Training Ground: Murray State Among Six Schools Losing Seven Head Coaches

The departure of Steve Prohm to Iowa State enabled Murray State to join the list of schools losing at least seven head coaches over the years to other major colleges or the NBA. The Racers lost four coaches to other universities in a 14-year span from 1985 to 1998. Prohm could join three other former Murray coaches in the 2016 NCAA playoffs (North Carolina State's Mark Gottfried, Cincinnati's Mick Cronin and Texas A&M's Billy Kennedy).

Incredibly, Tulsa lost four coaches in a seven-year period from 1995 to 2001. Other schools losing coaches in comparable short spans include Idaho (11 years from 1983 to 1993), Princeton (12 years from 2000 to 2011), New Orleans (14 years from 1994 to 2007) and Penn (15 years from 1971 to 1985).

Unlike POTUS, at least some universities have a strategy to win their basketball wars by knowing where to go for a competent coach. Following is an alphabetical list of the six DI schools - five of them mid-major institutions - losing seven head coaches to other DI schools or the pros:

Idaho - Dave MacMillan (left for Minnesota/1927), Dave Strack (Michigan/1960), Joe Cipriano (Nebraska/1963), Don Monson (Oregon/1983), Tim Floyd (New Orleans/1988), Kermit Davis (Texas A&M/1990), Larry Eustachy (Utah State/1993)

Kansas State - Jack Gardner (Utah/1953), Tex Winter (Washington/1968), Cotton Fitzsimmons (Phoenix Suns/1970), Lon Kruger (Florida/1990), Dana Altman (Creighton/1994), Bob Huggins (West Virginia/2008), Frank Martin (South Carolina/2012)

Montana - Jud Heathcote (Michigan State/1976), Jim Brandenburg (Wyoming/1978), Mike Montgomery (Stanford/1986), Stew Morrill (Colorado State/1991), Pat Kennedy (Towson/2004), Larry Krystkowiak (assistant with Milwaukee Bucks/2006), Wayne Tinkle (Oregon State/2014)

Murray State - Ron Greene (Indiana State/1985), Steve Newton (South Carolina/1991), Scott Edgar (Duquesne/1995), Mark Gottfried (Alabama/1998), Mick Cronin (Cincinnati/2006), Billy Kennedy (Texas A&M/2011), Steve Prohm (Iowa State/2015)

Penn - Howie Dallmar (Stanford/1954), Jack McCloskey (Wake Forest/1966), Dick Harter (Oregon/1971), Chuck Daly (assistant with Philadelphia 76ers/1977), Bob Weinhauer (Arizona State/1982), Craig Littlepage (Rutgers/1985), Fran Dunphy (Temple/2006)

Tulsa - Ken Hayes (New Mexico State/1975), Nolan Richardson Jr. (Arkansas/1985), Tubby Smith (Georgia/1995), Steve Robinson (Florida State/1997), Bill Self (Illinois/2000), Buzz Peterson (Tennessee/2001), Danny Manning (Wake Forest/2014)

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on June 8 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a June 8 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

JUNE 8

  • Chicago Cubs RF George Altman (appeared in 1953 and 1954 NAIA Basketball Tournament with Tennessee State) went 4-for-4 in a 4-3 loss against the New York Mets in the opener of a 1962 doubleheader.

  • In the midst of a career-high 13-game hitting streak, Philadelphia Phillies 1B Harry Anderson (averaged 7.7 ppg and 8.9 rpg for West Chester PA in 1951-52) supplied two homers among his four hits in the opener of a 1958 twinbill against the St. Louis Cardinals.

  • Detroit Tigers RHP Elden Auker (All-Big Six Conference first-five selection with Kansas State in 1931-32) tossed a one-hitter against the Philadelphia Athletics in 1937.

  • Posting his lone RBI with the Philadelphia Phillies in 1968, LF Howie Bedell (averaged 3.5 ppg and 3.5 rpg for West Chester PA in 1955-56) lofted a pinch-hit, sacrifice fly with one out in the fifth frame against the Los Angeles Dodgers, breaking P Don Drysdale's string of 58 2/3 consecutive scoreless innings.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates LF Carson "Skeeter" Bigbee (Oregon letterman in 1915) banged out at least three hits for the sixth time in a 13-game span in 1923.

  • Baltimore Orioles CF Al Bumbry (Virginia State's runner-up in scoring with 16.7 ppg as freshman in 1964-65) collected four hits and five RBI in a 13-8 win against the California Angels in 1980.

  • San Diego Padres 1B Tony Clark (San Diego State's leading scorer in WAC games in 1991-92) smacked a three-run pinch homer off P Billy Wagner in the bottom of the eighth inning in an 8-6 win against the New York Mets in 2008.

  • Cincinnati Reds CF Harry Craft (four-sport letterman with Mississippi College in early 1930s) went 5-for-5, hitting for the cycle, with six RBI in a 23-2 win against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1940.

  • Boston Red Sox 1B Walt Dropo (Connecticut's first player ever to average 20 points in single season with 21.7 ppg in 1942-43), en route to becoming 1950 A.L. Rookie of the Year, contributed two homers, seven RBI and five runs scored in a 29-4 romp over the St. Louis Browns in the most lopsided result in the 20th Century.

  • New York Yankees 1B-OF Buddy Hassett (played for Manhattan teams winning school-record 17 consecutive games in 1930 and 1931) extended his hit streak to 20 games with a pair of singles against the Cleveland Indians in 1942.

  • RHP Cal Koonce (standout for Campbell in 1960 and 1961 when North Carolina-based school was a junior college) purchased from the New York Mets by the Boston Red Sox in 1970.

  • Bonus baby LHP Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) activated from the injury list by the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1955. They made room for him by optioning P Tommy Lasorda, who eventually managed them for 21 years from 1976 to 1996.

  • Detroit Tigers SS Harvey Kuenn (played briefly for Wisconsin in 1951-52 after competing on JV squad previous season) collected four hits and four RBI against the New York Yankees in 1954.

  • In 1945, Cleveland Indians 2B Dutch Meyer (Texas Christian letterman in 1934-35 and 1935-36) supplied his third three-hit outing in the last four games.

  • LHP Dennis Rasmussen (sixth-man for Creighton averaged 5.1 ppg from 1977-78 through 1979-80) traded by the Cincinnati Reds to the San Diego Padres in 1988.

  • Cincinnati Reds 1B Eddie Shokes (Duke letterman in 1939-40 and 1940-41) supplied a career-high three hits against the Boston Braves in 1946.

Crossing Over: Ex-College Hoopsters Impact CWS as Championship Coaches

Florida State's Mike Martin, eliminated by long-time rival Florida, was again denied the possibility of becoming the latest former college basketball player to coach a school to a College World Series championship. One of the all-time five winningest college baseball coaches, he boasts the highest winning percentage among NCAA Division I mentors, winning almost three-fourths of his games. Martin, who has guided the Seminoles to the CWS a total of 15 times (1980-86-87-89-91-92-94-95-96-98-99-00-08-10-12), played basketball for Wingate (NC) in the mid-1960s before the institution became a four-year school. One of his junior college hoop teammates was Morris "Mo" McHone, who went on to coach the San Antonio Spurs in 1983-84. Martin coached basketball for Tallahassee (Fla.) Community College in the early 1970s.

Martin, runner-up in 1986 and 1999, isn't the only revered coach frustrated by not capturing a national title. Richard "Itchy" Jones, who averaged 8.9 ppg for Southern Illinois' basketball squad in 1956-57, established a baseball dynasty in 21-year coaching career at his alma mater before accepting a similar position with the Illini in Champaign in 1991. Jones compiled a 1,240-752-6 record before retiring in 2005. In 1971, his second year at Southern Illinois, Jones guided the Salukis to within one game of the national title, finishing second at the CWS. In 1974 and 1977, Jones brought SIU back to the CWS, placing third both times. Buoyed by 22 eventual major leaguers, he became the 18th coach in NCAA Division I history to win 1,000 games.

Stanford's Everett Dean, compiling a 3-0 basketball tournament record in 1942, is the only unbeaten coach in NCAA playoff history. He is also the only NCAA basketball championship coach to win a CWS baseball game for the same school as a coach (1953). Following is an alphabetical list of previous ex-college hoopsters who went the extra step and reached the milestone of coaching a CWS titlist:

JOHN "JACK" BARRY, Holy Cross
Infielder, primarily a shortstop, hit .243 with the Philadelphia Athletics and Boston Red Sox in 11 A.L. seasons from 1908 through 1919. Ranked fifth in the league in RBI in 1913 with 85 for the Athletics as a key component of Connie Mack's first dynasty. Participated in five World Series, four with the champion, in a six-year span from 1910 through 1915. Compiled a 90-62 managerial record with the Red Sox in 1917 before winning more than 80% of his games coaching his alma mater for 40 years (including capturing the 1952 College World Series). The 5-9 Barry was a basketball letterman for the Crusaders in 1908.

SAM BARRY, Wisconsin
Basketball Hall of Famer coached USC's 1948 baseball titlist. He is the Trojans' all-time winningest basketball coach.

RAY "PICK" FISHER, Middlebury (VT)
Righthander compiled a 100-94 record and 2.82 ERA with the New York Yankees and Cincinnati Reds in 10 years from 1910 through 1920. Ranked among the A.L. top 10 in ERA and complete games in back-to-back seasons (1914 and 1915). Started one World Series game for the Reds against the Chicago White Sox in 1919. Won 14 Big Ten Conference championships as baseball coach at Michigan for 38 years until the late 1950s (including 1953 College World Series title). Became a spring training pitching instructor for the Detroit Tigers after being blacklisted for almost 40 years because of salary disputes with Cincinnati's owners. Fisher played "class" basketball (1910 graduate) before becoming his alma mater's first full-time salaried member of the Physical Education Department.

MARTIN KAROW, Ohio State
Coach of his alma mater's 1966 College World Series winner after the Buckeyes finished runner-up the previous year. He was a basketball letterman in 1925.

JERRY KINDALL, Minnesota
Infielder hit .213 in nine seasons (1956 through 1958 and 1960 through 1965) with the Chicago Cubs, Cleveland Indians and Minnesota Twins. Baseball coach at Arizona for more than 20 years, leading the Wildcats to three College World Series titles (1976, 1980 and 1986). He is the only player to hit for the cycle in the College World Series at Omaha (against Ole Miss on June 11, 1956). Kindall is the only individual to play for and coach CWS champions. The 6-2 1/2, 175-pounder played two seasons of varsity basketball for Minnesota under coach Ozzie Cowles, averaging 1.4 ppg as a sophomore in 1954-55 and 6.9 ppg as a junior in 1955-56. Excerpt from school guide: "Exceptionally quick reflexes and a good eye are his main attributes although he also has tremendous spring making him a good rebounder."

DON LUND, Michigan
Outfielder hit .240 in a seven-year career (1945, 1947 through 1949 and 1952 through 1954) with the Brooklyn Dodgers, St. Louis Browns and Detroit Tigers. His only season as a regular was 1953 when he was the Tigers' right fielder. Coached baseball at his alma mater, winning the national championship in 1962, before running the Tigers' farm system until 1970. First-round selection as a fullback/linebacker by the Chicago Bears in the 1945 NFL draft. Rejected $100 a game offer from the Bears and never played pro football. He was a 6-0, 200-pound starting guard as a junior for the Wolverines' basketball team and starting center as a senior. Averaged 4.4 ppg in 46 outings. In his history of Michigan basketball, Jeff Mortimer wrote of the school's World War II squads: "Lund, rejected for military service because of a trick knee, was the mainstay of these teams." Following his playing career, he served as baseball coach for his alma mater (won 1962 College World Series), farm system director for the Tigers and associate athletic director at his alma mater.

DICK SIEBERT, Concordia-St. Paul (Minn.)
Lefthanded first baseman hit .282 with the Brooklyn Dodgers, St. Louis Cardinals and Philadelphia Athletics in 11 years in 1932 and from 1936 through 1945. All-Star in 1943 finished among the top Seven in the A.L. in batting average in 1941 and 1944. Minnesota's baseball coach for 31 years (753-361-8 record from 1948 through 1978) captured three CWS titles in a nine-year span from 1956 through 1964. His son, Paul, pitched with the Houston Astros, San Diego Padres and New York Mets for five years from 1974 to 1978. Siebert played two years of college basketball in 1929 and 1930. The March 1929 issue of the Concordia Comet mentions that, "Lefty Siebert, despite having never touched a basketball before enrolling at Concordia, was almost as good a basketball player as he was a baseball player."

JOHN "HI" SIMMONS, Northeast Missouri State
Missouri's all-time winningest baseball coach (481-284 record in 34 years) captured the 1954 NCAA title in one of his six College World Series appearances. One of his winning pitchers at the CWS was Norm Stewart, who went on to become Mizzou's all-time winningest basketball coach. School's baseball stadium is named after Simmons. All-conference center was senior captain of 1927-28 basketball squad.

