From Hoop Dreams to Field of Dreams: Hoopsters Touch All of the Bases

Fond of him or not, demanding mogul George Steinbrenner was a successful principal owner. The New York Yankees reached the World Series 11 times after he purchased the franchise in 1973, winning three straight championships from 1998 through 2000.

But most fans probably don't know that Steinbrenner wasn't nearly as successful in another sporting "world" when he opposed perhaps the greatest folk hero in college basketball history. The individual in question was a small-school sensation named Clarence "Bevo" Francis, who set an all-time collegiate scoring record at the time with 113 points for Rio Grande (Ohio) College in a 134-95 victory over Hillsdale on February 2, 1954. Francis' revolutionary jump shot helped him average 46.5 points per game that season when he earned spots on AP, UPI and NABC All-American teams.

Francis averaged 50.1 points the previous year for a 39-0 team that reportedly generated sufficient gate receipts to save the school from bankruptcy. However, a 116-point outing against Ashland and his season average were later expunged from the NCAA record book because 27 of the opponents for Rio Grande (pronounced RYE-o Grand) were junior colleges, military teams and vocational schools.

Among the coaches failing to contain Francis was Steinbrenner, who piloted the airmen at Lockbourne Air Force base in Portsmouth, Ohio. Bevo blistered Big George with a total of 83 points in two games at Lockbourne in 1952-53. Perhaps that explains why Mr. Steinbrenner's character babbled incoherently so much on Seinfeld.

Numerous universities have featured versatile athletes who played college basketball before going on to major league baseball careers. Fitting like a glove, following are former college basketball players who made a name for themselves in baseball:

MARK ACRE, New Mexico State
Reliever posted a 9-6 record for the Oakland A's in four seasons from 1994 through 1997 before his contract was sold to a Japanese team. Compiled a 5-1 record in the strike-shortened '94 campaign when he was considered heir apparent to assume Dennis Eckersley's closer role. He became a major leaguer despite posting a 2-10 record and 8.14 ERA with NMSU. . . . The 6-8, 225-pound forward-center averaged 1.9 points and 1.2 rebounds per game for coach Neil McCarthy while playing sparingly for the Aggies in 1988-89 and 1989-90 after averaging 25.1 points and 9.6 rebounds per game in his final junior college season at the College of the Siskiyous in Weed, Calif. He missed a three-point attempt while playing briefly in a 111-92 defeat against Loyola Marymount in the first round of 1990 NCAA Tournament West Regional. One of his teammates was 12-year NBA guard Randy Brown.

JERRY ADAIR, Oklahoma State
Bonus baby hit .254 in 1,165 games in 13 seasons from 1958 through 1970 with the Baltimore Orioles, Chicago White Sox, Boston Red Sox and Kansas City Athletics before playing one year in Japan. Adair set major league records for highest fielding average (.994) and fewest errors (five) by a second baseman in a season in 1964 and for consecutive errorless games by a second baseman (89 in 1964 and 1965). He participated in the 1967 World Series with the Red Sox after being traded by the White Sox for reliever Don McMahon. . . . Before signing a pro baseball contract, the 6-0, 175-pounder played two seasons of varsity basketball under legendary coach Hank Iba at Oklahoma State (third-leading scorer with 9.7 ppg in 1956-57 and second-leading scorer with 11.9 ppg in 1957-58). He ranked among the nation's top 12 free-throw shooters both seasons when one of his teammates was Eddie Sutton.

MIKE ADAMS, Texas A&M-Kingsville
Righthander compiled a 2-4 record with the Milwaukee Brewers in three years with them from 2004 through 2006. Traded by the Brewers to the New York Mets on May 26, 2006. Selected off waivers by the Cleveland Indians on July 7, 2006, before he was traded by the Indians to the San Diego Padres 11 days later. Went 6-4 with 1.81 ERA for the Padres from 2008 through 2010. . . . The 6-5 Adams enrolled at Kingsville on a basketball scholarship, scoring 14 points in 13 games in 1996-97.

JOE ADCOCK, Louisiana State
First baseman hit .277 with 336 home runs and 1,122 RBI in 17 seasons from 1950 through 1966 with the Cincinnati Reds, Milwaukee Braves, Cleveland Indians and the Los Angeles/California Angels. He hit four homers and a double for the Braves against the Brooklyn Dodgers on July 31, 1954, setting a major league record for most total bases in a game (18) that stood until broken by Shawn Green in 2002. Adcock was the Braves' regular first baseman on 1957 and 1958 National League champions. He failed to get an extra-base hit in nine World Series games against the Yankees, but his sixth-inning single accounted for Game Five's only run in 1957 when Lew Burdette outdueled Whitey Ford. Adcock, who blasted a career-high 38 homers in 1956 between injury-plagued seasons, was an All-Star in 1960 and managed the Indians in 1967. . . . He played three seasons from 1944-45 through 1946-47 for LSU as a 6-4, 190-pound center. Leading scorer with 18.6 ppg for the 1945-46 Tigers team that compiled an 18-3 record and lost against Kentucky in the Southeastern Conference Tournament final. Set SEC Tournament record with 15 field goals in a game against Tulane in 1946.

DALE ALDERSON, Upper Iowa
Lost his only decision and compiled a 6.56 ERA in 16 games with the Chicago Cubs in 1943 and 1944. . . . All-Iowa Conference basketball selection in 1938-39 and 1939-40.

DALE ALEXANDER, Milligan (Tenn.)
First baseman hit .331 with the Detroit Tigers and Boston Red Sox in five seasons from 1929 through 1933 before suffering a career-ending injury (therapy for twisted knee sliding into home plate led to third-degree burns, gangrene and near loss of his leg). Led the A.L. in hits as rookie and in batting average (.367) in 1932. Ranked among the top eight in the A.L. in home runs and RBIs each of his first two years. Only Hall of Famer Joe DiMaggio amassed more RBIs in his first two MLB campaigns. . . . According to school yearbooks in the mid-1920s, the 6-3 Alexander "was kept from his best by an old football injury" and "ability to get the tip-off and his floor work rated him one of the best centers in East Tennessee."

ETHAN ALLEN, Cincinnati
Outfielder hit .300 with the Cincinnati Reds, New York Giants, St. Louis Cardinals, Philadelphia Phillies, Chicago Cubs and St. Louis Browns in 13 seasons from 1926 through 1938. Allen, who never played in the minors, led the N.L. in doubles with the Phillies in 1934 (42) before finishing runner-up the next year (46). Ranked among the N.L. top eight in hits each of those back-to-back campaigns. Baseball coach for Yale from 1946 until 1968 (336-325-13 record) finished College World Series runner-up in back-to-back years (1947 and 1948). His college players included future U.S. President George H.W. Bush. . . . The 6-1 Allen was a basketball letterman for the Bearcats in 1924-25 and 1925-26.

RON ALLEN, Youngstown State
The only hit in 11 major league at-bats for the first baseman was a home run with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1972. Allen, originally signed by the Philadelphia Phillies, is a brother of Dick Allen and Hank Allen. . . . The 6-3 Allen averaged 14.7 ppg for YSU from 1961-62 through 1963-64. He led the Penguins in scoring and rebounding as a sophomore.

BILLY ALLGOOD, Southern Mississippi
In the early 1970s, he personally constructed Louisiana College's baseball facility bearing his name. Coached LC in more than a 1,000 baseball games, including a historic upset of defending national champion LSU in 1994 (first time an NAIA institution defeated a reigning NCAA Division I titlist). Briefly played minor-league baseball. . . . Averaged 3.5 ppg for USM from 1948-49 through 1952-53. LC's all-time winningest basketball coach (327 victories included an upset win at Texas-El Paso over Don Haskins plus triumphs over Tulane and Mississippi State from 1967-68 through 1969-70) was approached by LSU about becoming a candidate before the Tigers hired Press Maravich. "I'd sell every one of those wins to get people to do what they're capable of," Allgood said. "I didn't want to coach blue-chip athletes. I'd rather coach blue-chip people." LC defeated the following six eventual DI in-state schools at least five times apiece from 1964-65 through 1974-75: Louisiana Tech, McNeese State, Nicholls State, Northeast Louisiana, Northwestern State and Southeastern Louisiana.

BILL ALMON, Brown
Signed a $90,000 bonus contract with the San Diego Padres after becoming the first player selected overall in the 1974 June draft that had 12 of its first 13 choices go on to become major leaguers. Shortstop hit .254 in 15 seasons from 1974 through 1988 with the Padres, Montreal Expos, New York Mets, Chicago White Sox, Oakland A's, Pittsburgh Pirates and Philadelphia Phillies. Relegated to utility duty with the Padres when Ozzie Smith arrived on the scene. Almon's best year was 1981 when he hit .301 for the White Sox and finished runner-up in the A.L. Comeback Player of the Year voting with the best batting average for a starting shortstop in the league in 11 years. . . . The 6-3, 175-pound guard averaged 6.4 ppg for the 1971-72 Brown freshman team and 2.5 ppg in half a season for the 1972-73 varsity that ended a Bears' streak of 12 straight losing records.

WALTER ALSTON, Miami (Ohio)
Member of Baseball Hall of Fame managed the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers for 23 seasons from 1954 through 1976, winning seven National League pennants and three World Series. His managerial record was 2,040-1,613 (.558) with 23 one-year contracts. In eight All-Star Game assignments, Alston was the winning manager a record seven times. He struck out in his only major league at-bat with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1936. . . . The 6-2, 195-pound Alston, a charter member of his alma mater's Athletic Hall of Fame, lettered in basketball from 1932-33 through 1934-35. He scored 10 of Miami's 15 points in a 32-15 defeat against Indiana in his senior season.

GEORGE ALTMAN, Tennessee State
First baseman hit .269 with 102 home runs in nine seasons from 1959 through 1967 with the Chicago Cubs, St. Louis Cardinals and New York Mets before playing eight years in Japan. The two-time All-Star amassed career highs of 28 doubles, 12 triples (league high), 27 homers and 96 RBI in 1961 with the Cubs. Three weeks after swatting a pinch-hit homer in the '61 All-Star Game, he became the first player ever to hit two homers in the same contest against Los Angeles Dodgers Hall of Famer Sandy Koufax. The Mets traded Altman back to his original team, the Cubs, for outfielder Billy Cowan (an ex-Utah hoopster) on January 15, 1965. . . . The 6-4 1/2, 200-pound forward earned four letters for Tennessee A&I teams that compiled an 88-17 record from 1951-52 through 1954-55. The school appeared in the NAIA Tournament in 1953 and 1954.

BRANT ALYEA, Hofstra
Outfielder, plagued by strikeouts, hit .247 with the Washington Senators/Minnesota Twins in six seasons in 1965 and from 1968 through 1972. Debuted with a pinch-hit homer on the first pitch to him against the Angels. Amassed seven RBI, a major-league record for opening day, in 1970 against the Chicago White Sox en route to driving in 19 runs in pitcher Jim Perry's first four starts that year. Appeared in 1970 ALCS with the Twins after posting career highs of 12 doubles, 16 homers and 61 RBI (including seven on two round-trippers in a September game against the Milwaukee Brewers). . . . The 6-3 Alyea, playing under coach Butch van Breda Kolff, was Hofstra's runner-up in scoring and rebounding in 1959-60 (12.5 ppg, 8.8 rpg) before leading the team in both categories in 1960-61 (16.2 ppg, 9.7 rpg).

JOHN "JOEY" AMALFITANO, Loyola Marymount
Infielder, primarily a second baseman, hit .244 with the New York/San Francisco Giants, Houston Colt .45's and Chicago Cubs in 10 seasons (1954, 1955 and 1960 through 1967). He posted a career-high .277 bating average with the Giants in 1960. Traded by the Colt .45's back to the Giants for Dick LeMay and Manny Mota on November 30, 1962. Also registered a 66-116 record as manager of the Cubs from 1979 to 1981. . . . Collected six points and six rebounds in eight basketball games for the Lions in 1952-53.

FERRELL ANDERSON, Kansas
Catcher hit .261 in two N.L. campaigns with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1946 and St. Louis Cardinals in 1953. . . . The 6-1 Anderson was a basketball letterman for the Jayhawks in 1936-37 and 1937-38.

ERNIE ANDRES, Indiana
Played in 15 games with the Boston Red Sox as a third baseman in 1946. . . . NCAA consensus first-team All-American guard in 1939. Averaged 8.7 ppg for the Hoosiers from 1936-37 through 1938-39.

MORRIE ARNOVICH, Wisconsin-Superior
Hit .287 with the Philadelphia Phillies, Cincinnati Reds and New York Giants in seven N.L. seasons from 1936 through 1941 and 1946. Appeared in 1940 World Series with the Reds after participating in All-Star game with the Phillies the previous year when he hit a career-high .324 and led N.L. left fielders in putouts. . . . Played basketball for Superior in early 1930s.

ELDEN AUKER, Kansas State
Pitcher compiled a 130-101 record in 10 A.L. seasons from 1933 through 1942 with the Detroit Tigers, Boston Red Sox and St. Louis Browns. He led the American League in winning percentage in 1935 with a .720 mark (18-7 record). The submariner, a style developed because of a shoulder injury incurred while playing football for K-State, appeared in the 1934 and 1935 World Series with the Tigers. Auker hurled a complete game victory in a 10-4 verdict over the St. Louis Cardinals in Game Four of the '34 Series before losing Game Seven to Dizzy Dean. He pitched the first night game in St. Louis on May 24, 1940, losing to Cleveland Indians Hall of Famer Bob Feller, 3-2. Finished among the league's top eight winners six times in a nine-year span from 1934 through 1942, hurling two shutouts in four of those seasons. . . . Three-year basketball letterman was named to the first five on the All-Big Six team in his final college season (1931-32). The Spalding Official Basketball Guide called the 6-2, 195-pound guard an "outstanding performer, with height, endurance and skill beyond the ordinary."

MORRIS "RED" BADGRO, Southern California
Outfielder hit .257 in two seasons (1929 and 1930) with the St. Louis Browns after becoming a three-time All-Pro with the Giants.Member of Pro Football Hall of Fame was an offensive and defensive end with the New York Yankees (1927 and 1928), New York Giants (1930 through 1935) and Brooklyn Dodgers (1936) in a nine-year NFL career that was interrupted by a stint in major league baseball. . . . Earned varsity basketball letters for the Trojans in 1924-25 and 1926-27. Named to the first five on the All-Pacific Coast Conference team as a forward in 1926-27 when he was USC's MVP.

JOHN "MARK" BAILEY, Southwest Missouri State
Switch-hitting catcher posted a .220 batting average with the Houston Astros and San Francisco Giants in seven seasons from 1984 to 1992 (excluding 1989 and 1991). As a rookie, he homered in three straight games in mid-July and from both sides of the plate on September 16. . . . The 6-5 Bailey averaged 6.9 ppg and 4.3 rpg for the Bears from 1979-80 through 1981-82 just before the school moved up to the NCAA Division I level. In 1980-81, he led the team in rebounding (5.5 per game) ande field-goal shooting (51.4%).

FRANK BAKER, Southern Mississippi
Infielder, primarily a shortstop, hit .191 with the New York Yankees and Baltimore Orioles in four seasons from 1970 through 1974 (excluding 1972). Participated in back-to-back ALCS his last two years with the Orioles against the Oakland A's. . . . The 6-2 Baker was a basketball letterman for USM in 1965-66 and 1966-67 (2.2 ppg) under coach Lee Floyd, the father of DI and NBA coach Tim Floyd.

DICK BALDERSON, Richmond
Scouting and minor league director for the Kansas City Royals (1977 through 1985), V.P./Baseball Operations of the Seattle Mariners (1986 through 1988), director of scouting for the Chicago Cubs (1989 through 1992), director of player development and V.P./Player Personnel with the Colorado Rockies (1993 through 1997) before the protege of John Schuerholz joined the Atlanta Braves' organization as director of player development. . . . Averaged 11.2 points per game for the Spiders' freshman basketball team in the mid-1960s and 2.7 ppg during his sophomore season.

DUANE BANKS, Northern Colorado
Iowa's all-time winningest baseball coach. . . . Played one season of basketball for UNC.

STEVE BARBER, Riverside City College
Pitcher compiled a 1-0 record in 22 games with the Minnesota Twins in 1970 and 1971. . . . Starting guard for Jerry Tarkanian-coached community college power that combined for a 64-6 record in 1964-65 and 1965-66.

CURT BARCLAY, Oregon
Righthander compiled a 9-9 record with the New York Giants as a rookie in 1957 before a shoulder injury ended his pitching career. . . . The 6-3 Barclay was the Ducks' third-leading scorer and rebounder (9.9 ppg and 7.5 rpg) as a sophomore in 1950-51 when they posted their most victories (18-13) in an 11-year span from 1948-49 through 1958-59. One of his teammates was Jim Loscutoff, a seven-time NBA champion with the Boston Celtics.

MIKE BARLOW, Syracuse
Righthanded reliever compiled a 10-6 record with the St. Louis Cardinals, Houston Astros, California Angels and Toronto Blue Jays in seven years from 1975 through 1981. Appeared in 1979 ALCS with the Angels. . . . The 6-6 Barlow collected 20 points and 24 rebounds in 19 games for the Orange from 1967-68 through 1969-70. "I found out at Syracuse that some pretty good athletes ride the bench," Barlow said. "And that helped me move up in professional baseball because I was taught how to accept a role. So, you end up on the bench and you learn that your job is to be ready when you get called."

HERBERT "BABE" BARNA, West Virginia
Lefthanded hitter posted a .232 average in five seasons from 1937 to 1943 as an outfielder with the Philadelphia A's, New York Giants and Boston Red Sox. Swatted 52 home runs in a minor league campaign for Nashville. Also a starting end on the school's football squad, the 6-3, 210-pounder caught three touchdown passes in a game against Cincinnati before being selected in the seventh round of 1937 NFL draft by the Philadelphia Eagles. . . . Two-year basketball letterman averaged 4.9 ppg as a center.

EVERETT "EPPIE" BARNES, Colgate
First baseman went 1 for 7 in four games with the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1923 and 1924. . . . The 5-9 Barnes was a two-year basketball letterman for Colgate in 1920-21 and 1921-22.

CLYDE BARNHART, Shippensburg (Pa.)
Outfielder-third baseman hit .295 with the Pittsburgh Pirates in nine years from 1920 through 1928. Ranked fourth in the N.L. in slugging percentage in 1923 (.563) and fifth in RBI in 1925 (114). Teammate of Pirate legends Pie Traynor and Paul Waner participated in two World Series (1925 and 1927). His son, Vic, was an infielder for the Pirates in the mid-1940s. . . . The 5-10 Barnhart played basketball for Shippensburg's predecessor, Cumberland Valley State Normal School, prior to World War I.

HYDER "SCOTTY" BARR, Davidson
Utilityman hit .112 in 41 games with the Philadelphia Athletics in 1908 and 1909. . . . The 6-0 Barr was a basketball letterman for Davidson in 1907 and 1908.

JOHN "JACK" BARRY, Holy Cross
Infielder, primarily a shortstop, hit .243 with the Philadelphia Athletics and Boston Red Sox in 11 A.L. seasons from 1908 through 1919. Ranked fifth in the league in RBI in 1913 with 85 for the Athletics as a key component of Connie Mack's first dynasty. Participated in five World Series, four with the champion, in a six-year span from 1910 through 1915. Compiled a 90-62 managerial record with the Red Sox in 1917 before winning more than 80 percent of his games coaching his alma mater for 40 years (including capturing the 1952 College World Series). . . . The 5-9 Barry was a basketball letterman for the Crusaders in 1908.

