph against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1929.

  • Seattle Mariners 1B Bruce Bochte (starting forward for Santa Clara's NCAA playoff team in 1969-70 hit safely in first 14 games of 1979 campaign until his streak was snapped by the Minnesota Twins.

  • Kansas City Athletics LF Bob Cerv (ranked fourth on Nebraska's career scoring list in 1949-50 when finishing college career) clubbed two homers against the Cleveland Indians in a 1958 game.

  • Milwaukee Braves 2B Jack Dittmer (Iowa hooper in 1949-50) jacked a homer in his third consecutive contest in 1953.

  • New York Giants 2B Frankie Frisch (Fordham hoops captain) furnished four hits against the Brooklyn Dodgers in a 1923 outing.

  • San Diego Padres RF Tony Gwynn (All-WAC second-team selection with San Diego State in 1979-80 and 1980-81) went 4-for-4 against the San Francisco Giants in a 1991 game.

  • In 1953, New York Giants RHP Jim Hearn (Georgia Tech hoops letterman in 1941-42) posted his 12th consecutive win over the Pittsburgh Pirates.

  • Chicago Cubs SS Don Kessinger (three-time All-SEC selection for Mississippi from 1961-62 through 1963-64 while finishing among nation's top 45 scorers each year) contributed three hits, including an inside-the-park homer, in a 7-5 victory over the St. Louis Cardinals in 1970, snapping P Mike Torrez's 11-game winning streak dating back to previous season.

  • Chicago Cubs CF Jerry Martin (1971 Southern Conference MVP after he was Furman's runner-up in scoring the previous season) scored four runs in a 16-12 triumph against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1980.

  • OF Lyle Mouton (starter in LSU's backcourt with All-American Chris Jackson for 1989 NCAA playoff team) shipped by the New York Yankees to the Chicago White Sox in 1995 to complete an earlier deal involving P Jack McDowell.

  • New York Yankees 3B Graig Nettles (shot 87.8% from free-throw line for San Diego State in 1963-64) went 4-for-4 against the Texas Rangers in a 1979 contest.

  • Reliever Cecil Upshaw (led Centenary in scoring as junior while averaging 13.7 ppg and 6 rpg from 1961-62 through 1963-64) traded by the Atlanta Braves to the Houston Astros in 1973.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers rookie 1B Preston Ward (second-leading scorer for Southwest Missouri State in 1946-47 and 1948-49) went 2-for-5 against the New York Giants in each of his first three MLB games in 1948.

Lost in Shuffle: Spotlight on Legends Completely Obscures Their Predecessors

Retiring Steve Fisher of San Diego State (386) didn't quite make it, but more than 40 current NCAA Division I schools feature all-time winningest coaches boasting in excess of 400 triumphs. The length of tenure necessary to win so many games makes it almost impossible to remember their predecessors. Anyone who can name 1/4 of the mentors they succeeded goes straight to the Trivia Hall of Fame.

Billy Donovan's success with the Oklahoma City Thunder after departing Florida triggered a question as to what other individuals are completely overshadowed as successor to a coaching legend. Donovan combined with fellow record holders Phog Allen, Dale Brown, Gale Catlett, Denny Crum, Ed Diddle, Hec Edmundson, Jack Friel, Don Haskins, Lou Henson, Hank Iba, Frank Keaney, Bob Knight, Bob McKillop, Ray Meyer, Lute Olson, Alex Severance, Norm Stewart, Bob Thomason, John Thompson Jr., Gary Williams, John Wooden and Ned Wulk for more than 12,500 victories at their respective schools where they established new standards. Who would have thought such achievements were in store after their predecessors collaborated to go more than 300 games below .500 over a collective 100-plus seasons?

One of the predecessor names in particular should surprise you. Incredibly, the only one of Kansas' 10 head coaches with a career losing record is the inventor of the sport (Dr. James Naismith). Naismith is among the following coaches who were succeeded by individuals posting more than 400 wins to become the all-time winningest mentor at the same institution:

School All-Time Winningest Coach Predecessor (W-L Record During Tenure)
Arizona Lute Olson (590 victories) Ben Lindsey (4-25 in 1982-83)
Arizona State Ned Wulk (405) Bill Kajikawa (88-137 from 1948-49 through 1956-57)
Austin Peay Dave Loos (402) Howard Jackson (19-35 in 1983-84 and 1984-85
Butler Tony Hinkle (549) Harlan O. "Pat" Page (94-29 from 1920-21 through 1925-26)
California Clarence "Nibs" Price (449) Earl Wright (60-20 from 1920-21 through 1923-24)
Connecticut Jim Calhoun (626) Dom Perno (139-114 from 1977-78 through 1985-86)
Davidson Bob McKillop (495) Bobby Hussey (107-126 from 1981-82 through 1988-89)
Dayton Don Donoher (437) Tom Blackburn (352-141 from 1947-48 through 1963-64)
DePaul Ray Meyer (724) Bill Wendt (23-20 in 1940-41 and 1941-42)
Duke Mike Krzyzewski (998) Bill E. Foster (113-64 from 1974-75 through 1979-80)
Florida Billy Donovan (467) Lon Kruger (104-80 from 1990-91 through 1995-96)
Georgetown John Thompson Jr. (596) Jack Magee (69-80 from 1966-67 through 1971-72)
Houston Guy Lewis (592) Alden Pasche (135-116 from 1945-46 through 1955-56)
Illinois Lou Henson (421) Gene Bartow (8-18 in 1974-75)
Indiana Bob Knight (659) Lou Watson (62-60 from 1965-66 through 1968-69 and 1970-71)
Kansas Phog Allen (590) Dr. James Naismith (55-60 from 1899 through 1907)
Kentucky Adolph Rupp (875) John Mauer (40-14 from 1927-28 through 1929-30)
Louisiana State Dale Brown (448) Press Maravich (76-86 from 1966-67 through 1971-72)
Louisville Denny Crum (675) Howard Stacey (12-8 in 1970-71)
Maryland Gary Williams (461) Bob Wade (36-50 from 1986-87 through 1988-89)
Missouri Norm Stewart (634) Bob Vanatta (42-80 from 1962-63 through 1966-67)
Niagara Taps Gallagher (465) Bill McCarthy (44-35 from 1927-28 through 1930-31)
North Carolina Dean Smith (879) Frank McGuire (164-58 from 1952-53 through 1960-61)
Oklahoma State Hank Iba (655) Harold James (13-41 from 1931-32 through 1933-34)
Oregon State Slats Gill (599) Robert Hager (115-53 from 1922-23 through 1927-28)
Pacific Bob Thomason (414) Tom O'Neill (51-110 from 1982-83 through 1987-88)
Princeton Pete Carril (514) Butch van Breda Kolff (103-31 from 1962-63 through 1966-67)
Purdue Gene Keady (512) Lee Rose (50-18 in 1978-79 and 1979-80)
Rhode Island Frank Keaney (403) Fred Murray (9-8 in 1920-21)
St. John's Lou Carnesecca* (526) Frank Mulzoff (56-27 from 1970-71 through 1972-73)
Syracuse Jim Boeheim (1,004) Roy Danforth (148-71 from 1968-69 through 1975-76)
Temple John Chaney (516) Don Casey (151-94 from 1973-74 through 1981-82)
Texas A&M Shelby Metcalf (438) Bobby Rogers (92-52 from 1957-58 through 1962-63)
Texas-El Paso Don Haskins (719) Harold Davis (18-30 in 1959-60 and 1960-61)
UCLA John Wooden (620) Wilbur Johns (93-120 from 1939-40 through 1947-48)
UNLV Jerry Tarkanian (509) John Bayer (44-36 from 1970-71 through 1972-73)
Villanova Alex Severance (413) Doc Jacobs (62-56 from 1929-30 through 1935-36)
Washington Hec Edmundson (488) Stub Allison (7-8 in 1919-20)
Washington State Jack Friel (495) Karl Schlademan (18-27 in 1926-27 and 1927-28)
West Virginia Gale Catlett (439) Joedy Gardner (59-53 from 1974-75 through 1977-78)
Western Kentucky Ed Diddle (759) L.T. Smith (3-1 in 1922)

*Carnesecca succeeded Joe Lapchick when he served his first stint with St. John's from 1965-66 through 1969-70

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopers Make Their Mark on April 21 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopers had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is an April 21 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

APRIL 21

  • Lone MLB RBI for 3B Ernie Andres (NCAA consensus first-team basketball All-American with Indiana in 1939) helped the Boston Red Sox outlast the Philadelphia Athletics, 12-11, in the opener of a 1946 doubleheader.

  • St. Louis Browns rookie RF Beau Bell (two-year hoops letterman for Texas A&M in early 1930s) contributed four hits and four RBI against the Chicago White Sox in a 1935 game.

  • Baltimore Orioles CF Al Bumbry (Virginia State's runner-up in scoring with 16.7 ppg as freshman in 1964-65) supplied four hits against the Boston Red Sox in a 1982 contest.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates INF Gene Freese (West Liberty WV hoops captain of 1952 NAIA Tournament team) pinch-hitting for Willie Stargell, delivered a decisive three-run homer in the top of the ninth inning for an 8-5 win against the Chicago Cubs in 1964.

  • LHP Steve Hamilton (All-OVC selection was Morehead State's leading scorer and rebounder in 1956-57 and 1957-58) traded by the Washington Senators to the New York Yankees for P Jim Coates in 1963.

  • Chicago White Sox RHP Howie Judson (Illinois' third-leading scorer with 8.5 ppg as sophomore in 1944-45) won his 1949 season debut (5-2 against Detroit Tigers) before dropping next 14 decisions through August.

  • California Angels C Art Kusnyer (led Kent State in field-goal percentage in 1965-66 as team's third-leading scorer and rebounder) contributed a career-high three hits against the Texas Rangers in a 1972 outing.

  • Cleveland Indians CF Kenny Lofton (Arizona's hoops leader in steals for 1988 Final Four team compiling 35-3 record) collected three hits and three stolen bases against the Minnesota Twins in 1994.

  • St. Louis Cardinals LF Wally Moon (averaged 4.3 ppg with Texas A&M in 1948-49 and 1949-50) went 4-for-4 against the Chicago Cubs in the nightcap of a 1957 doubleheader.

  • Oakland Athletics CF Billy North (played hoops briefly for Central Washington in 1967-68) went 4-for-4 against the Detroit Tigers in a 1976 game.

  • Boston Red Sox SS Billy Werber (first Duke hoops All-American in 1929-30) registered multiple extra-base hits in his third consecutive contest in 1934.

  • St. Louis Cardinals 1B Bill White (two-year hooper with Hiram OH in early 1950s) supplied multiple hits in five of his first seven games in 1962.

  • Chicago White Sox RHP Jim Wilson (hoops letterman for San Diego State's 1942 NAIA Tournament participant) opened the 1957 campaign with a 10-inning shutout against the Kansas City Athletics.

  • New York Yankees DH Dave Winfield (starting forward for Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) smacked two homers against the Texas Rangers in a 1990 game.

Pitino Place: Pompous Pilot Slick Rick May Be Banned From Wearing White Suit

With a resolution possibly due in early June, scrutiny of Louisville's program has had a shelf life lasting a mite longer than 15 seconds, leaving the white suit coach Rick Pitino occasionally dons a drunk-on-power symbol for anything but purity. There is little doubt an earlier self-imposed one-year postseason competition ban and future scholarship/recruiting reductions (a/k/a preemptive plea bargain) implied the Cardinals faced more significant sanctions down the road such as NCAA prohibiting Pitino from wearing said white suit. If there is any good news, at least UL's upper brass didn't don Mexican garb for the "trick-or-treat" meeting with NCAA Infractions Committee and doesn't seem to buy stock into dimwitted deflection tactics blaming book publishing company owned by Indiana's largest-ever donor with law school named after him. However, it still seems probable Pitino will have an opportunity to cowardly boycott or conduct a Cam Newton-like walkout, departing hand gesture or not, at any press briefing if Strippergate sanctions finally are announced.

Amid full-figure female fallout from fact-filled tell-all tale (Breaking Cardinal Rules), pretentious Pitino said: “There's only one good thing about being 63 (now older) – you don't care what people think anymore.” The reprehensible regaling all sounded vaguely familiar. After all, it seems as if thin-skinned Pompous Pilot didn't care when he was in his 50s (restaurant affair with staffer's soon-to-be spouse), 40s (quit in mid-season after lured by $50 million to try to become reincarnation of Red Auerbach rather than next Adolph Rupp), 30s (BU Revue) and 20s (Hawaii infractions)?

Essentially, a tawdry timeline stems from philosophy of do as I say; not as I do. One of Pitino's books lecturing everyone else discusses how the past can haunt you. As an assistant at Hawaii, Pitino was implicated in eight of 64 violations leading to the Rainbows' two-year probation stint in the late 1970s. Nonetheless, the narcissist didn't care upon setting foot in Kentucky years ago as his one-day contract stump speech unfolded prior to incessant recycling. Was there any Pitino-linked symbolism when probation-bound Hawaii earned a berth in the NCAA playoffs while UL was banished?

“I think it's a positive because I know exactly what can go on the wrong way,” Pitino smugly self-assessed about suspect hoop activities in the Paradise of the Pacific shortly before he was hired by UK in the late 1980s. “There's no one in this business with more integrity (than me). It didn't happen in Hawaii as far as I'm concerned. I didn't make any mistakes, I don't care what anybody says. I'm not going to comment on it anymore because I don't have to.”

Need more I-don't-give-a-rip integrity? The alternate-reality program wallowed in self-absorption when Louisville failed to care about providing anything but a lame spin-tour remark stemming from an inquiry regarding an anecdote in the incisive book Raw Recruits written by dying-breed respected journalists Alexander Wolff and Armen Keteyian (more on media later). With apologies to “dictator” Dick Vitale's personal library, Season on the Brink (written by John Feinstein) and Raw Recruits rank 1-2 or vice versa as the all-time most compelling behind-the-scenes books on college basketball. After a big win for Pitino-coached Boston University at Rhode Island in the early 1980s, Raw Recruits alleged he rewarded the Terriers by having their bus stop at a jiggle joint on the way back to campus and hand out dollar bills to players so they might tuck them into G-strings.

Thirty years later, a ridiculous red-light district response from condescending UL about the book's sewer snippet was the famished BU brigade innocently walked in to get food, presumably thinking neon lights and all were essentials for a lively restaurant, but promptly bailed with hands covering their eyes. How many times have you heard about a booby bar being confused with fast food unless it is difficult to differentiate between excessive makeup on a Dancin' Girl and same for Ronald McDonald? Of course, there's not much happy-deal difference between unwrapped buns “having a good day” at the Golden Arches and gold jewelry near strategic arches on naked bodies. Maybe the classy New England establishment was simply a topless diner for roadie academic tutors, unbeknownst to coach, keeping GPA (Great Party Atmosphere) of squad members up by cramming for anatomy class on trek home.