BOBBY WINKLES, Illinois Wesleyan
Coached Arizona State to College World Series titles in 1965, 1967 and 1969 before managing the California Angels in 1973 and through the first 74 games of 1974 (170-213 major league record). Reggie Jackson, Rick Monday and Sal Bando were among the more than 20 future major leaguers he coached at ASU. Winkles led Illinois Wesleyan in scoring as a senior in 1950-51 (12 ppg). The 5-9, 170-pound guard was a first-team selection in the College Conference of Illinois.

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on June 7 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a June 7 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

JUNE 7

  • SS Bill Almon (averaged 2.5 ppg in half a season for Brown's 1972-73 team ending the Bears' streak of 12 straight losing basketball records) selected first overall in 1974 amateur draft featuring 12 of first 13 choices going on to become major leaguers. Almon was chosen by the San Diego Padres ahead of first-rounders Dale Murphy, Lance Parrish, Lonnie Smith, Rick Sutcliffe, Garry Templeton and Willie Wilson who eventually became All-Star honorees.

  • Seattle Mariners 1B Bruce Bochte (starting forward for Santa Clara's NCAA playoff team in 1969-70) provided four hits in a 5-4 win against the Cleveland Indians in 1981.

  • RHP Andrew Brackman (averaged 7.5 ppg and 3.5 rpg with North Carolina State in 2004-05 and 2005-06 for pair of NCAA playoff teams) selected in first round (30th pick overall) by the New York Yankees in 2007 amateur draft. Brackman was chosen ahead of supplemental first-rounders Todd Frazier and Justin Jackson. Other notable players picked who signed that year include Brandon Belt (11th round), Zack Cozart (2nd), Lucas Duda (7th), Greg Holland (10th), Freddie Freeman (2nd), Corey Kluber (4th), Jonathan Lucroy (3rd), Anthony Rizzo (6th), Giancarlo Stanton (2nd) and Jordan Zimmerman (2nd).

  • Brooklyn Robins RF Harvey Hendrick (Vanderbilt letterman in 1918) stroked three hits in third consecutive contest in 1927.

  • Philadelphia Phillies CF Kenny Lofton (Arizona's leader in steals for 1988 Final Four team compiling 35-3 record) logged three hits for the third time in a four-game span in 2005.

  • OF Jim Lyttle (led Florida State in free-throw shooting in 1965-66 when averaging 12.4 ppg) selected in first round (10th pick overall) by the New York Yankees in 1966 amateur draft. Lyttle was chosen ahead of fellow first-rounders John Curtis (did not sign that year), Richie Hebner, Carlos May and Gary Nolan.

  • New York Giants Hall of Fame RHP Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) combined with teammate Joe McGinnity to surrender 11 runs in the opening inning of a 19-0 drubbing by the Chicago Cubs in 1906. It is the worst setback in Giants' history.

  • Len Matuszek (starter for Toledo's 18-7 team in 1975-76) smashed a three-run, pinch-hit homer for the Los Angeles Dodgers against the Houston Astros in 1986.

  • RHP Joe Niekro (averaged 8.9 ppg and 3.8 rpg for West Liberty WV from 1963-64 through 1965-66) traded by the New York Yankees to the Minnesota Twins in 1987.

  • In the midst of a 12-game hitting streak, St. Louis Cardinals RF Don Padgett (freshman in 1934 with Lenoir-Rhyne NC excelled in multiple sports) pounded his fourth homer in last six contests.

  • Chicago Cubs RHP Claude Passeau (played for Millsaps MS in late 1920s and early 1930s) hurled a shutout against the Brooklyn Dodgers and supplied a two-run, game-ending homer in the ninth inning in 1946.

  • Detroit Tigers LF Curtis Pride (led William & Mary in steals three times and assists twice while averaging 5.6 ppg and 3.1 apg from 1986-87 through 1989-90) contributed a career-high four hits and scored the game-winning run in the bottom of the ninth inning in a 6-5 triumph against the New York Yankees in 1996.

  • OF Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) picked fourth overall by the San Diego Padres in 1973 amateur draft and goes straight to the majors.

  • 1B Babe Young (Fordham letterman in 1935-36) traded by the New York Giants to the Cincinnati Reds in 1947.

Hoop Dreams to Field of Dreams: Ex-Hoopsters/#1 MLB Picks Reaching Bigs

Swingman Pat Connaughton, Notre Dame's runner-up in scoring and rebounding the last two seasons, was the most notable college basketball player selected last year in the 2014 MLB Amateur Draft. Connaughton, a pitcher, was picked in the fourth round by the Baltimore Orioles (121st choice overall) before losing his lone decision in the New York-Penn League (Class A).

In an era of increased specialization, the Orioles selected former LSU hoopster Ben McDonald with the first pick in the 1989 draft. McDonald, a part-time starter as a freshman forward under coach Dale Brown in 1986-87, went on to pitch in the starting rotation for the Orioles and Milwaukee Brewers for nine years from 1989 through 1997 before becoming an analyst for ESPN's CWS coverage.

Infielder-outfielder C.J. Henry, the 17th pick overall in the 2005 draft, hit an anemic .222 in four low-minors seasons in the New York Yankees' farm system before the brother of Kansas standout Xavier Henry averaged 3.1 ppg in 13 contests with the Jayhawks in 2009-10. But North Carolina State's Andrew Brackman, who pitched briefly for the Yankees in 2011, is the only DI basketball regular in the 21st Century to become a major leaguer after being selected in the opening round of the amateur draft. Brackman was chosen ahead of supplemental first-rounders Todd Frazier and Justin Jackson. Other notable players picked that year include Brandon Belt (11th round), Zack Cozart (2nd), Lucas Duda (7th), Freddie Freeman (2nd), Matt Harvey (3rd/did not sign), Greg Holland (10th), Craig Kimbrel (33rd/did not sign), Corey Kluber (4th), Jonathan Lucroy (3rd), Anthony Rizzo (6th), Chris Sale (21st/did not sign), Giancarlo Stanton (2nd) and Jordan Zimmerman (2nd).

Numerous universities have featured versatile athletes who played college basketball before going on to major league baseball careers. Connecticut's Scott Burrell, a three-time All-Big East Conference choice under Huskies coach Jim Calhoun, is the first athlete to become a first-round draft pick of two major sports organizations (MLB and NBA). The first-round selection of the Seattle Mariners in 1989 and fifth-round choice by the Toronto Blue Jays in 1990 never reached as high as Double A, compiling a 2-6 Class A pitching record in 14 starts in the Blue Jays' farm system 1990 and 1991. Burrell, a first-round pick by the Charlotte Hornets in 1993, averaged 6.9 ppg and 3.5 rpg with four different NBA franchises in eight seasons from 1993-94 through 2000-01.

In 1989, Burrell was picked ahead of supplemental first-rounder Todd Jones plus the following eventual MLB hurlers: Jerry Dipoto (3rd round), Alan Embree (5th), Scott Erickson (4th), Sterling Hitchcock (9th), Trevor Hoffman (11th), Curt Leskanie (8th), Denny Neagle (3rd), Paul Quantrill (6th), Pat Rapp (15th), Shane Reynolds (3rd), Russ Springer (7th), Mike Trombley (14th) and Tim Worrell (20th). In 1990, Burrell was chosen before eventual MLB pitchers Jason Bere (36th round), Eddie Guardado (21st), Mike Hampton (6th), Dave Mlicki (17th), Troy Percival (6th), Andy Pettitte (22nd), Rick White (15th) and Mike Williams (14th).

Lefthanded reliever Matt Thornton of the Washington Nationals averaged 5.8 points and 2.4 rebounds per game for Grand Valley State (MI) from 1995-96 through 1997-98, shooting 54.7% from the floor his last two seasons before becoming a first-round draft choice by the Seattle Mariners. Following is an alphabetical list including Thornton among the major leaguers who were first-round choices in the amateur baseball draft after playing varsity college basketball:

First-Round Choice Position College(s) MLB Team Selector Pick Overall Year
Bill Almon SS Brown San Diego Padres 1st 1974
Andy Benes RHP Evansville San Diego Padres 1st 1988
Andrew Brackman RHP North Carolina State New York Yankees 30th 2007
Tony Clark 1B Arizona/San Diego State Detroit Tigers 2nd 1990
Cameron Drew OF New Haven CT Houston Astros 12th 1985
Atlee Hammaker LHP East Tennessee State Kansas City Royals 21st 1979
Rich Hand RHP Puget Sound WA Cleveland Indians 1st 1969**
Jim Lyttle OF Florida State New York Yankees 10th 1966
Ben McDonald RHP Louisiana State Baltimore Orioles 1st 1989
Dennis Rasmussen LHP Creighton California Angels 17th 1980
Jeff Shaw RHP Rio Grande OH Cleveland Indians 1st 1986**
*Mike Stenhouse OF-1B Harvard Oakland Athletics 26th 1979
Matt Thornton LHP Grand Valley State MI Seattle Mariners 22nd 1998
Dave Winfield OF Minnesota San Diego Padres 4th 1973
John Young 1B Chapman CA Detroit Tigers 16th 1969**

*Did not sign that year.
**January draft/secondary phase.
NOTES: 1B-OF Rick Leach (13th pick in 1979 by Detroit Tigers) was a JV player for Michigan and OF Ken Singleton (3rd selection in 1967 by New York Mets) was a freshman player for Hofstra. . . . Rasmussen and Stenhouse were compensation for signings of free-agent pitchers Nolan Ryan and Steve Renko, respectively.

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on June 6 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a June 6 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

JUNE 6

  • Philadelphia Phillies RHP Mike Adams (played basketball for Texas A&M-Kingsville in 1996-97) notched 14 straight relief appearances without allowing an earned run before going on the disabled list in 2014.

  • RHP Mike Barlow (Syracuse substitute from 1967-68 through 1969-70) traded by the Houston Astros to the California Angels in 1976.

  • Cleveland Indians RF Beau Bell (two-year letterman for Texas A&M in early 1930s) went 4-for-4 in a 5-4 win against the Washington Senators in 1940.

  • RHP Jim Bibby (Fayetteville State NC backup player and brother of UCLA All-American Henry Bibby) traded by the St. Louis Cardinals to the Texas Rangers in 1973.

  • Detroit Tigers 1B Tony Clark (San Diego State's leading scorer in WAC games in 1991-92) provided three extra-base hits against the Milwaukee Brewers in 1998.

  • San Diego Padres RF Tony Gwynn (All-WAC second-team selection with San Diego State in 1979-80 and 1980-81) stroked a ninth-inning single on a 3-0 delivery to end Tom Browning's bid for a perfect game with the Cincinnati Reds in 1988.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers 1B Gil Hodges (played for St. Joseph's IN in 1943 and Oakland City IN in 1947 and 1948) hammered two homers against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1953.

  • LF Danny Litwhiler (member of JV squad with Bloomsburg PA three years in mid-1930s) notched the only for the Philadelphia Phillies off Johnny Vander Meer of the Cincinnati Reds in a 1941 outing three years to the month after Vander Meer became the only MLB hurler to toss back-to-back no-hitters.

  • In 1963, Chicago Cubs RHP Lindy McDaniel (played for Oklahoma's 1954-55 freshman squad), entering a contest against the San Francisco Giants as a reliever with the bases loaded and one out in the top of the 10th inning, promptly picked Hall of Fame CF Willie Mays off second base an then fanned C Ed Bailey before leading off the bottom of the frame with a game-winning homer.

  • New York Yankees 3B Graig Nettles (shot 87.8% from free-throw line for San Diego State in 1963-64) smacked two homers against the Seattle Mariners in 1983.

  • Chicago Cubs RF Bill Nicholson (Washington College MD guard for two years in mid-1930s) blasted two homers against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1940.

  • RHP Joe Niekro (averaged 8.9 ppg and 3.8 rpg for West Liberty WV from 1963-64 through 1965-66) traded by the New York Yankees to the Minnesota Twins in 1987.

  • RHP Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) registered his only victory in 1961 (3-2 at San Francisco). He finished with the worst-ever season record (1-10 in final year with Philadelphia Phillies) for a Hall of Fame hurler.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers LF Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in Pacific Coast Conference both of his seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) accounted for four hits in back-to-back games against the Chicago Cubs in 1954.

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on June 5 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a June 5 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

JUNE 5

  • Cleveland Indians SS Lou Boudreau (leading scorer for Illinois' 1937 Big Ten Conference co-champion) went 4-for-4 against the Philadelphia Athletics in 1943.

  • Philadelphia Athletics C Mickey Cochrane (Boston University player in early 1920s) amassed four hits against the St. Louis Browns in 1926.

  • In the midst of a career-high 19-game hitting streak, Detroit Tigers LF Hoot Evers (Illinois starter in 1939-40) contributed five RBI in a 7-4 win against the Washington Senators in 1950.

  • Boston Red Sox 1B Dick Gernert (Temple letterman in 1948-49 when averaging 2.7 ppg) homered in his third consecutive contest against the Cleveland Indians in 1958.

  • LHP Atlee Hammaker (averaged 5.3 ppg as a freshman in 1976-77 and 4.9 ppg as a sophomore in 1977-78 under East Tennessee State coach Sonny Smith) selected in first round (21st pick overall) by the Kansas City Royals in 1979 amateur draft.

  • Brooklyn Robins LF Buddy Hassett (played for Manhattan teams winning school-record 17 consecutive games in 1930 and 1931) banged out four hits against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1938.