STAN BAUMGARTNER, University of Chicago
Lefthander compiled a 27-21 pitching record in eight seasons (1914 through 1916, 1921, 1922 and 1924 through 1926) with the Philadelphia Phillies and Philadelphia Athletics. . . . The 6-0, 175-pounder played on Big Ten football, basketball and baseball champions in the 1913-14 school year and later coached those three sports for the University of Delaware. For 20 years, he was a sportswriter with the Philadelphia Inquirer and co-authored a history of the Phillies.

FRANKIE BAUMHOLTZ, Ohio University
Outfielder hit .290 in 1,019 games in 10 N.L. seasons (1947 through 1949 and 1951 through 1957) with the Chicago Cubs, Cincinnati Reds and Philadelphia Phillies. Baumholtz, who finished fifth in the inaugural Rookie of the Year voting, hit under .283 in only two of his nine full seasons. Baumholtz hit .325 in 1952, finishing second to Stan Musial in the batting championship race. He led the N.L. in pinch hits in 1955 and 1956. . . . The first player in Ohio U. history to score 1,000 points in a career led the school to a three-year record of 49-18. His high game was 29 points against Dayton. Capped college career by earning MVP honors in 1941 NIT when he led the tourney in scoring with 53 points in three games for the second-place Bobcats, including a game-high 19 in the final. The lefthander was named to the first five on Converse's 1940-41 All-American team. . . . After a stint in the Navy, Baumholtz earned second-team all-league honors with Youngstown in the National Basketball League in 1945-46 and the Cleveland Rebels in the Basketball Association of America in 1946-47.

CHRIS BEASLEY, Arizona State
The 6-2 righthander compiled an 0-1 pitching record and 3.38 ERA in 22 games with the California Angels in 1991. . . . Two-year basketball letterman with the Sun Devils in 1982-83 (8.4 ppg) and 1983-84 (team-high 18.3 ppg and 87.5 FT%) under coach Bob Weinhauer. Only one ASU player has a higher two-year career free-throw percentage than Beasley's mark of 81.2%.

JIM BEATTIE, Dartmouth
Executive vice president of the Baltimore Orioles until 2005. Former Seattle Mariners farm director and Montreal Expos vice president/general manager compiled a 52-87 pitching record in nine seasons from 1978 through 1986 with the New York Yankees and Seattle Mariners. As a rookie with the Yankees, he went the distance for the first time in his major league career when he won Game 5 of the 1978 World Series (12-2 over the Los Angeles Dodgers). Beattie was a workhorse for the Mariners (hurling more than 172 innings four times in a five-year span from 1980 through 1984), setting a club record for a starter by pitching 19 straight scoreless innings. On September 27, 1983, he threw the first one-hitter in Seattle history. . . . The 6-5, 210-pound forward averaged 14.3 ppg and a team-high 8.9 rpg for Dartmouth in 1974-75 when he was selected team MVP and honorable mention All-Ivy League. The previous season as a sophomore, Beattie averaged 5 ppg and 5.7 rpg.

RICH BECK, Gonzaga
Righthander won two of three starts for the New York Yankees in 1965. He fanned eight batters and walked none while allowing one earned run in his seven-inning debut on September 14, 1965, against the Washington Senators. . . . The 6-3 Beck was on Gonzaga's basketball roster in 1961-62.

GLENN BECKERT, Allegheny (Mass.)
All-Star second baseman four straight seasons from 1969 throuogh 1972 hit .283 with the Chicago Cubs and San Diego Padres in 11 N.L. years from 1965 through 1975. The most difficult batter to strike out in the N.L. five times hit .280 or better six straight seasons, including a high of .342 in 1971 (third in league). Led the N.L. with 98 runs scored in 1968 when he also won a Gold Glove. For his entire Cubs career, he played alongside shortstop Don Kessinger, a fellow ex-college hoopster who attended Ole Miss. . . . The 6-1, 190-pounder was a three-year basketball letterman.

BILL BECKMANN, Washington (Mo.)
Righthander compiled a 21-25 record with the Philadelphia Athletics and St. Louis Cardinals in four years from 1939 through 1942. He hurled a pair of shutouts in each of his first two major league seasons. A clutch victory in his final major league appearance helped the Cards win a N.L. pennant. . . . The 6-0 Beckmann played basketball for the Bears in the late 1920s.

WILLIAM "GENE" BEDFORD, Southern Methodist
Second baseman played two games for the Cleveland Indians in 1925. . . . The 5-8 Bedford was a basketball letterman for SMU from 1922-23 through 1924-25.

JERRY BELL, Belmont (Tenn.)
Righthander compiled a 17-11 record and 3.28 ERA with the Milwaukee Brewers in four seasons from 1971 through 1974 before a chronic back ailment curtailed his career. He posted a 1.66 ERA in 25 games in 1972. . . . The 6-4 Bell played basketball for Belmont in 1965-66 and 1966-67.

R.C. "BEAU" BELL, Texas A&M
Outfielder-first baseman hit .297 with the St. Louis Browns, Detroit Tigers and Cleveland Indians in seven years from 1935 through 1941. One of the best righthanded hitters in the majors in 1936 and 1937. In 1936, he hit .344 with 123 RBI and 100 runs scored for the Browns. The next season, the All-Star led the A.L. in hits (218) and doubles (51) while hitting .340 with 117 RBI. Coached his alma mater to the 1951 College World Series in his first of eight campaigns from 1951 through 1958. . . . The 6-2, 185 pounder was a two-year basketball letterman in the early 1930s.

ANDY BENES, Evansville
U.S. Olympian in 1988 was the first selection in baseball draft that year. He compiled a 155-139 record in his 14 seasons with the San Diego Padres, Seattle Mariners, St. Louis Cardinals and Arizona Diamondbacks, reaching double digits in victories in 10 of those years. Benes led the N.L. in strikeouts in 1994 with 189 before posting a career-high 18 victories with the Cards in 1996 when he had a 10-game winning streak. Durable hurler ranked among the N.L. top seven in starts five times (1992-93-94-96-98). . . . He played a total of three minutes in two games for the Aces in 1985-86, missing his only field-goal attempt. The 6-6 Benes was asked to join the basketball squad in his hometown after the season started by first-year coach Jim Crews when the number of able bodies dropped below 12.

BERNARD "BENNY" BENGOUGH, Niagara
Catcher hit .255 with the New York Yankees and St. Louis Browns in 10 A.L. seasons from 1923 through 1932. Appeared in back-to-back World Series with the Yanks (1927 and 1928). . . . Basketball letterman for Niagara from 1916-17 through 1918-19.

STAN BENJAMIN, McDaniel (Md.)
Utilityman hit .229 with the Philadelphia Phillies and Cleveland Indians in five years from 1939 through 1942 and 1945. Runner-up in the N.L. in stolen bases in 1941 with 17. . . . The 6-2 Benjamin scored more than 100 points for McDaniel, now known as Western Maryland, each season in 1934-35 and 1935-36.

VERN BENSON, Catawba (N.C.)
Long-time major league coach was a third baseman-outfielder who hit .202 in 55 games with the Philadelphia Athletics and St. Louis Cardinals in 1943, 1946 and 1951 through 1953. . . . Scored four points in four basketball games during the 1942-43 season.

LOUIS "BOSEY" BERGER, Maryland
Infielder hit .236 in six seasons (1932, 1935 through 1939) with the Cleveland Indians, Chicago White Sox and Boston Braves. In 1937, he twice combined with White Sox teammate Mike Kreevich to hit homers as the first two batters in a game. When World War II started, Berger made a career of the military. . . . The 6-2 forward led the Terrapins to the 1931 Southern Conference championship with a league-high 19.1 ppg in conference competition. Maryland's first basketball All-American was an NCAA consensus first-team selection the next year as a senior. He was an All-Southern Conference Tournament first-team selection in 1931 and second-team choice in 1932.

AL BERGMAN, Notre Dame
Second baseman hit .214 in eight games with the Cleveland Indians in 1916. . . . Forward for the Irish's basketball squad in 1913-14 and 1914-15.

WALTER "BUS" BERGMAN, Colorado State
Scout for the Philadelphia Phillies was inducted into the NJCAA Baseball Coaches Hall of Fame. Mesa State's field is named after him (posted a 378-201 record there with three second-place finishes in baseball in the J.C. World Series). . . . Three-year basketball letterman was football co-captain and president of the student body in 1941.

HANK BIASATTI, Assumption (Windsor, Canada)
Receiving some playing time after an injury to Ferris Fain, the first baseman contributed two doubles in 24 games for the Philadelphia Athletics in 1949. . . . The only Canadian to play at the major league level in basketball and baseball competed with distinction in college before and after a three-year hitch in the Canadian Army during World War II. He scored 11 points and converted a pair of clutch foul shots in a dramatic 49-45 victory against the Harlem Globetrotters in November 1945. Coached his alma mater to a 77-66 record (.538) in the late 1950s and early 1960s. The 5-11, 175-pound lefthander competed with the Toronto Huskies in 1946-47.

JIM BIBBY, Fayetteville (N.C.) State
Although his career was interrupted after being drafted into the Army during the Vietnam War, the 6-5 righthander compiled a 111-101 record and 3.76 ERA with the St. Louis Cardinals, Texas Rangers, Cleveland Indians and Pittsburgh Pirates in 12 seasons from 1972 through 1984. He hurled the first no-hitter in Rangers history in 1973 and started two games for the victorious Pirates in the 1979 World Series. Bibby's best campaign was 1980, when he went 19-6 (league-high winning percentage) with a 3.32 ERA for the Pirates, earned a spot on the All-Star team and finished third in the N.L. Cy Young Award voting. He hurled five shutouts in 1974 before being traded midway through the next year by the Rangers with two teammates and $100,000 to the Indians for pitcher Gaylord Perry. . . . Bibby's brother, Fred, set a Fayetteville State single-season record with 18.1 rpg in 1963-64. Their younger brother, Henry, became an All-American guard with UCLA. "Jim was a hot dog, the 11th man," Henry told SI. "He'd get in a game, look up in the stands, score two points and think it was a big deal." Countered Jim: "You see that three-point shot Henry puts up? That's the same shot he learned in our backyard. He had to shoot from out there because, if he came inside, he got no pity."

CARSON "SKEETER" BIGBEE, Oregon
Outfielder hit .287 with the Pittsburgh Pirates in 11 years from 1916 through 1926. Brother of big leaguer Lyle Bigbee posted averages of .323 in 1921 and .350 in 1922 (pair of five-hit games in less than two months). Hit a double in 1925 World Series against the Washington Senators as the Pirates became the first team to come back from a 3-1 deficit in seven-game series. Playing third straight extra-inning game against Brooklyn, he went to bat 11 times in a 22-inning marathon on August 22, 1917. . . . The 5-9, 155-pounder was a letterman with his brother on Oregon's basketball squad in 1915.

LYLE BIGBEE, Oregon
Outfielder hit .181 with the Philadelphia Athletics and Pittsburgh Pirates in two years in 1920 and 1921. He also compiled an 0-3 pitching record. Played briefly with the Pirates alongside his brother Carson. Lyle also played professional football with Milwaukee in 1922. . . . The 6-0, 180-pounder was a letterman with his brother on Oregon's basketball team in 1915.

LARRY BIITTNER, Buena Vista (Iowa)
Lefthanded outfielder-first baseman hit .273 with the Washington Senators/Texas Rangers, Montreal Expos, Chicago Cubs and Cincinnati Reds in 14 years from 1970 through 1983. Noted pinch-hitter (95-for-370) posted at least a .298 batting average in one season with each of his three N.L. outposts. The Reds became the final franchise to enter the free-agent market when they signed Biittner in mid-winter prior to the 1981 campaign. . . . Drake transfer was Buena Vista's runner-up in scoring (16.7 ppg) and rebounding (7.6 rpg) in 1966-67.

LOUIS "BUDDY" BLAIR, Louisiana State
Lefthanded swinging third baseman hit .279 in 137 games with the Philadelphia Athletics in 1942 before serving in the military during WWII. . . . The 6-0 forward was a basketball letterman for LSU from 1932-33 through 1934-35. As a sophomore, Blair was an All-SEC Tournament second-team selection. He was also a member of their 1933 national championship track squad.

RAY "BUDDY" BLEMKER, Georgia Tech
The 5-11 lefthander pitched one game for the Kansas City Athletics in 1960. . . . Two-time All-SEC second-team guard averaged 16.2 ppg and 4.8 rpg for the Yellow Jackets from 1956-57 through 1958-59. He led them in scoring all three seasons.

BRUCE BOCHTE, Santa Clara
First baseman-outfielder hit .282 with the California Angels, Cleveland Indians, Seattle Mariners and Oakland A's in 12 seasons from 1974 through 1986 (boycotted 1983 as a personal protest over rising player salaries). Lefthander was A.L. All-Star with Seattle in 1979 when he finished 10th in batting average (career-high .316) and eighth in doubles (career-high 38) along with a career-high 100 RBI. Representing the Mariners the only time Seattle has hosted the Midsummer Classic, Bochte knocked in a run with a single off Gaylord Perry. Named team MVP the next year. In post-playing days, the avowed agnostic worked to "save the Mother Earth from humankind's destructive ways." . . . Starting 6-3 forward for the Broncos in 1969-70 when he averaged 7.4 ppg and 4 rpg under coach Dick Garibaldi. Collected eight rebounds in loss against Utah State and 10 points in victory against Jerry Tarkanian-coached Long Beach State in the 1970 NCAA playoffs. One of Bochte's teammates was center Dennis Awtrey, who went on to play 12 NBA seasons with six different franchises.

FRANK BOLLING, Spring Hill (Ala.)
Two-time All-Star second baseman hit .254 with the Detroit Tigers and Milwaukee/Atlanta Braves in 12 years from 1954 to 1966. Led A.L. in sacrifice flies in 1958 with nine and N.L. in sacrifice bunts in 1963 with 17. Led N.L. second basemen in fielding three times in a four-year span from 1961 through 1964. Brother of Milt Bolling, a shortstop who hit .241 with the Boston Red Sox, Washington Senators and Detroit Tigers in seven years from 1952 through 1958. They played a few games alongside each other with Detroit. . . . The 6-1, 175-pounder play college basketball in the early 1950s, averaging 7.3 ppg in 1950-51.

LOU BOUDREAU, Illinois
Hall of Fame infielder hit .295 in 15 seasons from 1938 through 1952 with the Cleveland Indians and Boston Red Sox. Managed Indians, Red Sox, Kansas City Athletics and Chicago Cubs, starting his managerial career at the age of 24 in 1942. As player-manager in 1948, the shortstop led Cleveland to the A.L. title and earned MVP honors by hitting .355 with 116 RBI. He hit a modest .273 in the World Series. The seven-time All-Star led the A.L. with 45 doubles on three occasions (1941, 1944 and 1947) and paced the league in batting average in 1944 (.327). Ranked among the A.L. top 10 in batting average five times in a six-year span from 1943 through 1948. . . . Played two varsity basketball seasons for Illinois (1936-37 and 1937-38) under coach Doug Mills. As a 5-11 sophomore, Boudreau led the Illini in scoring with 8.7 ppg as the team shared the Big Ten Conference title. Compiled an 8.8 average the next year. After helping the Illini upset St. John's in a game at Madison Square Garden, the New York Daily News described him as "positively brilliant" and said he "set up countless plays in breathtaking fashion." Averaged 8.2 ppg for Hammond (Ind.) in the National Basketball League in 1938-39. He was one of three individuals to coach Hammond the next season, compiling a 1-4 record.

CARL BOULDIN, Cincinnati
Compiled a 3-8 pitching record in four seasons from 1961 through 1964 with the Washington Senators. Traded in mid-July 1964 with first baseman Bill "Moose" Skowron to the Chicago White Sox for first baseman Joe Cunningham and a player to be designated (pitcher Frank Kreutzer) but never appeared with the White Sox. . . . Starting guard and co-captain as a senior on 1961 NCAA champion featuring Bob Wiesenhahn, Paul Hogue and Tom Thacker. The 6-2, 180-pounder averaged 2.8 ppg as a sophomore, 5.8 as a junior and 11.7 as a senior. The Bearcats reached the Final Four all three of his varsity seasons (third-place finishes in 1959 and 1960), compiling a 81-9 record in that span. He was an All-NCAA Tournament selection in 1961 before becoming a 14th-round choice by the Cincinnati Royals in the NBA draft. Sketch in school guide: "Poised, unruffled backcourt leader. Exceptionally fine ball handler and playmaker possesses clever offensive moves. Especially dependable in clutch situations."

DORIAN "DOE" BOYLAND, Wisconsin-Oshkosh
Lefthanded first baseman collected two hits in 19 at-bats with the Pittsburgh Pirates in three years from 1978 to 1981. Traded to the San Francisco Giants but never played for them. . . . Averaged 5.6 ppg and 3.4 rpg in half a season in 1974-75.

ANDREW BRACKMAN, North Carolina State
Righthander was a first-round draft choice who signed a four-year, $4.55 million deal with the New York Yankees in 2007 before undergoing Tommy John surgery. Candidate for one of the two openings in the Yankees' starting rotation during spring training in 2011, but a groin issue put those plans on hold although he appeared in three games for them as a reliever. After leading two minor leagues in wild pitches, he was released by the Yanks following the 2011 season. Cincinnati native signed with the Reds in 2012 and Chicago White Sox in 2013 and pitched in their minor league systems. . . . The 6-10 power forward averaged 7.5 ppg and 3.5 rpg with N.C. State in 2004-05 and 2005-06 for a couple of NCAA playoff teams. Averaged 5.6 ppg and 2.4 rpg in five NCAA tourney games (including 16 points and 6 rebounds as a freshman starter against UNC Charlotte in his first contest).

VIC BRADFORD, Alabama
Outfielder was one for five at the plate with the New York Giants in 1943. . . . Forward earned a basketball letter with the Crimson Tide in 1937.

RALPH BRANCA, New York University
Compiled an 88-68 pitching record in 12 seasons (1944 through 1954 and 1956) with the Brooklyn Dodgers, Detroit Tigers and New York Yankees. Appeared in 1947 and 1949 World Series with the Dodgers after notching 21-12 and 13-5 won-loss marks, respectively. Won Game 6 in the '47 World Series when he was helped by Al gionfriddo's famous catch of Joe DiMaggio's longdrive to left field. All-Star three straight years in the late 1940s is best remembered for throwing the pitch that Bobby Thomson of the New York Giants hit for a decisive three-run homer in the bottom of the ninth inning of the 1951 N.L. playoff. . . . A 6-2, 190-pound center, he was the sixth-leading scorer for NYU in 1943-44 with an average of 3.8 ppg. Former major league manager Bobby Valentine is his son-in-law.

CHUCK "BOBO" BRAYTON, Washington State
Legendary baseball coach with 21 league championships and two College World Series appearances for his alma mater (1,162-523-8 record from 1962 to 1994) had the fourth-highest victory total in NCAA history when he retired. . . . Lettered in basketball for WSU in 1944.