Dwelling a little more on distinguishing between day-of-reckoning dignity and depravity, how low can you sink when self-proclaimed Elvis Presley (ex-UL All-American Terrence “Why Would I Pay Anybody for Anything” Williams) was a credibility reference for Hookergate scoring considering his checkered past? It may be the equivalent of Pitino vouching for former UK guard Richie "He Can Do No Wrong" Farmer when he ran afoul of the law.

Here is what genuinely "doesn't make any sense at all" for someone who is kind of a big deal. Pitino, boasting a master-puppeteer reputation, has a penchant for "can't-find-one-person" pap not knowing what the hell is going on around him even if it is a relatively minor thing such as six-year UL assistant coach Steve Masiello failing to complete requirements for a diploma during and after his ex-Knicks ball-boy playing for him at UK before immersed in an academic controversy as Manhattan's coach.

Understandably, the contrived Sgt. “I know nothing” Schultz routine regarding the "we have a different way we recruit" rot really got old. One of Pitino's books also honed in on when it's best not to delegate. Pitino, saying he was “still trying to understand the motive,” treats his former player/assistant coach Andre McGee as if aspiring to explain a Shakespearean production ("Et tu, Brutus?"). Actually, it would be helpful to know when fall-guy target McGee was first exposed to this scurrilous stagecraft before he is thrown under the intellectually-and-morally bankrupt bus. The bluster bus is driven by Pitino, who said: "We have the most compliant coaches in the NCAA, no matter what you hear." We presume his assessment includes former graduate assistant Brandon Williams, who failed to cooperate in the NCAA's probe. If relevant at all, did we hear if this commendable credential predated McGee as a player and/or coach or kicked in after McGee departed for UMKC and subsequently working as a driver for car service Uber?

Do Pitino's longstanding don't-care comments credibly pass a sincere threshold to where the nation should deluge him with speedy-recovery well wishes to help mend his broken heart? As most ardent hoop observers are aware, the BU rock-star sojourn wasn't the only time he mistook a restaurant for adult entertainment. Amplifying on the toxic topic via common sense, it is inconceivable to accept no-compulsion premise there was nothing abnormal maneuvering from normal sensual behavior to chance stop-on-a-dime meeting with extortion-bound stranger on an upscale restaurant table. Just wondering, but did the fine-diner owner leave keys thinking the hangers-on were going to sweep the floor and clean the dishes exercising 15 seconds of shame? Perhaps they were waiting on UL football coach Bobby Petrino and hoop sage Bo Ryan to compare notes about exploits on and off the court.

Seems as if there was lack of credibility everywhere one turned. In the wake of such boorish behavior, should we bother to contemplate what went on to relieve stress at higher-stakes citadels such as New York (Knicks) and college cage capital (Lexington, KY)? It almost makes a Client 9-curious individual want to enlist the services of a PI to rummage through little black book of whomever the Manhattan Madam happened to be in late 1980s before conducting survey of coeds attending UK the first half of 1990s about any love lodge or perhaps big and blue van featuring tinted windows. First step learning about "good times" equipment might be giving amnesia antidote or truth serum to gatekeeper/chauffeur. Winston Bennett, an assistant under Pitino with UK and the Boston Celtics, may also be able to offer some insight based on the former All-SEC second-team selection admitting he "slept with 90 women a month" despite stature as the ultimate NBA scrub.

What transpired at UL is precisely why a control freak orchestrated construction of a basketball dormitory (named for his brother-in-law who tragically died in 9/11 attack) to monitor his roster and keep them from becoming salacious scholars. Instead, what repeatedly resulted was a classic example of lack of institutional control. So what if Pitino wasn't the whore-dorm booking agent or could pass a lie-detector test on a well-crafted question skirting the predatory activity. Doesn't his pact with UL have provision about “diligently supervise compliance of assistant coaches and any other employees for which he is administratively responsible”?

“I'm totally saddened to the point of disbelief over the incidents,” Pitino said during one of his incredible sulks. “We've built a very strong culture here of discipline and doing the right things.” You've got to be kidding! If so, did a single disciplined student-athlete exhibit sufficient strength to do the right thing, go to him and describe detestable culture infecting Club Minardi? If not, why are his family-atmosphere players more loyal to a subordinate than head coach? Pleading with the Hoop Gods, please don't eventually put public through the traditional "plausible-deniability" focus on disgruntled former "employees" defense.

Whether or not it was a byproduct of culture or karma, the Pitino brand a couple of years ago also faced a sex-lies-and-videotape scandal involving his son's recruits at Minnesota, which featured more suspended players than Big Ten Conference victories. Any video that year involving Gopher players, on or off hardwood, probably is filth and should be erased. Amid the disturbing credibility gap, it's probably time to shift gears and sarcastically add to the sad state of affairs with the following pointless plot lines for entertaining episodes on HBO's soon-to-be-announced Pitino Place show:

  • Jilted Karen, after escaping confinement by having sex with prison security guard boasting slick black hair, undergoes race-and-name change becoming Katina and trying to extort main character Slick Rick again before going on the cover of Vanity Fair and “earning” some sort of ESPY courage award for her copious copulation commentary.
  • In a what-might-have-been dream, Slick Rick learns in a confession booth about an innocent baby boy named Rowe Vee Wade if Catholic principles really meant more than abortion creating new definition for “health care” money. Rowe Vee Wade would have been a blue-chip playmaking prospect who played for half-brother and averaged more assists per game in college career than his look-alike estranged father (5.6 apg). Upon waking up from Rip Van Winkle slumber and media-hailed three-point shooting at summer Seniors Tournament in Florida, Slick Rick decides to become a sperm donor to try to clone Mr. Nifty Jr. (donor's college nickname).
  • Slick Rick groupie Vinny, moonlighting as an NCAA enforcement agent, taught boss to hold the tail during horse breeding and told tales about anything dealing with human breeding. But the aloof horse owner already was a thoroughbred Breeders' Cup Secretariat wannabee and only had eyes for what was under some of those gaudy race-track hats. Vinny, who was actually a double agent, eventually spilled his good-times guts to authorities when he was supposed to be conducting opposition research on rival Coach Pay-pal Cal including going through trash in Memphis trying to unearth any Slick Rick-like transgressions or rookie salary-cap violations he could possibly find to help prevent ninth defeat in last 10 confrontations.
  • Slick Rick blames Sick “You Better Put Some Ice On It” Willie for infecting him with some unnamed pants-dropping defect in front of stranger after shaking Bubba's cigar-stained hand before introducing President Stainmaker, still basking in the glow of an Arkansas title, at a campaign rally on the eve of the 1996 election. Finishing “expensive” speech on humility to Wall Street executives and meeting filing deadline for book on success, he had to take a rain check regarding cheerleader-recruiting/saxophone-lesson trip with Shrillary's Secret Weapon and equally frail contemptible Clintonista cronies to “Orgy Island.” Bubba's backup plan to reconnect with Slick was to become his boss as school Prez insofar as he has vast experience in such an overpaid category via $16.46 million over five years as honorary chancellor of Laureate University.
  • Intervention for Slick Rick unfolds to stop drinking bourbon named after him. Becoming delusional as much as Kanye is in debt, he claimed his new Kanye West/adidas shoes helped him win a dunking contest as college freshman decades ago against varsity standout Julius Erving in 1970-71 before Dr. J became a professional basketball highlight reel. Boasting super-human strength capable of reeling in mammoth marlin, Slick Rick claimed he won a home-run derby against Mike Flanagan in 1971-72 when the eventual 18-year MLB pitcher averaged 13.9 ppg for the same school's frosh squad. In a bizarre rant by Slick Rick after pain killer wore off from getting a title tattoo, the egomaniac thought he should receive Bill Cosby's Presidential Medal of Freedom if award is stripped from the widely-condemned comic. Meanwhile, Kanye ($53 million in debt) makes guest star appearance begging Taylor Swift for 53 cents for his "Famous" ideas so he can impress fashionable Kim by having more "rep" cred than 50 Cent with music endorsement by Slick Rick linked to any affiliated dorm dance.

All silly-season sarcasm aside, the bottom-line drivel is what do you expect from a program where the coach can't control himself? Prior to his passing, Louisville's most famous native, Muhammad Ali, issued his support while trying to recall which of his offspring went with which mother and delusional AD Tom Jurich, apparently an abortion advocate, said Pitino “has a perfect track record.” We presume Jurich's perfection testimonial isn't hampered by Parkinson's and includes Pitino settling for more than $2,500 to get rid of evidence. Maybe some of these unprincipled folks would show a shred of humanity if a female member of their immediate family was affected.

Just like the majority of scandals, follow the money trail of a plot that may have had its genesis in a Barbershop sequel of sorts. Whatever the amount spent by McGee for physical activity by saving gas money moving party venue closer to home, it's virtually impossible to believe the bank-bundled funds came entirely from his personal account. Pitino, responding as if he was kneed in the groin by some unknown assailant, had Olympian gall telling McGee “to step up” after skating around issue crying “Why?” way more than Nancy Kerrigan.

Of course, the most disgusting “why” involved fathers/guardians tagging along for a recruiting ride to LarryFlyntVille when not busy helping prospects with their studies. In employing a perverted version of father-son bonding, why was there the incentive way horsing around driving it homeboy rather than “a dolt” just having fond memory of playing horse against his boy in the family driveway. What would the party-planner incentive be if the recruit actually helped UL reach a Final Four?

Pitino, who said bump-and-grind allegations made him “sick to my stomach,” can always cure chronic tummy tumult via some dessert delicacy at his favorite upscale restaurant. Actually, frequent health references simply raise suspicion about his mid-season walking-out-through-the-door “flight” to Cleveland Clinic in 2003-04 three years after the "wounded tiger" quit the Celtics because Larry Bird, Kevin McHale and Robert Parish weren't walking back through their door.

An inalienable right exists to be stupid like Apple protecting phone of Islamic terrorist, but we saw the outline of a clever problem-solving act just when problem-child guard Chris Jones was dismissed. You've got the comedy-relief brains of a doorknob if you believed Louisville's shedding of a little light via a door-opening salvo explaining life-without-Jones stemmed primarily from a 9 p.m. curfew violation. It's unclear whether Pitino, exhibiting a theatrical flop reminiscent of Jones' chin-rubbing charade in a match-up with cross-state rival Kentucky, includes himself in refuting any bad acting.

Jones, described by Pitino as “type of guy who always has his hands in the cookie jar,” dropped out of school to defend himself as rigorously as the ACC's leader in steals average defended opponents. Wouldn't you like an insider to drop some knowledge regarding the rigorous classes the scholar took and stack them up against North Carolina's no-show way or the intellectually-stimulating spring-semester coursework for the one-and-done crowd? Depending upon your perspective, didn't the culture Pitino portrayed “steal” a scholarship from perhaps an authentic student-athlete? Some viewers may want to be assured they can't catch a STD from TV and seek to promptly take a shower after watching UL these days.

The shameless local and national media covering UL also are to blame, but they had a laser-like fixation on touchy-feely timing of ban rather than incalculable more vital issues such as academic integrity and power-structure lack of accountability of coaching staffs for revenue-producing sports. There should be a one-year ban on reading or watching the presstitutes because of their failure to live up to news-gathering obligations by allowing an Escort Queen to “(hard)cover” the program better than they did. How in the name of Edmund R. Murrow did Katina discern more about what was going on than Pitino, university officials and a seemingly enabling press stripped naked by her firsthand research?

Pitino claimed he didn't read Powell's expose but said “people will do anything for money.” Does the same assessment apply to Sextino regarding his series of what now seem like tainted hypocritical volumes (Success is a Choice, How to Add Value to Every Minute of Your Life, Lead to Succeed, Rebound Rules, etc.)? Taking the power of positive thinking to an extreme, he has had additional exposure to a couple of bullet points in his 10-step plan – thriving on pressure and learning from adversity.

Collateral damage caught in the middle of mess created by others, do you think chattel-graduate transfers Damion Lee (Drexel) and Trey Lewis (Cleveland State) were credibly “recruited” with emphasis on prospect of participating in NCAA playoffs? Lee said: "If we buy into the system and what coach Pitino preaches, then we can be successful." Standing O from UL fans notwithstanding, the betrayed duo "tabled" by Preacher Pitino's program should have sued the system - coaching staff and school - for fraud after enduring the pressure connected to this adversity. Mercenaries Lee and Lewis were wronged, but they triggered the wrongdoing and suffered the consequences by wrongly choosing to attend UL.

Meanwhile, self-described “soldier-in-this-army” Pitino asked: “If I resign, would people feel better about it?” Answer: Well, yes, if anyone credible amid the Get-Your-Fill-in-the-Ville debris remains boasting a moral compass rather than emphasizing morale-building comp-a__. Securing generous dose of humility upon receiving some sort of relatively modest suspension, author Pitino can take an adult education refresher course ruminating on his own following words in "The One-Day Contract":

  • "The egotistical coach, the arrogant athlete, they are stereotypes that too often ring true."
  • "The longer I live and the more I experience, the more I believe that humility is the quality essential to sustained success, and a lack of it is the major stumbling block for those who find success for a time, then lose it."
  • "There's no question when you coach at Kentucky, you fall into a trap of thinking you're much better than you really are, because of the adulation and attention. It is constant and seems to come in a never-ending supply. I did not know it in the midst of it, but that arrogance, that thinking of yourself as the best, is one of the biggest reasons successful people stumble and fail."
  • "The consequences of not learning humility can be tragic. If we don't always see these consequences in our own lives, we should be able to recognize them all around us. Not learning humility is, for one, an expensive lesson."
  • "Self-aggrandizement, alienation of friends, family, or teammates, a tragic tendency to overestimate one's talent that leads to overreaching, they all are traits of people who lack humility. This also is a story that is not new. The ancient Greeks had a word for this very situation: hubris."
  • "The same cycle (of self-destruction) can be seen in many fields. The list of those for whom humility not only might have saved a fortune, but their future, is long and star-studded."
  • "The decadent lifestyle, the entourages, the unrealistic expectation of stature and longevity - all this leads to poor choices and reckless decision making."
  • "With humility, you are better able to enjoy and understand success, and you are better able to examine and handle failure."
  • "Humble people always handle adversity so much better because they understand who they are. So many come to disappointing ends and wonder why it happened. Most often, it was a lack of humility, leading to arrogance, leading to the mistakes they made. They think they are more significant than they are and it makes them gamble with their lives and their professions. Then, when things go wrong, they lash out and blame others. Arrogant people spread around their failure with blame."
  • "Not only is humility the key to finding lasting success, but it is the key to lasting happiness. Go back through history, literature, spiritual books, and this cycle is repeated throughout generations and cultures: arrogance, fall, acceptance, humility, healing. We're no different from people who came before us. I can't state enough how important a lesson this is to learn, and the importance of learning it before life forces you to."