  • INF-OF Harvey Hendrick (Vanderbilt letterman in 1918) purchased from the St. Louis Cardinals by the Cincinnati Reds in 1932.

  • A three-run, pinch-hit homer by Gail Hopkins (averaged 2.5 ppg with Pepperdine in 1963-64) sparked the Kansas City Royals to an 11-7 triumph against the New York Yankees in 1971.

  • Cleveland Indians RF David Justice (led Thomas More KY in assists in 1984-85) jacked two homers against the Milwaukee Brewers in 2000.

  • Cleveland Indians CF Kenny Lofton (Arizona's leader in steals for 1988 Final Four team compiling 35-3 record) launched two homers against the Detroit Tigers in 1995.

  • Milwaukee Braves SS Johnny Logan (played for Binghamton in 1948-49) logged four hits in a 7-0 win against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1954.

  • St. Louis Cardinals RHP Lindy McDaniel (played for Oklahoma's 1954-55 freshman squad) notched his fifth complete-game victory in a five-week span in 1957.

  • RHP Ben McDonald (started six games as 6-6 freshman forward for Louisiana State in 1986-87) picked first overall by the Baltimore Orioles in the 1989 amateur draft. RHP Scott Burrell (three-time All-Big East Conference selection from 1990-91 through 1992-93 under coach Jim Calhoun) was the final choice in the opening round (26th by Seattle Mariners). Burrell was picked ahead of eventual MLB hurlers Jerry Dipoto, Alan Embree, Scott Erickson, Sterling Hitchcock, Trevor Hoffman, Todd Jones, Curt Leskanie, Denny Neagle, Paul Quantrill, Pat Rapp, Shane Reynolds, Russ Springer, Mike Trombley and Tim Worrell.

  • Washington Senators rookie CF Irv Noren (player of year for California community college state champion Pasadena City in 1945) went 4-for-4 against the Detroit Tigers in 1950.

  • Extending his hitting streak to 15 games, St. Louis Browns LF Ray Pepper (Alabama letterman in 1926-27) provided four safeties in a 10-5 win against the Chicago White Sox in the nightcap of a 1934 doubleheader.

  • Cincinnati Reds RF Wally Roettger (Illinois letterman in 1921-22 and 1922-23) registered two triples among his four hits against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1931.

  • RHP Lee Smith (averaged 3.4 ppg and 1.9 rpg with Northwestern State in 1976-77) fanned four of the last five Pittsburgh Pirates batters to earn a save for the Chicago Cubs in a 3-1 victory in 1983.

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on June 4 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a June 4 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

JUNE 4

  • Chicago Cubs LF Ethan Allen (Cincinnati basketball letterman in 1924-25 and 1925-26) went 4-for-4 in an 8-5 win against the New York Giants in 1936.

  • Chicago Cubs RF George Altman (appeared in 1953 and 1954 NAIA Tournament with Tennessee State) notched his sixth straight multiple-hit game in 1961.

  • RHP Elden Auker (All-Big Six Conference first five selection with Kansas State in 1931-32), supported by an inside-the-park homer from player/manager Mickey Cochrane (Boston University player in early 1920s) during a 10-run third inning, earned the triumph in an 18-9 decision over the Philadelphia Athletics.

  • Seattle Mariners RHP Jim Beattie (Dartmouth's top rebounder in 1974-75 when selected team MVP and honorable mention All-Ivy League) tossed a two-hit shutout against the Detroit Tigers in 1982.

  • 1B Tony Clark (San Diego State's leading scorer in WAC games in 1991-92) selected by the Detroit Tigers in first round (2nd pick overall) in 1990 amateur draft. Sixteen years later with the Arizona Diamondbacks, Clark cracked two homers among his four hits against the Atlanta Braves in 2006.

  • Cleveland Indians CF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) hit for the cycle against the Boston Red Sox in 1952.

  • St. Louis Cardinals 3B Howard Freigau (played for Ohio Wesleyan) collected four hits, four stolen bases and five RBI in a 12-5 win against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1924.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates LHP Joe Gibbon (two-time All-SEC forward for Ole Miss was nation's second-leading scorer as a senior in 1956-57) hurled his final MLB shutout (four-hitter against New York Mets in opener of 1967 twinbill).

  • Pinch-hitter Harvey Hendrick (Vanderbilt letterman in 1918) hammered a two-out, bases-loaded triple in the ninth inning to spark the Cleveland Indians to an 11-10 verdict over the St. Louis Browns in 1925. Four years later after having his career-high 25-game hitting streak snapped in the final contest of May, 1B Hendrick collected two homers and six RBI for the Brooklyn Robins in an 11-8 victory against the St. Louis Cardinals in the nightcap of a 1929 doubleheader.

  • RHP Jim Konstanty (Syracuse player in late 1930s) signed by the St. Louis Cardinals in 1956 after he was released by the New York Yankees.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers LHP Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) became the fourth hurler to toss three no-hitters, blanking the N.L.-leading Philadelphia Phillies, 3-0, in 1964.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers 2B Davey Lopes (NAIA All-District 15 selection for Iowa Wesleyan averaged 16.9 ppg as freshman in 1964-65 and 12.1 ppg as sophomore in 1965-66) collected three hits and three stolen bases against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1974.

  • Cleveland Indians 1B Ed Morgan (Tulane letterman from 1923-24 through 1925-26) manufactured four hits in a 10-2 win against the Boston Red Sox in 1931.

  • Chicago White Sox OF Gary Redus (J.C. player for Athens AL and father of Centenary/South Alabama guard with same name) ripped a game-winning grand slam in the bottom of the ninth inning against the Texas Rangers in 1988.

  • New York Giants RHP Hal Schumacher (multiple-sport athlete for St. Lawrence NY in early 1930s) tossed his fourth shutout in less than a month en route to a total of seven whitewashes in 1933.

  • Cleveland Indians 3B Riggs Stephenson (Alabama letterman in 1920) went 4-for-4 against the Detroit Tigers in 1922. Eight years later as a Chicago Cubs LF, Stephenson amassed five hits, four runs and four RBI against the Boston Braves in 1930.

  • 1B-OF Preston Ward (second-leading scorer for Southwest Missouri State in 1946-47 and 1948-49) traded by the Chicago Cubs to the Pittsburgh Pirates in a 10-player swap in 1953.

  • California Angels 3B John Werhas (USC's leading scorer in 1958-59 and 1959-60) whacked a pinch-hit homer against the Minnesota Twins in 1967.

  • In 1986, New York Yankees RF Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) homered twice in an 11-0 victory over the California Angels in support of RHP Joe Niekro (averaged 8.9 ppg and 3.8 rpg for West Liberty WV from 1963-64 through 1965-66), who hurled a no-hitter for 7 2/3 innings before yielding a safety.

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on June 3 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a June 3 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

JUNE 3

  • Chicago Cubs 2B Glenn Beckert (three-year basketball letterman for Allegeny PA) drove in P Ken Holtzman with the only run of the game in Holtzman's no-hitter against the Cincinnati Reds in 1971. The next year, Beckert banged out four hits against the San Diego Padres in 1972.

  • New York Giants SS Alvin Dark (letterman for LSU and USL during World War II) scored five runs in a 13-8 victory over the St. Louis Cardinals in 1954.

  • OF Cameron Drew (NECC first-team selection in 1984-85 when he led New Haven CT in scoring and rebounding) selected by Houston Astros in first round (12th pick overall) in 1985 amateur draft. Drew was chosen ahead of fellow first-rounders Joey Cora, Gregg Jefferies, Joe Magrane, Brian McRae and Rafael Palmeiro.

  • 1B Walt Dropo (Connecticut's first player ever to average 20 points for a season with 21.7 ppg in 1942-43) traded by the Boston Red Sox to the Detroit Tigers in a nine-player swap in 1952.

  • Overweight RHP George Earnshaw (competed with Swarthmore PA squad in 1922) fined by Philadelphia Athletics owner/manager Connie Mack in 1933.

  • OF Hoot Evers (starter for Illinois in 1939-40) traded by the Detroit Tigers to the Boston Red Sox in a nine-player swap in 1952.

  • Chicago White Sox RHP Eddie Fisher (played for Oklahoma's 1954-55 freshman squad) tossed a four-hit shutout against the Los Angeles Angels in 1963.

  • New York Giants C Paul Florence (Georgetown letterman from 1920-21 through 1922-23) furnished a career-high three hits in a 10-5 win against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1926.

  • In 1983, George Bamberger stepped down as manager of the New York Mets and was succeeded by Frank Howard (two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection when leading Ohio State in scoring and rebounding in 1956-57 and 1957-58).

  • In 1978, Philadelphia Phillies 2B Davey Johnson (averaged 1.7 ppg with Texas A&M in 1961-62) became the first MLB player to smack two pinch-hit grand slams in a single season.

  • Chicago Cubs 3B Vance Law (averaged 6.8 ppg for Brigham Young from 1974-75 through 1976-77) logged four hits against the New York Mets in 1988. Law added three more safeties the next day.

  • San Francisco Giants RF Rick Leach (averaged 15.5 ppg for Michigan's JV squad in 1975-76) registered four hits against the Houston Astros in 1990.

  • RHP Dave Lemanczyk (participated in NCAA Division II Tournament in 1970 and 1971 with Hartwick NY) traded by the Toronto Blue Jays to the California Angels in 1980.

  • LHP Dennis Rasmussen (sixth-man for Creighton averaged 5.1 ppg in three seasons from 1977-78 through 1979-80) selected in first round (17th pick overall) by the California Angels in 1980 amateur draft. Rasmussen was compensation for signing of free-agent P Nolan Ryan.

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on June 2 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a June 2 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

JUNE 2

  • 2B Jerry Adair (one of Oklahoma State's top three basketball scorers in 1956-57 and 1957-58 while ranking among the nation's top 12 free-throw shooters each season) traded by the Chicago White Sox to the Boston Red Sox for reliever Don McMahon in 1967 and wound up playing in the World Series later that year against the St. Louis Cardinals.

  • Cleveland Indians SS Lou Boudreau (leading scorer for Illinois' 1937 Big Ten Conference co-champion) scored six runs in a 1940 doubleheader split against the Philadelphia Athletics.

  • Philadelphia Athletics rookie C Mickey Cochrane (Boston University player in early 1920s) collected five RBI against the Boston Red Sox in 1925.

  • In 1951, 1B Walt Dropo (Connecticut's first player ever to average 20 points for a single season with 21.7 ppg in 1942-43) demoted by the Boston Red Sox to the minors to regain his form after he was A.L. Rookie of the Year the previous campaign.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates 3B Lee Handley (Bradley letterman from 1932-33 through 1934-35) banged out four hits against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1945.

  • Kansas City Royals DH Gail Hopkins (averaged 2.5 ppg with Pepperdine in 1963-64) went 4-for-4 against the Cleveland Indians in 1973.

  • Washington Senators LF Frank Howard (two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection in 1956-57 and 1957-58 when leading Ohio State in scoring and rebounding) hammered two homers against the California Angels in the opener of a 1965 twinbill.

  • New York Yankees DH David Justice (led Thomas More KY in assists in 1984-85) jacked two homers against the Cleveland Indians in 2001.

  • Philadelphia Phillies LF Danny Litwhiler (member of JV squad with Bloomsburg PA three years in mid-1930s) launched two homers against the Chicago Cubs in 1941.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers 2B Davey Lopes (NAIA All-District 15 selection for Iowa Wesleyan averaged 16.9 ppg as freshman in 1964-65 and 12.1 ppg as sophomore in 1965-66) tied a MLB mark by committing three errors in the first inning of a 6-3 setback against the Montreal Expos in 1973.

  • Chicago White Sox RHP Ted Lyons (two-time All-SWC first-team selection for Baylor in early 1920s) tossed a shutout against the Boston Red Sox in the opener of a 1940 doubleheader, notching his 225th career victory.

  • Chicago Cubs CF Jerry Martin (1971 Southern Conference MVP after he was Furman's runner-up in scoring the previous season) whacked two homers against the San Francisco Giants in 1979. Two years later as a member of the Giants, Martin capped off a nine-run, fourth-inning outburst with a grand slam against the Houston Astros in 1981.

  • C Cal Neeman (Illinois Wesleyan's leading scorer in 1947-48 and 1948-49) purchased from the St. Louis Cardinals by the Cleveland Indians in 1963.

  • Cleveland Indians 3B Graig Nettles (shot 87.8% from free-throw line for San Diego State in 1963-64) launched two homers against the Milwaukee Brewers in the nightcap of a 1970 twinbill.

  • San Francisco Giants CF Billy North (played briefly for Central Washington in 1967-68) went 3-for-3 with three steals in an 8-6 win against the Chicago Cubs in 1979.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates LF Wally Roettger (Illinois letterman in 1921-22 and 1922-23) knocked in five runs in the nightcap of a 1934 doubleheader against his original team (St. Louis Cardinals).

  • Baltimore Orioles LF Larry Sheets (All-ODAC selection in 1981-82 and 1982-83 with Eastern Mennonite VA) homered in his third consecutive contest in 1987.