MARV BREEDING, Samford
Second baseman hit .250 with the Baltimore Orioles, Washington Senators and Los Angeles Dodgers in four years from 1960 through 1963. As a rookie, he appeared in more games as a second baseman than anyone in the A.L. (152). . . . Guard in basketball in mid-1950s when school was known as Howard College. Also a placekicking teammate of QB Bobby Bowden, who went on to become one of the nation's all-time winningest football coaches with Florida State.

DELOS BROWN, Millikin (Ill.)
Appeared in one game with the Chicago White Sox in 1914. . . . The 5-9 Brown played basketball for Millikin in 1912-13.

ALONZA "AL" BUMBRY, Virginia State
Lefthanded swinging outfielder hit .281 with the Baltimore Orioles and San Diego Padres in 14 years from 1972 through 1985. He hit .337 as A.L. Rookie of the Year in 1973 when he tied a major league record with three triples in a game. Finished among the A.L. top 10 in batting average in 1977 (.317) and 1980 (.318 as an All-Star) and among top nine in stolen bases five times in a nine-year span from 1973 to 1981. Participated in World Series in 1979 and 1983. . . . The 5-8, 175-pounder played four seasons of college basketball from 1964-65 through 1967-68. Averaged 16.7 ppg (team runner-up) and 2 rpg as a freshman, 8.7 ppg and 2.7 rpg as a sophomore and 12.4 ppg and 4.6 rpg as a junior. Captain of the team as a senior before earning a Bronze Star as platoon leader in the Vietnam War.

LEO BURKE, Virginia Tech
Utilityman hit .239 with the Baltimore Orioles, Los Angeles Angels, St. Louis Cardinals and Chicago Cubs in seven years from 1958 through 1965. Traded by the Cardinals to the Cubs in mid-1963 for knuckleballer Barney Schultz, a key reliever for the Cards in their 1964 pennant-winning season. . . According to his alma mater Hall of Fame multi-sport profile, he was a basketball player for the Hokies in the mid-1950s.

RAY BURRIS, Southwestern Oklahoma State
Righthander compiled a 108-134 record and 4.17 ERA with the Chicago Cubs, New York Yankees, New York Mets, Montreal Expos, Oakland A's, Milwaukee Brewers and St. Louis Cardinals in 15 years from 1973 through 1987. Started three postseason games for the Expos in 1981 after averaging 227 innings pitched his last four full seasons with the Cubs from 1975 through 1978. Finished ninth in the A.L. in ERA (3.15) in 1984 in his lone year with the A's before being traded to the Brewers for pitcher Don Sutton. . . . The 6-5 Burris, a two-sport standout in college, is in SWOS's Hall of Fame.

L.C. "PETE" BUTLER, Northern Colorado
Coached his alma mater to 25 consecutive Rocky Mountain Conference titles and participation in nine NCAA playoffs. . . . Three-sport UNC athlete, including basketball. Also served as head basketball coach from 1940-41 through 1955-56, compiling a 151-133 record with seven conference titles (best season was 13-4 in 1948-49).

JOE BUZAS, Bucknell
Shortstop hit .262 in 30 games with the New York Yankees in 1945 before a shoulder injury curtailed his career. Went on to operate 82 minor league franchises in his 47 years as an owner. . . . Three-year basketball letterman from 1938-39 through 1940-41.

ROGER CADOR, Southern (La.)
Lefthanded outfielder's Organized Ball career ended at Triple A (Richmond in International League) in 1977 after he was the Atlanta Braves' 10th-round selection in the 1973 amateur draft. He hit .308 at the A level in 1974 and had minor league career highs of 13 homers and 63 RBI the next year at AA (Savannah in Southern League). He went on to coach his alma mater for 27 years, compiling a 796-449-1 record through 2011 and winning the SWAC Coach of the Year award more than a dozen times. In 1987, he became the first coach of a Historically Black College to post a victory in the NCAA Tournament. In 1972 (two years before aluminum bats arrived on the scene), he hit a team-high .393 when the Jaguars led the small-school division with a lofty .334 team mark. Among his college teammates were catcher Danny Goodwin, the only player ever to twice be tabbed as the No. 1 pick overall in the MLB draft, and outfielder Dale Brock, a three-time MLB draftee and cousin of Hall of Famer Lou Brock. . . . The 6-5 Cador averaged 3.1 ppg and 3.5 rpg in eight basketball games in 1970-71 and 7.8 ppg in 20 games in 1971-72.

FRANK CALLAWAY, Tennessee
Infielder hit .255 in 43 games with the Philadelphia Athletics in 1921 and 1922. . . . The 6-0 Callaway was a basketball letterman for Tennessee in 1918 and 1919 (captain).

OWEN "OWNIE" CARROLL, Holy Cross
Righthander registered a 64-90 record and 4.43 ERA with the Detroit Tigers, New York Yankees, Cincinnati Reds and Brooklyn Dodgers in nine seasons in 1925 and from 1927 through 1934. Paced the 1928 Tigers with a career-high 16 victories but led the N.L. with 19 defeats for the last-place Reds four years later. Traded with Harry Rice by the Tigers in late May 1930 to the Yankees for two members of the legendary 1927 squad featuring Murderers' Row (pitcher Waite Hoyt and shortstop Mark Koenig). . . . The 165-pounder was a basketball letterman for the Crusaders in 1922 when they went 14-3.

FRANK CARSWELL, Rice
Outfielder hit .267 in 16 games with the Detroit Tigers in 1953. . . . The 6-0, 195-pounder was a three-time All-SWC first-team selection in basketball from 1938-39 through 1940-41. He was the Owls' leading scorer as a sophomore with 11.5 ppg. Teammate of All-American Bob Kinney scored a team-high 25 points in two NCAA Tournament contests in 1940.

JAY "CARL" CASHION, Davidson
Righthander compiled a 12-13 record with the Washington Senators in four years from 1911 through 1914. Ranked ninth in A.L. in won-loss percentage in 1912 with a 10-6 mark. Lefthanded swinger also played 12 games as an outfielder. . . . The 6-2 Cashion was a basketball letterman for Davidson in 1912 and 1913.

BOB CERV, Nebraska
Outfielder hit .276 in 12 seasons from 1951 through 1962 with the New York Yankees, Kansas City Athletics, Los Angeles Angels and Houston Colt .45s. Cerv played in the 1955, 1956 and 1960 World Series with the Yankees. He slugged a homer in the '55 Series against the Brooklyn Dodgers and hit .357 in the '60 Series against the Pittsburgh Pirates. In 1958, he batted .305 (sixth in A.L.) with 38 home runs (fourth) and 104 RBI (fourth) for Kansas City and was chosen over Ted Williams as the All-Star left fielder in the year of the Boston legend's final batting title. Finished among the A.L. top 10 in batting average and RBI in back-to-back years (1958 and 1959). . . . The 6-0, 200-pounder averaged 6.2 ppg for the Cornhuskers in four varsity seasons from 1946-47 through 1949-50, ranking fourth on the school's career scoring list when he finished his career. Excerpt from school guide: "One of the finest defensive guards to perform on the Nebraska maples. Combines unusual speed with a sixth sense of timing to steal the ball or tie up the ball handler."

JOHN CHAPMAN, Mount St. Mary's
Shortstop hit .282 in 19 games with the Philadelphia Athletics in 1924. . . . Played basketball multiple seasons for the Mount.

BOB CHLUPSA, Manhattan
Reliever compiled an 0-2 record in 15 games with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1970 and 1971. . . . The 6-7, 215-pounder averaged 14.9 ppg and 8.3 rpg in three varsity seasons from 1964-65 through 1966-67. He averaged a team-high 10.1 rpg for the Jaspers as a junior when they compiled the undisputed best record in the Metropolitan Collegiate Conference. Chlupsa was named to the 10-man All-New York City team as a senior captain when he averaged a team-high 10.8 rpg before becoming a 13th-round choice of the expansion San Diego Rockets in the 1967 NBA draft.

TONY CLARK, Arizona/San Diego State
First baseman averaged 31 homers per year in a four-year span from 1996 through 1999 with the Detroit Tigers. Finished sixth in the A.L. with 117 RBI in 1997. The tallest switch-hitter (6-7) in major league history was the second pick overall in the 1990 amateur draft. Traded to the Boston Red Sox following an All-Star campaign in 2001. Hit .262 with 251 homers and 824 RBI in 15 seasons from 1995 through 2009 with the Tigers, Red Sox, New York Mets, New York Yankees, Arizona Diamondbacks and San Diego Padres. Became first former player named executive director of the Major League Baseball Players Association prior to 2014 season. . . . Played in only five games his freshman season for Arizona in 1990-91 under coach Lute Olson before transferring home to San Diego State. The swingman averaged 11.6 ppg and 4.6 rpg for the Aztecs as a sophomore in 1991-92, leading them in scoring in WAC games.

MARTY CLARY, Northwestern
Pitcher compiled a 5-14 record in 58 games with the Atlanta Braves in 1987, 1989 and 1990. . . . The 6-4 guard was a letterman for the Wildcats in 1982 and 1983. He hit 82.8 percent of his free throws (24 of 29).

DONN CLENDENON, Morehouse (Ga.)
First baseman hit .274 with 159 home runs and 682 RBI with the Pittsburgh Pirates, Montreal Expos, New York Mets and St. Louis Cardinals in 12 years from 1961 through 1972. He posted career highs of 28 HRs and 98 RBI in 1966 with the Pirates. Finished among the N.L. top 10 in triples and RBI in 1965, 1966 and 1968. World Series MVP with the "Miracle Mets" in 1969 when he hit three home runs (Games 2, 4 and 5). . . . The 6-4 Clendenon earned letters in four collegiate sports, including basketball.

GORDON "MICKEY" COCHRANE, Boston University
Hall of Famer hit .320 (highest career mark ever for a catcher) with the Philadelphia Athletics and Detroit Tigers in 13 seasons from 1925 through 1937. Swatted three homers in a single game as a rookie. Lefthanded swinger was A.L. MVP in 1928 and 1934. Led the A.L. in on-base percentage in 1933 (.459) and ranked among the league top nine in batting average five times (1927-30-31-33-35). Two-time All-Star participated in five World Series (1929-30-31-34-35). . . . Five-sport athlete with BU, including basketball (class of '24).

ANDY COHEN, Alabama
Second baseman hit .281 in three seasons with the New York Giants in the late 1920s. Legendary John McGraw sought a Jewish star to succeed Rogers Hornsby. Brother of Washington Senators pitcher Syd Cohen managed in the minors and coached for the Philadelphia Phillies. . . . Forward was a two-year basketball letterman with the Crimson Tide in 1924 and 1925.

SYD COHEN, Alabama
Lefthander compiled a 3-7 record in three seasons with the Washington Senators in the mid-1930s. Brother of New York Giants second baseman Andy Cohen was the last A.L. pitcher to strike out Babe Ruth. . . . Forward earned a basketball letterman with the Crimson Tide in 1927.

VINCE COLBERT, East Carolina
Righthanded pitcher compiled a 9-14 record and 4.57 ERA with the Cleveland Indians in three years from 1970 through 1972. He was their only winning pitcher (7-6) with 10 or more starts in 1971. . . . ECU's first African-American basketball player averaged 14.3 ppg and 7.3 rpg in 1966-67 and 1967-68. The 6-4 J.C. transfer led ECU in rebounding as a junior (7.1 rpg) after becoming one of the all-time top 10 scorers and rebounders for the College of Eastern Utah.

RAY COLLINS, Vermont
Lefthander registered an 84-62 record and 2.51 ERA in seven years with the Boston Red Sox from 1909 through 1915. Posted a 1.88 ERA in 14 1/3 innings against the New York Giants in the 1912 World Series before winning a total of 39 games in 1913 and 1914. He completed nearly 60 percent of his 151 starts, including hurling complete-game victories in both ends of a doubleheader against the Detroit Tigers on September 22, 1914 (5-3 and 5-0). . . . The 6-1, 185-pounder was a two-year letterman in basketball (1907 and 1908). Vermont, due to travel and weather, did not play its schedule in his senior season. Coached baseball for his alma mater.

EARLE COMBS, Eastern Kentucky
Hall of Fame outfielder hit .325 with the New York Yankees in 12 seasons from 1924 through 1935. Lefthanded swinger led the A.L. in hits with 231 in 1927 when he also paced the the league in singles and triples. Also led the A.L. in triples in 1928 and 1930. Assembled a 29-game hitting streak in 1931. Leadoff hitter and "table-setter" for the Yankees' potent "Murderer's Row" offense ranked among the A.L. top six in runs eight straight years when he became the first player in modern major league history to score at least 100 runs in his first eight full seasons. Posted a .350 batting average in four World Series (1926-27-28-32) before a pair of serious collisons shortened his productive career. Served as coach with the Yankees (1936-44), St. Louis Browns (1947), Boston Red Sox (1948-54) and Philadelphia Phillies (1955). . . . Captain of his alma mater's basketball squad for three years when the school was known as Eastern State Normal.

GENE CONLEY, Washington State
Compiled a 91-96 pitching record in 11 seasons (1952 and 1954 through 1963) with the Boston/Milwaukee Braves, Philadelphia Phillies and Boston Red Sox. Three-time All-Star Game performer finished second in the N.L. rookie of the year voting in 1954 when he had a 14-9 record and 2.97 ERA for the Braves. He was the winning pitcher in the 1955 All-Star Game (struck out the side in the top of 12th inning before Stan Musial homered in bottom half of the frame). Conley was a member of the 1957 World Series-winning Braves. Finished among the N.L. top six in ERA in 1954, 1956 and 1959. . . . Conley, a center who was an All-Pacific Coast Conference first-team selection in his only season of varsity basketball, led the Cougars and PCC North Division in scoring in 1949-50 as a sophomore (13.3 ppg) under coach Jack Friel before signing a professional baseball contract. He played six seasons in the NBA with the Boston Celtics and New York Knicks, averaging 5.9 ppg and 6.3 rpg. Member of Celtics championship teams in 1959, 1960 and 1961. Excerpt in school guide: "Unusually fast and active for a boy his size (6-7, 215 pounds)."

GENE CONNELL, Penn
Catcher hit .250 in six games with the Philadelphia Phillies in 1931. . . . Three-year basketball letterman was captain of the team his final season in 1927-28.

BILL CONNORS, Syracuse
Righthanded reliever compiled an 0-2 record in 26 games with the Chicago Cubs and New York Mets in three years from 1966 through 1968. . . . The 6-1 Connors averaged 6 ppg and 2.3 rpg for the Orange in 1960-61.

HERB CONYERS, Central Missouri State
First baseman had one homer among his three hits in nine at-bats with the Cleveland Indians in 1950. Texas League MVP in 1949 led four different minor leagues in batting average. . . . The 6-5, 210-pounder was the second-leading scorer for the Mules' MIAA championship team as a senior in 1941-42 when he earned first-team all-conference recognition.

DANNY COOMBS, Seton Hall
Lefthanded pitcher compiled a 19-27 record in nine years from 1963 through 1971 with the Houston Colt 45s/Astros and San Diego Padres. His only year in a regular starting rotation was 1970 when he went 10-14 with the Padres. . . . The 6-4, 200-pounder was Seton Hall's third-leading scorer (10.4 ppg) and rebounder (5.5 rpg) as a sophomore in 1961-62 in his only varsity basketball season with the Pirates before signing a pro baseball contract. One of his teammates was Nick Werkman, who finished among the nation's top three scorers three straight seasons.

DAN COSTELLO, Mount St. Mary's
Lefthanded hitting outfielder posted a .243 average with the New York Yankees and Pittsburgh Pirates in four years from 1913 through 1916. . . . Played basketball four seasons from 1910-11 through 1913-14.

BILLY COWAN, Utah
Outfielder hit .236 with the Chicago Cubs, New York Mets, Milwaukee Braves, Philadelphia Phillies, New York Yankees and California Angels in eight seasons (1963 through 1965, 1967 and 1969 through 1972). Pacific Coast League MVP in 1963 with the Salt Lake City Bees. His only year as a regular was 1964 when he posted career highs of 16 doubles, 19 homers and 50 RBI as the Cubs center fielder ranked among the N.L. top nine in stolen bases with 12. Traded by the Cubs to the Mets for George Altman on January 15, 1965. . . . The 6-0 Cowan was a basketball letterman from 1957-58 through 1959-60 under coach Jack Gardner. Co-captain of the Utes as a senior when the teammate of All-American Billy McGill scored 25 points in three NCAA playoff games.

ROGER CRAIG, North Carolina State
Former N.L. pitcher and manager. Compiled a 74-98 pitching record and 3.83 ERA in 12 seasons from 1955 through 1966 with the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers, New York Mets, St. Louis Cardinals, Cincinnati Reds and Philadelphia Phillies. Led N.L. in losses with the Mets in 1962 (10-24) and 1963 (5-22) after pacing the league in shutouts with the Dodgers with four in 1959. Pitched in seven World Series games with the Dodgers and Cardinals (2-2 record). Managed 10 seasons with the San Diego Padres and San Francisco Giants, winning the 1989 N.L. title with the Giants (738-737 career record). Sports Illustrated called him "maestro of the split-fingered fastball." . . . The 6-4, 180-pound forward scored 33 points as a member of the 1949-50 N.C. State freshman basketball team before signing a pro baseball contract.

WALKER CRESS, Louisiana State
Righthander lost his only decision while pitching 62 innings for the Cincinnati Reds in 1948 and 1949. . . . The 6-5 Cress was a basketball letterman for LSU from 1936-37 through 1938-39.

WILMER "BILL" CROUCH, Eastern Michigan
Righthander compiled an 8-5 record and 3.47 ERA with the Brooklyn Dodgers, Philadelphia Phillies and St. Louis Cardinals in three years (1939, 1941 and 1945). His major league debut was a complete game victory over the Philadelphia Phillies on September 8, 1939. Ranked ninth in N.L. in games pitched with 38 in 1941. Son of Skip Crouch, a pitcher for the St. Louis Browns in 1910, coached his alma mater to a 143-126 record over 16 years from 1949 through 1964. . . . Captain of EMU's basketball squad in 1927-28. Coached EMU to a 50-66 record in six seasons from 1947-48 through 1952-53.

GEORGE CROWE, Indiana Central
First baseman hit .270 in nine years (1952, 1953 and 1955 through 1961) with the Boston/Milwaukee Braves, Cincinnati Reds and St. Louis Cardinals. His best season was with the Reds in 1957 when he collected 31 homers (sixth in league) and 92 RBI (eighth). One year after being named an All-Star, he led the N.L. in pinch-hits with 17 in his first season with the Cardinals in 1959 when Stan Musial was their first baseman. In 1960, Crowe slugged a MLB-record 11th pinch-hit homer. . . . The 6-2, 210-pounder was a four-year basketball letterman from 1939-40 through 1942-43 for a college now known as the University of Indianapolis after becoming the first Indiana high school player to be named the state's Mr. Basketball.

TIM CULLEN, Santa Clara
Infielder, primarily a second baseman, hit .220 with the Washington Senators, Chicago White Sox and Oakland A's in seven seasons from 1966 through 1972. Led A.L. second basemen in fielding percentage in 1970 one year after committing three errors in one inning on August 30, 1969. Traded by the White Sox to the Senators for Ron Hansen on August 2, 1968. Played in ALCS in his final major league campaign. . . . Starting 6-1 guard for the Broncos in 1962-63 when he averaged 10 ppg and 3.4 rpg in Dick Garibaldi's first season as coach. One of Cullen's basketball teammates was Bob Garibaldi, who pitched briefly for the San Francisco Giants.