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopers Make Their Mark on April 20 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopers had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is an April 20 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

APRIL 20

  • Cincinnati Reds LF Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading basketball scorer in 1945-46) jacked two homers against the Pittsburgh Pirates in the nightcap of a 1952 twinbill.

  • Cincinnati Reds RF Frankie Baumholtz (MVP in 1941 NIT and first player in Ohio University history to score 1,000 career points) contributed four hits against the St. Louis Cardinals in a 1948 game.

  • In his first appearance in 1956, Brooklyn Dodgers RHP Roger Craig (forward with North Carolina State's 1949-50 freshman hoops team) fired a four-hit shutout against the Pittsburgh Pirates.

  • Boston Red Sox 1B Dick Gernert (Temple hoops letterman in 1948-49) smashed three homers in a doubleheader sweep of the Washington Senators in 1953.

  • In his MLB debut in 1923, pinch-runner Hinky Haines (Penn State hoops letterman in 1919-20 and 1920-21) scored the tying tally on Babe Ruth's ninth-inning, game-winning two-run double in the New York Yankees' 4-3 win against the Boston Red Sox.

  • Washington Senators RF Chuck Hinton (played multiple sports for Shaw NC before serving two years in U.S. Army in mid-1950s) went 4-for-4 against the New York Yankees in a 1963 contest.

  • New York Giants RHP Walt Huntzinger (All-Ivy League forward with Penn in 1921-22) didn't allow an earned run in 8 1/3 innings en route to registering his first MLB victory (2-1 against the Boston Braves in 1924).

  • Chicago Cubs 3B Davey Lopes (NAIA All-District 15 selection for Iowa Wesleyan averaged 16.9 ppg as freshman in 1964-65 and 12.1 ppg as sophomore in 1965-66 before transferring with his coach to Washburn KS) went 5-for-5 and walked twice in a 17-inning game against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1986.

  • A single by Kansas City Royals RF Jerry Martin (Furman's second-leading scorer in 1969-70 and third-leading scorer in 1970-71) was the only hit Detroit Tigers P Milt Wilcox surrendered in an 8-0 shutout in 1982.

  • In 1981, Philadelphia Phillies RF Bake McBride (averaged 12.7 ppg and 8.1 rpg in 21 games for Westminster MO in 1968-69 and 1969-70) provided his third two-double outing in a six-game span.

  • Chicago Cubs RF Bill Nicholson (Washington College MD hooper in mid-1930s) blasted two homers, including a grand slam, and supplied six RBI in a 7-4 win at St. Louis in 1947.

  • In 1961, 2B Mel Roach (averaged 9.3 ppg for Virginia in 1952-53) tied the score with the Philadelphia Phillies by ripping a two-out, three-run pinch-hit homer in the ninth inning and the Milwaukee Braves went on to prevail, 7-6, in 11 frames.

  • Cleveland Indians rookie 2B Riggs Stephenson (Alabama hoops letterman in 1920) accounted for multiple hits in each of first six MLB outings in 1921.

  • RHP Kent Tekulve (freshman hooper for Marietta OH in mid-1960s) traded by the Pittsburgh Pirates to the Philadelphia Phillies in 1985. Two years earlier, Tekulve permitted his only earned run in first 17 relief appearances of the 1983 campaign.

  • 2B Wayne Terwilliger (two-year letterman for Western Michigan averaged 5.6 ppg in his final season in 1947-48) collected an eighth-inning single for the Washington Senators' lone safety in a 7-0 loss against the Philadelphia Athletics in 1954.

  • Boston Red Sox C Sammy White (All-PCC Northern Division first-five selection for Washington in 1947-48 and 1948-49) stroked three doubles against the Washington Senators in the nightcap of a 1953 doubleheader.

  • New York Yankees RF Dave Winfield (starting forward for Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) doubled in his fifth straight game in 1986.

  • Tampa Bay Devil Rays CF Randy Winn (Santa Clara backcourtmate of eventual two-time NBA Most Valuable Player Steve Nash in 1993-94) supplied an extra-base safety in his sixth consecutive contest in the midst of eight multiple-hit outings in a 10-game span in 2002.

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopers Make Their Mark on April 19 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopers had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is an April 19 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

APRIL 19

  • Toronto Blue Jays LF Danny Ainge (three-time Brigham Young basketball All-American and national player of year as senior in 1980-81) went 3-for-3 in an 8-1 setback against the Cleveland Indians in 1980.

  • Only MLB decision for RHP Steve Barber (J.C. starter under coach Jerry Tarkanian before attending La Verne CA) was a 9-8 victory for the Minnesota Twins against the Kansas City Royals in 1971.

  • 3B Bosey Berger (Maryland's first hoops All-American in 1931-32) awarded on waivers from the Cleveland Indians to the Chicago White Sox in 1937.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates 1B Donn Clendenon (four-sport letterman with Morehouse GA) provided four hits against the Cincinnati Reds in a 1966 game.

  • In 2017 in his third MLB start, Amir Garrett (averaged 7.4 ppg and 4 rpg for St. John's under coach Steve Lavin in 2011-12 and 2012-13 before RS transfer year at Cal State Northridge) tied a Cincinnati Reds record for a rookie LHP by fanning 12 Baltimore Orioles batters.

  • St. Louis Cardinals RHP Walt Huntzinger (All-Ivy League forward with Penn in 1921-22) toiled 14 innings but lost, 5-4, against the Chicago Cubs in 1926. He was waived to the Cubbies two months later.

  • New York Giants 1B Monte Irvin (Lincoln PA hooper 1 1/2 years in late 1930s) collected six RBI against the Boston Braves in the nightcap of a 1951 doubleheader.

  • St. Louis Cardinals 1B George Kernek (Oklahoma hoops letterman in 1959-60 and 1960-61) contributed three hits for the second time in four games in 1966.

  • Five hits by CF Bake McBride (averaged 12.7 ppg and 8.1 rpg in 21 games for Westminster MO in 1968-69 and 1969-70) were in vain as the St. Louis Cardinals incurred a 17-inning, 4-3 loss against the New York Mets in 1976.

  • In a 1961 contest, Los Angeles Dodgers LF Wally Moon (averaged 4.3 ppg with Texas A&M in 1948-49 and 1949-50) supplied two homers and five RBI against his original team (St. Louis Cardinals).

  • In 1942, Chicago Cubs RHP Claude Passeau (Millsaps MS hooper in late 1920s and early 1930s) didn't yield a hit until there was one out in the eighth inning when CF Harry Craft (Mississippi College hooper first half of 1930s) singled for the Cincinnati Reds.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers LF Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in Pacific Coast Conference both of his seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) went 4-for-4 against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1954.

  • RHP Sonny Siebert (team-high 16.7 ppg for Missouri in 1957-58 as All-Big Eight Conference second-team selection) traded by the Cleveland Indians to the Boston Red Sox in a six-player swap in 1969.

Tourney Journey: What is Titlist UNC's Longest NCAA Tournament Drought?

Champion North Carolina is among 20 universities never to miss the NCAA playoffs more than 10 straight seasons after their tournament debut. A total of 47 schools have appeared more than 20 times in the NCAA tourney through 2017 - Kentucky (57), North Carolina (48), UCLA (48), Kansas (46), Louisville (42), Duke (41), Indiana (39), Syracuse (38), Villanova (37), Notre Dame (36), Arizona (34), Connecticut (33), Texas (33), Marquette (32), Temple (32), Arkansas (31), Cincinnati (31), Michigan State (31), Ohio State (31), Georgetown (30), Illinois (30), Oklahoma (30), Brigham Young (29), Kansas State (29), Purdue (29), St. John's (29), Utah (29), Oklahoma State (28), West Virginia (28), Maryland (27), Michigan (27), Xavier (27), Memphis (26), Missouri (26), North Carolina State (26), Pittsburgh (26), Iowa (25), Princeton (25), New Mexico State (23), Penn (23), Wake Forest (23), Western Kentucky (23), Wisconsin (23), DePaul (22), Louisiana State (21), Saint Joseph's (21) and Virginia (21).

Notre Dame, compiling a losing record in the NCAA playoffs (37-39), is the only one of the 22 institutions with at least 30 appearances never to win a Final Four game. The Fighting Irish's only F4 trip was in 1978 when they lost in the national semifinals against Duke (90-86) before bowing in the national third-place contest against Arkansas (71-69).

Among the schools with more than 25 appearances, Kansas State was the only one other than Kentucky never to be shut out of the tourney as long as five years after its maiden voyage until K-State was denied 11 consecutive campaigns through 2007. DePaul, missing the last 13 years, has the longest active NCAA Tournament dry spell among the following 47 universities with more than 20 appearances:

Years School NCAA Debut Longest NCAA Drought Coach(es) During Playoff Dry Spell
3 Kentucky 1942 1989 through 1991 Eddie Sutton and Rick Pitino
5 UCLA 1950 1957 through 1961 John Wooden
5 Virginia 1976 2002 through 2006 Pete Gillen and Dave Leitao
6 Princeton 1952 1970 through 1975/2005 through 2010 Pete Carril/Joe Scott and Sydney Johnson
7 Brigham Young 1950 1958 through 1964 Stan Watts
7 Louisville 1951 1952 through 1958 Peck Hickman
7 Purdue 1969 1970 through 1976 George King and Fred Schaus
8 Syracuse 1957 1958 through 1965 Marc Guley and Fred Lewis
9 Kansas 1940 1943 through 1951 Phog Allen and Howard Engleman
9 Marquette 1955 1984 through 1992 Rick Majerus, Bob Dukiet and Kevin O'Neill
9 Ohio State 1939 1951 through 1959 Floyd Stahl and Fred Taylor
9 Villanova 1939 1940 through 1948 Alex Severance
10 Connecticut 1951 1980 through 1989 Dom Perno and Jim Calhoun
10 Memphis 1955 1963 through 1972 Dean Ehlers, Moe Iba and Gene Bartow
10 New Mexico State 1952 1980 through 1989 Weldon Drew and Neil McCarthy
10 North Carolina 1941 1947 through 1956 Tom Scott and Frank McGuire
10 North Carolina State 1950 1992 through 2001 Les Robinson and Herb Sendek
10 Notre Dame 1953 1991 through 2000 Digger Phelps, John MacLeod and Matt Doherty
10 Saint Joseph's 1959 1987 through 1996 Jim Boyle, John Griffin and Phil Martelli
10 Utah 1944 1967 through 1976 Jack Gardner, Bill E. Foster and Jerry Pimm
11 Duke 1955 1967 through 1977 Vic Bubas, Bucky Waters, Neill McGeachy and Bill E. Foster
11 Kansas State 1948 1997 through 2007 Tom Asbury, Jim Wooldridge and Bob Huggins
11 St. John's 1951 1962 through 1972 Joe Lapchick, Lou Carnesecca and Frank Mulzoff
11 Temple 1944 1945 through 1955 Josh Cody and Harry Litwack
12 Indiana 1940 1941 through 1952 Branch McCracken and Harry Good
12 Texas 1943 1948 through 1959 Jack Gray, Thurman Hull and Marshall Hughes
13 DePaul 1943 2005 through 2017 Dave Leitao, Jerry Wainwright and Oliver Purnell
13 Iowa 1955 1957 through 1969 Bucky O'Connor, Sharm Scheuerman and Ralph Miller
14 Cincinnati 1958 1978 through 1991 Gale Catlett, Ed Badger, Tony Yates and Bob Huggins
14 Maryland 1958 1959 through 1972 Bud Millikan, Frank Fellows and Lefty Driesell
14 Wake Forest 1939 1963 through 1976 Bones McKinney, Jack Murdock, Jack McCloskey and Carl Tacy
14 West Virginia 1955 1968 through 1981 Bucky Waters, Sonny Moran, Joedy Gardner and Gale Catlett
15 Michigan 1948 1949 through 1963 Ernie McCoy, Bill Perigo and Dave Strack
15 Pittsburgh 1941 1942 through 1956 Doc Carlson and Bob Timmons
16 Penn 1953 1954 through 1969 Howie Dallmar, Ray Stanley, Jack McCloskey and Dick Harter
17 Illinois 1942 1964 through 1980 Harry Combes, Harv Schmidt, Gene Bartow and Lou Henson
17 Oklahoma State 1945 1966 through 1982 Hank Iba, Sam Aubrey, Guy Strong, Jim Killingsworth and Paul Hansen
18 Arkansas 1941 1959 through 1976 Glen Rose, Duddy Waller, Lanny Van Eman and Eddie Sutton
18 Michigan State 1957 1960 through 1977 Forddy Anderson, John Benington, Gus Ganakas and Jud Heathcote
19 Western Kentucky 1940 1941 through 1959 Ed Diddle
21 Xavier 1961 1962 through 1982 Jim McCafferty, Don Ruberg, George Krajack, Dick Campbell, Tay Baker and Bob Staak
24 Arizona 1951 1952 through 1975 Fred Enke, Bruce Larson and Fred Snowden
24 Louisiana State 1953 1955 through 1978 Harry Rabenhorst, Jay McCreary, Frank Truitt, Press Maravich and Dale Brown
31 Georgetown 1943 1944 through 1974 Ken Eagles, Elmer Ripley, Buddy O'Grady, Harry Jeannette, Tommy Nolan, Tom O'Keefe, Jack Magee and John Thompson Jr.
31 Missouri 1944 1945 through 1975 George Edwards, Sparky Stalcup, Bob Vanatta and Norm Stewart
31 Oklahoma 1939 1948 through 1978 Bruce Drake, Doyle Parrack, Bob Stevens, John MacLeod, Joe Ramsey and Dave Bliss
46 Wisconsin 1941 1948 through 1993 Bud Foster, John Erickson, John Powless, Bill Cofield, Steve Yoder and Stu Jackson

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopers Make Their Mark on April 18 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopers had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is an April 18 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

APRIL 18

  • Philadelphia Phillies INF Gene Freese (West Liberty WV basketball captain of 1952 NAIA Tournament team) smacked a pinch grand slam against the Cincinnati Reds in a 1959 game.