  • Atlanta Braves LHP George Stone (averaged 14.7 ppg and 6.5 rpg for Louisiana Tech in 1964-65 and 1965-66) won his first six decisions in 1969.

  • LHP Matt Thornton (averaged 5.8 ppg and 2.4 rpg for Grand Valley State MI from 1995-96 through 1997-98) selected by Seattle Mariners in first round (22nd pick overall) in 1998 amateur draft.

Sharing the Wealth: Remote Chance of New Coach Inheriting All-American

Georges Niang will be Gorgeous Georges to new Iowa State coach Steve Prohm if Niang becomes a two-time All-American after Fred Hoiberg abandoned mayoral duties for old stomping grounds with the NBA's Chicago Bulls. An average of 50 schools annually have new bench bosses but the chances are rare for a coach such as Prohm to inherit an All-American in an era of players departing early for the NBA if they generate any success at all. Only two players since Navy's David Robinson (A-A center in 1986 and 1987) were All-Americans for two different coaches - North Carolina's Antawn Jamison (Dean Smith and Bill Guthridge in 1997 and 1998) and Notre Dame's Troy Murphy (Matt Doherty and Mike Brey in 2000 and 2001).

Yale's Tony Lavelli is the only player in NCAA history to become a major-college All-American under three different head coaches (Red Rolfe in 1946, Ivy Williamson in 1947 and Howard Hobson in 1948 and 1949). Ozzie Cowles and Buster Sheary were factors on both sides of the coaching an All-American equation (developing and inheriting). Following is an alphabetical list of major-college players earning All-American accolades at the same school under two different mentors:

Multiple-Year A-A Player School Coaches and All-American Seasons
Ernie Andres Indiana Everett Dean (1938) and Branch McCracken (1939)
Gene Banks Duke Bill Foster (1979) and Mike Krzyzewski (1981)
Alfred "Butch" Beard Louisville Peck Hickman (1967) and John Dromo (1969)
Larry Bird Indiana State Bob King (1977 and 1978) and Bill Hodges (1979)
Charley Brown Seattle John Castellani (1958) and Vince Cazzetta (1959)
Bill Cartwright San Francisco Bob Gaillard (1977 and 1978) and Dan Belluomini (1979)
Kresimir Cosic Brigham Young Stan Watts (1972) and Glenn Potter (1973)
Bob Cousy Holy Cross Doggie Julian (1948) and Buster Sheary (1949 and 1950)
John "Hook" Dillon North Carolina Ben Carnevale (1946) and Tom Scott (1947)
Rod Foster UCLA Larry Farmer (1981) and Larry Brown (1983)
Artis Gilmore Jacksonville Joe Williams (1970) and Tom Wasdin (1971)
Jack Gray Texas Ed Olle (1934) and Marty Kanow (1935)
Tom Heinsohn Holy Cross Buster Sheary (1955) and Roy Leenig (1956)
Antawn Jamison North Carolina Dean Smith (1997) and Bill Guthridge (1998)
Ron Johnson Minnesota Ozzie Cowles (1959) and John Kundla (1960)
Leo Klier Notre Dame Moose Krause (1944) and Elmer Ripley (1946)
Tony Lavelli Yale Red Rolfe (1946), Ivy Williamson (1947) and Howard Hobson (1948 and 1949)
Alfred "Butch" Lee Marquette Al McGuire (1977) and Hank Raymonds (1978)
Mike Maloy Davidson Lefty Driesell (1968 and 1969) and Terry Holland (1970)
Dick McGuire St. John's Joe Lapchick (1947) and Frank McGuire (1949)
Jim McIntyre Minnesota Dave McMillan (1948) and Ozzie Cowles (1949)
Calvin Murphy Niagara Jim Maloney (1968) and Frank Layden (1969 and 1970)
Troy Murphy Notre Dame Matt Doherty (2000) and Mike Brey (2001)
Eddie Phillips Alabama C.M. Newton (1980) and Wimp Sanderson (1982)
David Robinson Navy Paul Evans (1986) and Pete Herrmann (1987)
Dave Schellhase Purdue Ray Eddy (1965) and George King (1966)
Dave Stallworth Wichita Ralph Miller (1963 and 1964) and Gary Thompson (1965)
Wes Unseld Louisville Peck Hickman (1966 and 1967) and John Dromo (1968)
Kenny Walker Kentucky Joe B. Hall (1985) and Eddie Sutton (1986)
Bryan Warrick St. Joseph's Jim Lynam (1981) and Jim Boyle (1982)
Richard Washington UCLA John Wooden (1975) and Gene Bartow (1976)

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on June 1 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a June 1 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

JUNE 1

  • Pittsburgh Pirates 1B Donn Clendenon (four-sport letterman including basketball with Morehouse GA) contributed four hits against the New York Mets in 1963.

  • Chicago White Sox CF Guy Curtright (two-time All-MIAA selection led Northeast Missouri State in scoring each of four seasons in early 1930s) scored four runs in an 11-9 win against the Washington Senators in 1945.

  • Brooklyn Robins 3B Wally Gilbert (Valparaiso captain from 1918-19 through 1920-21) stroked four hits in a 10-2 victory against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1930.

  • Cleveland Indians 1B Mike Hargrove (Northwestern Oklahoma State letterman) went 4-for-4 against the Seattle Mariners in 1983.

  • Cincinnati Reds 1B Harvey Hendrick (Vanderbilt letterman in 1918) went 5-for-5, including three doubles, against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1931. The previous day against the Cards, Hendrick secured four hits in the opener of a doubleheader.

  • Detroit Tigers RF Lynn Jones (averaged 10.4 ppg for Thiel PA from 1970-71 through 1973-74) supplied his second four-hit game against the Milwaukee Brewers in a span of eight days in 1981.

  • LF Danny Litwhiler (member of JV squad with Bloomsburg PA three years in mid-1930s) traded by Philadelphia Phillies to St. Louis Cardinals in 1943.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers 2B Davey Lopes (NAIA All-District 15 selection for Iowa Wesleyan averaged 16.9 ppg as freshman in 1964-65 and 12.1 ppg as sophomore in 1965-66) whacked two homers against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1979.

  • Philadelphia Phillies 1B Len Matuszek (starter for Toledo's 18-7 team in 1975-76) failed to notch a putout in a 12-3 defeat against the Chicago Cubs in 1984.

  • St. Louis Cardinals LF Wally Moon (averaged 4.3 ppg with Texas A&M in 1948-49 and 1949-50) had his 24-game hitting streak end against the Milwaukee Braves in 1957.

  • Boston Red Sox 1B Ed Morgan (Tulane letterman from 1923-24 through 1925-26) collected four hits and four RBI in a 13-1 win against the Washington Senators in 1934.

  • OF Lyle Mouton (starter in LSU's backcourt with All-American Chris Jackson for 1989 NCAA playoff team) traded by the Baltimore Orioles to the Milwaukee Brewers in 1999.

  • In 1962, Washington Senators RHP Ray Rippelmeyer (led SIU in scoring and rebounding in 1952-53 before transferring and pacing SEMO in scoring in 1953-54 and 1954-55 as All-MIAA first-team choice each year) registered his lone MLB victory (as reliever against Minnesota Twins).

  • New York Giants RF Wally Roettger (Illinois letterman in 1921-22 and 1922-23) went 4-for-4 against the Boston Braves in the opener of a 1930 twinbill.

  • Kansas City Athletics RHP Dave Thies (two-time all-conference selection finished St. Mary's MN career in 1959 as school's all-time leading scorer) lost his lone MLB decision (against the Washington Senators in 1963).

  • LHP Bob Veale (scored 1,160 points with Benedictine KS from 1955-56 through 1957-58) amassed 16 strikeouts in shutting out the Philadelphia Phillies, 4-0, for the Pittsburgh Pirates' 12th consecutive victory in 1965.

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on May 31 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 31 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 31

  • Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading basketball scorer in 1945-46) collected two homers and five RBI against the Chicago Cubs in 1956.

  • St. Louis Browns RHP Elden Auker (All-Big Six Conference first-five selection with Kansas State in 1931-32) registered his fifth straight win during the month in 1942. All of the victories were complete games.

  • St. Louis Browns RF Beau Bell (two-year letterman for Texas A&M in early 1930s) banged out four hits in an 11-10 triumph against the Detroit Tigers in 1936.

  • In 1979, Seattle Mariners 1B Bruce Bochte (starting forward for Santa Clara's NCAA playoff team in 1969-70) amassed three hits, three runs and five RBI in a 12-10 win against his original club (California Angels).

  • Kansas City Athletics LF Bob Cerv (ranked fourth on Nebraska's career scoring list in 1949-50 when finishing his career) clobbered a homer in back-to-back games for the third time this month in 1958.

  • Boston Red Sox rookie RHP Boo Ferriss (Mississippi State letterman in 1941) secured his sixth complete-game victory of the month in 1945.

  • Philadelphia Phillies 3B Gene Freese (captain of 1952 NAIA Tournament team for West Liberty WV) whacked his fifth pinch homer of the 1959 season. Two years later with the Cincinnati Reds, Freese smashed two round-trippers in an 8-7 triumph against the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1961.

  • Buttressed by nine doubles from Pittsburgh Pirates teammates, LHP Joe Gibbon (two-time All-SEC forward for Ole Miss was the nation's second-leading scorer as a senior in 1956-57) hurled a complete-game, 9-1 victory against the Atlanta Braves in 1961.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates SS Dick Groat (two-time All-American with Duke in 1950-51 and 1951-52 when finishing among nation's top five scorers each season) delivered five hits in a 4-3 victory against the Cincinnati Reds in 1960.

  • Boston Red Sox RHP Tom Herrin (Louisiana Tech letterman in 1947-48 and 1948-49) notched his lone MLB victory (20-10 decision over the Philadelphia Athletics in 1954).

  • First victory of the 1957 campaign for Chicago White Sox RHP Bob Keegan (Bucknell letterman in 1941-42 and 1942-43) was a four-hit shutout against the Detroit Tigers.

  • New York Yankees LF Charlie Keller (three-year letterman with Maryland from 1934-35 through 1936-37) accumulated two homers and five RBI against the Cleveland Indians in 1947.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates CF Kenny Lofton (Arizona's leader in steals for 1988 Final Four team compiling a 35-3 record) had his 26-game hitting streak end in 2003, falling one contest short of the franchise record.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers 2B Davey Lopes (NAIA All-District 15 selection for Iowa Wesleyan averaged 16.9 ppg as a freshman in 1964-65 and 12.1 ppg as a sophomore in 1965-66) stroked three doubles against the San Francisco Giants in 1979.

  • Boston Red Sox 1B Tony Lupien (Harvard captain in 1938-39) provided four hits against the St. Louis Browns in the nightcap of a 1943 doubleheader. Five years later with the Chicago White Sox, Lupien went 6-for-8 in a 1948 doubleheader split against the Detroit Tigers.

  • Chicago White Sox RHP Ted Lyons (two-time All-SWC first-team selection for Baylor in the early 1920s) notched his fifth consecutive complete-game victory during the month in 1926.

  • Chicago White Sox RF Sam Mele (NYU's leading scorer in 1943 NCAA playoffs) smacked two homers against the Boston Red Sox in 1952.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates RHP Don Schwall (All-Big Seven Conference second-team selection led Oklahoma in rebounding in 1956-57) tossed his second shutout of the month in 1963.

  • Baltimore Orioles LF Larry Sheets (All-ODAC selection in 1981-82 and 1982-83 with Eastern Mennonite VA) supplied three doubles among his four hits against the Seattle Mariners in 1988.

  • San Diego Padres OF Will Venable (All-Ivy League first-team selection as junior and second-team choice as senior averaged 9.3 ppg under Princeton coach John Thompson III from 2001-02 through 2004-05) went 4-for-4 in a 4-2 win against the Chicago White Sox in 2014.

  • Washington Senators RHP Monte Weaver (played center for Emory & Henry VA in mid-1920s) posted his fifth triumph of the month en route to eight straight victories in 1934.

What the Heel: Carolina Way Still Includes Stalling From All Corners

Did North Carolina hire Hillary Clinton's vigorous lawyers experienced at redacting documents before releasing NCAA allegations stemming from a shady African and Afro-American independent study course? Amid the "Four Corners" stalling (administration/coaching staff/press/politicians), could we at least have some pre-response entertainment such as a spirited dunk contest among foot-dragging Chancellor Carol Holt, Sgt. Schultz-like coach Roy "I Know Nothing" Williams, look-the-other-way media represented by Dick Vitale and mum state politicians more enthused about prospect of third NCAA championship in 12 years justifying contract extension for Williams? The dunk-a-thon should be conducted on a kids goal because that is the Sepp Blatter-like way principals involved in this ruse have played footsie with onlookers.

If the Heelhole of a selling-your-scholastic-soul scheme was solely for GPA boosting, Carolina's 2005 (10 of 15 members were AFAS majors with total of 35 "pretty doggone good" bogus classes over two semesters) and 2009 NCAA titles could be in jeopardy of being vacated. Shrouded in more secrecy than Area 51, candid commentary probably will hinge on subpoena-related deposition details emerging from suing players promised a good education but major-manipulated into AFAS, Communications plus Exercise and Sport Science.