DICK CULLER, High Point (N.C.)
Infielder hit .244 with the Philadelphia Athletics, Chicago White Sox, Boston Braves, Chicago Cubs and New York Giants in eight seasons in 1936 and from 1943 through 1949. He was the regular shortstop for the Braves in 1945 and 1946. . . . College basketball #9 jersey for two-time Little All-American (1935 and 1936) was retired. School yearbooks of the period describe him as "the best all-round boy in the senior class, a little flash who set the fastest pace the (conference) had seen and ran through the opposition with the graceful rapidity of a sly fox." Soccer coach for his alma mater from 1934 to 1936.

BERNARD "BUD" CULLOTON, Fordham
Righthander lost his only verdict while compiling a 3.28 ERA in 13 games with the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1925 and 1926. . . . Three-year basketball letterman for the Rams from 1919 through 1921.

GUY CURTRIGHT, Northeast Missouri State
Outfielder hit .276 with Chicago White Sox from 1943 through 1946. Set major league rookie record (subsequently broken) with a 26-game hitting streak in his only season as a regular. . . . Two-time all-conference selection as a 5-11, 200-pound forward in the Missouri Intercollegiate Athletic Association. Captain of 1932-33 squad led the Bulldogs' basketball team in scoring each of his four seasons.

ANGELO DAGRES, Rhode Island
Lefthanded outfielder went 4 for 15 in eight games with the Baltimore Orioles in 1955. . . . The 5-11 Dagres averaged 6 ppg in 1954-55.

ALVIN DARK, Louisiana State/Louisiana-Lafayette
Three-time All-Star infielder hit .289 in 14 years (1946 and 1948 through 1960) with the Boston/Milwaukee Braves, New York Giants, St. Louis Cardinals, Chicago Cubs and Philadelphia Phillies. He hit a career-high .322 with the Braves in 1948 when he won the Rookie of the Year award. Dark led the N.L. in doubles with the Giants with 41 in 1951 and paced the league's shortstops three times each in putouts and double plays. Ranked among the N.L. top 10 in hits seven times in a 10-year stretch from 1948 through 1957. He hit .323 in three World Series ('48 with Braves; '51 and '54 with Giants). Dark compiled a 994-954 record in 13 years (1961-64, 1966-71, 1974, 1975, 1977) as manager of the Giants, Kansas City/Oakland A's, Cleveland Indians and San Diego Padres. He won the 1962 N.L. pennant with the Giants and 1974 World Series with Oakland. . . . As a sophomore in 1942, Dark was a 5-11, 160-pound tailback who led LSU in rushing (433 yards in 60 carries) and passing (completed 40 of 106 passes for 556 yards and five touchdowns). Third-round NFL draft choice by the Philadelphia Eagles in 1945 (25th pick overall). Member of LSU's 1942-43 basketball squad before entering military service (Marine Corps V-12 program) during World War II. Dark, known as the "Swamp Fox," was a five-sport letterman at Southwestern Louisiana Institute (now Louisiana-Lafayette) during 1943-44 when he led the Bulldogs to an Oil Bowl victory over Arkansas A&M in Houston with a TD run, TD pass, field goal and three PATs.

ARTHUR "BILL" DAVIS, Minnesota
First baseman hit .181 with the Cleveland Indians and San Diego Padres in three seasons (1965, 1966 and 1969). Traded by the Indians to the Padres for a player to be designated later (Zoilo Versalles) on October 21, 1968. . . . Averaged 6.4 ppg and 5 rpg for the Gophers from 1961-62 through 1963-64 under coach John Kundla. The 6-7 forward contributed 12.5 ppg as a senior for a team including eventual NBA standouts Archie Clark and Lou Hudson.

**PAUL "BUDDY" DEAR, Virginia Tech
Second baseman played in two games, scoring one run, for the Washington Senators in 1927. . . . His lone shot in the majors came the same year the 5-8 Dear came out of college, where he played basketball.

JOHN DeMERIT, Wisconsin
Outfielder hit .174 in 93 games with the Milwaukee Braves and New York Mets in five N.L. seasons from 1957 to 1962 (excluding 1960). As a rookie, he played in one World Series game for the Braves against the New York Yankees. . . . The 6-1 forward was a basketball letterman for the Badgers in 1956-57 when he averaged 2.2 ppg and 2.1 rpg under Bud Foster, the school's all-time winningest coach until Bo Ryan supplanted him in 2011-12.

CORNELIUS "CON" DEMPSEY, San Francisco
Righthander started two of three games he appeared in with the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1951. Sidearmer led the Pacific Coast League in strikeouts with the San Francisco Seals in 1948 and 1949. First baseball player inducted into the USF Athletic Hall of Fame. . . . The 6-4 Dempsey also played basketball for the Dons during the Golden Age of athletics on the Hilltop before having his career interrupted by WWII (served in U.S. Navy).

TONY DePHILLIPS, Fordham
Catcher hit .100 in 35 games with the Cincinnati Reds in 1943. . . . The 6-2 DePhillips was a three-year basketball letterman from 1933-34 through 1935-36.

CLAUD DERRICK, Georgia
Infielder, primarily a shortstop, was the first University of Georgia athlete to play major league baseball. He hit .242 with the Philadelphia Athletics, New York Yankees, Cincinnati Reds and Chicago Cubs in five seasons from 1910 through 1914. . . . Captain of the Bulldogs' basketball squad in 1907-08.

GENE DESAUTELS, Holy Cross
Backup catcher hit .233 with the Detroit Tigers, Boston Red Sox, Cleveland Indians and Philadelphia Athletics in 13 seasons from 1930 through 1933, 1937 through 1943, 1945 and 1946. His best season was 1938 when he hit .291 with 48 RBI for the Red Sox. . . . The 5-11, 170-pounder was a basketball letterman for the Crusaders in 1929 and 1930.

**PAUL "SHORTY" DES JARDIEN, University of Chicago
Yielded two runs in one inning as a pitcher for the Cleveland Indians in 1916. . . . Two-time All-Western Conference selection (predecessor to Big Ten) in 1914 and 1915.

VAUGHAN "BING" DEVINE, Washington (Mo.)
Professional sports administration career spanned 50 years, including about 35 of them with the St. Louis Cardinals' baseball organization in a number of capacities--director of public relations, minor league manager, vice president and general manager. Major league executive career also included stints as president of the New York Mets, special assignment scout for the San Francisco Giants, and vice president for player development with the Montreal Expos. . . . Letterman in basketball and baseball for St. Louis-based Washington University, where he graduated in 1938.

BOBBY DEWS, Georgia Tech
Atlanta Braves coach joined the organization in 1975 after nearly 15 years as a player and manager in the St. Louis Cardinals' farm system. Southern League Manager of the Year in 1978. . . . Averaged 8.8 ppg as a starting junior guard for the Yellow Jackets' 22-6 team in 1959-60 under coach Whack Hyder. Teammate of All-American Roger Kaiser scored nine points in a Mideast Regional final loss against eventual NCAA champion Ohio State.

RON DIORIO, New Haven (Conn.)
Righthanded reliever posted a 3.10 ERA in 25 games with the Philadelphia Phillies in 1973 and 1974. . . . Diorio, a 6-6 forward-center, was team runner-up in scoring (15.7 ppg) and rebounding (10.8 rpg) as a senior in 1968-69 after averaging a modest 3.8 ppg and 3.5 rpg in half a season the previous year and 4.2 ppg in 1966-67.

JACK DITTMER, Iowa
Second baseman hit .232 with the Boston/Milwaukee Braves and Detroit Tigers in six years from 1952 through 1957. He was a regular in 1953. . . . The 6-1 forward, who attended college on a football scholarship as an end, scored 15 points in eight basketball games in 1949-50.

LARRY DOBY, Virginia Union
Outfielder hit .283 with 253 home runs and 969 RBI in a 13-year career from 1947 through 1959 with the Cleveland Indians and Chicago White Sox. The first black player in the American League twice led the A.L. in homers (32 in 1952 and 1954). He was the first African-American to lead a league in homers (1952 and 1954) and the first to participate in the World Series (1948). Hit 20 or more round-trippers eight consecutive seasons from 1949 through 1956 while finishing among the A.L. top nine in slugging percentage each year. The seven-time All-Star drove in 100 or more runs five times, leading the A.L. with 126 in 1954 when the Indians won 111 games before being swept by the New York Giants in the World Series. Appeared in 1948 and 1954 World Series with the Indians, winning Game 4 in '48 with a homer off Braves star Johnny Sain. Doby managed the White Sox for most of 1978 (37-50 record). . . . The 6-1, 180-pounder attended LIU on a basketball scholarship but transferred to Virginia Union prior to the start of the season after Uncle Sam summoned him for World War II service. Doby was told Virginia Union had a ROTC program and he could complete his freshman season before being drafted. He became eligible the second semester of the 1942-43 season and was a reserve guard on a team that won the CIAA title.

TAYLOR DOUTHIT, California
Center fielder hit .291 in 11 N.L. seasons from 1923 through 1933 with the St. Louis Cardinals, Cincinnati Reds and Chicago Cubs. His best season was in 1929 when he hit .336 when the Cards. Ranked among the N.L. top eight in runs in 1926, 1928 and 1929. Near or over .300 in each of St. Louis' pennant-winning campaigns (1926, 1928 and 1930), but went 7-for-50 in World Series competition. Led N.L. outfielders in putouts three years. The Cardinals, in a move to make room for Pepper Martin, traded Douthit to the Reds for fellow college basketball player Wally Roettger (Illinois) on June 15, 1931, one day after posting seven straight hits in a doubleheader sweep over the Philadelphia Phillies. . . . Basketball letterman with the Bears from 1922 through 1924.

JAMES "SKIP" DOWD, Holy Cross
Pitched in one game for the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1910. . . . Basketball letterman for the Crusaders in 1908.

AL DOWNING, Muhlenberg (Pa.)
Lefthanded pitcher compiled a 123-107 record in 17 seasons from 1961 through 1977 with the New York Yankees, Oakland A's, Milwaukee Brewers and Los Angeles Dodgers. Although he never lived up to billing as "the black Sandy Koufax," he was the first black starting pitcher in Yankees history and led the A.L. in strikeouts with 217 in 1964. A.L. All-Star with the Yanks in 1967 when he had four shutouts and finished eighth in ERA (2.63). Downing paced the N.L. in shutouts with five in his first season with the Dodgers in 1971 when he posted a 20-9 record. Lost all three World Series decisions (two with the Yankees and one with Dodgers), yielding a pivotal grand slam to St. Louis' Ken Boyer midway through Game 4 in 1964. . . . Attended Muhlenberg on a basketball scholarship, but left before he ever played to turn to Organized Ball and his ultimate date with history yielding Hank Aaron's record-setting 715th home run.

HOWARD "DANNY" DOYLE, Oklahoma State
Switch-hitting catcher hit .209 in 13 games with the Boston Red Sox in 1943. . . . The 6-1 Doyle averaged 6.8 ppg for the Cowboys in the late 1930s and 1944 under legendary coach Hank Iba.

JIM DOYLE, Niagara
Third baseman hit .278 with the Cincinnati Reds and Chicago Cubs in 1910 and 1911. He died on February 1, 1912, in Syracuse, N.Y. . . . The 5-10 Doyle was a basketball letterman for Niagara in 1906 and 1907.

CAMERON DREW, New Haven (Conn.)
Lefthanded swinging outfielder went 3 for 16 in seven games with the Houston Astros in 1988 after being their first-round selection (12th pick overall) in the 1985 amateur draft. South Atlantic League MVP in 1986 was forced to retire by the end of the decade because of his basketball-damaged knees. . . . The 6-5 Drew averaged 15.4 ppg and team-high 8.9 rpg as a sophomore in 1983-84 before becoming a NECC first-team selection in 1984-85 when he led New Haven in scoring (16.7 ppg) and rebounding (12.6 rpg).

JOHN "PADDY" DRISCOLL, Northwestern
Infielder hit .107 in 13 games with the Chicago Cubs in 1917. . . . Basketball letterman for the Wildcats in 1915-16.

WALT DROPO, Connecticut
First baseman hit .270 with 152 home runs and 704 RBI in 13 seasons from 1949 through 1961 with the Boston Red Sox, Detroit Tigers, Chicago White Sox, Cincinnati Reds and Baltimore Orioles. Named A.L. Rookie of the Year in 1950 when All-Star team member hit .322 (eighth in league) with 34 homers (runner-up) and a league-leading 144 RBI for the Red Sox. Also ranked sxith in RBI in 1952 and ninth in 1953. Tied major league record with 12 consecutive hits in 1952, including a 7-for-7 effort in a twin bill against the Washington Senators. . . . The 6-5, 220-pounder averaged 21.7 ppg in 1942-43, 21 ppg in 1945-46 and 19.7 ppg in 1946-47 in a Huskies' career interrupted by World War II. The first player in UConn history to average 20 points for a season has the second-highest scoring average in school annals (20.7). He didn't play pro basketball despite being the Providence Steamrollers' top draft choice in 1947. Dropo was also selected by the Chicago Bears in the ninth round of 1946 NFL draft.

LOUIS DRUCKE, Texas Christian
Righthander compiled an 18-15 record with the New York Giants in four years from 1909 through 1912. In 1910, he ranked fourth in the N.L. in strikeouts (151) and seventh in ERA (2.47). . . . The 6-1 Drucke was a basketball letterman for TCU in 1909.

JEAN DUBUC, Saint Michael's (Vt.)/Notre Dame
Righthander compiled an 85-76 record and 3.04 ERA with the Cincinnati Reds, Detroit Tigers, Boston Red Sox and New York Giants in nine years from 1908 to 1919 (excluding 1910-11-17) before he was banned for life in connection with the Black Sox scandal. Ranked among the A.L. top nine in complete games three times in a four-year span (1912-13-15), posting 17 victories in two of those seasons with Detroit. Led the N.L. in games finished with 22 and relief victories with six in his final big league campaign. Frequent pitch hitter struck out as a batter in one plate appearance with Boston against the Chicago Cubs in the 1918 World Series. . . . Forward played college basketball for Saint Michael's in 1905-06 and 1906-07 before competing for the Irish in 1907-08.

GRANT DUNLAP, Pacific
Outfielder hit .353 (6 of 17 with one homer and one triple) in brief stint with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1953. Baseball coach for Occidental (Calif.) for 30 years from 1955 to 1984. . . . The 6-2 Dunlap, a basketball letterman for Pacific in 1942-43 and 1946-47, also attended Occidental during World War II. Coached Occidental's basketball squad to a 185-153 record (.546) in 15 seasons from 1954-55 through 1968-69.

DON EADDY, Michigan
Infielder played briefly with the Chicago Cubs in 1959. . . . The 5-11, 165-pounder averaged 11.4 ppg in four seasons from 1951-52 through 1954-55. One of the first two African-Americans to play basketball for the Wolverines. He led the team in scoring in Big Ten Conference competition as a sophomore (13.8 ppg) the same year he was a member of the school's NCAA baseball championship squad. Eaddy was a basketball teammate of eventual NFL Pro Bowl offensive end Ron Kramer.

GEORGE EARNSHAW, Swarthmore (Pa.)
Righthander compiled a 127-93 record with the Philadelphia Athletics, Chicago White Sox, Brooklyn Dodgers and St. Louis Cardinals in nine years from 1928 through 1936. He posted a league-high 24 victories in 1929. Combined with Lefty Grove under manager Connie Mack to comprise the major's premier pitching tandem from that year through 1931 (79 victories for Grove, 67 for Earnshaw). A.L. runner-up in strikeouts three consecutive years from 1929 through 1931. Registered a 4-3 mark and 1.58 ERA for the Athletics in three World Series, including two wins against the Cardinals in 1930 when he had 22 consecutive scoreless innings. . . . The 6-4, 210-pounder competed for Swarthmore's basketball squad during the 1922 campaign. He was the captain-elect for 1923 but did not play. Awarded a Bronze Star as a World War II naval gunnery officer before serving as a Phillies coach in 1949 and 1950.

JOHN EASTON, Princeton
Struck out each of his three at-bats with the Philadelphia Phillies in 1959 after serving as a pinch-runner for them in one game in 1955. . . . The 6-2 Easton averaged 5.9 ppg with the Tigers from 1952-53 through 1954-55 under coach Cappy Cappon, including a career-high 8 ppg as a junior. Scored six points against eventual national runner-up La Salle in 1955 East Regional and four points against Villanova in regional third-place game.

ED EDELEN, Mount St. Mary's
Righthander pitched two games for Washington in 1932. . . . The 6-0 Edelen played basketball for Mount St. Mary's from 1929-30 through 1931-32.

PAUL EDMONDSON, Northridge (Calif.) State
Righthander compiled a 1-6 record and 3.70 ERA in 14 games with the Chicago White Sox in 1969. Lone major league victory came in his debut when he hurled a two-hitter against the California Angels on June 20, 1969. . . . The 6-5 Edmondson averaged 12.4 ppg and 6.6 rpg from 1962-63 through 1964-65.

HANK EISENHART, Juniata (Pa.)
Lefthander pitched in one game for the Cincinnati Reds in 1944. . . . Earlier that year, the senior captain in basketball set a school single-season record for scoring.

CHARLES "SLIM" EMBREY, Vanderbilt
Righthander pitched in one game for the Chicago White Sox on October 1, 1923. . . . The 6-2 Embrey was a basketball letterman for Vandy in 1921-22 and 1922-23.

JOE ENGEL, Mount St. Mary's
Lefthander compiled a 17-23 record and 3.34 ERA with the Washington Senators, Cincinnati Reds and Cleveland Indians in seven seasons from 1912 to 1920 (excluding 1916 and 1918). Went on to become a colorful promoter as a minor league team owner. . . . Played basketball for Mount St. Mary's in 1910-11 and 1911-12.

RALPH ERICKSON, Idaho State
Lefthander won his lone decision in eight games with the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1929 and 1930. . . . The 6-1 Erickson also played basketball and football for Idaho State in the mid-1920s.

SAMMY ESPOSITO, Indiana
Utility infielder hit .207 in 560 games during 10-year career (1952 and 1955 through 1963) with the Chicago White Sox and Kansas City Athletics. Saw action in two World Series games in 1959 with the White Sox. On September 7, 1960, he started in place of second baseman Nellie Fox, ending Fox's consecutive-game streak at 798. Esposito was baseball coach at North Carolina State from 1967 through 1987, leading the Wolfpack to a third-place finish in the 1968 College World Series. . . . He played one season (1951-52) of varsity basketball for the Hoosiers before signing a pro baseball contract, averaging 7 ppg as a starting guard under coach Branch McCracken. Assistant basketball coach at N.C. State for 14 years, including the 1974 NCAA champion. Sketch in school guide: "Only 5-9, he is fast, a peerless playmaker and one of the best defensive men on the squad."