  • San Diego Padres RF Tony Gwynn (All-WAC second-team selection with San Diego State in 1979-80 and 1980-81) went 5-for-5 against the St. Louis Cardinals in a 1993 contest.

  • Texas Rangers 1B Mike Hargrove (Northwestern Oklahoma State hoops letterman) collected four hits and five RBI against the Milwaukee Brewers in the opener of a 1976 doubleheader.

  • RHP Jim Konstanty (Syracuse hooper in late 1930s) traded by the Cincinnati Reds with cash to the Boston Braves in 1946.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers LHP Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman hoops squad in 1953-54) threw the second of two immaculate innings in his career when he struck out the side on nine pitches against the Cincinnati Reds in third frame in 1964.

  • Atlanta Braves CF Kenny Lofton (Arizona's leader in steals for 1988 Final Four team compiling 35-3 record) provided a homer among his five hits in a 14-0 romp over the Colorado Rockies in 1997. Five years later with the Chicago White Sox, Lofton delivered multiple safeties seven times in a span of eight games while raising his batting average from .250 to .426 in 2002.

  • Davey Lopes (NAIA All-District 15 selection for Iowa Wesleyan averaged 16.9 ppg and 3.4 rpg as freshman in 1964-65 and 12.1 ppg as sophomore in 1965-66 before transferring with his coach to Washburn KS) fired as manager of the Milwaukee Brewers in 2002.

  • San Francisco Giants CF Billy North (played hoops briefly for Central Washington in 1967-68) stole three bases against the Atlanta Braves in 1981.

  • Montreal Expos RHP Steve Renko (averaged 9.9 ppg and 5.8 rpg as Kansas sophomore in 1963-64) won his first start of season against the New York Mets before dropping last 10 decisions of the 1972 campaign.

  • Hall of Fame RHP Robin Roberts (one of Michigan State's top three scorers each season from 1944-45 through 1946-47) surrendered the first hit on artificial turf in 1966 when Los Angeles Dodgers SS Maury Wills singled to center at Houston's Astrodome.

  • 1B Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in Pacific Coast Conference both of his seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) ripped his first homer for the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947 (against New York Giants). The blast was Robinson's lone round-tripper in his first 30 MLB games.

  • New York Yankees RHP Roy Sherid (Albright PA hoops center in 1926-27 and 1927-28) toiled 15 innings but lost, 5-4, against the Boston Red Sox in 1931.

  • RHP Cecil Upshaw (led Centenary in scoring as junior while averaging 13.7 ppg and 6 rpg from 1961-62 through 1963-64) registered his fourth victory hurling at least three innings of relief in the Atlanta Braves' first 11 games of the 1971 season.

  • Philadelphia Athletics 3B Billy Werber (first Duke hoops All-American in 1929-30) provided four safeties in season opener en route to seven multiple-hit games in his first 11 outings of the 1938 campaign.

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopers Make Their Mark on April 17 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopers had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is an April 17 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

APRIL 17

  • Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading basketball scorer in 1945-46) contributed four hits against the Cincinnati Reds in the nightcap of a 1955 twinbill.

  • Philadelphia Phillies LF Harry Anderson (averaged 7.7 ppg and 8.9 rpg for West Chester PA in 1951-52) hammered two homers against the Milwaukee Braves in a 1960 game.

  • Milwaukee Braves 2B Frank Bolling (averaged 7.3 ppg for Spring Hill AL in 1950-51) smacked two homers in a 5-2 win against the Houston Colt .45s in 1964.

  • Baltimore Orioles CF Al Bumbry (Virginia State's runner-up in scoring with 16.7 ppg as freshman in 1964-65) stroked four hits against the Kansas City Royals in 1981.

  • Detroit Tigers 1B Tony Clark (San Diego State's leading scorer in WAC games in 1991-92) homered in his third consecutive contest in 1997.

  • Cincinnati Reds CF Harry Craft (four-sport hoops letterman with Mississippi College in early 1930s) accumulated four hits and five RBI in a 7-6 setback against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1941.

  • Chicago White Sox RHP Eddie Fisher (hooper for Oklahoma's 1954-55 freshman squad) hurled his first complete game in 10 years. Fisher also won his next three starts by yielding only one earned run covering 18 innings.

  • Kansas City Royals RHP Dave Frost (averaged 10.5 ppg and 4 rpg for Stanford from 1971-72 through 1973-74) registered his third relief victory in four games early in 1982.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates LHP Joe Gibbon (two-time All-SEC forward for Ole Miss was the nation's second-leading scorer as a senior in 1956-57), making his MLB debut in the nightcap of a doubleheader against the Cincinnati Reds in 1960, threw two scoreless innings of relief and emerged as the winner when the Bucs erupted for six runs in the ninth.

  • Utilityman Chuck Harmon (freshman starter was Toledo's second-leading scorer for 1943 NIT runner-up) became the second black player for the Cincinnati Reds when pinch-hitting against the Milwaukee Braves in a 1954 contest.

  • Baltimore Orioles 2B Davey Johnson (averaged 1.7 ppg with Texas A&M in 1961-62) provided back-to-back four-hit games against the Boston Red Sox in 1969.

  • Chicago White Sox RHP Bob Keegan (Bucknell hoops letterman in 1941-42 and 1942-43) toiled at least eight innings for the first of 10 straight starts in 1954, including a pair of shutouts.

  • Detroit Tigers SS Harvey Kuenn (played briefly for Wisconsin in 1951-52 after competing on JV hoops squad previous season) stroked three doubles among his four hits against the Kansas City Athletics in a 1955 game.

  • Milwaukee Braves SS Johnny Logan (Binghamton hooper in 1948-49) jacked two homers in a 5-1 win against the Cincinnati Reds in 1954.

  • Chicago White Sox RHP Ted Lyons (two-time All-SWC first-team selection for Baylor in early 1920s) hurled a shutout against the Cleveland Indians in his season debut. The 41-year-old Lyons went the distance in all 20 starts during the 1942 campaign en route to posting an A.L.-best 2.10 ERA.

  • Philadelphia Phillies RF Bake McBride (averaged 12.7 ppg and 8.1 rpg in 21 games for Westminster MO in 1968-69 and 1969-70) collected two homers and five RBI against the Pittsburgh Pirates in a 1979 contest.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates RHP Elmer Ponder (Oklahoma hoops letterman in 1913-14 and 1915-16) tossed a 13-inning shutout against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1920.

  • Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in Pacific Coast Conference both of his seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) secured his first safety with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947. It was one of his 19 bunt hits as a rookie.

  • Chicago Cubs LF Riggs Stephenson (Alabama hoops letterman in 1920) supplied three extra-base hits, including a homer, in a six-inning, 3-0 victory against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1930.

  • Detroit Tigers RF Champ Summers (led SIUE in scoring in 1969-70 after doing same with Nicholls State in 1964-65) collected four hits against the Boston Red Sox, igniting a career-high 17-game hitting streak in 1980.

  • In 1989, Cincinnati Reds RHP Kent Tekulve (freshman hooper in mid-1960s for Marietta OH) passed Hoyt Wilhelm as MLB's all-time leader in relief appearances.

Small-Town Value: Numerous A-As Came From Smaller Outposts Than Happ

Wisconsin All-American Ethan Happ came from an obscure hometown (Milan, IL) with small population (5,100). But there are a striking number of major-college All-Americans who came from significantly smaller outposts. Flyover-country hamlets offering little more than a part-time post office and gas station supplied the following standouts from municipalities with populations fewer than 1,000:

All-American Pos. Major College A-A Year(s) Hometown Population
James Anderson G Oklahoma State 2010 Junction City, AR 705
Forrest "Whitey" Baccus G Southern Methodist 1935 Estelline, TX 190
Frankie Baumholtz F Ohio University 1941 Midvale, OH 655
R. Gale Bishop F-C Washington State 1943 Sumas, WA 710
Tom Burleson C North Carolina State 1973 and 1974 Newland, NC 720
Bob Burrow C Kentucky 1955 and 1956 Wells, TX 925
A.W. Davis F Tennessee 1965 Rutledge, TN 830
Evan Eschmeyer C Northwestern 1999 New Knoxville, OH 760
Pat Garrity F Notre Dame 1998 Monument, CO 690
Joe Gibbon F Mississippi 1957 Hickory, MS 670
Gary Gray G Oklahoma City 1967 Fort Cobb, OK 760
Jimmy Hagan C Tennessee Tech 1959 Glendale, KY 300
Charles Halbert C West Texas State 1942 House, NM 120
Bob Harris C Oklahoma A&M 1949 Linden, TN 750
Kirk Haston F-C Indiana 2001 Lobelville, TN 915
Don Hennon G Pittsburgh 1958 and 1959 Wampum, PA 665
Bailey Howell F-C Mississippi State 1958 and 1959 Middleton, TN 595
Dick Ives F Iowa 1945 Diagonal, IA 360
Paul Judson G Illinois 1956 Hebron, IL 785
Dean Kelley G Kansas 1953 McCune, KS 530
Henry "Bud" Koper F-G Oklahoma City 1964 Rocky, OK 240
Paul Lindemann C Washington State 1941 Cowiche, WA 425
Karl Malone F Louisiana Tech 1985 Summerfield, LA 370
E. "Branch" McCracken F Indiana 1930 Monrovia, IN 860
Ryan Minor F Oklahoma 1995 and 1996 Hammon, OK 865
Phillip "Red" Murrell F Drake 1958 Linneus, MO 420
Willie Murrell F Kansas State 1964 Taft, OK 490
Otto Porter Jr. F Georgetown 2013 Morley, MO 697
Bryant Reeves C Oklahoma State 1994 and 1995 Gans, OK 345
Jack Smiley G Illinois 1943 Waterman, IL 945
Ray Steiner G St. Louis 1952 Bland, MO 660
John Stroud F Mississippi 1980 Myrtle, MS 400
Terry Teagle G-F Baylor 1982 Broaddus, TX 190
Gary Thompson G Iowa State 1957 Roland, IA 710
Jack Tingle F Kentucky 1947 Bedford, KY 835
Gene Tormohlen C Tennessee 1959 Holland, IN 685
Carlyle "Blackie" Towery C Western Kentucky 1940 and 1941 Shady Grove, KY 100
Kenny Walker F Kentucky 1985 and 1986 Roberta, GA 860
Waldo Wegner C Iowa State 1935 Everly, IA 350
Murray Wier G-F Iowa 1948 Grandview, IA 475
Win Wilfong F Memphis State 1957 Puxico, MO 830

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopers Make Their Mark on April 16 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopers had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is an April 16 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

APRIL 16

  • Detroit Tigers 2B Frank Bolling (averaged 7.3 ppg for Spring Hill AL basketball team in 1950-51), en route to hitting .632 through first five games of the 1958 campaign, banged out four hits in a 5-4 win against the Chicago White Sox.

  • Kansas City Athletics LF Bob Cerv (ranked fourth on Nebraska's career scoring list in 1949-50 when finishing college career) collected three extra-base hits and five RBI in a 9-4 triumph against the Cleveland Indians in 1958.

  • 1B Kerby Farrell (key hooper for couple of strong Freed-Hardeman TN squads in mid-1930s) purchased from the Boston Braves by the Chicago White Sox in 1945.

  • Houston Astros C Joe Ferguson (played in 1967 NCAA playoffs with Pacific) furnished three extra-base hits against the Atlanta Braves in a 1977 game.

  • Philadelphia Athletics RF Walt French (hoops letterman for Rutgers and Army) furnished four hits against the Washington Senators in a 1926 contest.

  • Debut with San Francisco Giants for RHP Rich Gale (led New Hampshire with 7.2 rpg in 1975-76) was a success, hurling a three-hit, 6-1 victory against the Cincinnati Reds in 1982.

  • St. Louis Cardinals RHP Bob Gibson (Creighton's leading scorer and rebounder in 1955-56 and 1956-57) and Philadelphia Phillies P Cal McLish both fail to finish the first inning when each starter allowed six runs in the Cards' 12-6 win at Philly in 1962.

  • Chicago White Sox C Frank Grube (Lafayette starting hoops guard as senior in 1926-27) went 4-for-4 against the Cleveland Indians in a 1932 game.

  • San Diego Padres RF Tony Gwynn (All-WAC second-team selection with San Diego State in 1979-80 and 1980-81) went 5-for-5 against the Los Angeles Dodgers in a 1987 contest en route to N.L.-high 218 hits.

  • Cleveland Indians CF Kenny Lofton (Arizona's leader in steals for 1988 Final Four team compiling 35-3 record) delivered three extra-base hits against the Toronto Blue Jays in a 1993 contest.

  • Milwaukee Braves SS Johnny Logan (Binghamton hooper in 1948-49) went 5-for-5 against the Cincinnati Reds in a 1955 game.

  • Final blast of 390 MLB career homers by 3B Graig Nettles (shot 87.8% from free-throw line for San Diego State in 1963-64) was a pinch-hit, game-tying round-tripper for the Montreal Expos against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1988.

  • RHP Roy Parmelee (hoops letterman for Eastern Michigan in 1924-25 and 1925-26) purchased from the Chicago Cubs by the Boston Red Sox in 1938.

  • In a 1931 contest, Cincinnati Reds RF Wally Roettger (Illinois hoops letterman in 1921-22 and 1922-23) went 5-for-5 against his original team (St. Louis Cardinals).

Celebrating Former Hooper Jackie By Acknowledging 42 Other MLB Players

"A life is not important except in the impact it has on other lives." - Jackie Robinson

Every sports fan accepts the cultural significance of Jackie Robinson Day, an annual event commemorating and honoring the groundbreaking day he made his debut 70 years ago with the Brooklyn Dodgers as MLB's first African-American player.

But what many observers might not know about Robinson is the impact he also had in basketball. UCLA's initial all-conference hooper in the 1940s was a forward who compiled the highest scoring average in the Pacific Coast Conference both of his seasons with the Bruins (12.3 points per league game in 1939-40 and 11.1 ppg in 1940-41) after transferring from Pasadena (Calif.) City College. Continuing his scoring exploits, the six-time National League All-Star was the leading scorer for the Los Angeles Red Devils' barnstorming team in 1946-47.