At any rate, for the sake of supplying a good chuckle to offset a portion of the angst, the public should have an opportunity to digest a sampling of the pithy prose from those unread Prime Time 10-page papers (assigned mostly A grades with few B+ marks since a player or two may have misspelled his name). Pilfering POTUS lingo, pinhead purveyors simply seek to say: "You didn't write (or build) that!" UNC, admitting "regrettable actions" even before an academic accreditation sanction, may deserve the death penalty simply because disgraceful no-show classes came under the umbrella of a Center For Ethics. To date, there has been no delusional discrimination claim among UNC athletes or regular students failing to have access to Asian-American, Cuban-American, Irish-American, Latin-American or Mexican-American studies.

The university has paid in excess of $1 million in PR costs dealing with the scholastic scandal but that's an affordable expense insofar as there was significant savings over these many years when no faculty was necessary to actually provide instruction for bogus bookwork. Rather than learning classy pass fakes on the court, the courted players passed by "learning" in fake classes. It's no excuse but, if the let's-not-dwell-on-the-negative media would get off its royal cushion, how many other schools across the nation have comparable compromising courses? This is not exactly virgin territory among power-league members after a former Minnesota tutor claimed she wrote or helped write more than 400 papers or pieces of coursework for in excess of 20 Gophers players in the mid-1990s. Amid notice of allegations to UNC, the NCAA should remember: "If you don't stand for something (such as higher scholastic standards), you'll fall for anything (excessive number of suspect student-athletes)."

How in Heel is having athletic department personnel steering players into sham classes for 18 years not, at its core curriculum, a textbook definition of "lack of institutional control?" On the other hand, it may be the "institution (athletic department)" was very much in control and knew damn well it was playing puppeteer as much as POTUS using the "N" word in a radio interview. What exactly were the names of these equally undignified 101 classes? Perhaps the AFAS coloring-book syllabus included: Urban Riots Honoring Michael Brown, Freddie Gray and Trayvon Martin; Hands Off! Don't Loot!; Black Lives Matter Except For Aborted Innocent Babies; Rap is Crap But Deserves National Anthem; Cultural Impact of Hair Braiding and Pants On the Ground; Dignity and Ethics in Setting O.J. Free; Profiling Welfare Kings and Queens; Where's Your Daddy?; Race-Hustling Leaders Rev Al, Jesse Jackson and Van Jones; Reasons Why Black Sheep Vote More Than 90% For Dimorats; Impact of Tattoo Misspellings; How Jailin' Rose Bombs Uncle Toms; Dancin' On Their Graves Like Ray Lewis; Breathing Around ESPN's Undefeated Jason Whitlock, etc., etc., etc.

When will ESPN get to the bottom of the chicanery by giving truth serum to two of the network's college football commentators (former UNC coaches Mack Brown and Butch Davis) or yielding answers via another orchestrated interview with Coy Roy serving as master of "really-bothered-by-whole-thing" ceremonies featuring backdrop of supportive ex-players? ESPN, in a stimulating move as vital as the Bunny Ranch supporting Shrillary, should have just gone ahead and issued Williams' support group some "Game Day" posters for their journalistic juvenile pep rally. Defining courage down via crass tabloidism, the network has gone so far let-it-be left it Jennerly defended decision to give ESPY Courage Award to Bruce or Caitlyn or whatever he or she is rather than infinitely more obvious choice of Army veteran Noah Galloway or the late women's hoopster Lauren Hill.

What a surprise Brown's coaching career included Texas, which is also investigating reports of academic misconduct among Longhorns athletes. Amid all of the press posturing and Carolina's scholastic shenanigans, even if you have to fabricate, don't let integrity icon Dean Smith's last two Final Four teams in the mid-1990s be involved in any way or else no coach on the planet can be trusted. It seems totally out of character, but time will tell if liberal "do-anything-for-them" overkill via "fairness" control-freak tendencies polluted UNC's program at the genesis of the academic scandal and will eventually stain his legacy. If so, we'll all be weeping like a Villanova pep-band piccolo player.

How difficult would it have been for Williams, instead of pleading educational mission ignorance, to take a few minutes out of his busy schedule per semester to assess academic progress of each of his players? Didn't he acknowledge there was "class clustering" early in his Carolina head coaching tenure? It is the height of hypocrisy for him and other "father-figure" DI mentors to have contract bonus provisions stemming from APR/graduation rates. Will UNC's extension into the next decade demand he apologize to whistle-blower tutor Mary "Just Keep My Players Eligible" Willingham? Didn't Williams figuratively assault her (triggering death threats in aftermath of additional administration admonishments) by impugning Mary, Mary, Quite Contrary's character saying her illiteracy claims were untrue and totally unfair about a striking number of scholars boasting middle-school reading skills?

Said Willingham prior to settling a lawsuit with UNC for $335,000 (about $1,000 per basketball player enrollment in paper class minus attorneys' fees): "I went to a lot of basketball games in the Dean Dome, but Roy never came and sat with me while I tutored his guys." Heaven help us if Williams' "sad-time" excuses, coupled with equally lame remarks from gridiron mentors Brown and Davis regarding the academic debris, are typical of the coaching community level of interest in authentic advancement toward a genuine diploma. Reminiscent of escaped convicts in New York deserving inclusion in a penitentiary honors program, two-time All-American Rashad McCants claims he made Dean's List at UNC one semester despite failing to attend any of the four classes in which he "earned" straight A's on his way out (at least not via manhole cover).

In this absence-of-standards era, Williams is virtually guaranteed a job with ESPN as an analyst if he fibs to NCAA investigators similar to certifiable liar Bruce Pearl. Amid the pimpish compartmentalization, there are also "clever" guys such as Oregon stemming from its timing in waiting to expel three players implicated in an alleged sexual assault in order to avoid a reduction in its Academic Progress Rate score. Meanwhile, fellow Pac-12 Conference member California adopted a stricter admissions policy when it comes to academics. Will Cal set a nationwide trend for increased scholastic standards or will majority of universities duck the issue? Not if the condescending NCAA headquarters appears much more concerned about Indian nicknames.

Former Duke starter Jay Bilas, who succeeded Vitale as ESPN's Prime Time Performer in the GameDay color commentator role, has experiential ACC knowledge competing against colorful North Carolina State coach Jim Valvano's suspect squads (735 average SAT score - featuring Chris Washburn at 470 - and excessive number of positive drug tests during the 1980s). While pondering rigorous courses washout Washburn passed to remain academically eligible for more than a season, a cold-blooded question surfaces as to whether the academic anemia at UNC is worse than what occurred at N.C. State, which probably gains the negative nod if only because of Washburn teammate Charles Shackleford's following animal-expert quote: "Left hand, right hand, it doesn't matter. I'm amphibious." The "A" in "bring your A-game" in an ACC ad apparently doesn't stand for academics.

If bookish Bilas genuinely knows self-evaluation "toughness," he will maneuver upstream and shift his passion from lambasting the NCAA about paying these gentlemen and scholars to a lawyerly focus on stopping the NCAA from preying on players who have no business representing universities because they aren't authentic student-athletes. Granted, such an academic-values modification will translate into an inferior product for him and his network to promote (and for luminaries such as Jim Boeheim, John Calipari, Bob Huggins, Mike Krzyzewski, Rick Pitino plus Williams to coach for that matter). But does a mediocre Duke player such as Lance Thomas need more than $30,000 as down payment on jewelry? What about multiple Memphis players reporting they were robbed of more than $66,000 worth of vital items for Calipari-coached college students (mink coats, diamond earrings, stereo equipment, flat-screen TV)?

Moreover, Syracuse's Boeheim wouldn't have an opportunity to be "impressed" about one-and-done Carmelo Anthony's 1.8 gpa before failing to mention if Anthony attended more classes than games his second semester. Did BMOC Melo mellow out in Orange-hot Child and Family Studies? Too many self-serving schools and their athletic departments are living an academic lie as much as the white NAACP chapter president and are ignorant as much as CNN anchor calling Dallas gunman "brave and courageous" for shooting at police headquarters.

When there are games and national crowns to win, how interested could Bilas' alma mater and Carolina's chief rival possibly be in education these days, anyway? Three freshman sensations from this year's NCAA titlist give Duke six one-and-done "graduates" in a five-year span. After Julius Randle became the sixth Kentucky freshman in the previous five years to be among the NBA's top eight draft picks, the gifted group may have pooled credit-hour resources for a single shared diploma (hopefully not useless AFAS). Randle, breaking his right leg in NBA debut with the L.A. Lakers, and Duke All-American Jabari Parker, incurring a season-ending knee injury between Thanksgiving and Christmas, got prompt "nothing-lasts-forever" lessons that it might be prudent to pay a little attention to academic pursuits. What quality of classes are taken in college by mercenary professional-caliber athletes if a mind-numbing 60% of NBA players file for bankruptcy five years after retirement?

Openness in revealing UNC's academic allegations and the NCAA's mission-statement response to this subterfuge will determine how ethically bankrupt major-college athletics has become under the present leadership and corrosive press incompetently covering the corruption.

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on May 30 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 30 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 30

  • Boston Red Sox 1B Dale Alexander (starting basketball center for Milligan TN in mid-1920s) suffered a career-ending injury in 1933 (therapy for twisted knee sliding into home plate led to third-degree burns, gangrene and near loss of his leg). Four years earlier as a Detroit Tigers rookie, he launched a homer in both ends of a 1929 doubleheader split against the St. Louis Browns.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates LF Clyde Barnhart (played for Shippensburg PA predecessor Cumberland Valley State Normal School prior to World War I) collected four hits, four runs scored and five RBI against the St. Louis Cardinals in the nightcap of a 1925 doubleheader.

  • Detroit Tigers 2B Frank Bolling (averaged 7.3 ppg for Spring Hill AL in 1950-51) blasted two homers in a 3-2 win against the Kansas City Athletics in the nightcap of a 1957 twinbill.

  • RHP Ownie Carroll (Holy Cross letterman in 1922) traded with Harry Rice by the Detroit Tigers in 1930 to the New York Yankees for two members of the legendary 1927 squad featuring Murderers' Row (P Waite Hoyt and SS Mark Koenig).

  • In 1955, Milwaukee Braves 1B George Crowe (four-year letterman from 1939-40 through 1942-43 for Indiana Central after becoming first high school player named state's Mr. Basketball) closed out the month with five multiple-hit games, homering in three of the contests.

  • 3B Gene Freese (captain of 1952 NAIA Tournament team for West Liberty WV) whacked two homers, powering the Cincinnati Reds to a 1961 doubleheader sweep of the Los Angeles Dodgers.

  • Brooklyn Robins/Dodgers 3B Wally Gilbert (Valparaiso captain in early 1920s) supplied six straight safeties in a doubleheader sweep of the New York Giants in 1931.

  • Detroit Tigers 1B Hank Greenberg (enrolled at NYU on hoop scholarship in 1929 but attended college only one semester) went 5-for-5, including four runs, two homers and five RBI, against the St. Louis Browns in 1937.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates SS Dick Groat (two-time All-American with Duke in 1950-51 and 1951-52 when finishing among nation's top five scorers each season) went 4-for-4 and scored four runs in the nightcap of a 1958 twinbill against the Milwaukee Braves.

  • C Frank Grube (starting guard for Lafayette as a senior in 1926-27), two teammates and Chicago White Sox manager Lew Fonseca involved in a fight with an umpire under the stands after a doubleheader loss at Cleveland in 1932.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers 1B Gil Hodges (played for St. Joseph's IN in 1943 and Oakland City IN in 1947 and 1948) knocked in eight runs against the Boston Braves in a 1952 doubleheader sweep. The next year, Hodges homered twice against the Pittsburgh Pirates in the opener of a 1953 twinbill. In 1958 after the Dodgers moved to Los Angeles, Hodges homered in both ends of a doubleheader against the Chicago Cubs. Four years later, Hodges homered three times in a 1962 twinbill against the New York Mets.

  • Washington Senators LF Frank Howard (two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection when leading Ohio State in scoring and rebounding in 1956-57 and 1957-58) hammered two homers and chipped in with six RBI against the Kansas City Athletics in the opener of a 1967 twinbill.

  • New York Yankees LF Charlie Keller (three-year letterman with Maryland from 1934-35 through 1936-37) went 4-for-4 against the Philadelphia Athletics in the nightcap of a 1946 doubleheader.

  • RHP Cal Koonce (Campbell standout in 1960 and 1961 when North Carolina-based school was junior college), after helping the New York Mets sweep a twinbill against the Pittsburgh Pirates, didn't allow a run in his first 13 relief appearances in 1968.

  • St. Louis Cardinals SS Doc Lavan (played for Hope MI from 1908 through 1910) had six hits in a 1921 twinbill sweep of the Cincinnati Reds.

  • Baltimore Orioles rookie RHP Dave Leonhard (averaged 4.8 ppg with Johns Hopkins MD in 1961-62) tossed his second shutout of the month.

  • RF Sam Mele (NYU's leading scorer in 1943 NCAA playoffs) traded by the Washington Senators to the Chicago White Sox in 1952.

  • Cleveland Indians 1B Ed Morgan (Tulane letterman from 1923-24 through 1925-26) contributed five RBI in a 12-6 win against the Chicago White Sox in the opener of a 1932 doubleheader.