DARRELL EVANS, Pasadena City College
Infielder-outfielder hit .248 with 414 homers and 1,254 RBI in 21 seasons from 1969 through 1989 with the Atlanta Braves, San Francisco Giants and Detroit Tigers. Earned a spot on the N.L. All-Star Team in 1973, when he was one of three Braves players to swat at least 40 homers. Paced the N.L. in bases on balls in 1973 and 1974. Led the A.L. with 40 homers for the Tigers in 1985, becoming the oldest major league player (38) to win a home run title. Evans appeared in the 1984 World Series with the Giants and being an All-Star with them the previous year. . . . As a sophomore for Pasadena (Calif.) City College in 1966-67, the 6-2 Evans was a member of a Jerry Tarkanian-coached club that won the state junior college crown.

WALTER "HOOT" EVERS, Illinois
Two-time All-Star outfielder hit .278 with the Detroit Tigers, Boston Red Sox, New York Giants, Baltimore Orioles and Cleveland Indians in 12 seasons in 1941 and from 1946 through 1956. Evers was also a long-time executive with the Tigers. His best season was with them in 1950 when he led the A.L. in triples (11) and ranked third in slugging percentage (.551), fourth in doubles (35), sixth in extra-base hits (67), seventh in batting average (.323), ninth in on-base percentage (.408), ninth in RBI (103) and ninth in total bases (290). Red Sox left fielder while Ted Williams served in the U.S. military hit for the cycle on September 7, 1950, with the Tigers. . . . The 6-2 Evers was a basketball starter for the Illini in 1939-40 under coach Doug Mills.

JIM FANNING, Buena Vista (Iowa)
Catcher hit .170 in 64 games with the Chicago Cubs in four years from 1954 through 1957. Long-time MLB executive managed the Montreal Expos to a 116-103 record in three years the first half of the 1980s. His biggest trades as general manager with the Expos involved Rusty Staub (acquired from Houston Astros and shipped to New York Mets). . . . Collected 25 points for Buena Vista in 1947-48 and 1948-49.

KERBY FARRELL, Freed-Hardeman (Tenn.)
First baseman hit .262 for the Boston Braves and Chicago White Sox in two seasons in 1943 and 1945. Lefthander pitched in five games for the Braves as a rookie. Three-time Minor League Manager of the Year (1954, 1956 and 1961) managed the Cleveland Indians to a 76-77 record in 1957. . . . Key player for a couple of strong FHC basketball squads in the mid-1930s.

DARCY FAST, Warner Pacific (Ore.)
Lefthander lost his only decision with the Chicago Cubs in 1968. Tagged with the label "The Missing Cub" because of his stint in the Army National Guard in 1969 when the team squandered a 9 1/2-game lead in mid-August to the Miracle Mets. . . . All-conference basketball player in 1965-66 and 1966-67.

BILL "DUTCH" FEHRING, Purdue
Switch-hitting catcher played in one game with the Chicago White Sox in 1934. . . . Teammate of All-Americans Norm Cottom, Ed Shaver and John Wooden averaged 4.7 ppg as a 6-0 center for Boilermaker basketball teams from 1931-32 through 1933-34.

JOE FERGUSON, Pacific
Catcher-outfielder hit .240 with 122 homers and 445 RBI with the Los Angeles Dodgers, St. Louis Cardinals, Houston Astros and California Angels in 14 seasons from 1970 through 1983. Paced the N.L. in sacrifice flies in 1973 with 10 and catchers in fielding average. Ranked among the league's top eight in bases on balls in 1973 and 1977. Appearing in two World Series with the Dodgers (1974 and 1978), he hit a two-run homer off Vida blue to account for the winning margin in the Dodgers' lone victory over the Oakland A's in Game 2 of the 1974 WS. . . . Teammate of All-American Keith Swagerty averaged 3.7 ppg and 2.3 rpg in 1965-66 and 1966-67 under coach Dick Edwards. The 6-1 Ferguson scored two points against eventual NCAA champion UCLA in the 1967 West Regional final.

RICK FERRELL, Guilford (N.C.)
Hall of Fame catcher hit over .300 five times en route to a .281 career batting average with the St. Louis Browns, Boston Red Sox and Washington Senators in 18 years from 1929 through 1947. Eight-time All-Star set an A.L. record with 1,805 games behind the plate. Traded with his brother (pitcher Wes Ferrell) from Boston to Washington during the 1937 campaign. . . . The 5-10, 160-pounder was a basketball forward before graduating in 1928.

DAVID "BOO" FERRISS, Mississippi State
Two-time All-Star righthander compiled a 65-30 record with the Boston Red Sox in six years from 1945 to 1950. Hurling 22 scoreless innings and winning his first eight starts commencing his career before capturing 13 consecutive contests at Fenway Park the next year, he became the most dominant A.L. pitcher in the mid-1940s until sustaining a freak shoulder injury at Cleveland in mid-July 1947. Led the A.L. in won-loss percentage in 1946 with a 25-6 mark before pitching a shutout in Game 3 of the World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals. Frequently used as a lefthanded pinch-hitter. Ferriss became athletic director and baseball coach for 26 seasons at Delta State. After he retired, Delta State and the Red Sox won a national championship and World Series, respectively, in the same year (2004). . . . The 6-2, 200-pound Ferriss was a basketball letterman for MSU in 1940-41.

DAN FIFE, Michigan
The 6-3, 175-pound pitcher compiled a 3-2 record in 14 games with the Minnesota Twins in 1973 and 1974. . . . The father of Big Ten Conference guards Dugan Fife (Michigan) and Dane Fife (Indiana) averaged 12.6 ppg and 4.9 rpg as the Wolverines' third-leading scorer each year in three varsity seasons from 1968-69 through 1970-71 under coach Johnny Orr. Dane eventually coached IPFW for six seasons before becoming an assistant under Michigan State's Tom Izzo. Excerpt from school guide on the Milwaukee Bucks' 10th-round draft choice in 1971: "One of the most intense players in country. Greatest hustler in the whole Big Ten."

RAY "PICK" FISHER, Middlebury (Vt.)
Righthander compiled a 100-94 record and 2.82 ERA with the New York Yankees and Cincinnati Reds in 10 years from 1910 through 1920. Ranked among the A.L. top 10 in ERA and complete games in back-to-back seasons (1914 and 1915). Started one World Series game for the Reds against the Chicago White Sox in 1919. Won 14 Big Ten Conference championships as baseball coach at Michigan for 38 years until the late 1950s. Became a spring training pitching instructor for the Detroit Tigers after being blacklisted for almost 40 years because of salary disputes with Cincinnati's owners. . . . Played "class" basketball (1910 graduate) before becoming his alma mater's first full-time salaried member of the Physical Education Department.

PAUL FITZKE, Wyoming
Righthander pitched in one game for the Cleveland Indians in 1924. . . . Basketball letterman for the Cowboys in 1920-21.

MIKE FLANAGAN, Massachusetts
Lefthander compiled a 167-143 record with the Baltimore Orioles and Toronto Blue Jays in 18 years from 1975 through 1992. Earned the 1979 A.L. Cy Young Award by leading the majors in wins (23-9) with 190 strikeouts, 3.08 ERA and league-high five shutouts. He hurled over 200 innings seven times in his major league career, including four consecutive seasons from 1977 through 1980. Member of the Orioles' 1983 World Series champion after splitting a pair of decisions in the 1979 World Series against the Pittsburgh Pirates. Flanagan started more games (334) than any other A.L. pitcher from 1977 to 1987, leading the league in 1978 and finishing runner-up each of the next two years. . . . The 6-0, 195-pounder averaged 13.9 ppg for UMass' 15-1 freshman basketball squad in 1971-72, a year after the legendary Dr. J (Julius Erving) left the Minutemen with one season of eligibility remaining to sign with the ABA. Flanagan scored 25 points against Springfield College and 27 against Connecticut. Members of UMass' varsity that season included sophomores Rick Pitino and Al Skinner.

PAUL "PEP" FLORENCE, Georgetown
Switch-hitting catcher posted a .229 batting average in 76 games with the New York Giants in 1926. . . . The 6-1 Florence was a three-year basketball letterman for the Hoyas from 1920-21 through 1922-23.

D'ARCY "JAKE" FLOWERS, Washington College (Md.)
Utility infielder with the St. Louis Cardinals' Gashouse Gang in 1926 when they defeated the New York Yankees in the World Series. He later became a Brooklyn Dodger and enjoyed his best season in 1930 when he hit .320. He played in his second World Series against the Philadelphia Athletics in 1931. His 10-year major-league playing career ended with the Cincinnati Reds and a .256 average. He had a penchant for hitting homers in his first game against his former teammates. Honored by The Sporting News as minor league manager of the year in 1937. . . . The 5-11, 170-pounder was a member of the championship 1923 "Flying Pentagon" basketball squad.

STU FLYTHE, North Carolina State
Righthander led the A.L. in wild pitches in 1936 with 16 despite pitching in only 17 games for the Philadelphia Athletics. . . . The 6-2 Flythe was a basketball letterman with the Wolfpack from 1932-33 through 1934-35.

MARK FREEMAN, Louisiana State
Righthander compiled a 3-3 record with the New York Yankees, Kansas City Athletics and Chicago Cubs in 1959 and 1960. . . . The 6-4 center averaged 3.6 ppg as a senior in 1950-51.

GENE FREESE, West Liberty State (W.Va.)
Infielder, primarily a third baseman, hit .254 with the Pittsburgh Pirates, St. Louis Cardinals, Philadelphia Phillies, Chicago White Sox, Cincinnati Reds and Houston Astros in 12 years from 1955 through 1966. Dueled with rookie brother George Freese for same position with the Pirates in 1955. In 1959 with the Phillies, he hit three grand slams and five pinch-hit homers, including two in a row in April. In 1960 with the White Sox, he finished third in the A.L. in doubles with 32. After supplying career highs of 26 homers and 87 RBI in 1961 with the Reds, he was only 1-for-16 in the World Series against the New York Yankees. Freese claimed to be the origin of the nickname "Charlie Hustle" for Pete Rose when he was a rookie teammate in 1963. . . . Three-sport standout for West Liberty was captain of the school's 1952 NAIA Tournament basketball team.

HOWARD FREIGAU, Ohio Wesleyan
Infielder hit .272 in seven N.L. seasons from 1922 through 1928 with the St. Louis Cardinals, Chicago Cubs, Brooklyn Dodgers and Boston Braves. The 5-10, 160-pounder was the Cubs' regular third baseman in 1925 and 1926 when he hit .288 over those two years. . . . The 5-10 1/2 Freigau played basketball one season for OWU.

WALTER FRENCH, Rutgers/Army
Backup outfielder posted a .303 batting average with the Philadelphia Athletics in six seasons in 1923 and from 1925 through 1929. Hit .312 in three-year stretch from 1925 through 1927. Lefthanded batter participated in the 1929 World Series. . . . The 155-pounder was a basketball letterman for Army's 18-5 team in 1921 after earning two letters in the sport with Rutgers (averaging 4.4 ppg in 1918-19 and 2.5 ppg in 1919-20). Also played professional football with the Pottsville Maroons.

FRANKIE FRISCH, Fordham
Hall of Famer compiled a run of 11 consecutive .300 seasons and set fielding records for chances and assists with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1927. As player-manager with the Cards, he instilled the rollicking all-out style of hardnosed play that prompted a team nickname of "The Gashouse Gang." His season strikeout total topped 20 only twice en route to a .316 average in his 19-year career, which also included a stint with the New York Giants. N.L. MVP in 1931 when he led the league in stolen bases for the third of three times. . . . According to his bio in Total Baseball, "The Fordham Flash" captained the Rams' basketball squad. In 1925, Frisch officiated the first-ever game played in the Rose Hill Gym (the oldest NCAA Division I facility in the nation).

TODD FROHWIRTH, Waukesha County Technical Institute (Wis.)
Righthander posted a 20-19 record and 3.50 ERA with the Philadelphia Phillies, Baltimore Orioles and Boston Red Sox in eight years from 1987 through 1994. . . . The 6-4, 190-pounder played junior college basketball in the early 1980s. Became a high school basketball coach.

DAVE FROST, Stanford
Righthander compiled a 33-37 record with the Chicago White Sox, California Angels and Kansas City Royals in six years from 1977 through 1982. He appeared in the 1979 ALCS with the Angels after ranking eighth in the league with 16 victories. Traded by the White Sox with Brian Downing and Chris Knapp to the Angels for Bobby Bonds, Thad Bosley and Richard Dotson on December 5, 1977. . . . The 6-6 forward averaged 10.5 ppg and 4 rpg for the Cardinal from 1971-72 through 1973-74 under coach Howie Dallmar. Teammate of center Rich Kelley, who played 11 seasons in the NBA, led the squad in free-throw percentage as a sophomore (82.1%).

JOHNSON FRY, Marshall
Played in one game with the Cleveland Indians in 1923. . . . The 6-1 Fry was a basketball letterman with Marshall in 1921-22.

HAROLD "CHICK" GAGNON, Holy Cross
Infielder hit .222 in 14 games with the Detroit Tigers and Washington Senators in 1922 and 1924. . . . Basketball letterman for the Crusaders in 1920-21 and 1921-22.

RICH GALE, New Hampshire
Righthander compiled a 55-56 record with the Kansas City Royals, San Francisco Giants, Cincinnati Reds and Boston Red Sox in seven seasons from 1978 through 1984. Did not allow any earned runs in his seven-inning debut against the Milwaukee Brewers and won his first five decisions. Hurled three shutouts with the Royals as a rookie before appearing in the World Series with them two years later. Served as pitching coach for the Boston Red Sox in the early 1990s. . . . The 6-7 Gale was a three-year basketball letterman for UNH, averaging 6.9 ppg and 6 rpg from 1972-73 through 1975-76 (missed 1974-75). He led the team with 7.2 rpg in 1975-76.

BOB GARBARK, Allegheny (Mass.)
Catcher hit .248 with the Cleveland Indians, Chicago Cubs, Philadelphia Athletics and Boston Red Sox in seven years from 1934 to 1945. Brother of former Yankees catcher Mike Garbark, who played basketball for Villanova's 25-5 club in 1937-38. . . . Four-year letterman in basketball (class of '32).

MIKE GARBARK, Villanova
Catcher hit .244 with the New York Yankees in two years from 1944 and 1945. Brother of former major league catcher Bob Garbark, a four-year basketball letterman with Allegheny (Mass.). . . . Letterman for Villanova's 25-5 basketball squad in 1937-38 under coach Alex Severance.

BOB GARIBALDI, Santa Clara
Righthander compiled an 0-2 record and 3.08 ERA in four brief stints with the San Francisco Giants (1962-63-66-69). . . . Starting 6-4 forward for the Broncos in 1961-62 when he averaged 10.6 ppg and 5.6 rpg under coach Bob Feerick. One of Garibaldi's basketball teammates was Tim Cullen, an infielder for seven A.L. seasons from 1966 through 1972.

TOM GASTALL, Boston University
Catcher hit .181 in 52 games in 1955 and 1956 after he was signed to a $40,000 bonus by the Baltimore Orioles. Gastall died at the age of 24 on September 20, 1956, when he crashed into Chesapeake Bay while secretly flying his previously-damaged light plane. After starting his college football career as an end (caught game-winning pass in a 33-28 upset of William & Mary his sophomore season), he became a star quarterback who was selected in the 10th round of the 1955 NFL draft by the Detroit Lions. Gastall threw four touchdown passes in the first half of a game against Syracuse, intercepted three passes vs. Wichita in 1951 and played in the North-South game in the Orange Bowl in Miami. . . . The 6-2, 185-pounder was a three-year basketball letterman who averaged 8.6 ppg in his final two seasons (1953-54 and 1954-55). He was captain of the team as a senior.

JIM GEDDES, Ohio State
Righthander pitched in 11 games for the Chicago White Sox in 1972 and 1973. . . . The 6-2 Geddes averaged 2.7 ppg for OSU from 1967-68 through 1969-70 under coach Fred Taylor. Geddes, who played briefly against Dean Smith-coached North Carolina in the 1968 national semifinals, was a teammate of All-Big Ten Conference performers Bill Hosket, Dave Sorenson and Jim Cleamons.

JOHNNY GEE, Michigan
One of the tallest players ever to play major league baseball. Lefthander compiled a 7-12 record in 44 games during six seasons (1939, 1941, 1943 through 1946) with the Pittsburgh Pirates and New York Giants. . . . Senior captain of Wolverines team in 1936-37 that compiled a 16-4 record and third-place finish in the Big Ten Conference. The 6-9, 225-pounder was sixth in the Big Ten in scoring that season with an average of 8.8 ppg. In his history of Michigan basketball, Jeff Mortimer wrote: "Gee looked upon a rebound as something that was his property unless it could be taken away by force."

CHARLIE GELBERT, Lebanon Valley (Pa.)
Infielder, primarily a shortstop, hit .267 with the St. Louis Cardinals, Cincinnati Reds, Detroit Tigers, Washington Senators and Boston Red Sox in nine years from 1929 through 1940 (missed 1933 and 1934 after an off-season hunting accident nearly cost him his left leg). Posted a .304 batting average in 1930 when he finished 10th in the N.L. in doubles with 39. Hit .300 in back-to-back World Series with the Cards against the Philadelphia Athletics in 1930 and 1931. Replaced in St. Louis' lineup by Leo Durocher. . . . The 5-11 Gelbert scored at least 125 points each of his last three college basketball seasons in the late 1920s.

BEN GERAGHTY, Villanova
Infielder hit .199 with the Brooklyn Dodgers and Boston Braves in 1936, 1943 and 1944. . . . The 5-11 Geraghty was a basketball letterman for Villanova from 1933-34 through 1935-36.

DICK GERNERT, Temple
First baseman-outfielder hit .254 with 103 home runs in 11 seasons from 1952 through 1962 with the Boston Red Sox, Chicago Cubs, Detroit Tigers, Cincinnati Reds and Houston Astros. The 6-3, 185-pounder had five years with at least 14 homers, including 19 as a Boston rookie and career-high 21 (seventh in A.L.) the next season. He pinch hit four times for the Reds in the 1961 World Series. . . . Gernert earned a letter with Temple's basketball team in 1948-49 when he averaged 2.7 ppg.

JOE GIBBON, Mississippi
Lefthander compiled a 61-65 pitching record and 3.52 ERA in 419 games during 13 N.L. seasons from 1960 through 1972 with the Pittsburgh Pirates, San Francisco Giants, Cincinnati Reds and Houston Astros. Pitched in two games in 1960 World Series for the Pirates before hurling three shutouts for them the next year when he finished sixth in the N.L. in ERA (3.32) and posted a career-high 13 victories. . . . Two-time All-SEC forward finished four-year career as the Rebels' leader in career scoring (1,601 points for 18.9 average) and rebounds (827 for 9.6 average). He was the nation's second-leading scorer as a senior in 1956-57 with an average of 30 ppg, finishing ahead of first-team All-Americans Elgin Baylor (29.7 with Seattle) and Wilt Chamberlain (29.7 with Kansas). Gibbon, the second player in SEC history to average more than 30 ppg in a single season, scored a career-high 46 points in a game against LSU. Named to the first team on Helms Foundation All-American squad and second team on United Press All-American contingent. Selected by the Boston Celtics in ninth round of 1957 NBA draft. School guide described him as "Ole Miss' big weapon, a portsided, long-range bomber who is accurate from the corner, from the front and through crowded defenses for drive-in baskets."