In deference to Robinson's uniform number, following is an alphabetical list of 42 more of the best African-American basketball players for four-year colleges who subsequently played at the MLB level (including Cincinnati Reds regal rookie Amir Garrett):

College Hooper Four-Year School Summary of Basketball Career Summary of MLB Career
Ron Allen Youngstown State Averaged 14.7 ppg from 1961-62 through 1963-64, leading Penguins in scoring and rebounding as sophomore. Only hit in 11 MLB at-bats for 1B and brother of Dick Allen and Hank Allen was homer with St. Louis Cardinals at San Diego in 1972.
George Altman Tennessee State Four-year letterman was forward on teams compiling 88-17 record from 1951-52 through 1954-55 (including two NAIA Tournament appearances). Two-time All-Star 1B hit .269 with 102 home runs in nine seasons from 1959 through 1967 with Chicago Cubs, St. Louis Cardinals and New York Mets before playing eight years in Japan.
Jim Bibby Fayetteville State (N.C.) Backup hooper's brother, Fred, set Fayetteville State single-season record with 18.1 rpg in 1963-64. Their younger brother, Henry, was All-American guard with UCLA. RHP compiled 111-101 record and 3.76 ERA with St. Louis Cardinals, Texas Rangers, Cleveland Indians and Pittsburgh Pirates in 12 seasons from 1972 through 1984. Hurled first no-hitter in Rangers history in 1973 and started two games for victorious Pirates in 1979 World Series.
Dorian "Doe" Boyland Wisconsin-Oshkosh Averaged 5.6 ppg and 3.4 rpg in half a season in 1974-75. 1B had two hits in 19 at-bats with Pittsburgh Pirates in three years from 1978 to 1981. Traded to San Francisco Giants but never played for them.
Al Bumbry Virginia State Averaged 16.7 ppg (team runner-up) as freshman in 1964-65 and 12.4 ppg plus 4.6 rpg as junior in 1966-67. Lefthanded-swinging OF hit .281 with Baltimore Orioles and San Diego Padres in 14 years from 1972 through 1985. Hit .337 as A.L. Rookie of the Year in 1973 when tying MLB single-game record with three triples. Finished among top nine in stolen bases five times in first nine years. Participated in World Series in 1979 and 1983.
Ray Burris Southwestern Oklahoma State Two-sport standout is in school's Hall of Fame. RHP compiled 108-134 record and 4.17 ERA with Chicago Cubs, New York Yankees, New York Mets, Montreal Expos, Oakland A's, Milwaukee Brewers and St. Louis Cardinals in 15 years from 1973 through 1987. Started three postseason games for Expos in 1981 after averaging 227 innings pitched last four full seasons with Cubs.
Tony Clark Arizona/San Diego State Swingman averaged 11.6 ppg and 4.6 rpg for Aztecs as sophomore in 1991-92, leading them in scoring in WAC games. 1B averaged 31 HRs annually in four-year span from 1996 through 1999 with Detroit Tigers. Tallest switch-hitter (6-7) in MLB history hit .262 with 251 homers and 824 RBI in 15 seasons from 1995 through 2009 with Tigers, Red Sox, New York Mets, New York Yankees, Arizona Diamondbacks and San Diego Padres.
Donn Clendenon Morehouse (Ga.) Earned letters in four collegiate sports before leading Army base at Fort Jackson (Columbia, S.C.) to hoop title before discharge in time for spring training in 1959. 1B hit .274 with 159 home runs and 682 RBI with Pittsburgh Pirates, Montreal Expos, New York Mets and St. Louis Cardinals in 12 years from 1961 through 1972. World Series MVP with "Miracle Mets" in 1969 when hitting three home runs (Games 2, 4 and 5).
Vince Colbert East Carolina ECU's first African-American hooper averaged 14.3 ppg and 7.3 rpg in 1966-67 and 1967-68. J.C. transfer led Pirates in rebounding as junior. RHP compiled 9-14 record and 4.57 ERA with Cleveland Indians in three years from 1970 through 1972. He was their only winning pitcher (7-6) with 10 or more starts in 1971.
George Crowe Indiana Central Four-year hoops letterman from 1939-40 through 1942-43 for college now known as University of Indianapolis after becoming first Indiana H.S. player named state's "Mr. Basketball." 1B hit .270 in nine years (1952, 1953 and 1955 through 1961) with Boston/Milwaukee Braves, Cincinnati Reds and St. Louis Cardinals. One year after named All-Star, led N.L. in pinch-hits (17)in first season with Cards in 1959 before slugging MLB-record 11th pinch-hit HR in 1960.
Arthur "Bill" Davis Minnesota Averaged 6.4 ppg and 5 rpg from 1961-62 through 1963-64 under coach John Kundla. Forward contributed 12.5 ppg as senior for team including eventual NBA standouts Archie Clark and Lou Hudson. 1B hit .181 with Cleveland Indians and San Diego Padres in three seasons (1965, 1966 and 1969).
Larry Doby Virginia Union Attended LIU on hoops scholarship but transferred to VU after Uncle Sam summoned him for World War II service. Reserve guard on team winning 1943 CIAA title. Seven-time All-Star OF hit .283 with 253 HRs and 969 RBI in 13 years from 1947 through 1959 with Cleveland Indians and Chicago White Sox. First black player in A.L. twice led league in homers (1952 and 1954). Smacked 20 or more HRs eight seasons in row from 1949 through 1956.
Don Eaddy Michigan One of first two African-Americans to play hoops for Wolverines averaged 11.4 ppg in four seasons from 1951-52 through 1954-55. Led team in scoring in Big Ten Conference competition as sophomore. INF played briefly with Chicago Cubs in 1959.
Amir Garrett St. John's Averaged 7.4 ppg and 4 rpg in 2011-12 and 2012-13 under coach Steve Lavin prior to transfer to Northridge State, where he had RS year before focusing only on baseball. After representing Cincinnati Reds at 2016 All-Star Futures Game, LHP won his first two MLB decisions in April 2017 with six shutout innings in each start. In his third start, he tied Reds record for rookie LHP by fanning 12 Baltimore Orioles batters.
Bob Gibson Creighton First Bluejays player to average 20 ppg for his career (20.2). Led school in scoring in 1955-56 (40th in country with 22 ppg) and 1956-57 and was second-leading scorer in 1954-55. Hall of Famer compiled 251-174 pitching record with 3,117 strikeouts and 2.91 ERA in 17 seasons from 1959 through 1975 with St. Louis Cardinals. In 1968, RHP tossed 13 shutouts en route to a 1.12 ERA. Ranked among N.L. top six in strikeouts 11 times from 1961 through 1972. He hit 24 home runs and won nine consecutive Gold Gloves (1965 through 1973). Notched 7-2 mark and 1.89 ERA in nine World Series games, including strikeout record of 17 Tigers in 1968 contest.
Tony Gwynn San Diego State Averaged 8.6 ppg and 5.5 apg from 1977-78 through 1980-81. Second-team All-WAC selection as junior and senior. San Diego Padres OF hit .338 in 20 seasons (1982 through 2001), winning eight N.L. batting titles - 1984, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1994, 1995, 1996 and 1997. Played in 15th All-Star Game in 1999 before topping 3,000-hit plateau later in year.
Chuck Harmon Toledo Second-leading scorer as sophomore in 1946-47 (13.6 ppg) and as junior in 1947-48 (8.8). As freshman starter in 1942-43, swingman was second-leading scorer for 22-4 team finishing NIT runner-up. Utilityman hit .238 in four seasons from 1954 through 1957 with Cincinnati Reds, St. Louis Cardinals and Philadelphia Phillies.
Billy Harrell Siena When school's first African-American player finished career, he held school records for most points in season (396 in 1951-52), career and game (28 against Arizona State in 1951) plus most rebounds in season (387 in 1949-50). INF hit .231 in 173 games with Cleveland Indians (1955, 1957, 1958) and Boston Red Sox (1961).
Chuck Hinton Shaw (N.C.) Played multiple sports before serving two years in U.S. Army in mid-1950s. His brother, Checo, was lineman with him on football squad and power forward for hoops team. OF-INF played every defensive position while hitting .264 with Washington Senators, Cleveland Indians and California Angels in 11 A.L. seasons from 1961 through 1971. In 1962, he was runner-up in stolen bases in A.L. and finished fourth in batting average. First expansion Senator to be named to All-Star team was final Senator to hit .300.
Monte Irvin Lincoln (Pa.) Athletic career was nearly prematurely ended when infection from scratched hand in hoops game kept him close to death for seven weeks. Hall of Fame OF-1B hit .293 with 99 HRs and 443 RBI in eight years from 1949 through 1956 with New York Giants and Chicago Cubs. Irvin led N.L. in RBI with 121 in 1951 (same year led World Series in hitting with .458 mark vs. crosstown Yankees).
Anthony "Tony" Johnson LeMoyne-Owen (Tenn.) J.C. transfer forward was All-VSAC selection in 1976-77 and 1979-80 as team's top scorer. LF hit .232 with Montreal Expos and Toronto Blue Jays in two years in 1981 and 1982.
"Sweet" Lou Johnson Kentucky State Teammate of legendary coach Davey Whitney averaged 5.7 ppg and 2 rpg in 1951-52. OF hit .258 with Chicago Cubs, Los Angeles/California Angels, Milwaukee Braves, Los Angeles Dodgers and Cleveland Indians in eight seasons from 1960 through 1969. Contributed two homers and two doubles for Dodgers in 1965 World Series against Minnesota Twins.
Lynn Jones Thiel (Pa.) Averaged 10.4 ppg from 1970-71 through 1973-74. OF hit .252 with Detroit Tigers and Kansas City Royals in eight seasons from 1979 through 1986. Doubled and tripled as pinch-hitter for Royals in 1985 World Series against St. Louis Cardinals.
David Justice Thomas More (Ky.) Led team in assists in 1984-85 while averaging 9.3 ppg and 3.5 rpg. Three-time All-Star OF hit .279 in 14 seasons from 1989 through 2002 with Atlanta Braves, Cleveland Indians, New York Yankees and Oakland A's. Jacked 40 homers (N.L. runner-up) with 120 RBI (also runner-up) in 1993 with Braves and total of 41 homers (fourth in A.L.) with 118 RBI in 2000 with Indians and Yanks.
Kenny Lofton Arizona Averaged 4.8 ppg and 2.6 apg in four seasons from 1985-86 through 1988-89 under coach Lute Olson. Leader in steals for 1988 Final Four team compiling 35-3 record. Lefthanded CF hit .299 and stole 622 bases in 17 seasons from 1991 through 2007 with Houston Astros, Cleveland Indians, Atlanta Braves, Chicago White Sox, San Francisco Giants, Pittsburgh Pirates, Chicago Cubs, New York Yankees, Philadelphia Phillies, Los Angeles Dodgers and Texas Rangers. Four-time Gold Glover led Indians with .325 batting mark (fourth in A.L.) and paced majors with 70 stolen bases in 1993. After trade to Cleveland, hit .285 for Indians in 1992 and led the A.L. in stolen bases with 66 (record for A.L. rookie). Six-time All-Star led A.L. in stolen bases five consecutive years from 1992 through 1996, hitting career-high .349 in 1994.
Davey Lopes Iowa Wesleyan/Washburn (Kan.) NAIA All-District 15 selection averaged 16.9 ppg and 3.4 rpg as All-IIAC first-team choice freshman in 1964-65 and 12.1 ppg as sophomore in 1965-66 before transferring with his coach. All-CIC selection in 1967-68 when averaging 7.6 ppg for NAIA Tournament team. Four-time All-Star 2B hit .263 with Los Angeles Dodgers, Oakland A's, Chicago Cubs and Houston Astros in 16 seasons from 1972 through 1987. Led N.L. in stolen bases in back-to-back campaigns in 1975 (77) and 1976 (63) after finishing runner-up in 1974 (59). Swiped five bases in game in 1974, tying 70-year-old N.L. record before establishing since-broken N.L. mark with 38 consecutive successful thefts in 1975.
Terrell Lowery Loyola Marymount Two-time All-WCC first-team selection and league-leading scorer. Tallied career-high 48 points against Idaho State as junior in 1990-91 when finishing among top five nationally in scoring (28.5 ppg) and assists (9.1 apg). OF hit .282 with Chicago Cubs, Tampa Bay Devil Rays and San Francisco Giants from 1997 through 2000. Stroked five hits for Giants in single game against Milwaukee Brewers in 2000.
Arnold "Bake" McBride Westminster (Mo.) Averaged 12.7 ppg and 8.1 rpg in 21 games in 1968-69 and 1969-70. Lefthanded-swinging OF hit .299 with St. Louis Cardinals, Philadelphia Phillies and Cleveland Indians in 11 seasons from 1973 through 1983. N.L. Rookie of the Year in 1974 when hitting .309 with Cardinals was named to N.L. All-Star team two years later.
Lyle Mouton Louisiana State Averaged 8.2 ppg and 3.2 rpg as sophomore in 1988-89 under coach Dale Brown. Started in backcourt with All-American Chris Jackson when Tigers lost to UTEP in West Regional of NCAA playoffs. OF hit .280 for Chicago White Sox, Baltimore Orioles, Milwaukee Brewers and Florida Marlins in seven years from 1995 through 2001.
Billy North Central Washington Collected two points and two rebounds in four games in 1967-68. Switch-hitting CF posted .261 batting average with Chicago Cubs, Oakland Athletics, Los Angeles Dodgers and San Francisco Giants in 11 years from 1971 through 1981. Paced A.L. in stolen bases in 1974 (54) and 1976 (75).
Curtis Pride William & Mary Averaged 5.6 ppg and 3.1 apg from 1986-87 through 1989-90. Led team in steals three times and assists twice. Named to CAA All-Rookie team as freshman and All-Defensive team next two seasons. Born with 95% hearing disability, lefthanded-swinging OF hit .250 in 11 seasons from 1993 to 2006 with seven franchises (Montreal Expos, Detroit Tigers, Boston Red Sox, Atlanta Braves, Montreal Expos, New York Yankees and Anaheim/California Angels).
Dave Ricketts Duquesne Three-year starter led Dukes in scoring as senior with 17.9-point average in 1956-57, finishing fourth in nation in free-throw percentage (86.2%). Converted school-record 42 FTAs in row. Catcher hit .249 in six seasons (1962, 1965 and 1967 through 1970) with St. Louis Cardinals and Pittsburgh Pirates. Switch-hitter played with Cards in 1967 and 1968 World Series.
Dick Ricketts Duquesne Second-team consensus All-American choice as junior in 1953-54 and first five consensus All-American selection as senior in 1954-55. Converted all 19 FTAs in game against Dayton. School's all-time leading scorer averaged 17.7 ppg and 12.2 rpg in starting all 111 games during four-year career. Compiled 1-6 pitching record in only season with St. Louis Cardinals in 1959.
Earl Robinson California Three-time All-PCC second-team selection averaged at least 10 ppg each season from 1955-56 through 1957-58 under coach Pete Newell. Averaged 15.5 points in four NCAA Tournament games his last two years, leading Bears in scoring in two of four playoff contests. OF hit .268 in four seasons from 1958 to 1964 with Los Angeles Dodgers and Baltimore Orioles.
Ted Savage Lincoln (Mo.) Led in scoring average with 13.5 ppg in 1955-56 before averaging 14.5 ppg and 5.6 rpg in 1956-57. OF hit .233 in nine seasons (1962, 1963 and 1965 through 1971) with Philadelphia Phillies, Pittsburgh Pirates, St. Louis Cardinals, Chicago Cubs, Los Angeles Dodgers, Cincinnati Reds, Milwaukee Brewers and Kansas City Royals.
Ken Singleton Hofstra Freshman hooper in mid-1960s. Three-time All-Star OF hit .282 with 246 HRs and 1,065 RBI with New York Mets, Montreal Expos and Baltimore Orioles in 15 years from 1970 through 1984. Switch-hitter exceeded 20 HRs in five seasons, including high of 35 (fifth in A.L.) in 1979 with Orioles.
Lee Smith Northwestern State Forward averaged 3.4 ppg and 1.9 rpg in 1976-77. Seven-time All-Star was all-time saves leader when he retired, notching 478 in 18 seasons from 1980 through 1997 with Chicago Cubs, Boston Red Sox, St. Louis Cardinals, New York Yankees, Baltimore Orioles, California Angels, Cincinnati Reds and Montreal Expos until Trevor Hoffman broke his mark in 2006. Set N.L. record in 1991 (subsequently broken) for most saves in season with 47 for Cardinals. RHP led N.L. in saves three times (1983-91-92) and A.L. once (1994).
Nate Smith Tennessee State Letterman in 1953-54 and 1954-55. Catcher went 2 for 9 in five games with Baltimore Orioles in 1962.
Bob Veale Benedictine (Kan.) Scored 1,160 points from 1955-56 through 1957-58 as center for school previously called St. Benedict's. LHP compiled 120-95 record and 3.08 ERA in 13 seasons from 1962 through 1974 with Pittsburgh Pirates and Boston Red Sox. Led N.L. in strikeouts with 250 in 1964 (first of four consecutive years he won at least 16 games and ranked among top seven in strikeouts).
Will Venable Princeton All-Ivy League first-team selection as junior and second-team choice as senior averaged 9.3 ppg under coach John Thompson III from 2001-02 through 2004-05. Lefthanded OF hit .249 with San Diego Padres, Texas Rangers and Los Angeles Dodgers in nine seasons from 2008 through 2016. Finished among N.L. top 10 in triples (8th with 7) and stolen bases (9th with 29) in 2010.
Bill White Hiram (Ohio) Three-sport letterman played two years of hoops. Five-time All-Star 1B hit .286 with New York/San Francisco Giants, St. Louis Cardinals and Philadelphia Phillies in 13 N.L. seasons in 1956 and from 1958 through 1969. Lefthander ranked among N.L. top 10 in RBI five times (1961-62-63-64-66). Placed among N.L. top eight in both doubles and triples three straight campaigns from 1959 through 1961. Gold Glover seven consecutive years from 1960 through 1966.
Desi Wilson Fairleigh Dickinson FDU's all-time leading scorer (1,902 points) was NEC player of year in 1989-90. Leading scorer (23.8 ppg) and rebounder (9.2 rpg) for 1990-91 league co-champion. Lefthanded-swinging 1B hit .271 with San Francisco Giants in 1996.
Dave Winfield Minnesota Averaged 6.9 ppg and 5.4 rpg as junior in 1971-72 and 10.5 ppg and 6.1 rpg as senior in 1972-73 under coach Bill Musselman. Played entire game in 1972, collecting eight points and eight rebounds against eventual Final Four participant Florida State, in Gophers' first NCAA Tournament appearance. Hall of Fame OF hit .283 with 465 home runs, 1,833 RBI and 3,110 hits in 22 seasons (1973 through 1988 and 1990 through 1995) with San Diego Padres, New York Yankees, California Angels, Toronto Blue Jays, Minnesota Twins and Cleveland Indians. Led N.L. in total bases in 1979 with 333 before ranking among A.L. top four in batting average in 1984 (.340) and 1988 (.322). Seven-time Gold Glover appeared in 12 All-Star Games after never playing in minors. Participated in World Series with Yankees (1981) and Blue Jays (1992).