  • Washington Senators 3B Buddy Myer (Mississippi State letterman in 1923-24) hit safely in all 22 games of the month and 24 in a row overall in 1929.

  • Chicago Cubs rookie C Cal Neeman (Illinois Wesleyan's leading scorer in 1947-48 and 1948-49) hit safely in last 11 games of the month in 1957.

  • The Chicago Cubs went 32 games in 1943 before hitting a homer prior to RF Bill Nicholson (guard for Washington College MD two years in mid-1930s) knocking a couple of balls beyond the outfield barrier in a 5-1 victory over the Braves. His first of a pair of two-run blasts came in the team's 1,120th at-bat of the season.

  • 1B Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in Pacific Coast Conference both of his seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) ripped a 13th-inning homer to give the Brooklyn Dodgers a 2-1 win over the New York Giants in the opener of a 1949 doubleheader.

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on May 29 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 29 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 29

  • Rookie RHP Mark Acre (played in 1990 NCAA Basketball Tournament with New Mexico State) allowed his only run through 10 relief appearances to early June 1994 with the Oakland A's (0.82 ERA in first 3 1/2 weeks).

  • SS Bill Almon (averaged 2.5 ppg in half a season for Brown's 1972-73 team ending the Bears' streak of 12 straight losing records) traded by the Pittsburgh Pirates to the New York Mets in 1987.

  • Cleveland Indians RF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) launched the first MLB homer over the outer wall at Kansas City's Municipal Stadium in 1955.

  • Boston Red Sox RHP Boo Ferriss (Mississippi State letterman in 1941) hurled his third shutout of the month in 1946.

  • In the midst of a 20-game hitting streak, New York Yankees 1B-OF Buddy Hassett (played for Manhattan teams winning school-record 17 consecutive games in 1930 and 1931) contributed four hits in a 16-1 rout of Washington in 1942.

  • LF "Sweet" Lou Johnson (Kentucky State teammate of legendary HBCU coach Davey Whitney averaged 5.7 ppg and 2 rpg in 1951-52) swatted two homers in a 5-3 triumph against the Milwaukee Braves in 1965.

  • Chicago White Sox RHP Howie Judson (Illinois' third-leading scorer in 1944-45) ended a personal streak of 15 straight defeats with a 12-8 relief victory over the St. Louis Browns in 1950.

  • OF Jim Lyttle (led Florida State in free-throw shooting in 1965-66 when averaging 12.4 ppg) purchased from the Montreal Expos by the New York Mets in 1974.

  • RHP Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) notched a 3-0 shutout over the Boston Braves in 1916, sparking the New York Giants to their 17th triumph in a row (all on the road).

  • New York Yankees 3B Graig Nettles (shot 87.8% from free-throw line for San Diego State in 1963-64) socked two homers against the Oakland Athletics in 1973.

  • Philadelphia Phillies RF Bill Nicholson (Washington College MD guard for two years in mid-1930s) provided his third consecutive three-hit contest in 1953. Nicholson supplied only one more safety in the final 40 at-bats of his 16-year MLB career.

  • Houston Astros RHP Joe Niekro (averaged 8.9 ppg and 3.8 rpg for West Liberty WV from 1963-64 through 1965-66) belted the only homer of his 22-year career in 1976. The round-tripper against the Atlanta Braves came at the expense of his brother (Phil).

  • RHP Claude Passeau (played for Millsaps MS in late 1920s and early 1930s) traded by the Philadelphia Phillies to the Chicago Cubs in 1939.

  • LF Ray Pepper (Alabama letterman in 1926-27) banged out five hits, including two homers, and drove in five runs to boost the St. Louis Browns to a 12-7 victory over the Detroit Tigers in 1934.

  • OF Curtis Pride (led William & Mary in steals three times and assists twice while averaging 5.6 ppg and 3.1 apg from 1986-87 through 1989-90) pounded a pinch homer for the Atlanta Braves against the Chicago Cubs in 1998.

  • Philadelphia Phillies LHP Eppa Rixey (Virginia letterman in 1912 and 1914) yielded a ninth-inning inside-the-park homer but held on for a 4-3, 13-inning victory against Pittsburgh. It is the only homer Rixey allowed in 301 innings pitched.

  • Baltimore Orioles DH Larry Sheets (All-ODAC selection in 1981-82 and 1982-83 with Eastern Mennonite VA) smacked two homers in an 8-6 win against the Oakland Athletics in 1986. Three years later, Sheets socked a round-tripper in his third of last four outings.

  • In 1926, Cleveland Indians 2B Freddy Spurgeon (played for Kalamazoo MI in 1921-22) extended his hitting streak to 11 games in a row with eighth contest of the month boasting at least three safeties.

  • Chicago Cubs OF Bob Will (all-league athlete was Mankato State MN captain in 1954-55) slugged his second pinch-hit homer in an eight-game span in 1962.

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on May 28 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 28 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 28

  • In 1954, Chicago Cubs CF Frankie Baumholtz (MVP in 1941 NIT and first player in Ohio University basketball history to score 1,000 career points) stroked four hits against his original team (Cincinnati Reds).

  • New York Yankees LF Bob Cerv (ranked fourth on Nebraska's career scoring list in 1949-50 whacked a pinch grand slam against the Chicago White Sox in 1961.

  • RHP George Earnshaw (competed with Swarthmore PA in 1922) acquired by the Philadelphia Athletics from Baltimore in 1928.

  • Detroit Tigers 1B Hank Greenberg (enrolled at NYU on hoop scholarship in 1929 but attended college only one semester) smacked two homers in an 8-3 win against the New York Yankees in 1935.

  • RF David Justice (led Thomas More KY in assists in 1984-85) provided a two-run single to spark a ninth-inning rally propelling the Atlanta Braves past the San Diego Padres, 8-6, in 1991.

  • San Francisco Giants CF Billy North (played briefly for Central Washington in 1967-68) stole three bases in a game for the third time this month in 1981.

  • RHP Ron Reed (Notre Dame's leading rebounder in 1963-64 and 1964-65) traded by the Atlanta Braves to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1975.

  • Baltimore Orioles LF Larry Sheets (All-ODAC selection in 1981-82 and 1982-83 with Eastern Mennonite VA) socked two homers against the California Angels in 1987.

  • As a substitute in a 17-inning tie, Los Angeles Dodgers rookie 3B John Werhas (USC's leading scorer in 1958-59 and 1959-60) collected a career-high three hits against the Cincinnati Reds in 1964.

  • In 1994, Minnesota Twins DH Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) collected his 3,054th MLB hit, surpassing former Twin Rod Carew into 15th place on the all-time list.

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on May 27 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 27 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 27

  • CF Ethan Allen (Cincinnati basketball letterman in 1924-25 and 1925-26) traded by the Cincinnati Reds to the New York Giants in 1930. Five years later, Allen was with the Philadelphia Phillies when he stroked four hits in a 4-2 win against the Pittsburgh Pirates.

  • Philadelphia Athletics C Mickey Cochrane (Boston University player in early 1920s) whacked two homers against the Detroit Tigers in 1933.

  • Washington Senators 2B Tim Cullen (starting guard for Santa Clara in 1962-63 when averaging 10 ppg and 3.4 rpg) contributed four hits in an 8-1 victory against the Detroit Tigers in 1967.

  • Boston Red Sox rookie RHP Boo Ferriss (Mississippi State letterman in 1941) tossed his fourth shutout in first six starts in 1945.

  • Baltimore Orioles 3B Wayne Gross (led Cal Poly Pomona in assists in 1974-75) cracked a grand slam against the California Angels in 1984.

  • Cleveland Indians 1B Mike Hargrove (Northwestern Oklahoma State letterman) provided at least three hits in fourth consecutive contest in 1981.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers RF Frank Howard (two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection when leading Ohio State in scoring and rebounding in 1956-57 and 1957-58) went 4-for-4 against the Philadelphia Phillies in the opener of a 1962 doubleheader.

  • RHP Andy Karl (Manhattan letterman in mid-1930s) traded by the Philadelphia Phillies to the Boston Braves in 1947.

  • Cleveland Indians CF Kenny Lofton (Arizona's leader in steals for 1988 went 3-for-3 with three stolen bases against the Oakland Athletics in 1994.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers LHP Preacher Roe (played for Harding AR in late 1930s) fired the second of back-to-back shutouts in 1949.

  • Closer Lee Smith (averaged 3.4 ppg and 1.9 rpg with Northwestern State in 1976-77) traded by the California Angels to the Cincinnati Reds in 1996.

  • Chicago Cubs LF Riggs Stephenson (Alabama letterman in 1920) provided three straight three-hit games in 1927. Four years later in 1931, Stephenson went 4-for-4, including three extra-base hits, against the Cincinnati Reds. In 1932, he went 4-for-4 again against the Reds.

  • In 1975, Oakland Athletics RHP Jim Todd (averaged 16 ppg for Millersville PA in 1968-69) didn't allow an earned run in nine straight relief appearances in the month until doing so against the Baltimore Orioles.

  • Seattle Mariners LF Randy Winn (Santa Clara backcourtmate of eventual two-time NBA Most Valuable Player Steve Nash in 1993-94) went 5-for-5 in a 15-7 triumph against the Kansas City Royals in 2003.

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on May 26 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 26 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 26

  • RHP Mike Adams (played basketball for Texas A&M-Kingsville in 1996-97) traded by the Milwaukee Brewers to the New York Mets in 2006.

  • Lefthander Harvey Haddix of the Pittsburgh Pirates spun a perfect game for 12 innings in 1959 before Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading scorer in 1945-46) swatted a game-winning homer in the 13th (credited with double because of base-running snafu).

  • Pittsburgh Pirates LF Clyde Barnhart (played for Shippensburg PA predecessor Cumberland Valley State Normal School prior to World War I) had his 25-game hitting streak snapped by the Chicago Cubs in 1925.

  • St. Louis Browns RF Beau Bell (two-year letterman for Texas A&M in early 1930s) collected two homers and five RBI against the Boston Red Sox in 1937.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates LF Carson "Skeeter" Bigbee (Oregon letterman in 1915) went 4-for-4 including three doubles against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1923.

  • Baltimore Orioles CF Al Bumbry (Virginia State's runner-up in scoring with 16.7 ppg as freshman in 1964-65) contributed five hits in a 16-inning marathon against the Detroit Tigers in 1979.

  • Philadelphia Athletics C Mickey Cochrane (Boston University player in early 1920s) went 5-for-5 against the Washington Senators in 1929.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers RHP Roger Craig (forward with North Carolina State's 1949-50 freshman team) tossed a three-hit shutout against the New York Giants in 1956.

  • St. Louis Cardinals CF Taylor Douthit (California letterman from 1922 through 1924) went 7-for-10 in a 1929 twinbill against the Pittsburgh Pirates.

  • In the midst of a career-high 14-game hitting streak, Los Angeles Dodgers C Joe Ferguson (played in 1967 NCAA playoffs with Pacific) furnished four hits against the San Francisco Giants in 1974.

  • Boston Red Sox RHP Boo Ferriss (Mississippi State letterman in 1941) hurled a one-hitter against the Chicago White Sox in the opener of a 1946 doubleheader.

  • In 1970, Los Angeles Dodgers C Tom Haller (backup forward for Illinois in 1956-57 and 1957-58 under coach Harry Combes) banged out four hits against his original team (San Francisco Giants).

  • Boston Braves 1B Buddy Hassett (played for Manhattan teams winning school-record 17 consecutive games in 1930 and 1931) banged out four hits in a 10-8 loss against the New York Giants in 1940.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers LHP Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) fanned 16 Philadelphia Phillies batters in a 1962 game.

  • Detroit Tigers SS Harvey Kuenn (played briefly for Wisconsin in 1951-52 after competing on JV squad previous season) collected four hits against the Kansas City Athletics in 1956.

  • Texas Rangers DH Rick Leach (averaged 15.5 ppg for Michigan's JV squad in 1975-76) went 3-for-3 in a 5-3 victory against the Minnesota Twins in 1989.

  • INF Jerry Lumpe (member of Southwest Missouri State's 1952 NAIA Tournament championship team) traded by the New York Yankees to the Kansas City Athletics in 1959 in a swap involving Ralph Terry, who pitched in five straight World Series for the Yanks.

  • San Diego Padres 3B Graig Nettles (shot 87.8% from free-throw line for San Diego State in 1963-64) homered in his fourth consecutive contest in 1986.

  • Starting LHP Gary Peters (played for Grove City PA in mid-1950s) batted sixth in the starting lineup for the Chicago White Sox in a 5-1 loss against the New York Yankees in the opener of a 1968 doubleheader.

  • St. Louis Browns RHP Nels Potter (leading scorer during two years he attended Mount Morris IL in early 1930s) retired the first 23 Boston Red Sox batters he faced in 1944 game.

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on May 25 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 25 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 25

  • RHP Jim Bibby (Fayetteville State NC backup basketball player and brother of UCLA All-American Henry Bibby) and Pittsburgh Pirates teammate Jim Winn tied a MLB record by combining to walk seven consecutive batters in the third inning of a 1983 game against the Atlanta Braves.