BOB GIBSON, Creighton
Hall of Famer compiled a 251-174 pitching record with 3,117 strikeouts and 2.91 ERA in 17 seasons from 1959 through 1975 with the St. Louis Cardinals. In 1968, he had 13 shutouts en route to a 1.12 ERA, the second-lowest since 1893 in 300 innings. Two years later, the eight-time All-Star posted a career-high 23 victories, which led the N.L. Ranked among the N.L. top six in strikeouts 11 times from 1961 through 1972. He hit 24 home runs and won nine consecutive Gold Gloves (1965 through 1973). Gibson notched a 7-2 mark and 1.89 ERA in nine games in the 1964, 1967 and 1968 World Series (92 strikeouts in 81 innings). Righthander set a World Series record with 17 strikeouts against the Detroit Tigers on October 2, 1968. . . . First Creighton player to average 20 points per game for his career (20.2). Led the school in scoring in 1955-56 (40th in the country with 22 ppg) and 1956-57 and was second-leading scorer in 1954-55 before playing one season (1957-58) with the Harlem Globetrotters. Sketch from school brochure: "Possesses outstanding jump shot and for height (6-1) is a terrific rebounder." In Gibson's autobiography Stranger to the Game, he recalled that: "At Holy Cross, I scored 20 and the Crusaders' big man, Tommy Heinsohn, worked me for 22 points and 20 rebounds as we were pounded, 97-60. As far as I know, Heinsohn was the only NBA player I faced at Creighton, and he made an impression. The first time I tried to take the ball to the hoop against him, he jammed it down my throat."

WALLY GILBERT, Valparaiso
Third baseman hit .269 with the Brooklyn Robins/Dodgers and Cincinnati Reds in five seasons from 1928 through 1932. The 6-0 Gilbert ranked seventh in the N.L. in at bats in 1930 after placing ninth in singles the previous year with 135. Collected six hits in a single game in 1931, a season when he led N.L. third basemen in assists. . . . Former captain played basketball for Valpo from 1918-19 through 1920-21.

DAVE GIUSTI, Syracuse
Righthander compiled a 100-93 record and 3.60 ERA with the Houston Astros, St. Louis Cardinals, Pittsburgh Pirates, Oakland Athletics and Chicago Cubs in 15 years from 1962 through 1977. Won 37 and started 100 games for the Pirates in three campaigns from 1966 through 1968 before palm-ball specialist became a reliever most of the remainder of his career. Blanked the Baltimore Orioles in 5 1/3 innings in three games for the World Series champion Pirates in 1971 after becoming the first N.L. pitcher to appear in each contest of a four-game LCS (securing three saves). Led the N.L. with 30 saves in 1971 in the midst of finishing among the league's top four in that category six straight seasons. Hurled a 1-2-3 seventh inning for the N.L. in the 1973 All-Star Game. . . . Giusti connected on 6 of 10 field-goal attempts in two games for the Orange in 1959-60.

JIM GLEESON, Rockhurst (Mo.)
Switch-hitting outfielder posted a .263 batting average with the Cleveland Indians, Chicago Cubs and Cincinnati Reds in five seasons (1936 and 1939 through 1942). His best year was with the Cubs in 1940 when he ranked third in the N.L. in doubles with 39, sixth in batting average at .313 and seventh in triples with 11. Gleeson was also a member of the following organizations: New York Yankees, St. Louis Cardinals and Boston Red Sox. Coached under Yogi Berra with the Yanks in 1964. . . . The '33 graduate served as captain and achieved all-conference honors in four sports, including basketball. The 6-1 Gleeson was inducted into the NAIA Hall of Fame in 1964.

GENE GLYNN, Mankato (Minn.) State
Primarily a third-base coach for four different National League teams (Colorado Rockies, Montreal Expos, Chicago Cubs and San Francisco Giants). Seven-year minor league infielder in the Expos' organization was named Northwest League Manager of the Year in 1990. . . . Mankato's career assists leader was an all-conference guard during his career when he averaged 7.8 ppg and 3.4 rpg from 1975-76 through 1978-79. Led the team in free-throw shooting as a freshman (77.3%).

EDDIE GRANT, Harvard
Infielder hit .249 with Cleveland, Philadelphia, Cincinnati and the New York Giants in 10 years in 1905 and from 1907 through 1915. Led the N.L. in at-bats in 1908 and 1909 and in singles in 1909 (147) and 1910 (134). He died from German shelling on October 5, 1918, in the Argonne Forest, France, during WWI while in charge of his battalion after his commanding officer was killed. . . . After pacing the freshman squad in scoring in 1902, Grant played varsity basketball as a sophomore before he was declared ineligible for receiving money in an independent summer baseball league.

DAVE GRAY, Weber State
Righthander started one of the nine games he pitched with the Boston Red Sox in 1964. . . . The 6-1 Gray played basketball for Weber State in the early 1960s when the school was a junior college.

DALLAS GREEN, Delaware
Compiled a 20-22 pitching record in eight seasons from 1960 through 1967 with the Philadelphia Phillies, Washington Senators and New York Mets. Managed the Phillies to victory over the Kansas City Royals in the 1980 World Series. Assembled a 395-406 managerial record with the Phillies and Mets. . . . Green played two seasons of varsity basketball for the Blue Hens, averaging 6.5 ppg and 5.3 rpg as a sophomore in 1953-54 and 12.1 ppg as a junior in 1954-55, when the 6-5 center was the school's second-leading scorer and rebounder (10.6 rpg).

PAUL GREGORY, Mississippi State
Righthander compiled a 9-14 record with the Chicago White Sox in two years in 1932 and 1933. Completed eight of 26 major league starts. Won four SEC titles during his 18-year stint as baseball coach at his alma mater. . . . The 6-2, 180-pounder earned a basketball letter in 1929-30. He also coached MSU's basketball team to a 58-100 record over eight seasons from 1947-48 through 1954-55.

CARLOS "TIM" GRIESENBECK, Texas A&M
Catcher went 1 for 3 in five games with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1920. . . . Basketball letterman for A&M in 1917.

CALVIN GRIFFITH, George Washington
Owner of the Washington Senators/Minnesota Twins for 24 seasons before selling the franchise to Minneapolis banker Carl Pohlad for around $35 million in 1984. When Griffith departed the game as one of the last of the single-family owners, his payroll was the lowest in the majors because he was convinced huge salaries were ruining the sport. The Twins lost the 1965 World Series in seven games to the Los Angeles Dodgers. They led the A.L. in attendance their first 10 seasons in Minnesota while featuring stars such as Bob Allison, Rod Carew, Harmon Killebrew, Tony Oliva and Zoilo Versailles. . . . Griffith was a GWU basketball letterman in 1934 and 1935 when the Colonials compiled a 25-10 record.

DICK GROAT, Duke
Shortstop hit .286 in 1,929 games in 14 seasons (1952 and 1955 through 1967) with the Pittsburgh Pirates, St. Louis Cardinals, Philadelphia Phillies and San Francisco Giants. Eight-time All-Star Game performer started on World Series Championship teams with the Pirates in 1960 and Cardinals in 1964. N.L. MVP in 1960 when he paced the league in batting average (.325). Ranked among the N.L. top four in hits in 1960, 1962 and 1963 (led league in doubles with 43). . . . Named College Basketball Player of the Year by the Helms Foundation in 1950-51. Nation's fifth-leading scorer as a junior (25.2 ppg) and runner-up as a senior (26 ppg). Averaged 14.5 as a sophomore in 1949-50. Scored a career-high 48 points against North Carolina on February 29, 1952. Played 26 games in the NBA, averaging 11.9 points per game for the Fort Wayne Pistons in 1952-53. In 1951, Virginia coach Gus Tebell said Groat is "the finest player I've seen in the South in my 27 years of coaching. An All-American on anybody's team. I recall the brilliance of Hank Luisetti and I must put Groat in the same category with him. Excellent shot and remarkable ballhandler."

FRANK GRUBE, Lafayette
Catcher hit .244 with the Chicago White Sox and St. Louis Browns in seven years from 1931 through 1936 and 1941. . . . Starting guard in basketball as a senior in 1926-27. The 5-9, 180-pounder played end for the NFL's New York Yankees for one season in 1928 after being an All-American end on Lafayette's undefeated 1926 national championship football team.

TONY GWYNN, San Diego State
Padres outfielder hit .338 in 20 seasons (1982 through 2001), winning eight N.L. batting titles--1984, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1994, 1995, 1996 and 1997. Played in 15th All-Star Game in 1999 before topping the 3,000-hit plateau later in the year. Holds N.L. record for most years leading league in singles (seven). Paced the N.L. in runs in 1986 (107) and on-base percentage in 1994 (.454). Gold Glove winner five times (1986-87-89-90-91). He hit .368 in the 1984 N.L. Championship Series to help San Diego reach the World Series against the Detroit Tigers. Also participated in the 1998 World Series against the New York Yankees. Became baseball coach at his alma mater after retiring from the major leagues. . . . Averaged 8.6 ppg and 5.5 apg in 107 games with the Aztecs in four seasons (1977-78 through 1980-81). The 5-11, 170-pound guard was named second-team All-Western Athletic Conference as both a junior and senior. Led the WAC in assists as a sophomore and junior before finishing third as a senior. Paced San Diego State in steals each of his last three seasons. Selected in the 10th round of 1981 NBA draft by the San Diego Clippers.

HENRY "HINKEY" HAINES, Penn State
Outfielder hit .160 in 28 games with the New York Yankees in 1923 before appearing in the World Series against the New York Giants. . . . The 5-10 Haines was a basketball letterman in 1919-20 and 1920-21.

ED HALICKI, Monmouth (N.J.)
Pitcher compiled a 55-66 record and 3.62 ERA in seven seasons from 1974 through 1980 with the San Francisco Giants and California Angels. His best season was 1977 when he posted a 16-12 record for the Giants. The next year, he finished runner-up in the N.L. in shutouts with four and ninth with a 2.85 ERA. Hurled a no-hitter for them vs. the New York Mets on August 24, 1975. . . . The 6-7, 220-pound forward-center collected 1,777 points and 1,266 rebounds in four seasons from 1968-69 through 1971-72. He still holds Monmouth's single-game rebounding record with 40 in his junior year (against Southeastern). Named to NAIA All-American third team as a senior when he led the Hawks in scoring with 21 ppg.

DICK HALL, Swarthmore (Pa.)
Played 19 seasons in the majors (1952 through 1957 and 1959 through 1971) with the Pittsburgh Pirates, Kansas City Athletics, Baltimore Orioles and Philadelphia Phillies. He hit .210 as an outfielder-infielder his first three years in the majors before becoming a pitcher and compiling a 93-75 record and 3.32 ERA. Led the A.L. in relief wins in 1970, becoming the first pitcher in 51 years to end a season with more victories (10) than walks (six in 61 innings). Hall appeared in three consecutive World Series with Baltimore (1969 through 1971). . . . The 6-6, 200-pounder averaged 11.9 ppg in 1948-49, 13.4 in 1949-50 and 15.4 in 1950-51 for Southern Division champions in the Middle Atlantic States Conference.

TOM HALLER, Illinois
Catcher hit .257 in 12 seasons from 1961 through 1972 with the San Francisco Giants, Los Angeles Dodgers and Detroit Tigers. The three-time All-Star had a career-high 27 home runs with the Giants in 1966. Haller played in the 1962 World Series with San Francisco (swatted a two-run homer off Whitey Ford of the Yankees in Game Four) and 1972 A.L. Championship Series with Detroit. Led the N.L. with nine sacrifice flies in 1968. He served as a front office executive with the Giants and Chicago White Sox. In a MLB first, he was the Tigers catcher on July 14, 1972, when his his brother, Bill, umpired behind the plate. . . . The 6-4, 195-pounder scored 16 points in 29 varsity games as a backup forward for the Fighting Illini's basketball squad as a sophomore (1956-57) and junior (1957-58) under coach Harry Combes. Haller lettered for the school's football team in 1956 and 1957 as a quarterback-placekicker before receiving a reported $54,000 bonus to sign with the baseball Giants.

STEVE HAMILTON, Morehead State
Lefthanded pitcher compiled a 40-31 record, 3.05 ERA and 42 saves in 421 games during 12 seasons from 1961 through 1972 with the Cleveland Indians, Washington Senators, New York Yankees, Chicago White Sox, San Francisco Giants and Chicago Cubs. Appeared in 1963 and 1964 World Series with the Yankees, saving Game 6 in the '64 Fall Classic after relieving Jim Bouton. Hamilton had a career-best 1.39 ERA in 1965 and career-high 11 saves for them in 1968. . . . Averaged 17.9 ppg and 16.4 rpg in four-year college basketball career (1954-55 through 1957-58), leading the Eagles in scoring and rebounding as a junior and senior. He ranked 15th in the country in scoring as a junior (24.2 ppg) and among the nation's top 10 rebounders as a senior (19.1 rpg). The 6-7, 195-pound forward-center averaged 18.5 points in four NCAA Tournament games in 1956 and 1957. Hamilton had a 51-point game against Ohio University as a junior when he finished 28th in the nation in free-throw shooting (81.9 percent). He also lettered as a pole vaulter in track. The current athletic director at his alma mater averaged 4.5 points and 3.4 rebounds per game in two seasons with the NBA's Minneapolis Lakers after being their second-round draft choice in 1958. He is the only athlete to play in a World Series and an NBA Finals (rookie in 1959 when the Lakers were swept by the Boston Celtics) after participating in the NCAA playoffs.

TOM HAMILTON, Texas
Star first baseman for the Longhorns' 1949 baseball squad that won the first of the school's four College World Series titles. Hamilton hit .474 that season to lead the Southwest Conference. He played briefly with the Philadelphia Athletics in 1952 and 1953 under manager Jimmy Dykes and with star outfielders Dave Philley and Gus Zernial. . . . Freshman forward averaged 3.3 ppg on Texas' 1947 Final Four team that set a school record for most victories in a season with 26. The Longhorns' basketball team entered the 1947 NCAA Tournament with the nation's best record before losing by one point (55-54) in the national semifinals to Oklahoma, a team they defeated by 12 points in mid-season. Hamilton (6-4, 210) was the SWC's leading scorer as a senior.

ATLEE HAMMAKER, East Tennessee State
Lefthanded pitcher, a first-round pick in 1979 amateur draft, compiled a 59-67 record in 12 seasons with four different teams--Kansas City Royals, San Francisco Giants, San Diego Padres and Chicago White Sox (1981-85, 1987-91, 1994 and 1995). His best year was 1983 when the All-Star posted a 10-9 record and N.L.-best 2.25 ERA for the Giants, who acquired him from the Royals in a five-player trade involving aging pitcher Vida Blue. Hammaker appeared in 1989 World Series with the Giants. . . . The 6-2, 185-pound guard averaged 5.3 ppg as a freshman in 1976-77 and 4.9 as a sophomore in 1977-78. . . . Excerpt from school guide: "Probably most exciting player on club. Has ability to come off the bench and provide much needed spark at times."

WALTER "JACK" HAMMOND, Colgate
Second baseman hit .222 in 45 games with the Cleveland Indians and Pittsburgh Pirates in 1915 and 1922. . . . The 5-11 Hammond was a four-year basketball letterman for Colgate from 1909-10 through 1912-13.

RICH HAND, Puget Sound (Wash.)
Righthander compiled a 24-39 record and 4.01 ERA with the Cleveland Indians, Texas Rangers and California Angels for four years from 1970 through 1973. First pick in the secondary phase of the 1969 amateur draft by the Indians. . . . The 6-1 Hand averaged 6.2 ppg for Puget Sound in 1967-68. His daughter, Whitney, averaged 11.6 ppg, 5.3 rpg and 2.8 apg for Oklahoma from 2008-09 to 2012-13.

GENE HANDLEY, Bradley
Infielder, primarily a second baseman, hit .252 with the Philadelphia Athletics in 1946 and 1947. Brother of major league infielder Lee Handley. . . . Basketball letterman for the Braves in 1932-33 and 1933-34.

LEE HANDLEY, Bradley
Infielder, primarily a third baseman, hit .269 with the Cincinnati Reds, Pittsburgh Pirates and Philadelphia Phillies in 10 N.L. seasons from 1936 through 1947 (excluding 1942 and 1943 after he was hurt in an auto accident). Brother of major league infielder Gene Handley led the N.L. in stolen bases in 1939 with 17 after finishing seventh in runs scored the previous year with 91. . . . Basketball letterman for the Braves from 1932-33 through 1934-35.

MIKE HARGROVE, Northwestern Oklahoma State
First baseman hit .290 with the Texas Rangers, San Diego Padres and Cleveland Indians in 12 years from 1974 through 1985. Rookie of the Year when he posted a career-high .323 batting average (fifth in A.L.). Lefthander earned a spot on the A.L. All-Star team in 1975. Finished among the A.L. top seven in on-base percentage seven times in nine-year span from 1975 through 1983. Led the A.L. in walks in 1976 and 1978. Compiled a 1,188-1,173 manaqgerial record for the Indians, Baltimore Orioles and Seattle Mariners in 16 A.L. seasons from 1991 through 2007, guiding Cleveland to five consecutive Central Division titles from 1995 through 1999. . . . The 6-0, 190-pounder (class of '72) is the school's last athlete to letter in all three major sports (including football).

WILLIAM B. HARMAN, Virginia
Righthander pitched in five games for the Philadelphia Phillies in 1941. . . . The 6-4 Harman was a basketball letterman for the Cavaliers from 1938-39 through 1940-41.

CHUCK HARMON, Toledo
Utilityman hit .238 in four seasons from 1954 through 1957 with the Cincinnati Reds, St. Louis Cardinals and Philadelphia Phillies after hitting over .300 five consecutive years in the minors. . . . Second-leading scorer for the Rockets as a sophomore in 1946-47 (13.6 ppg) and as a junior in 1947-48 (8.8). As a freshman starter in 1942-43, the 6-2, 175-pound swingman was Toledo's second-leading scorer in the NIT for a 22-4 team that finished runner-up to St. John's. Sketch in school guide: "Master of tricky play and a whirlwind on the backboards."

BILLY HARRELL, Siena
Infielder hit .231 in 173 games with the Cleveland Indians (1955, 1957, 1958) and Boston Red Sox (1961). . . . The 6-1, 180-pounder averaged 10.3 ppg in three seasons of varsity basketball for Siena. When the school's first African-American player finished his college career, he held school records for most points in a season (396 in 1951-52), career and game (28 against Arizona State in 1951) and most rebounds in a season (387 in 1949-50). Excerpt from school guide: "Seems to have steel springs for legs and extension hooks for hands. Can reach the top of the backboard if necessary. Shifty and speedy. Has variety of shots. He'll often pass up scoring chance to give ball to teammate."

OSCAR "SLIM" HARRELL, Baylor
Righthander pitched three scoreless innings for the Philadelphia Athletics in 1912. . . . The 6-3 Harrell was a basketball letterman for Baylor in 1912.

CHARLES "MICKEY" HARRINGTON, Southern Mississippi
Appeared in one game as a pinch-runner with the parent Philadelphia Phillies in 1963. . . . The 6-4 forward averaged 10.3 ppg for four NAIA Tournament teams from 1951-52 through 1954-55.

WALTER "BUDDY" HARRIS, Philadelphia Textile
Righthander compiled a 1-1 record in 22 games with the Houston Astros in two years (1970 and 1971). Traded by Houston with Rich Chiles to the New York Mets for Tommie Agee but never played for them. . . . The 6-7 Harris was a basketball letterman in 1965-66 and 1966-67.