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopers Make Their Mark on April 15 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopers had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a taxing April 15 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

APRIL 15

  • New York Giants 2B Andy Cohen (Alabama basketball letterman in 1924 and 1925) went 3-for-4 for the second time in first three games of 1928 campaign.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers RF Ox Eckhart (Texas hoops letterman in 1923) smacked his lone MLB homer (against New York Giants in 1936).

  • RHP Bob Gibson (Creighton's leading scorer and rebounder in 1955-56 and 1956-57) made his St. Louis Cardinals debut at Los Angeles in 1959, hurling the final two innings in a 5-0 setback against the Dodgers. He became the first future Hall of Famer to yield a homer to first batter he faced in the majors (3B Jim Baxes went downtown in seventh inning).

  • First appearance and start in 1961 for Philadelphia Phillies RHP Dallas Green (Delaware's second-leading scorer and rebounder in 1954-55) wound up becoming a five-hit shutout against the San Francisco Giants.

  • INF Gene Handley (Bradley hoops letterman in 1932-33 and 1933-34) purchased from the Pittsburgh Pirates by the St. Louis Cardinals in 1940.

  • 1B Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in Pacific Coast Conference both of his seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) debuted for the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947, becoming the first black player to appear in a MLB game. Before Robinson was replaced by Howie Schultz (Hamline MN hooper in early 1940s), he went hitless in three at-bats against the Boston Braves a year before President Truman desegregated the military.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates CF Bill Virdon (Drury MO hooper in 1949) belted two homers in a 4-1 triumph against the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1961.

  • Washington Senators rookie RHP Monte Weaver (hoops center for Emory & Henry VA in mid-1920s) won his season debut in 1932 with a four-hit shutout against the Boston Red Sox.

  • Boston Red Sox C Sammy White (All-PCC Northern Division first-five selection for Washington in 1947-48 and 1948-49) went 4-for-4 against the Washington Senators in 1954.

  • Philadelphia Phillies CF Cy Williams (Notre Dame forward in 1909-10) homered twice against the Boston Braves in a 1922 game.

  • San Diego Padres RHP Chris Young (All-Ivy League first-team selection as Princeton's leading scorer and rebounder in 1999-00) tied a MLB record with 25 straight starts on the road without a defeat before bowing at Los Angeles against the Dodgers in 2007.

Missing in Main Action: Simmons First AWOL Consensus A-A in 38 Years

Freshman phenom or flop. Last season, LSU's Ben Simmons was first NCAA consensus A-A in 38 years (since Minnesota's Mychal Thompson and Portland State's Freeman Williams in 1978) to leave college after failing to appear in either of the two principal national postseason tournaments during their career. After previously occurring frequently, Army's Kevin Houston (1987) had been the last All-American of any type to miss the NCAA tourney and NIT. Houston, Thompson and Williams are several of 23 four-year players among all A-As in this dubious category.

Simmons and fellow All-Americans Kay Felder (Oakland) and Markelle Fultz (Washington freshman this campaign) might have made bigger names for themselves if they had participated in national postseason competition prior to declaring early for the NBA draft. Fultz is the 126th standout from a member of an existing power league (26 of them consensus) on the following alphabetical list of All-Americans who never competed in the NCAA playoffs or NIT since the events were introduced in the late 1930s:

Player Position School Years All-American
Alvan Adams C Oklahoma 1974 and 1975
Jim Ashmore G Mississippi State 1957
Chet Aubuchon G Michigan State 1940
*Don Barksdale C UCLA 1947
Leo Barnhorst F-C-G Notre Dame 1949
John Barr G Penn State 1941
*Walt Bellamy C Indiana 1961
Gale Bishop F-C Washington State 1943
Bruno Boin F-C Washington 1957
George BonSalle C Illinois 1957
Wally Borrevik C Oregon State 1944
*Vince Boryla F-C Notre Dame/Denver 1949
Fred Boyd G Oregon State 1972
*Frank Burgess G Gonzaga 1961
Jim Burns G Northwestern 1967
Lawrence Butler G Idaho State 1979
*Leo Byrd F Marshall 1959
Bob Calihan C Detroit 1939
Dan Callandrillo G Seton Hall 1982
Joe Capua G Wyoming 1956
Tom Chilton F East Tennessee State 1961
*Doug Collins G Illinois State 1973
Russ Critchfield G California 1967
Billy Cunningham F North Carolina 1964 and 1965
*Chuck Darling C Iowa 1952
A.W. Davis F Tennessee 1965
Charlie Davis G Wake Forest 1971
***Terry Dischinger C-F Purdue 1960 through 1962
Bill Ebben F Detroit 1957
Paul Ebert C Ohio State 1952 through 1954
Frank Ehmann F Northwestern 1955
Bob Faris F George Washington 1939
Bob Faught C Notre Dame 1942
Kay Felder G Oakland 2016
Ken Flower G Southern California 1953
**Darrell Floyd G-F Furman 1955 and 1956
*Chet Forte G Columbia 1957
Don Freeman F Illinois 1966
**Robin Freeman G Ohio State 1955 and 1956
Markelle Fultz G Washington 2017
Terry Furlow F Michigan State 1976
*Dave Gambee F Oregon State 1958
*Dick Garmaker F Minnesota 1954 and 1955
Bill Garrett C Indiana 1951
Ed Gayda F Washington State 1950
Harold Gensichen F Western Michigan 1943
Ralph "Toddy" Giannini G Santa Clara 1940
Joe Gibbon F Mississippi 1957
Chester "Chet" Giermak C William & Mary 1950
**Otto Graham F Northwestern 1943 and 1944
**Dick Groat G Duke 1951 and 1952
**Dale Hall F Army 1944 and 1945
*Ralph Hamilton F Indiana 1947
Bill Hanson F-C Washington 1962
Vince Hanson C Washington State 1945
Bill Hapac F Illinois 1940
Jules "Skip" Harlicka G South Carolina 1968
Jerry Harper C-F Alabama 1956
*Spencer Haywood F-C Detroit 1969
**Fred Hetzel F-C Davidson 1963 through 1965
Joe Hobbs G Florida 1958
Paul Hoffman F-C Purdue 1947
Kevin Houston G Army 1987
Frank Howard C-F Ohio State 1957
**Bailey Howell F-C Mississippi State 1958 and 1959
Lou Hudson G-F Minnesota 1965 and 1966
*Dick Ives F Iowa 1944 and 1945
*Chester "Chet" Jaworski G Rhode Island State 1939
Ron Johnson C Minnesota 1959 and 1960
Vinnie Johnson G Baylor 1979
Paul Judson G Illinois 1956
Rich Kelley C Stanford 1975
*Walt Kirk G Illinois 1945
**Leo Klier F Notre Dame 1944 and 1946
Ed Koffenberger C-F Duke 1946 and 1947
Tom Kondla C Minnesota 1967
Ron Kramer C Michigan 1957
Dennis "Mo" Layton G Southern California 1971
Kevin Loder F Alabama State 1981
Stan Love C Oregon 1971
Jeff Malone G Mississippi State 1983
John Mandic C Oregon State 1942
Julius McCoy F Michigan State 1956
Banks McFadden C Clemson 1939
George McGinnis F Indiana 1971
*Jim McIntyre C Minnesota 1948 and 1949
Mark McNamara C California 1982
Carl McNulty C Purdue 1952
Chuck Mencel G Minnesota 1953 and 1955
Mike Mitchell F Auburn 1978
*Bill Mlkvy F Temple 1951
**Glen Max Morris C-F Northwestern 1945 and 1946
Jack Murdock G Wake Forest 1957
Phillip "Red" Murrell F Drake 1958
Don Nelson F-C Iowa 1961 and 1962
*Johnny Neumann F-G Mississippi 1971
Paul Neumann G Stanford 1959
Albert "Ab" Nicholas G Wisconsin 1952
Don Ohl G Illinois 1958
Frank Oleynick G Seattle 1975
Dick O'Neal C Texas Christian 1957
Bernie Opper G Kentucky 1939
**Kevin O'Shea G Notre Dame 1947 through 1950
Robert Parish C Centenary 1974 through 1976
Roger Phegley G-F Bradley 1978
Ricky Pierce F-G Rice 1982
Lou Pucillo G North Carolina State 1959
Dave Quabius G Marquette 1939
Ray Ragelis F-C Northwestern 1951
Jimmy Rayl G Indiana 1962 and 1963
Bob Rensberger G Notre Dame 1943
John Richter C North Carolina State 1959
Bill Ridley G Illinois 1956
Eddie Riska F Notre Dame 1941
Flynn Robinson G Wyoming 1965
Mike Robinson G Michigan State 1974
Wil Robinson G West Virginia 1972
Gene Rock F-G Southern California 1943
Marshall Rogers G Pan American 1976
Joe Ruklick C Northwestern 1959
**Dave Schellhase F Purdue 1965 and 1966
Harv Schmidt F Illinois 1957
Dave Scholz F Illinois 1969
Danny Schultz G Tennessee 1964
**Frank Selvy F Furman 1952 through 1954
*George Senesky F-G St. Joseph's 1943
*Bill Sharman G Southern California 1950
Gene Shue F Maryland 1953 and 1954
*Ben Simmons F-G Louisiana State 2016
Gary Simmons G Idaho 1958
Ralph Simpson F-G Michigan State 1970
Meyer "Whitey" Skoog F-G Minnesota 1949 through 1951
Doug Smart C-F Washington 1957 through 1959
Chris Smith C Virginia Tech 1960
Don Smith C Iowa State 1968
Glen Smith F Utah 1952
Forrest "Frosty" Sprowl F Purdue 1942
Bill Stauffer F-C Missouri 1952
Terry Teagle G-F Baylor 1982
Gary Thompson G Iowa State 1957
**Mychal Thompson F-C Minnesota 1977 and 1978
Rudy Tomjanovich F Michigan 1969 and 1970
Gene Tormohlen C Tennessee 1959
Walt Torrence G-F UCLA 1959
John Townsend F Michigan 1938
Vic "Slick" Townsend G-F Oregon 1941
Dick Van Arsdale F Indiana 1965
Tom Van Arsdale F Indiana 1965
Ernie Vandeweghe F Colgate 1949
*Grady Wallace F South Carolina 1957
Lou Watson F-G Indiana 1950
Nick Werkman F Seton Hall 1963
Paul Westphal G Southern California 1971 and 1972
*Murray Wier G-F Iowa 1948
Richard "Buzz" Wilkinson G Virginia 1955
*Freeman Williams G Portland State 1977 and 1978
Max Williams G Southern Methodist 1960
Sam Williams F Iowa 1968
*Mark Workman C West Virginia 1951 and 1952
George Yardley F Stanford 1950
Rich Yunkus C Georgia Tech 1970 and 1971

*Times named an NCAA consensus All-American.