  • New York Yankees LF Bob Cerv (ranked fourth on Nebraska's career scoring list in 1949-50 when finishing career) cracked a grand slam against the Baltimore Orioles in 1956.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates 1B Donn Clendenon (four-sport letterman with Morehouse GA) capped a streak of five multiple-hit games in succession with four safeties against the Chicago Cubs in 1965.

  • Hall of Fame C Mickey Cochrane (Boston University player in early 1920s), after socking a third-inning homer for the Detroit Tigers against the New York Yankees in his final official at-bat, incurred a skull fracture in three places when beaned by a 3-1 pitch in the fifth in 1937. The player-manager never returned to active duty as a player. In 1950, Cochrane was named general manager of the Philadelphia Athletics.

  • In 1960, St. Louis Cardinals 1B George Crowe (four-year letterman from 1939-40 through 1942-43 for Indiana Central after becoming the first high school player named the state's "Mr. Basketball") clobbered a MLB career-record 11th pinch-hit homer.

  • In 1928, St. Louis Cardinals CF Taylor Douthit (California letterman from 1922 through 1924) endured his only hitless contest in a 28-game span to early June.

  • Boston Red Sox 1B Walt Dropo (Connecticut's first player ever to average 20 points for a season with 21.7 in 1942-43), en route to becoming 1950 A.L. Rookie of the Year, drove in six runs (four with a grand slam) in a 15-12 verdict over the St. Louis Browns.

  • Washington Senators C Rick Ferrell (played forward for Guilford NC before graduating in 1928) stroked three doubles against the St. Louis Browns in 1938.

  • St. Louis Cardinals RHP Bob Gibson (Creighton's leading scorer and rebounder in 1955-56 and 1956-57) hurled his third shutout of the month in 1969.

  • Detroit Tigers 1B Hank Greenberg (enrolled at NYU on hoop scholarship in 1929 but attended college only one semester) went 4-for-4, including two homers, against the New York Yankees in 1938.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers 1B Gil Hodges (played for St. Joseph's IN in 1943 and Oakland City IN in 1947 and 1948) homered twice off the San Francisco Giants' Mike McCormick in 1959.

  • Washington Senators RHP Bobby Humphreys (four-year letterman graduated from Hampden-Sydney VA in 1958) had his streak of eight straight scoreless relief appearances come to an end in 1969.

  • 2B Davey Lopes (NAIA All-District 15 selection for Iowa Wesleyan averaged 16.9 ppg as freshman in 1964-65 and 12.1 ppg as sophomore in 1965-66) lashed the last of seven homers for the Los Angeles Dodgers on a 3-0 delivery in a 17-6 whipping of the Cincinnati Reds in 1979. In Lopes' next at-bat, he was decked on four straight pitches, precipitating a brawl. Six year earlier as a rookie, Lopes notched his eighth multiple-hit contest in a 10-game span in 1973.

  • Chicago White Sox RHP Ted Lyons (two-time All-SWC first-team selection for Baylor in early 1920s) notched his sixth consecutive complete-game victory during the month in 1930.

  • St. Louis Cardinals rookie CF Wally Moon (averaged 4.3 ppg with Texas A&M in 1948-49 and 1949-50) swiped four bases in a 9-4 decision over the Chicago Cubs in 1954.

  • Detroit Tigers OF Jim Northrup (second-leading scorer and third-leading rebounder for Alma MI in 1958-59) contributed five RBI against the Boston Red Sox in 1967.

  • New York Yankees 3B Red Rolfe (played briefly with Dartmouth in 1927-28 and 1929-30) went 5-for-5 against the Detroit Tigers in 1938.

  • In 1971, California Angels C John Stephenson (scored 1,361 points for William Carey MS in early 1960s) hit safely in his first 15 games of the month until he was held hitless by the Oakland Athletics.

  • OF Champ Summers (team-high scoring averages of 15.7 ppg for Nicholls State in 1964-65 and 22.5 ppg for SIUE in 1969-70) traded by the Cincinnati Reds to the Detroit Tigers in 1979.

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on May 24 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 24 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 24

  • Detroit Tigers 1B Dale Alexander (starting basketball center for Milligan TN in mid-1920s) whacked two homers in an 8-7 defeat against the Chicago White Sox in 1930.

  • RHP Elden Auker (All-Big Six Conference first five selection with Kansas State in 1931-32) pitched the first night game in St. Louis in 1940 when Cleveland Indians Hall of Fame P Bob Feller defeated the Browns, 3-2.

  • Chicago Cubs 2B Glenn Beckert (three-year letterman for Allegheny PA) went 4-for-4 in a 4-3 win against the Cincinnati Reds in the nightcap of a 1967 twinbill.

  • Subbing for Chicago Cubs Hall of Fame 1B Ernie Banks, Leo Burke (averaged 9.2 ppg for Virginia Tech in 1952-53 and 1953-54) went 3-for-3 with two extra-base hits against the Cincinnati Reds in the nightcap of a 1964 doubleheader.

  • Philadelphia Athletics C Mickey Cochrane (Boston University player in early 1920s) went 4-for-4 against the Washington Senators in 1929. Eight years later with the Detroit Tigers, Cochrane collected four hits against the Senators in 1937.

  • St. Louis Cardinals CF Taylor Douthit (California letterman from 1922 through 1924) went 4-for-4 against the Cincinnati Reds in the nightcap of a 1931 twinbill.

  • Davey Johnson (averaged 1.7 ppg with Texas A&M in 1961-62) replaced Tony Perez as manager of the Cincinnati Reds in 1993.

  • Chicago White Sox RHP Ted Lyons (two-time All-SWC first-team selection for Baylor in the early 1920s) surrendered 24 hits in going the distance in a 21-inning, 6-5 defeat against the Detroit Tigers in 1929. In 1946, 45-year-old Lyons relinquished the mound to become manager of the White Sox. In his last 28 appearances, he hurled complete games.

  • St. Louis Browns rookie RHP Dave Madison (LSU letterman from 1939-40 through 1942-43) didn't yield a run in his first eight relief appearances in 1952.

  • New York Giants RHP Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) defeated the St. Louis Cardinals 24 consecutive times until losing to the Cards, 3-1, in 1909.

  • Atlanta Braves rookie RHP Ron Reed (Notre Dame's leading rebounder in 1963-64 and 1964-65) won his sixth straight start in 1968.

  • 1B Howie Schultz (Hamline MN product played and coached professional basketball) awarded on waivers from the Philadelphia Phillies to the Cincinnati Reds in 1948.

  • San Diego Padres OF Will Venable (All-Ivy League first-team selection as junior and second-team choice as senior averaged 9.3 ppg under Princeton coach John Thompson III from 2001-02 through 2004-05) supplied four hits and scored three runs against the Los Angeles Dodgers in 2015.

  • 1B-OF Preston Ward (second-leading scorer for Southwest Missouri State in 1946-47 and 1948-49) contributed a triple and homer in helping the Pittsburgh Pirates snap an 11-game losing streak with a 15-1 romp over the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1955.

Looks Are Deceiving: High School Player Ratings Little More Than Media Hype

Loyalists for big-name schools are counting on remaining or returning to elite status next season. Typically, the follow-the-pack national media falls in lockstep predicting most of them will be back to at least near the top of the national polls. But welfare writers (accepting guesswork handouts from well-meaning but ineffectual middle men) better hope the recruiting gurus ranking high school hotshots emerge from a sorry slump. A textbook example is Frank Kaminsky, who wasn't a Top 100 recruit in 2011 but emerged as unanimous national player of the year as a Wisconsin senior. Meanwhile, 17 of the consensus Top 50 prospects in 2011 failed to average at least 10 points per game in their college careers.

What good are prep player rankings if the brainiac analysts can't come close to pinpointing a prospect who will become a college All-American in a couple of years? Two seasons ago provided ample evidence of rating ineptitude when four of the five NCAA unanimous All-American first-team selections, including national player of the year Trey Burke (Michigan), weren't ranked among the consensus Top 100 H.S. recruits assembled by RSCI the years they left high school. First-teamer Kelly Olynyk (Gonzaga) and Final Four MOP Luke Hancock (Louisville) weren't among the top 100 in 2009. First-teamers Doug McDermott (Creighton) and Victor Oladipo (Indiana) plus honorable mention All-American Russ Smith (leading scorer for NCAA champion Louisville) weren't among the top 100 in 2010.

Three strikes and the player pimps are out (of credibility). Burke, McDermott and Kaminsky pooled their previously overlooked assets to assemble a string of three straight national POY honorees. Burke wasn't included among the consensus top 100 in 2011 although every scout in this burgeoning charade saw him play on the same high school squad with eventual Ohio State All-American Jared Sullinger. Ditto McDermott with regal recruit Harrison Barnes (North Carolina).

Unbelievably, a UM teammate by the name of Carlton Brundidge was ranked higher than Burke but Brundidge scored a grand total of six points in 15 games before leaving the Wolverines' program. Media hacks as confused as Bruce Jenner, apparently incapable of calculating the difference between AAU-pickup street ball and genuine team ball, should be deep-sixed when you consider the following long list of mediocre players ranked higher than Burke but averaging fewer than six points per game in their DI college careers: Tyler Adams (Georgetown/2.5 ppg), Juan Anderson (Marquette/3.8), C.J. Barksdale (Virginia Tech/5.2), Jamal Branch (Texas A&M & St. John's/4.9), Angelo Chol (Arizona & San Diego State/3.1), Erik Copes (George Mason/4.7), Nnanna Egwu (Illinois/5.5), D.J. Gardner (Mississippi State/RS kicked off team), Malcolm Gilbert (Pittsburgh & Fairfield/1.4), Mikael Hopkins (Georgetown/4.9), Sidiki Johnson (Arizona & Providence/2.9), Ty Johnson (Villanova & South Carolina/3.3), Damien Leonard (South Carolina/5.5), Hunter Mickelson (Arkansas & Kansas/4.6), Alex Murphy (Duke & Florida/3.2), Dai-Jon Parker (Vanderbilt/5.4), Marshall Plumlee (Duke/1.4), Zach Price (Louisville & Missouri/0.9), Julian Royal (Georgia Tech & George Mason/3.3), Mike Shaw (Illinois & Bradley/1.3), Antwan Space (Florida State & Texas A&M/4.8), Bernard Sullivan (Clemson & Charlotte/2.2), Naadir Tharpe (Kansas/5.1), Shaquille Thomas (Cincinnati/5.5) and Amir Williams (Ohio State/4.9).

At least the so-called experts offering these mistake-ridden critiques had 2013 first-teamer Otto Porter Jr. (Georgetown) and second-teamer Ben McLemore (Kansas) ranked among the top 50 in 2011. But as a cautionary measure, pore over this information again the next time some lazy broadcaster needing a drool bucket begins slobbering over a pimple-faced teenager without ever seeing him play firsthand and only using recruiting services as a resource. In fact, the purveyors of know-it-all opinion should be behind the eight ball when they had the following players averaging less than eight points per game in their college careers ranked ahead of Porter and McLemore: Rakeem Christmas (Syracuse/7.4), Michael Gbinije (Duke & Syracuse/6.4), Shannon Scott (Ohio State/5.5) and Josiah Turner (Arizona/6.8).

Turner was jailed a couple of days a couple of years ago as punishment for "extreme" DUI. He should have been joined behind bars by dopey devotees intoxicated by recruiting services proclaiming him and more than 100 other players as better than Burke. Who really is more inebriated if they accept as gospel player rankings dwelling on wingspans, weight reps, Soul Train dance moves and carnival-like dunk contests? How about focusing solely on whether they'll continue to improve against comparable athletes, boast the proper attitude to learn to fit in with teammates in a me-myself-and-I generation and make a major bottom-line impact on the game rather than strut-your-stuff swagger? When pass is considered a dirty four-letter word, the chronic over-hyping doesn't appear as if it will end anytime soon evidenced by a couple of 2013 Top 10 recruits declaring for the NBA draft - Florida's Chris Walker (3.7 ppg, 2.7 rpg, 0.1 apg) and Kentucky's Dakari Johnson (5.8 ppg, 4.3 rpg, 0.5 apg).

NBA Most Valuable Player and three-point shooting sensation Stephen Curry (Davidson) is perhaps the premier collegian thus far this century. If you've got a life, you don't have time to go over all of the no-names ranked better than Curry when he graduated from high school in 2006. You'd have an easier task competing in the national spelling bee, trying to size up all of the issues involving Tulsa coach Frank Haith's checking account when he was at Miami (Fla.) or discerning how much Roy Williams "earned" in academic progress bonuses at North Carolina.

Rating recruits - the ultimate sports distortion foisted upon dupes - is akin to believing government grifters telling the gullible masses that taxpayer-financed Muslim extremist terrorism is workplace violence or fueled by a largely unseen movie. Pilfering a propaganda-like phrase spun during the institutionalizing of political correctness to the detriment of the safety of the American people, the player ratings are authentic "man-made disasters." They need to make a dramatic turnaround comparable to the White House's post-marathon bombing appeasing administration lauding Cambridge/Boston area police after previous exploitation portraying them as "acting stupidly" when it suited their agenda. Amid the insulting misinformation overload, it might be time to visit Rev. Wrong's church and see if he is recruiting susceptible supporters by telling his captive audience that "America's Chechens have come home to roost." Truth escape artists and opponents of Tsarnaev receiving a death-penalty sentence can simply deny you ever heard or read such impudence.