HERB HASH, Richmond
Righthanded pitcher compiled an 8-7 record with the Boston Red Sox in 1940 and 1941. . . . Three-year basketball letterman averaged 6.4 ppg as a junior center for the Spiders' undefeated team (20-0) in 1934-35. Contributed 7.5 ppg the next season.

JOHN "BUDDY" HASSETT, Manhattan
First baseman-outfielder compiled a .292 lifetime batting average in seven seasons from 1936 through 1942 with the Brooklyn Dodgers, Boston Braves and New York Yankees. The only year he hit less than .284 was with Boston in 1940, when his average was .234. Hassett struck out only 17 times in 635 at-bats as a rookie. Finished among the N.L. top nine in hits in 1936, 1937 and 1939. The lefthander played in the 1942 World Series with the Yanks, who retrieved him in a trade for Tommy Holmes after selling him to Brooklyn while Lou Gehrig was in his prime. . . . Played for Manhattan teams that won a school-record 17 consecutive games in 1930 and 1931. His brother, Billy, became an All-American guard for Notre Dame in 1945.

WYNN HAWKINS, Baldwin-Wallace (Ohio)
Righthander compiled a 12-13 pitching record and 4.17 ERA with the Cleveland Indians in three years from 1960 through 1962. As a rookie, he yielded Ted Williams' 500th home run. Went on to work for the Indians in the sales department, as a scout, and as a traveling secretary. . . . The 6-3 Hawkins, a Little All-American, was the school's all-time leading scorer (1,392 points) when he graduated in 1957.

BILL HAYWOOD, Wilmington (N.C.) Junior College
The 6-3, 205-pound righthander appeared in 14 games as a reliever with no decisions and a 4.63 ERA for the Washington Senators in 1968. He was baseball coach at Western Carolina for 13 years before becoming assistant director of player development with the Seattle Mariners. . . . Member of basketball team that participated in the 1962 NJCAA Tournament.

TOM HEALY, Pittsburgh
Third baseman hit .230 in 29 games with the Philadelphia Athletics in 1915 and 1916. . . . The 6-0 Healy was a basketball letterman for Pitt in 1914 and 1915.

JIM HEARN, Georgia Tech
Righthander compiled a 109-89 record and 3.81 ERA with the St. Louis Cardinals, New York Giants and Philadelphia Phillies in 13 N.L. seasons from 1947 through 1959. Led the N.L. in shutouts with five in 1950 two years before earning a spot on the All-Star team. Ranked among the N.L. top six in games started four times in a five-year span from 1951 through 1955. The #3 starter for the Giants in 1951 during their "miracle" pennant run won Game 3 in the World Series against the New York Yankees. Traded by the Giants to the Phillies for Stu Miller on October 11, 1956. . . . The 6-3 Hearn was a basketball letterman for the Yellow Jackets in 1941-42.

HARVEY HENDRICK, Vanderbilt
Lefthanded hitting utilityman notched a .308 batting average with the New York Yankees, Cleveland Indians, Brooklyn Dodgers, Cincinnati Reds, St. Louis Cardinals, Chicago Cubs and Philadelphia Phillies in 11 seasons from 1923 through 1925 and 1927 through 1934. Participated as a rookie with the Yankees in the 1923 World Series against the New York Giants. Hit .310 or better in his first three years with the Dodgers from 1929 through 1931. In his single full season at one position, he led the N.L. with 18 errors as a first baseman for the Reds in 1931. . . . The 6-2, 190-pounder was a basketball letterman for the Commodores in 1918.

MARK HENDRICKSON, Washington State
Lefthander compiled a 57-74 record and 5.02 ERA in first nine seasons with the Toronto Blue Jays, Tampa Bay Devil Rays, Los Angeles Dodgers, Florida Marlins and Baltimore Orioles through 2010. His best season was 2005 when he went 11-8 with the Devil Rays. Selected six times in baseball's June draft. . . . The 6-8 Hendrickson, a four-year starting forward from 1992-93 through 1995-96, was the Cougars' leading rebounder each season. Two-time All-Pacific-10 selection was WSU's second-leading scorer as a junior and senior with at least 16 ppg. Led the Pac-10 in rebounding as a senior with 9.5 per game. Finished his college career as the school's all-time second-leading rebounder (927) and third-leading scorer (1,496 points). Appeared in 1994 NCAA Tournament against Boston College.

ALBERT HERMANN, Colgate
Infielder hit .234 in 32 games with the Boston Braves in 1923 and 1924. . . . The 6-0, 180-pounder was a two-year basketball letterman in the early 1920s.

TOM HERRIN, Louisiana Tech
Righthander compiled a 1-2 record with the Boston Red Sox in 1954. . . . The 6-3 Herrin was a basketball letterman for Tech in 1947-48 and 1948-49 (9.1 ppg).

RICK HERRSCHER, Southern Methodist
Played 35 games as an infielder-outfielder for the 1962 New York Mets team that finished with an anemic 40-120 record. . . . After scoring 59 points in a single game for SMU's freshman team against a J.C. opponent, he averaged 11.5 points per game in three seasons (1955-56 through 1957-58) of varsity basketball as a 6-3, 185-pound swingman. Led the Mustangs with 17.5 ppg as a senior when he was an All-SWC first-team selection. Helped them win two Southwest Conference titles under coach Doc Hayes. Member of SMU squad that reached the 1956 Final Four. Excerpt from school guide: "Captain is most versatile cager ever to play for the Mustangs. He possesses great finesse and can fake and evade the man who is guarding him. He knows all the tricks of a postman. His outside shot demands the respect of all opponents. He is an excellent feeder." Herrscher was chosen in the sixth round of the 1958 NBA draft by the St. Louis Hawks.

ORAL HILDEBRAND, Butler
Righthander compiled an 83-78 record in 10 seasons from 1931 through 1940 with the Cleveland Indians, St. Louis Browns and New York Yankees. Named to the first A.L. All-Star team in 1933 when he led the league with six shutouts. Pitched four shutout innings as fourth-game starter for the Yanks in 1939 World Series after posting 10-4 record during the season. . . . Three-year letterman (1927-28 through 1929-30) on Butler teams that combined for a 48-11 record. Senior captain scored 32 points in 24 minutes in a game against Evansville. Named to second five on 1928-29 College Humor Magazine All-American team and third five on 1929-30 College Humor All-America squad.

BILL "PAT HILLY" HILGERINK, Dayton
Outfielder went 3 for 10 in eight games with the Philadelphia Phillies in 1914. . . . The 5-11 Hilgerink played basketball for the Flyers from 1906 through 1908.

GIL HODGES, St. Joseph's (Ind.)/Oakland City (Ind.)
Dead-pull hitter had a .273 batting average with 370 home runs and 1,274 RBI in an 18-year playing career with the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers and New York Mets. Became a three-time Gold Glove first baseman after being switched from catcher by manager Leo Durocher because of the emergence of Roy Campanella. Eight-time All-Star swatted four home runs against the Braves on August 31, 1950. The 6-1 1/2, 200-pounder drove in more than 100 runs seven consecutive seasons from 1949 through 1955 and hammered 20 or more homers 11 straight years from 1949 through 1959. Finished among the N.L. top three in homers four times in a five-year span from 1950 through 1954. Hodges, who hit 14 grand slams, achieved career highs in 1954 by hitting .304 with league runner-up totals of 42 homers and 130 RBI. He appeared in seven World Series. After a woeful 0-for-21 performance in a 1952 World Series loss to the Yankees, he led the Dodgers' regulars with a .364 World Series average the next year. Hodges homered in each of his last four World Series with the Dodgers, including blasts that won 1956's Game One vs. the Yanks and 1959's Game Four vs. the White Sox. Hodges hit the first homer in Mets history in 1962 before he was traded to the Senators for OF Jim Piersall the next year. Managed the "Miracle Mets" to the 1969 World Series championship, compiling a 660-753 record (.467) with the Senators and Mets in nine years from 1963 through 1971. . . . Gil and his brother (Bob), natives of Petersburg, Ind., enrolled at St. Joseph's (Ind.) in the fall of 1941. Gil, a Marine who spent 18 months in the Pacific with 80 of those days in combat on Okinawa, later attended Oakland City, where he played basketball in 1947 and 1948. Morris Klipsch, a Petersburg auto dealer, says Gil may have liked basketball as much as baseball. "I recall him saying one fall after the Dodgers season was over that he would like to join a pro basketball team," Klipsch said.

FRANK "LEFTY" HOERST, La Salle
Southpaw compiled a 10-33 pitching record and 5.17 ERA in five seasons (1940 through 1942, 1946 and 1947) with the Philadelphia Phillies. He had a 3-10 mark in 1941, although two of the triumphs came against the pennant-winning Brooklyn Dodgers. . . . The 6-3, 192-pounder was a four-year letterman for La Salle's basketball team (class of '39).

HOWARD "MUL" HOLLAND, Virginia
Righthander compiled a 1-1 record in 13 games with the Cincinnati Reds, New York Giants and St. Louis Cardinals in 1926, 1927 and 1929. . . . The 6-4 Holland was a basketball letterman for the Cavaliers from 1923-24 through 1926-27.

GARY HOLLE, Siena
First baseman went 1 for 6 in five games with the Texas Rangers in 1979. Led the Pacific Coast League in batting average two years earlier. Originally drafted by the Milwaukee Brewers, he was traded by them with Ed Farmer and cash to the Rangers for Reggie Cleveland. . . . The 6-6 Holle led Siena in scoring and rebounding in 1974-75 (20.6 ppg, 10 rpg) and 1975-76 (20.6 ppg, 9 rpg).

GARY HOLMAN, Southern California
First baseman-outfielder hit .259 with the Washington Senators in 1968 and 1969. His .294 batting average as a rookie during the heart of the second dead-ball era was far above the team mark of .224. . . . The 6-1 lefthander was a basketball letterman with USC in 1962-63 under coach Forrest Twogood.

JAY HOOK, Northwestern
Compiled a 39-62 pitching record in eight seasons from 1957 through 1964 with the Cincinnati Reds and New York Mets. He pitched the initial game won by the expansion Mets after they'd lost their first nine. Finished ninth in the N.L. with 13 complete games in 1962. After earning his masters degree in thermodynamics, Hook quit pro baseball at 28 to accept a job with Chrysler. . . . The 6-2, 185-pound swingman was the Wildcats' third-leading scorer as a sophomore with 10.7 ppg. Teammate of eventual All-American Joe Ruklick had a 5.3-point average the next season (1956-57).

ALEX HOOKS, Southern Methodist
First baseman hit .227 in 15 games with the Philadelphia Athletics in 1935. . . . The 6-1 Hooks was a basketball letterman for SMU in 1926-27 and 1927-28.

GAIL HOPKINS, Pepperdine
First baseman hit .266 with the Chicago White Sox, Kansas City Royals and Los Angeles Dodgers in seven seasons from 1968 through 1974. Lefthanded swinger, who was known for being difficult to strike out, posted career highs with 16 doubles, nine homers and 47 RBI in his first year with the Royals in 1971. . . . The 5-10 Hopkins averaged 2.5 ppg in 10 basketball contests for the Waves in 1963-64.

DOUG HOWARD, Brigham Young
First baseman/outfielder hit .212 with the California Angels, St. Louis Cardinals and Cleveland Indians in five seasons from 1972 through 1976. . . . Second-team All-WAC basketball selection as a junior in 1968-69 (15.4 ppg, 4 rpg, 85.3 FT%) and as a senior in 1969-70 (18.2 ppg, 5.2 rpg, 85.3 FT%). Son of BYU Hall of Famer Orin Howard led the Cougars in scoring each of his last two seasons, finishing his career with averages of 14.5 ppg and 6.3 rpg. The 6-3 guard participated in the 1969 NCAA Tournament.

FRANK HOWARD, Ohio State
New York Mets coach was outfielder/first baseman for 16 seasons from 1958 through 1973 with the Los Angeles Dodgers, Washington Senators, Texas Rangers and Detroit Tigers. In 1,902 major league games, he hit .273 with 382 home runs and 1,119 RBI. N.L. Rookie of the Year in 1960. Capped off a string of four straight years finishing among the A.L. top five in RBI with a league-high 126 in 1970. Howard led the A.L. in homers with 44 in both 1968 and 1970 and was runner-up in 1969 with 48. Eight of his round-trippers came in a five-game stretch in 1968 to set a major league record. Four-time All-Star homered in Game 4 of the 1963 World Series to help the Dodgers sweep the New York Yankees. . . . Two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection averaged 17.4 ppg and 13.9 rpg in three seasons (1955-56 through 1957-58) of varsity basketball with the Buckeyes, leading them in both scoring and rebounding as a junior (20.1 ppg and 15.3 rpg) and senior (16.9 ppg and 13.6 rpg). The 6-5, 220-pounder grabbed a still existing school-record 32 rebounds in a game against Brigham Young his junior season. Howard, who was 54th in the country in scoring as a junior, finished his college career as OSU's third-leading career scorer and leading rebounder. Howard was a first-team All-American selection by the U.S. Basketball Writers/Look Magazine, Converse and NEA as a junior when he ranked eighth in the nation in rebounding. He was a third-round choice of the Philadelphia Warriors in the 1958 NBA draft. Excerpt from school guide: "One of the strongest players in college basketball and one of the top rebounders. Shoots very well from the outside." Selected in the third round of the 1958 NBA draft by the Philadelphia Warriors.

HARRY HULIHAN, Middlebury (Vt.)
Lefthander compiled a 2-3 record in seven games for the Boston Braves in 1922. . . . The 5-11 Hulihan played basketball his first two years at Middlebury but without distinction.

BOBBY HUMPHREYS, Hampden-Sydney (Va.)
The 5-11 righthander compiled a 27-21 record and 3.36 ERA with the Detroit Tigers, St. Louis Cardinals, Chicago Cubs, Washington Senators and Milwaukee Brewers in nine years from 1962 through 1970. Participated in 1964 World Series with the Cards. Reliever, known for his "side-saddle" delivery, ranked among the A.L. top 10 in appearances in 1966 and 1968 with the Senators. . . . Four-year basketball letterman (class of '58).

WALTER HUNTZINGER, Penn
Pitcher compiled a 7-8 record and 3.60 ERA in 60 major league games, mostly in relief, with the New York Giants, St. Louis Cardinals and Chicago Cubs from 1923 through 1926. Member of Giants teams that won N.L. pennants in 1923 and 1924. . . . Three-year letterman for Penn teams that went 67-6 from 1919-20 through 1921-22. Member of Ivy League champions as a sophomore and junior. Named to second five all-league team as a senior forward.

BRUCE HURST, Dixie (Utah)
Lefthander compiled a 145-113 record with the Boston Red Sox, San Diego Padres, Colorado Rockies and Texas Rangers in 15 years from 1980 to 1994. Despite Boston's famed "Green Monster" outfield wall, he was 33-9 at Fenway Park from 1986 to 1988. In 1981, Hurst pitched five innings in the longest game in history (8 hours and 25 minutes--33 innings). In the 1986 World Series, he started three games (winning two). Two years later, he was an All-Star while leading the A.L. with 10 complete games en route to a career-best 18-6 mark. Hurst, a first-round pick in 1976 amateur draft, paced the N.L. with four shutouts in 1990. . . . During the offseason after being a first-round draft pick out of high school by the Red Sox in 1976, he played for Dixie's basketball squad while continuing his education until he earned his J.C. diploma.

MONTE IRVIN, Lincoln (Pa.)
Hall of Fame outfielder-first baseman hit .293 with 99 home runs and 443 RBI in eight major league years from 1949 through 1956 with the New York Giants and Chicago Cubs. Irvin led the N.L. in RBI with 121 in 1951, the same year he led the World Series in hitting (.458 vs. crosstown Yankees) after collecting seven hits in the first two contests of the six-game set. He was a member of the Giants' squad that swept the Cleveland Indians in the 1954 World Series. Finished among the N.L. top seven in batting average in 1951 (.312) and 1953 (.329). The 6-1, 195-pounder was one of the first black players signed after baseball's color line was broken in 1947. Among the brightest stars in the Negro Leagues, he registered league highs of .422 in 1940 and .396 in 1941 before spending three years in the Army. . . . His athletic career was nearly prematurely ended when an infection from a scratched hand in a basketball game kept him close to death for seven weeks. Irvin participated in basketball for 1 1/2 years in the late 1930s for Lincoln, an all-black university in Oxford, Pa., before dropping out of school.

RON JACKSON, Western Michigan
Bonus baby first baseman hit .245 in seven seasons from 1954 through 1960 with the Chicago White Sox and Boston Red Sox. . . . Second-team All-Mid-American Conference choice in 1952, 1953 and 1954. The 6-7, 225-pound center led WMU in scoring in 1952-53 (15.5 ppg, 12.3 rpg) and 1953-54 (19.7 ppg, 10.9 rpg). Excerpt from sketch in Dell Basketball magazine: "Scores with one-hand flip inside, has a good one-hand push near the foul circle, a two-hand set from the side well out. Good pass, good speed, good rebound, and his team's strongest defensive player to boot."

NEWTON "BUCKY" JACOBS, Richmond
Compiled a 1-2 record as righthanded reliever with the Washington Senators in three brief stints with them (1937, 1939 and 1940). . . . Contributed three baskets as a sophomore in overtime in a victory at Emory and Henry that preserved the Spiders' undefeated season (20-0) in 1934-35. Forward was among the team's top two scorers each of the next two years.

ANTHONY "TONY" JOHNSON, Lemoyne-Owen (Tenn.)
Left fielder hit .232 with the Montreal Expos and Toronto Blue Jays in two years in 1981 and 1982. . . . The 6-4 forward was an All-VSAC selection in 1976-77 (team-high 20.3 ppg) and 1979-80 (team-high 17.1 ppg) after transferring from junior college (Shelby).

DAVEY JOHNSON, Texas A&M
A.L. Manager of the Year in 1977 with the Baltimore Orioles directed the New York Mets to victory over the Orioles in the 1986 World Series. His managerial record in 14 seasons with the Cincinnati Reds, New York Mets, Orioles and Los Angeles Dodgers was 1,148-888 (.564) befrore leaving the Washington Nationals' front office in the middle of the 2011 campaign to become their manager. Johnson finished first or second 11 times in his first 15 seasons as a big league skipper. Four-time All-Star hit .261 as an infielder in a 13-year career (1965 through 1975, 1977 and 1978) with the Orioles, Atlanta Braves, Philadelphia Phillies and Chicago Cubs. Earned three straight A.L. Gold Gloves as a second baseman with the Orioles from 1969 through 1971. Slugged 43 (N.L. runner-up) of his 136 career homers for the Braves in 1973 after appearing in four World Series with the Orioles (1966, 1969, 1970 and 1971). Owns the distinction of being the only player to have hit behind both Hank Aaron and Japan's all-time home-run king, Sadaharu Oh. . . . Averaged 1.7 ppg as a sophomore in his only varsity season (1961-62) with the Aggies before signing a pro baseball contract.