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopers Make Their Mark on April 14 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopers had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is an April 14 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

APRIL 14

  • 2B Denny Doyle (averaged 2.7 ppg for Morehead State's basketball squad in 1962-63) stroked a two-run single in the bottom of the eighth inning to give the Philadelphia Phillies a 6-5 win against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1971.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers LHP Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman hoops team in 1953-54) threw the ninth complete game without permitting a walk in his career by blanking the St. Louis Cardinals, 4-0, in 1964 in his only Opening Day start.

  • A two-run pinch single by Rick Leach (averaged 15.5 ppg for Michigan's JV squad in 1975-76) provided the margin of victory in the Texas Rangers' 4-2 verdict over the Detroit Tigers in 1989.

  • Atlanta Braves CF Kenny Lofton (Arizona's leader in steals for 1988 Final Four team compiling a 35-3 record) contributed five hits and five runs scored in a 14-5 rout of the Cincinnati Reds in 1997.

  • New York Yankees 3B Graig Nettles (shot 87.8% from free-throw line for San Diego State in 1963-64), en route to tying a MLB record with 11 homers in the month of April, collected four round-trippers - two in each game - during a 1974 doubleheader split opposing his former team (Cleveland Indians).

  • Kansas City Royals LHP Paul Splittorff (runner-up in scoring and rebounding for Morningside IA in 1967-68) tossed a two-hit shutout against the Chicago White Sox in 1973.

  • LHP Ed Wells (multi-sport athlete graduated in 1924 from Bethany WV) purchased from the New York Yankees by the St. Louis Browns in 1933.

By George: Playoff Paul Accustomed to Media Overlooking His Hoop Prowess

Paul George should be accustomed to basketball not-so-savvy voters shunning him despite him again carrying the Indiana Pacers to the NBA playoffs. Whatever happens in opening round matchup against LeBron James of defending champion Cleveland Cavaliers, George deserves plaudits after scoring at least 20 points in the Pacers' last 12 regular-season outings, including 30.8 ppg, 8 rpg and 3.6 apg in their final five contests.

Mr. Versatility for Fresno State in 2009-10 was overlooked by inept All-American voters before promptly blossoming into an All-Star with the Pacers. George, flourishing despite incurring a gruesome broken leg several years ago, is the latest textbook example of the chronic problem exhibited by low-information A-A voters and their shoddy treatment of mid-major standouts. Is the #MessMedia spending too much time reading a contrived-narrative slanted story in "Rolling to Get Stoned" or fiction novel by former Obama security guru?

Jeff Foxworthy, breaking the gruesome mental-midget fever, should host a show Are You Smarter Than a Fifth-Rate Press Pundit? Questioning the qualifications of misguided media members quickly comes to mind when assessing their longstanding track record failing to acknowledge stellar mid-level players as All-Americans. The majority of the predictably pathetic press appear as if they are swallowing their own vomit trying to accept and describe Donald Trump's non-traditional political prowess. Despite superb collegiate careers, including player of the year acclaim in a mid-major conference, a striking number of individuals didn't generate sufficient national recognition to be chosen as an All-American. For instance, Louisiana Tech's Paul Millsap led the nation in rebounding three straight seasons from 2003-04 through 2005-06 but wasn't accorded All-American status.

Incredibly, the overlooked features two prominent floor generals who went on to lead the NBA in assists a total of 14 times - John Stockton (nine) and two-time MVP Steve Nash (five) - plus Tim Hardaway, who averaged 8.2 apg during his 13-year pro career; Joe Dumars, a six-time NBA All-Star guard and 1989 NBA Finals MVP, and Derek Fisher, who received five championship rings with the Los Angeles Lakers in the first decade of the 21st Century. Among shunned frontcourters, two-time conference MVPs Chris Gatling, Brian Grant, Popeye Jones and Rik Smits each played at least 11 seasons in the NBA.

Whether they are coaches who need to come out of the film-watching closet or members of the lame-stream media, many incompetent voters should be deep-sixed for overdosing on the premier leagues while condescendingly looking upon mid-level players such as ex-Lehigh luminary C.J. McCollum, who has averaged more than 20 ppg each of the last two pro campaigns and will eventually be among the following alphabetical list of Division I conference MVPs left behind in regard to securing All-American status before they enjoyed NBA/ABA careers of at least six seasons:

Player Pos. School Mid-Level Conference League MVP Season(s)
Mark Acres F Oral Roberts Midwestern City 1982-83 and 1983-84
Rick Adelman G Loyola CA West Coast Athletic 1967-68
Jim Ard C Cincinnati Missouri Valley 1969-70
Vin Baker C Hartford North Atlantic 1992-93
Jose Juan Barea G Northeastern Colonial Athletic Association 2005-06
Anthony Carter G Hawaii Western Athletic 1996-97
Terry Catledge F South Alabama Sun Belt 1983-84 and 1984-85
Chris Childs G Boise State Big Sky 1988-89
Doug Christie G-F Pepperdine West Coast 1990-91 and 1991-92
Craig "Speedy" Claxton G Hofstra America East 1997-98 and 1999-00
Wayne Cooper C New Orleans Sun Belt 1977-78
Antonio Daniels G Bowling Green Mid-American 1996-97
Bryce Drew G Valparaiso Mid-Continent 1996-97 and 1997-98
Joe Dumars G McNeese State Southland 1984-85
Ledell Eackles F New Orleans American South 1987-88
Blue Edwards F East Carolina Colonial Athletic Association 1988-89
Melvin Ely C Fresno State Western Athletic 2000-01 and 2001-02
Derek Fisher G Arkansas-Little Rock Sun Belt 1995-96
Fred Foster F Miami of Ohio Mid-American 1967-68
Winston Garland G Southwest Missouri State Mid-Continent 1986-87
Chris Gatling C-F Old Dominion Sun Belt 1989-90 and 1990-91
Kenny Gattison F Old Dominion Sun Belt 1985-86
Mike Glenn G Southern Illinois Missouri Valley 1975-76
Brian Grant F-C Xavier Midwestern Collegiate 1992-93 and 1993-94
Willie Green G Detroit Horizon League 2002-03
Bob Gross F-G Long Beach State PCAA 1974-75
Tim Hardaway G Texas-El Paso Western Athletic 1988-89
Trenton Hassell F Austin Peay Ohio Valley 2000-01
Gordon Hayward G-F Butler Horizon League 2009-10
Armond Hill G Princeton Ivy League 1975-76
George Hill G IUPUI Summit League 2007-08
Tyrone Hill F-C Xavier Midwestern Collegiate 1989-90
Roy Hinson C Rutgers Atlantic 10 1982-83
Lindsey Hunter G Jackson State Southwestern Athletic 1992-93
Avery Johnson G Southern (LA) Southwestern Athletic 1987-88
Eddie Jones F-G Temple Atlantic 10 1993-94
Ronald "Popeye" Jones C Murray State Ohio Valley 1989-90 and 1990-91
Chris Kaman C Central Michigan Mid-American 2002-03
Joe Kleine C Arkansas Southwest 1984-85
Larry Krystkowiak F Montana Big Sky 1983-84 through 1985-86
Courtney Lee G-F Western Kentucky Sun Belt 2007-08
Jim Les G Bradley Missouri Valley 1985-86
Reggie Lewis F Boston University ECAC North Atlantic 1984-85 through 1986-87
Grant Long F Eastern Michigan Mid-American 1987-88
Pace Mannion G-F Utah Western Athletic 1982-83
Aaron McKie G Temple Atlantic 10 1992-93
Steve Mix C-F Toledo Mid-American 1968-69
Steve Nash G Santa Clara West Coast 1994-95 and 1995-96
Johnny Newman F Richmond ECAC South 1983-84
Norm Nixon G Duquesne Eastern Collegiate Basketball League 1976-77
Michael Olowokandi C Pacific Big West 1997-98
Anthony Parker G-F Bradley Missouri Valley 1995-96
Robert "Sonny" Parker G-F Texas A&M Southwest 1974-75
Tim Perry F Temple Atlantic 10 1987-88
Kurt Rambis C-F Santa Clara West Coast Athletic 1979-80
Dan Roundfield F Central Michigan Mid-American 1974-75
Brian Shaw G UC Santa Barbara PCAA 1987-88
Reggie Slater C Wyoming Western Athletic 1991-92
Larry Smith F Alcorn State Southwestern Athletic 1979-80
Rik Smits C Marist ECAC Metro 1986-87 and 1987-88
Ricky Sobers G UNLV West Coast Athletic 1974-75
John Stockton G Gonzaga West Coast Athletic 1983-84
Rodney Stuckey G Eastern Washington Big Sky 2005-06
Jason Thompson F Rider Metro Atlantic Athletic 2007-08
George Trapp F Long Beach State PCAA 1969-70 and 1970-71
Gary Trent F Ohio University Mid-American 1992-93 through 1994-95
Ronny Turiaf F Gonzaga West Coast 2004-05
David Wesley G Baylor Southwest 1991-92

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopers Make Their Mark on April 13 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopers had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is an April 13 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

APRIL 13

  • Montreal Expos SS Bill Almon (averaged 2.5 ppg in half season for Brown's 1972-73 basketball team ending school's streak of 12 straight losing records) stroked four hits in a 5-4 win against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1980.

  • In his first MLB game in 1954, Detroit Tigers 2B Frank Bolling (averaged 7.3 ppg for Spring Hill AL in 1950-51) belted a homer off Baltimore Orioles P Don Larsen.

  • San Diego Padres RF Tony Gwynn (All-WAC second-team selection with San Diego State in 1979-80 and 1980-81) and two teammates establish a MLB record by each hitting a homer as the first three batters in the bottom of the first inning of their 1987 home opener against San Francisco Giants RHP Roger Mason (multiple-year letterman in late 1970s for Saginaw Valley State MI).

  • Boston Red Sox C Duane Josephson (led Northern Iowa in scoring in 1962-63 and 1963-64 under coach Norm Stewart) opened the scoring with a second-inning, two-run homer off Denny McLain in a 5-3 victory against the Washington Senators in 1971.

  • 1B Tony Lupien (Harvard hoops captain in 1938-39) awarded on waivers from the Boston Red Sox to the Philadelphia Phillies in 1944.

  • St. Louis Cardinals CF Wally Moon (averaged 4.3 ppg with Texas A&M in 1948-49 and 1949-50) swatted a homer against the Chicago Cubs in his first at-bat en route to becoming 1954 N.L. Rookie of the Year.

  • Detroit Tigers RHP Jeff Robinson (two-time NAIA All-District 3 hoops honoree in early 1980s left Azusa Pacific CA as school's No. 9 all-time scorer) hurled a four-hit shutout against the Minnesota Twins in 1989.

  • St. Louis Cardinals closer Lee Smith (averaged 3.4 ppg and 1.9 rpg with Northwestern State in 1976-77) set MLB record for most career saves in 1993 (mark subsequently broken).

  • RHP Jim Wilson (hoops letterman for San Diego State's 1942 NAIA Tournament participant) purchased from the Milwaukee Braves by the Baltimore Orioles in 1955.

  • California Angels RF Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) collected 15 total bases and six RBI on three homers, a double and single in a 15-9 verdict over the Minnesota Twins in 1991.

Oh Brother!: Where Will Lawsons Rank Among Standout Sets of Siblings?

There appears to be a need to establish some Law(sons) and Order via a historical perspective. Many in the mainstream media are portraying the transfer of brothers Dedric and K.J. Lawson from Memphis to Kansas as the MOAB story thus far in the off-season. Actually, if Michael and Marcus Weathers continue to improve, the twins who attended high school in Kansas could very well be the top set of brothers to transfer this year after their sterling freshman campaign for Miami (Ohio).

The Lawson duo collaborated for 31.5 ppg, 18 rpg and 6.1 apg with the underachieving Tigers this campaign prior to the scholars departing by giving coach Tubby Smith a vulgar half-a-peace sign. However, their scoring average pales in comparison to the brother output by Tom and Sam Stith as standouts on St. Bonaventure teams participating in the NIT the two years they played together in 1958-59 and 1959-60, compiling a 41-8 record. The Stiths combined to average 52 ppg in 1959-60, an NCAA single-season mark for brothers on the same team. Tom (46) and Sam (22) collaborated for 68 points in a 93-80 triumph over Marshall. Each of them ranked among the national leaders in field-goal percentage their two years together.

The Stith siblings are among about 20 different sets of brothers averaging more points in a single season for the same school than the Lawsons. A chronological list in this category includes GWU's Joe and John Holup (combined for 33.2 ppg in 1952-53), Seattle's Johnny and Eddie O'Brien (45.1 in 1952-53), St. Louis' Bob and Bill Nordmann (32 in 1959-60), Stiths (52 in 1959-60), Delaware's Nate and Pete Cloud (32.8 in 1962-63), Indiana's Tom and Dick Van Arsdale (43.5 in 1963-64 and 35.6 in 1964-65), St. John's Bob and Ken McIntyre (34 in 1964-65), SMU's Gene and Lynn Phillips (36.8 in 1968-69), GWU's Bob and Mike Tallent (46.7 in 1968-69), Villanova's Larry and Keith Herron (34.5 in 1976-77), Northeast Louisiana's Calvin and Kenny Natt (35.2 in 1976-77), ORU's Mark and Jeff Acres (35.8 in 1983-84), LIU's Carey and Paul Scurry (32.1 in 1984-85), Howard's John and Howard Spencer (39 in 1986-87), VMI's Damon and Ramon Williams (36.9 in 1988-89 and 39.3 in 1989-90), UCLA's Ed and Charles O'Bannon (34 in 1994-95), Wright State's Cain and Seth Doliboa (33 in 2001-02), VMI's Travis and Chavis Holmes (34.2 in 2006-07 and 34 in 2007-08) plus Rider's Jason and Ryan Thompson (35.4 in 2007-08).