The same play-dumb mindset comparable to the Benghazi stonewalling applies to entitlement-era "ridiculists" stemming from recruiting service player ratings. Resembling Jason Collins' long-time fiancée, you look like a full-fledged fool by putting a significant amount of stock in these breathless rush-to-judgment projections spawning a slew of blue-chippers turned prima donnas. But don't muzzle 'em with a jock jihad or sound as lucid as the buffoonish Bomb Mom. Just give the sane a barf bag when clueless adults hold their collective breath to see if some coddled kid dons their alma mater's cap on TV announcing a college choice. Why can't we simply wait until the impressionable athletes compete in an actual game on a college court before rendering assessments on their ability at the next level?

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on May 23 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 23 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 23

  • RHP Mike Barlow (Syracuse basketball substitute from 1967-68 through 1969-70) shipped by the Oakland Athletics to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1975 to complete an earlier trade.

  • Chicago Cubs RF Frankie Baumholtz (MVP in 1941 NIT and first player in Ohio University history to score 1,000 career points) contributed four hits against the Milwaukee Braves in 1953.

  • Chicago Cubs 2B Glenn Beckert (three-year letterman for Allegheny PA) collected four hits for the second time in a four-game span in 1971.

  • Philadelphia Athletics 3B Buddy Blair (LSU letterman from 1932-33 through 1934-35) banged a career-high four hits in a 4-3 win against the Boston Red Sox in 1942.

  • RHP Ray Burris (played for Southwestern Oklahoma State) traded by the Chicago Cubs to the New York Yankees for P Dick Tidrow in 1979.

  • Baltimore Orioles LHP Mike Flanagan (averaged 13.9 ppg for UMass' freshman squad in 1971-72) tossed a two-hit shutout against the Detroit Tigers in 1978.

  • INF Howard Freigau (played for Ohio Wesleyan) traded by the St. Louis Cardinals to the Chicago Cubs in 1925.

  • Boston Red Sox C Bob Garbark (four-year letterman graduated from Allegheny PA in 1932) went 4-for-4 against the St. Louis Browns in 1945.

  • St. Louis Cardinals RHP Bob Gibson (Creighton's leading scorer and rebounder in 1955-56 and 1956-57) fanned 16 Philadelphia Phillies batters in a 3-1 victory in 1970.

  • In the midst of hitting safely in 33 of his first 37 MLB games in 1936, Brooklyn Dodgers rookie 1B Buddy Hassett (played for Manhattan teams winning school-record 17 consecutive contests in 1930 and 1931) smacked his initial homer.

  • New York Yankees LF Charlie Keller (three-year letterman with Maryland from 1934-35 through 1936-37) cracked three extra-base hits against the Boston Red Sox in 1941.

  • In 1911, New York Giants RHP Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) defeated the Cincinnati Reds for the 18th consecutive time.

  • INF Dan Monzon (played for Buena Vista IA in mid-1960s) traded by the Minnesota Twins to the Montreal Expos in 1974.

  • New York Yankees 3B Graig Nettles (shot 87.8% from free-throw line for San Diego State in 1963-64) drilled two homers against the Texas Rangers in 1975.

  • RHP Curly Ogden (competed as center for Swarthmore PA in 1919, 1920 and 1922) purchased from the Philadelphia Athletics by the Washington Senators in 1924.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates RHP Elmer Ponder (Oklahoma letterman in 1913-14 and 1915-16) tossed a five-hit shutout against the Brooklyn Robins in 1920.

  • Chicago Cubs SS Paul Popovich (teammate of Jerry West for West Virginia's 1960 NCAA playoff team) went 3-for-3 and knocked in the decisive run with a double off Tug McGraw in the bottom of the eighth inning of a 2-1 victory against the New York Mets in 1972.

  • New York Yankees rookie LHP Dennis Rasmussen (sixth-man for Creighton averaged 5.1 ppg from 1977-78 through 1979-80) secured his first MLB victory, yielding only two hits and fanning 10 Seattle Mariners batters over eight innings in 1984.

  • Baltimore Orioles RHP Robin Roberts (Michigan State's runner-up in scoring in 1945-46 and 1946-47) fired a two-hitter (both by light-hitting SS Eddie Brinkman/.224 career batting average) in a 6-0 victory over the Washington Senators in 1963.

  • LHP Paul Splittorff (runner-up in scoring and rebounding for Morningside IA in 1967-68) toiled 11 shutout innings for the Kansas City Royals before they edged the Minnesota Twins, 1-0, in 15 frames in 1981.

  • Bobby Winkles (led Illinois Wesleyan in scoring in 1950-51) stepped down as manager of the Oakland A's in 1978 although they were leading the A.L. Western Division.

Guardian of Hoop Galaxy: MSU Decommit Swanigan Runs Reverse to Purdue

Reverse responsibilities in tow, a former NFL linebacker was instrumental in perhaps the biggest news of the off-season. Purdue probably went from a borderline Top 25 team to an authentic Final Four candidate when regal recruit Caleb Swanigan decommitted from Michigan State and aligned with the Boilermakers, giving them one of the nation's most imposing frontcourts. Roosevelt Barnes, Swanigan's guardian, averaged 2.7 points and 1.1 rebounds per game as a senior in 1980-81 under coach Gene Keady, who played football for Kansas State before becoming a 19th-round choice as a back by the Pittsburgh Steelers in the 1958 NFL draft.

Barnes, a 6-2 guard, collected 14 points and 23 rebounds in 24 games for Purdue's 1980 Final Four team after scoring 39 points in 43 games the previous two campaigns. College teammate of longtime coach Kevin Stallings played briefly for Fort Wayne in the CBA. Barnes, who led the Boilers in tackles for loss with nine in 1981, was a 10th-round NFL draft choice before competing four years from 1982 through 1985 with the Detroit Lions.

Barnes isn't the only football player who impacted Purdue hoops. He is joined by the following alphabetical list of versatile Boilermaker basketball/football athletes:

ERICH BARNES - Defensive back intercepted 45 passes in 14 seasons (1958 through 1971) with the Chicago Bears, New York Giants and Cleveland Browns. Fourth-round draft choice played in six Pro Bowls (1960-62-63-64-65-69) and six NFL championship games. Basketball teammate of eventual "Fearsome Foursome" DE Lamar Lundy was a 6-3, 190-pound forward-center who played briefly for the Boilermakers' varsity basketball team as a sophomore in 1955-56.

CHARLES DAVIS - Starting tight end most of four years from 2002 through 2005 caught 60 passes his last two seasons, including a 61-yard TD against archrival Indiana as a junior when he was a second-team All-Big Ten Conference selection by the media. Fifth-round NFL draft choice by the Pittsburgh Steelers in 2006. Upon return from 2004 Sun Bowl, the 6-6, 260-pounder averaged 2.9 ppg and 3.1 rpg in 19 basketball games for the Boilermakers in Keady's swan song.

LEN DAWSON - Member of Pro Football Hall of Fame completed 2,136 passes for 28,731 yards and 239 touchdowns in 19 seasons (1957 through 1975) with the Cleveland Browns, Dallas Texans and Kansas City Chiefs. First-round draft choice of the Pittsburgh Steelers went on to become a seven-time All-Pro. Quarterbacked the Chiefs to victory over Minnesota in Super Bowl following 1969 season. Played in two games as a 6-0, 180-pound guard for Purdue's basketball team in the 1956-57 campaign.

BOB GRIESE - TV analyst and member of College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame. Quarterback played 14 seasons (1967 through 1980) with the Miami Dolphins, completing 1,926 of 3,429 passes for 25,093 yards and 192 touchdowns. The first-round draft choice was an eight-time Pro Bowl selection and played in three Super Bowls. As a 6-1, 185-pound sophomore guard in 1964-65, he scored 22 points in 16 games in his only varsity basketball season with the Boilermakers. "I always loved basketball, but it was impossible to do justice to both sports," Griese said.

LAMAR LUNDY - Member of the "Fearsome Foursome" as a defensive end for the Los Angeles Rams in his 13-year NFL career (1957 through 1969). Fourth-round draft choice participated in the 1960 Pro Bowl. Caught 35 passes for 584 yards and six touchdowns in his first three seasons. He averaged 10.5 points and 8.5 rebounds per game in three varsity seasons, leading the Boilermakers in rebounding as a junior and senior. He finished 30th in the country in field-goal shooting (48.1%) in 1956-57 when he was Purdue's only All-Big Ten Conference selection (third-team). Sketch in school guide: "The most improved player in the Big Ten. The 6-6, 225-pound Lundy was more often than not the equal of or better than opposing centers reaching 6-8 or 6-9. His unusual speed and defensive ability make him a valuable asset."

ELMER OLIPHANT - One of the legendary athletes in the history of college sports. Earned nine letters (three in football and two each in basketball, baseball and track) at Purdue before graduating in 1914. Two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection set a Boilermaker single-game football record with 43 points against Rose Poly on November 17, 1912. Won 12 letters at Army (U.S. Military Academy) in football, basketball, baseball, track, boxing and hockey before graduating in 1918. Consensus All-American halfback in 1916 and 1917 played pro football for Rochester and Buffalo in 1920 and 1921. The 5-7, 175-pound Oliphant was named to the 10-man All-American basketball teams selected in 1957 by the Helms Foundation for the 1913-14 and 1914-15 seasons. Spalding's Official Basketball Guide called him "the fastest and most aggressive floor worker in the conference."

On This Date: Former College Hoopsters Make Mark on May 22 MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only 4% of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a May 22 calendar focusing on such versatile MLB athletes:

MAY 22

  • Chicago Cubs 1B George Altman (appeared in 1953 and 1954 NAIA Basketball Tournament with Tennessee State) swatted two homers in a 4-3 win against the Atlanta Braves in the nightcap of a 1966 doubleheader.

  • Seattle Mariners 1B Bruce Bochte (starting forward for Santa Clara's NCAA playoff team in 1969-70) went 4-for-4 and chipped in with six RBI in a 12-11 win against the Kansas City Royals in 1979.

  • 1B Bill Davis (averaged 12.5 ppg in 1963-64 for a Minnesota team including eventual NBA standouts Archie Clark and Lou Hudson) traded by the San Diego Padres to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1969.

  • 1B-LF Dick Gernert (Temple letterman in 1948-49) was one of four Boston Red Sox players to wallop a homer in the sixth inning of an 11-0 victory over the Cleveland Indians in 1957.

  • Baltimore Orioles RHP Dick Hall (averaged 13.5 ppg from 1948-49 through 1950-51 with Swarthmore PA Southern Division champions in Middle Atlantic States Conference) notched his fourth relief win of the month in 1964.

  • San Francisco Giants C Tom Haller (backup forward for Illinois in 1956-57 and 1957-58 under coach Harry Combes) banged out four hits against the Houston Astros in the opener of a 1965 doubleheader.

  • Pittsburgh Pirates 3B Lee Handley (Bradley letterman from 1932-33 through 1934-35) went 4-for-4 against the New York Giants in 1939.

  • Brooklyn Dodgers 1B Gil Hodges (played for St. Joseph's IN in 1943 and Oakland City IN in 1947 and 1948) collected two homers and six RBI against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1951. Twelve years later, Hodges became manager of the Washington Senators in 1963 after his acquisition from the New York Mets for OF Jimmy Piersall.

  • Los Angeles Dodgers rookie RF Frank Howard (two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection when leading Ohio State in scoring and rebounding in 1956-57 and 1957-58) contributed four hits against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1960.

  • 3B Jerry Lumpe (member of Southwest Missouri State's 1952 NAIA Tournament championship team) notched the New York Yankees only hit (a single) in a 5-0 setback against knuckleballer Hoyt Wilhelm of the Baltimore Orioles in 1959. The next year as a Kansas City Athletics 2B in 1960, Lumpe launched two homers against his original team (Yankees).

  • Chicago White Sox RHP Ted Lyons (two-time All-SWC first-team selection with Baylor in the early 1920s) beat the Washington Senators, 9-2, in 1938 for his 200th career victory.

  • In 1965, Detroit Tigers rookie RF Jim Northrup (second-leading scorer and third-leading rebounder for Alma MI in 1958-59) jacked his first MLB homer (off Hall of Famer Robin Roberts of Baltimore Orioles).

  • Montreal Expos LF Curtis Pride (led William & Mary in steals three times and assists twice while averaging 5.6 ppg and 3.1 apg from 1986-87 through 1989-90) went 3-for-3 against the New York Mets in 2001.

  • Utilityman Jimmy Stewart (All-Volunteer State Athletic Conference selection for Austin Peay State in 1959-60 and 1960-61) purchased from the Chicago Cubs by the Chicago White Sox in 1967.

  • Kansas City Royals RHP Chris Young (All-Ivy League first-team selection as Princeton's leading scorer and rebounder in 1999-00) won first four decisions and compiled 0.78 ERA through his first 10 outings of 2015 campaign.

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