Depending upon your view, the most efficient brothers in Memphis history probably were Forest and Orby Arnold in 1955-56 when they helped take the Tigers to the 25-team NCAA playoffs. But the Lawson tandem still has time to mature and possibly join a couple of KU brothers acts (Kelley and Morris) among the following additional 40-plus sets of standout brother combinations on same team in NCAA history (listed alphabetically):

  • Mark and Jeff Acres combined to average 29.9 ppg and 8 rpg for Oral Roberts in three seasons (1981-82, 1983-84 and 1984-85). The Titans participated in the 1982 NIT and 1984 NCAA playoffs.
  • Forest (senior/21.2) and Orby (freshman/7.9) Arnold combined to average 29.1 ppg for Memphis State's 20-7 NCAA playoff team in 1955-56. Forest was the school's all-time leading scorer (1,854 points) until Larry Finch broke his mark in 1973. Orby finished his career in 1958-59 with 1,245 points.
  • Nate and Pete Cloud, two of the top scorers and rebounders in Delaware history, played together on Blue Hens teams compiling a 32-13 record in 1961-62 and 1962-63. Pete (28) and Nate (18) combined for 46 points in a 100-66 victory over Muhlenberg on February 16, 1963.
  • Stanford twins Jarron and Jason Collins combined for 19.3 ppg and 12.6 rpg in 1999-00 before powering the Cardinal to a 31-3 record in 2000-01 with 27.3 ppg and 14.5 rpg.
  • Penn State's Joe (31) and Jon (career-high 26) Crispin combined for 57 points and 13 of 21 treys in a 73-68 win at Kentucky in perhaps the biggest road victory in the Nittany Lions' history. They pooled their resources for 27.8 ppg and 7 apg in 1999-00 and 26.7 ppg and 5 apg in 2000-01. Jon transferred to UCLA after Joe graduated.
  • Al and Mel Daniel combined for 29.5 ppg with Furman's 20-9 team in 1978-79. They teamed for 42 points in a 91-73 victory over UNC Charlotte and 39 in an 83-70 win over eventual NCAA No. 1 seed North Carolina in the North-South Doubleheader. Al, a two-time All-Southern Conference choice, was drafted by the San Antonio Spurs in the fourth round later that year while Mel became a three-time All-SC selection.
  • Forwards Cain and Seth Doliboa transferred to Wright State from Dayton and Bowling Green, respectively. Cain (Sr.) and Seth (Soph.) were All-Horizon League second-team selections in 2001-02 when they combined for 33 ppg and 12 rpg.
  • Kral and Shann Ferch combined for 27.6 ppg and 8.4 apg with Montana State's 21-8 Big Sky Conference regular-season champion and NIT squad in 1986-87. They teamed for 23.4 ppg the previous season, including a total of 45 (Kral 30 and Shann 15) in a double-overtime contest at Weber State.
  • Twins Joey and Stevie Graham combined for 25.3 ppg and 9.5 rpg as sophomores with Central Florida in 2001-02 before they transferred to Oklahoma State. The transfers collaborated for 15.2 ppg and 6.6 rpg in 2003-04 and 24.2 ppg and 9.4 rpg in 2004-05 for two OSU NCAA playoff teams.
  • Twin guards Aaron and Andrew Harrison combined for 24.6 ppg as freshmen in 2013-14 and 20.3 ppg as sophomores for a pair of Kentucky Final Four squads.
  • Twins Jarvis and Jonas Hayes combined for 25.1 ppg as freshmen with Western Carolina in 1999-00. They transferred to Georgia after Jarvis led the Southern Conference in scoring with 17.1 ppg. With the Bulldogs, the twins teamed for 25.8 ppg and 10.3 rpg in 2001-02 and 25 ppg and 8.8 rpg in 2002-03.
  • Villanova's Larry and Keith Herron combined for more than 30 ppg from 1974-75 through 1976-77. Another brother, Reggie, played with them in 1976-77.
  • Twins Travis and Chavis Holmes combined for 18.7 ppg with VMI in 2005-06, 34.2 ppg in 2006-07 and 34 ppg in 2007-08. They colloborated for 57 points in a 156-95 victory over Virginia Intermont in 2006-07 when they each ranked among the nation's top five in steals (placed 1-2 in the Big South Conference). Finished 1-2 nationally in thefts their senior season.
  • Joe and John Holup were the top two players for George Washington's first NCAA Tournament team in 1954. Joe, the school's all-time leading scorer and rebounder, paced the nation in field-goal percentage in 1954 and 1956. He also led the nation in rebounding in 1956. John was the team's leading scorer in 1952 before giving way to Joe the next season. John was a co-captain in 1954 when GWU secured the Southern Conference championship.
  • In 1974, seniors Kim and Kerry Hughes carried Wisconsin to its only winning record in Big Ten Conference competition (8-6; 16-8 overall) in a 34-year span from 1963 through 1996. Kim was the Badgers' top rebounder as a sophomore. The 6-11 identical twins combined for 27 ppg and 22 rpg in their junior season and 26 ppg and 20.3 rpg in their final year. Kerry had 21 points and Kim contributed 20 in a home game versus Northwestern their senior year.
  • Kansas guards Allen and Dean Kelley are the only set of brothers to play together in two NCAA Tournament title games (1952 and 1953). The Jayhawks posted a 47-9 record during those two years. Dean was selected by Fort Wayne in the 1953 NBA draft before Allen was picked by Milwaukee in the 1954 NBA draft.
  • Identical twins Lloyd and Floyd Kerr were swingmen who combined to average 25.3 ppg and 10.7 rpg for Colorado State from 1966-67 through 1968-69. Brothers Kerr each scored more than 10 points in all three NCAA playoff games when the Rams reached the Midwest Regional final their senior season (17-7 record) before becoming NBA third-round draft choices.
  • Mike (Sr.) and Jimmy (Soph.) Lee combined for 25.9 ppg for Syracuse's 24-5 team that participated in the 1973 NCAA Tournament East Regional. Jimmy (25) and Mike (20) collaborated for 45 points in a game against La Salle.
  • Twin centers Brook and Robin Lopez combined for 20.2 ppg, 11.5 rpg and 4.1 bpg with Stanford as freshmen in 2006-07 and 29.4 ppg, 13.8 rpg and 4.4 bpg as sophomores in 2007-08 before they both left school early and became NBA first-round draft choices.
  • Senior center-forward Randy Mahaffey, an All-ACC first-team selection, and sophomore forward Richie Mahaffey combined for 27 ppg and 16.8 rpg for Clemson's ACC first-division team in 1966-67 (17-8 record). Randy (34) and Richie (28) collaborated for 62 points in a 102-88 overtime victory at Virginia.
  • Frank and John Mandic were all-league selections for Oregon State's 1940 PCC champion (27-11 record). John was the Beavers' leading scorer after Frank paced the squad the previous season.
  • Rodney and Scooter McCray were instrumental in helping Louisville reach the Final Four in 1982 and 1983 before they played in the NBA.
  • Bob and Ken McIntyre, two of the top 25 scorers in St. John's history, were the top two point producers for the Redmen in 1963-64 (combined for 31 ppg) and 1964-65 (34 ppg) in Joe Lapchick's final two seasons as coach. The McIntyres collaborated for 34 points in a 55-51 victory over Villanova in the 1965 NIT championship game.
  • Dick and Bernie Mehen were All-SEC forwards for Tennessee's second-place team in 1941-42.
  • George and Ed Mikan powered DePaul to a 40-8 record in 1945 (NIT champion) and 1946 before they both played at least six seasons in the NBA. George was a first-team All-American both years.
  • Twins Markieff and Marcus Morris from Philadelphia combined for 12 ppg and 9.2 rpg with Kansas in 2008-09, 19.5 ppg and 11.4 rpg in 2009-10 and 30.8 ppg and 15.9 rpg as All-Big 12 Conference selections in 2010-11 before they both left school early and became NBA first-round draft choices.
  • Calvin (All-American) and Kenny Natt, combining for 29.3 ppg and 12.6 rpg, sparked Northeast Louisiana (23-6 record) to its first national postseason tournament (1979 NIT) as a major college before commencing their NBA careers. They combined for 26.6 ppg and 15.2 rpg in 1977-78 after collaborating for 35.2 ppg and 14.9 rpg in 1976-77.
  • Bob and Bill Nordmann combined for 32 ppg for St. Louis' 19-9 NIT team in 1959-60. Bob, nicknamed Bevo, was an All-Missouri Valley Conference first-team selection. He went on to play four seasons in the NBA after missing the 1960-61 campaign because of a severe knee injury.
  • Ed and Charles O'Bannon of UCLA combined for 29.8 ppg and 15.6 rpg in 1993-94 and 34 ppg and 14.4 rpg for the Bruins' NCAA titlist in 1994-95. Ed (37) and Charles (13) collaborated for 50 points in a 100-77 triumph against Duke in late February 1995.
  • Bantam-sized twins Johnny and Eddie O'Brien were the top two scorers for Seattle (26-3 record) when it reached the 1953 NCAA Tournament in the Chieftains' first season at the major-college level. They also were infielders for the Pittsburgh Pirates the same year. Johnny O'Brien, a 5-8 unanimous first-team All-American who played center on offense and remains the school's all-time scoring leader, is the only player to score more than 40 points in his first NCAA Tournament game (42 in an 88-77 victory against Idaho State). Eddie contributed 21 in the same playoff contest.
  • Forwards Bud and Ralph Ogden combined with center Dennis Awtrey to lead Santa Clara to 50 victories in 56 contests and West Regional finals against UCLA in 1968 and 1969. The Ogdens teamed for 27.9 ppg and 12.4 rpg in 1967-68 and 31.5 ppg and 15.5 rpg in 1968-69.
  • Forwards Gene (21.3) and Lynn (15.5) Phillips combined for 36.8 ppg with SMU in 1968-69.
  • Clifton and Roscoe Pondexter were All-PCAA first-team selections in 1973-74 when Long Beach State's top two scorers combined for 31.2 ppg and 15.5 rpg in powering the 49ers to a 24-2 record. Clifton (23) and Roscoe (18) combined for 41 points in a 98-89 victory over Oral Roberts. They both left college with eligibility remaining after the season.
  • Dave and Dick Ricketts were starters for Duquesne's 1955 NIT champion (22-4 record). Dick, who remains the school's all-time leading scorer, had three 30-point games for the Dukes before playing three seasons in the NBA. Both brothers played major league baseball.
  • Carey and Paul Scurry combined for 32.1 ppg and 20.7 rpg for LIU in 1984-85 (15-13 record). Carey was ECAC Metro player of the year that season by leading the league in scoring, rebounding and blocked shots (2.8 bpg).
  • Eventual NBA draft choices Dwight and Greg Smith were standouts for Western Kentucky's NCAA playoff teams in 1965-66 and 1966-67 combining for a 48-6 record.
  • Army's backcourt of Chris and J.P. Spatola combined for 26.3 ppg and 6.2 apg in 2000-01. Chris was an All-Patriot League second-team selection that season when he led the conference in scoring with 18.5 ppg. The next year, they combined for 25.6 ppg and 7 apg.
  • Howard University's John and Howard Spencer combined for 39 ppg and 17 rpg in 1986-87 when the Bison posted its best record (24-4) in school Division I history. Howard, a transfer from Auburn, was an All-MEAC first-team selection that season and John was an All-MEAC second-team choice the next year.
  • George Washington's Bob and Mike Tallent combined for 46.7 ppg in 1968-69 (14-11 record). Bob, a transfer from Kentucky, still holds four school offensive records, including a 28.9-point average that led the Southern Conference in his senior year. Mike paced the league the next season with a 21.3-point mark.
  • Rider's Jason and Ryan Thompson combined for 28.4 ppg and 15.3 rpg in 2006-07 and 35.4 ppg, 18.3 rpg, 3.3 bpg and 2.7 spg in 2007-08.
  • Twins Tom (17.4 ppg) and Dick (17.2 ppg) Van Arsdale ranked sixth and seventh on Indiana's list of all-time leading scorers when they graduated in 1965. They were among the nation's top 60 point producers as juniors in 1963-64 and combined for 76 points in a 108-102 neutral court victory over Notre Dame. The Hoosiers went 19-5 their senior campaign. Each of them played 12 seasons in the NBA, where they both scored more than 14,200 points.
  • Twins Damon and Ramon Williams combined for 28.9 ppg in their four-year VMI careers from 1986-87 through 1989-90. They were All-Southern Conference Tournament first-team selections as sophomores in 1988. Ramon was an all-league first-team pick as a junior and Damon achieved the feat as a senior. They rank among the school's top scorers in history.

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopers Make Their Mark on April 12 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! As a new season unfolds, read all about memorable major league baseball achievements, moments and transactions involving former college basketball players! Numerous ex-college hoopers had front-row seats to many of the most notable games and dates in MLB history.

Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is an April 12 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

APRIL 12

  • RHP Rich Beck (listed on Gonzaga's basketball roster in 1961-62) purchased from the Philadelphia Phillies by the New York Yankees in 1965.

  • RHP Dick Hall (averaged 13.5 ppg from 1948-49 through 1950-51 for Swarthmore PA Middle Atlantic States Conference Southern Division champions) traded by the Kansas City Athletics to the Baltimore Orioles in 1961.

  • In 1961, San Francisco Giants C Tom Haller (backup forward for Illinois in 1956-57 and 1957-58 under coach Harry Combes) stroked his first MLB hit, a homer off Pittsburgh Pirates P Vern Law.

  • A pinch-hit homer by OF Lynn Jones (averaged 10.4 ppg for Thiel PA from 1970-71 through 1973-74) accounted for the Detroit Tigers' only runs in a 6-2 loss against the Toronto Blue Jays in 1981.

  • Cleveland Indians rookie CF Kenny Lofton (Arizona's leader in steals for 1988 Final Four team compiling 35-3 record) swiped four bases against the Boston Red Sox in the opener of a 1992 doubleheader.

  • Detroit Tigers RHP Jeff Robinson (two-time NAIA All-District 3 hoops honoree in early 1980s left Azusa Pacific CA as school's No. 9 all-time scorer) won his MLB debut, allowing only one run in seven innings in a 7-1 victory against the Chicago White Sox in 1987.

  • After a pair of rainouts, 1B-OF Norm Siebern (member of Southwest Missouri State's back-to-back hoops NAIA Tournament titlists in 1952 and 1953) socked a decisive eighth-inning HR to give the New York Yankees a season-opening 3-2 win over the visiting Boston Red Sox in 1959.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates RHP Kent Tekulve (freshman hooper for Marietta OH in mid-1960s) commenced a streak of 12 relief appearances in a row without allowing an earned run in 1978.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates LHP Bob Veale (scored 1,160 points from 1955-56 through 1957-58 with Benedictine KS) outdueled San Francisco Giants P Juan Marichal, 1-0, in 1965.

  • San Diego Padres RF Will Venable (All-Ivy League first-team selection as junior and second-team choice as senior averaged 9.3 ppg under Princeton coach John Thompson III from 2001-02 through 2004-05) scored four runs against the Atlanta Braves in 2010.

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