"SWEET" LOU JOHNSON, Kentucky State
Outfielder hit .258 with the Chicago Cubs, Los Angeles/California Angels, Milwaukee Braves, Los Angeles Dodgers and Cleveland Indians in eight seasons from 1960 through 1969. Led the N.L. in times hit by pitch in 1966 after finishing runner-up in that category the previous year. Contributed two homers and two doubles for the Dodgers in 1965 World Series against the Minnesota Twins. . . . Teammate of legendary coach Davey Whitney averaged 5.7 ppg and 2 rpg in 1951-52.

LYNN JONES, Thiel (Pa.)
Career backup outfielder hit .252 with the Detroit Tigers and Kansas City Royals in eight seasons from 1979 through 1986. Late-inning defensive replacement for left fielder Lonnie Smith doubled and tripled in three at-bats for the Royals in the 1985 World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals. Brother of Darryl Jones, an outfielder with the New York Yankees in 1979. . . . The 5-9 Jones averaged 10.4 ppg for Thiel from 1970-71 through 1973-74.

RICHARD "ITCHY" JONES, Southern Illinois
Established aa baseball dynasty in 21-year coaching career at his alma mater before accepting a similar position with the Illini in Champaign in 1991. Compiled a 1,240-752-6 record before retiring in 2005. In 1971, his second year at SIU, Jones guided the salukis to within one game of the national title, finishing second at the College World Series. In 1974 and 1977, Jones brought SIU back to the CWS, placing third both times. Buoyed by 22 eventual major leaguers, he became the 18th coach in NCAA Division I history to win 1,000 games. . . . Averaged 8.9 ppg for the Salukis in 1956-57.

DUANE JOSEPHSON, Northern Iowa
Catcher hit .258 in eight seasons with the Chicago White Sox (1965 through 1970) and Boston Red Sox (1971 and 1972). He was a member of the 1968 A.L. All-Star team but his best year was 1970 when he hit .316. Pacific Coast League MVP in 1966 with the Indianapolis Indians. . . . Averaged 13.4 ppg as a 6-0, 190-pound guard in three varsity seasons from 1961-62 through 1963-64 under coach Norm Stewart at what was then called the State College of Iowa. He led the team in scoring as a junior (18.3 ppg) and senior (16.8 ppg) and was named to the All-North Central Conference team both of those seasons. Averaged 17.4 points in five NCAA College Division Tournament games in 1964 when SCI finished fourth.

HOWARD "HOWIE" JUDSON, Illinois
Righthander compiled a 17-37 pitching record and 4.29 ERA in seven seasons with the Chicago White Sox (1948 through 1952) and Cincinnati Reds (1953 and 1954). Ranked 3rd in the A.L. in games pitched with 46 in 1950 one year after posting an anemic 1-14 mark. . . . Lettered in basketball for the Illini as a freshman in 1943-44 and as a sophomore in 1944-45 (third-leading scorer with average of 8.5 ppg) under coach Doug Mills. Judson's twin brothers, Paul and Phil, played for the Illini in the mid-1950s after leading tiny Hebron High to the 1952 Illinois High School state championship. Phil's son, Rob, coached Northern Illinois for six seasons from 2001-02 through 2006-07.

DAVID JUSTICE, Thomas More College (Ky.)
Lefthanded outfielder hit .279 in 14 seasons from 1989 through 2002 with the Atlanta Braves, Cleveland Indians, New York Yankees and Oakland A's. Jacked 40 homers (N.L. runner-up) with 120 RBI (also runner-up) in 1993 with the Braves and a total of 41 homers (fourth in A.L.) with 118 RBI in 2000 with the Indians and Yanks. Finished third in the A.L. with a .329 batting average in 1997. Three-time All-Star was N.L. Rookie of the Year in 1990. Participated in six World Series. Former ESPN analyst was previously married to actress Halle Berry. . . . Averaged 6.4 ppg and 2.3 rpg in 1983-84 and 1984-85. In his second and final year, the 6-3 Justice led Thomas More with 92 assists while averaging 9.3 ppg and 3.5 rpg.

HERBERT JUUL, Illinois
Lefthander pitched in one game for Cincinnati in 1911. . . . The 5-11 Juul was a basketball letterman for the Illini in 1905-06 and 1906-07.

OWEN KAHN, William & Mary
Appeared in one game with the Boston Braves in 1930. . . . The 5-11 Kahn was a basketball letterman for William & Mary in 1924-25 and 1925-26.

ANTON "ANDY" KARL, Manhattan
Righthanded reliever compiled a 19-23 record in five years from 1943 through 1947 with the Boston Red Sox and Philadelphia Phillies. His 67 appearances and 15 saves for the Phillies were N.L. highs in 1945. . . . The 6-1 1/2, 175-pound Karl earned basketball letters with the Jaspers from 1933-35.

MARTY KAROW, Ohio State
Infielder went 2 for 10 in six games with the Boston Red Sox in 1927. . . . Basketball letterman for OSU in 1924-25.

BOB KEEGAN, Bucknell
Righthander compiled a 40-36 record and 3.66 ERA with the Chicago White Sox in six seasons from 1953 through 1958. Reached the majors as a 32-year-old rookie. All-Star in 1954 when he ranked seventh in the A.L. in victories with 16. Hurled a no-hitter against the Washington Senators on August 20, 1957. . . . Two-year basketball letterman in 1941-42 and 1942-43 before serving in the military during World War II.

CHARLIE KELLER, Maryland
Outfielder hit .286 with 189 home runs and 760 RBI in 13 seasons (1939 through 1943 and 1945 through 1952) for the New York Yankees and Detroit Tigers. Five-time A.L. All-Star attained career highs of 33 homers (A.L. runner-up) and 122 RBI (third) in 1941. Ranked among the A.L. top four in on-base percentage five times in an eight-year span from 1939 through 1946. Lefthanded swinger hit .306 for the Yanks in 19 World Series games (1939, 1941-43). Keller led the A.L. with 38 pinch hits in 1951 with the Tigers. . . . Three-year basketball letterman with the Terrapins from 1934-35 through 1936-37.

DON "RED" KELLETT, Penn
Infielder played in nine games with the Boston Red Sox in 1934. . . . The 6-0, 185-pounder was a three-year basketball letterman for the Quakers during the first half of the 1930s.

HERB KELLY, Notre Dame
Lefthander compiled a 1-3 record in 10 games with the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1914 and 1915. . . . The 5-9 Kelly was a member of the Irish's basketball squad from 1911-12 through 1913-14.

GEORGE KERNEK, Oklahoma
First baseman hit .259 in 30 games with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1965 and 1966. . . . The 6-3 Kernek was a basketball letterman for OU in 1959-60 and 1960-61 under coach Doyle Parrack.

DON KESSINGER, Mississippi
Shortstop hit .252 in 16 seasons from 1964 through 1979 with the Chicago Cubs, St. Louis Cardinals and Chicago White Sox. Managed the White Sox in 1979 before becoming coach at his alma mater. Led N.L. shortstops in putouts three times, assists four times and double plays four times. The 6-1, 170-pound switch-hitter played in six All-Star Games in a seven-year span from 1968 through 1974. His best season was 1969 when he scored 109 runs (fourth in N.L.), had 181 hits (seventh), stroked 38 doubles (runner-up) and earned one of his two Gold Gloves. . . . Selected to the 10-man All-Southeastern Conference team all three of his varsity seasons from 1961-62 through 1963-64 while finishing among the nation's top 45 scorers each year. In scoring for all games, he ranked third in the SEC as a sophomore (21.4 ppg), second as a junior (21.8 ppg) and second as a senior (23.5 ppg). He scored 49 points on 22-of-28 field-goal shooting against Tulane on February 2, 1963, and exploded for 48 points against Tennessee 10 nights later. Excerpt from school guide: "One of the nation's most gifted athletes, he features every shot in the book but the specifics are one-handed push shots, usually a jumper, and driving layups." One of his sons, Keith, earned two basketball letters at Ole Miss before eventually reaching the major leagues as an infielder with the Cincinnati Reds.

JERRY KINDALL, Minnesota
Infielder hit .213 in nine seasons (1956 through 1958 and 1960 through 1965) with the Chicago Cubs, Cleveland Indians and Minnesota Twins. Baseball coach at Arizona for more than 20 years, leading the Wildcats to three College World Series titles (1976, 1980 and 1986). He is the only player to hit for the cycle in the College World Series at Omaha (against Ole Miss on June 11, 1956). Kindall is the only individual to play for and coach College World Series champions. . . . The 6-2 1/2, 175-pounder played two seasons of varsity basketball for Minnesota under coach Ozzie Cowles, averaging 1.4 ppg as a sophomore in 1954-55 and 6.9 ppg as a junior in 1955-56. Excerpt from school guide: "Exceptionally quick reflexes and a good eye are his main attributes although he also has tremendous spring making him a good rebounder."

LYNN KING, Drake
Lefthanded swinging outfielder hit .208 with the St. Louis Cardinals in three years (1935, 1936 and 1939). . . . The 5-9, 165-pounder was an All-Missouri Valley Conference second-team selection in basketball three consecutive years from 1928-29 through 1930-31. He was also an All-MVC quarterback three seasons in a row.

HARRY HERSEL KINZY, Texas Christian
Righthander lost his only decision in 13 pitching appearances with the Chicago White Sox in 1934. . . . Kinzy was a 6-4 starting forward for TCU from 1931-32 through 1933-34.

FRED KIPP, Emporia (Kan.) State
Lefthander compiled a 6-7 record and 5.08 ERA with the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers and New York Yankees in four seasons from 1957 through 1960. His only full big league season was in 1958 with the Dodgers in their maiden year in L.A. . . . The 6-4, 200-pounder was a four-year basketball letterman and two-time all-conference selection in the early 1950s.

ROBERT "RAY" KNODE, Maryland
First baseman hit .266 in 109 games with the Cleveland Indians from 1923 through 1926. Brother of Mike Knode, a utilityman with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1920. . . . The 5-10 Knode played basketball for the Terrapins in 1918-19.

BARNETT "BARNEY" KOCH, Oregon
Second baseman hit .219 in 33 games with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1944. . . . The 5-8 Koch was a basketball letterman for Oregon in 1943-44.

HORACE "PIP" KOEHLER, Penn State
Outfielder played in 12 games with the New York Giants in 1925. . . . The 5-10 Koehler was a basketball letterman in 1921-22 and 1922-23.

BRUCE KONOPKA, Southern California
First baseman hit .238 in 45 games with the Philadelphia Athletics in three brief stints (1942-43-46). . . . The 6-2 lefthander was a basketball letterman with USC in 1940-41 under coach Sam Barry.

JIM KONSTANTY, Syracuse
N.L. MVP and All-Star in 1950 when he pitched in a major league record 74 games, all in relief, and compiled a 16-7 record and 2.66 ERA for the N.L. champion Philadelphia Phillies. All-Star led N.L. in games pitched (74) and saves (22) before losing 1950 World Series opener to the New York Yankees as a starter, 1-0, prior to relieving in two other Series games. Righthander compiled a career record of 66-48 in 11 seasons (1944, 1946 and 1948 through 1956) with the Cincinnati Reds, Boston Braves, Phillies, Yankees and St. Louis Cardinals. . . . Member of 1937-38 and 1938-39 Syracuse basketball teams.

ERNIE KOOB, Western Michigan
Lefthander compiled a 23-30 record and 3.13 ERA with the St. Louis Browns in four years from 1915 through 1917 and 1919. He completed half of his 20 starts in posting an 11-8 mark in 1916. . . . The 5-10 Koob was a basketball letterman for WMU in 1914.

CAL KOONCE, Campbell
Righthander compiled a 47-49 record in 10 seasons from 1962 through 1971 with the Chicago Cubs, New York Mets and Boston Red Sox. Koonce began his rookie year with the Cubs by winning nine of his first 10 decisions. He was a reliever for the 1969 Amazin' Mets World Series champion one year after finishing seventh in the N.L. in games pitched with 55. Went on to become his alma mater's all-time winningest baseball coach by compiling a seven-year mark of 174-123-1. . . . Standout basketball player for Campbell in 1960 and 1961 when the North Carolina-based school was a junior college.

FRED KOSTER, Louisville
Lefthanded outfielder hit .225 with the Philadelphia Phillies in 1931. . . . The 5-10, 165-pounder, a four-year starting forward from 1923-24 through 1926-27, was the team's leading scorer as a sophomore (10 ppg) and as a senior (8 ppg).

SANDY KOUFAX, Cincinnati
Youngest individual named to Baseball Hall of Fame (36) compiled a 165-87 record and 2.76 ERA in 12 seasons as a lefthanded pitcher with the Brooklyn (1955 through 1957) and Los Angeles (1958 through 1966) Dodgers. Led the N.L. in ERA in each of his last five seasons, going 25-5 in 1963 (MVP), 26-8 in 1965 and 27-9 in 1966. Paced the N.L. in strikeouts four times (1961-63-65-66). Three-time Cy Young Award winner pitched four no-hitters and had 98 games with at least 10 strikeouts. Notched a 4-3 record and 0.95 ERA in eight World Series games in 1959, 1963 (MVP), 1965 (MVP) and 1966. . . . The Brooklyn native attended Cincinnati one year on a combination baseball/basketball scholarship before signing a pro baseball contract for a reported $20,000 bonus. He was the third-leading scorer with 9.7 ppg as a 6-2, 195-pound forward for the Bearcats' 12-2 freshman team in 1953-54. Koufax compiled a 3-1 pitching record in his lone college baseball campaign, averaging 14.3 strikeouts and 8.4 bases on balls per game when his statistics are converted to a nine-inning game ratio. . . . Ed Jucker, coach of Cincinnati's NCAA titlists in 1961 and 1962, coached the Bearcats' baseball squad and freshman basketball team in 1953-54. Jucker said of Koufax's basketball ability: "He was an intense player, and he had motivation to do well. You have those ingredients, and the kind of person he was, why, he couldn't lose. He could jump extremely well, was a strong kid and a good driver. He would have made a fine varsity player. We certainly could have used him." If viewers pay attention to CBS acknowledging celebrities in the stands during telecasts with crowd shots, they've probably noticed Koufax regularly attending the Final Four.

MEL KRAUSE, Oregon
Baseball coach compiled a 218-220-1 record for his alma mater from 1970 until 1981 when the program was discontinued. Captured two Northern Division co-championships (1972 and 1974). . . . The 6-2 Krause was a starter for the Ducks' basketball squad in 1949-50 (7.1 ppg) and 1950-51 (6.9 ppg and 4.5 rpg).

BILL KRUEGER, Portland
Lefthander compiled a 68-66 record and 4.35 ERA in 13 years from 1983 through 1995 with the Oakland A's, Los Angeles Dodgers, Milwaukee Brewers, Seattle Mariners, Minnesota Twins, Montreal Expos, Detroit Tigers and San Diego Padres. Krueger hurled a seven-inning no-hitter for Albuquerque against Phoenix in a PCL game in 1987 after he was traded by the A's to the Dodgers. The 6-5, 205-pounder won at least 10 games in three seasons (1984, 1991 and 1992). . . . Averaged 5.1 ppg in his four-year career from 1975-76 through 1979-80 (missed 1978-79 campaign because of a broken left foot). As a freshman, he managed the second-best free-throw percentage in school history (WCAC-leading 87.1%).

ERNIE KRUEGER, Lake Forest (Ill.)
Catcher hit .263 with the Cleveland Indians, New York Yankees, Brooklyn Dodgers, New York Yankees and Cincinnati Reds for eight years from 1913 to 1925. Caught all 26 innings for the Dodgers in 1920 against the Boston Braves in what was then baseball's longest game before competing for the World Series champion later that year. . . . Captain of Lake Forest's basketball squad (class of '15).

JOHN "JACK" KUBISZYN, Alabama
Infielder hit .188 in 50 games with the Cleveland Indians in 1961 and 1962. Traded by the Indians with Ron Taylor to the St. Louis Cardinals for Fred Whitfield. . . . Averaged 18.3 ppg for the Tide from 1955-56 through 1957-58. All-SEC first-team guard as a senior (24.2 ppg) after earning second-team acclaim the previous year (24.6 ppg). Erupted for more than 40 points in three games en route to ranking among the nation's top 20 scorers in back-to-back seasons.

HARVEY KUENN, Wisconsin
Infielder-outfielder hit .303 in 15 years from 1952 through 1966 with the Detroit Tigers, Cleveland Indians, San Francisco Giants, Chicago Cubs and Philadelphia Phillies. In his career with the Tigers, he led the A.L. in batting average once (.353 in 1959), hits four times (209 in 1953 when he was rookie of the year, 201 in 1954, 196 in 1956 and 198 in 1959) and doubles on three occasions (38 in 1955, 39 in 1958 and 42 in 1959). Ranked among the A.L. top seven in batting average seven times (1953-54-55-56-58-59-60). He went 1 for 12 (.083) in 1962 World Series with the Giants. Kuenn compiled a 160-118 record as manager of the Milwaukee Brewers in 1982 and 1983, guiding them to the World Series in his first season. . . . Played in five games for Wisconsin's basketball team in the 1951-52 season. The 6-2, 185-pounder missed all eight of his field-goal attempts and hit three of seven free throws.

ART KUSNYER, Kent State
Backup catcher hit .176 with the Chicago White Sox, California Angels, Milwaukee Brewers and Kansas City Royals in six A.L. seasons (1970 through 1973, 1976 and 1978). Involved in a nine-player deal between the Angels and Brewers on October 22, 1973. . . . The 6-2 Kusnyer led the Golden Flashes in field-goal percentage (44.5%) in 1965-66 when he was their third-leading scorer and rebounder (10.5 ppg and 4 rpg).

ED LAFITTE, Georgia Tech
Righthander compiled a 35-36 record and 3.34 ERA with the Detroit Tigers, Brooklyn Dodgers and Buffalo in five years in 1909, 1911, 1912, 1914 and 1915. He won 18 games in 1914. . . . Center for Georgia Tech's first intercollegiate team in 1906.

JOE LAHOUD, New Haven (Conn.)
Platoon outfielder hit .223 with the Boston Red Sox, Milwaukee Brewers, California Angels, Texas Rangers and Kansas City Royals in 11 A.L. seasons from 1968 through 1978. Rushed to the bigs from Class A to replace injured right fielder Tony Conigliaro. Lefthander appeared in 1977 ALCS with the Royals. Traded by the Red Sox with Ken Brett, Billy Conigliaro, Jim Lonborg, Don Pavletich and George Scott to the Brewers for Marty Pattin, Lew Krausse, Tommy Harper and Pat Skrable on October 10, 1971. . . . The 6-0 Lahoud was a basketball letterman for New Haven in the mid-1960s.

ERLING "SWEDE" LARSEN, Villanova/Colgate
Second baseman played in three games with the Boston Braves in 1936. . . . The 5-11 Larsen was a two-year basketball letterman for Colgate in 1933-34 and 1934-35 after earning a letter with Villanova in 1932-33.

CHARLES "CHICK" LATHERS, Michigan
Lefthanded swinging infielder hit .228 with the Detroit Tigers in 1910 and 1911. . . . The 6-0 forward scored 16 points in five games in 1909.

JOHN "DOC" LAVAN, Hope (Mich.)
Shortstop hit .245 with the St. Louis Browns, Philadelphia Athletics, Washington Senators and St. Louis Cardinals in 12 seasons from 1913 through 1924. Runner-up in the A.L. in games played in 1915 with 157. Lavan made 75 errors in 1915 for the Browns and later twice led N.L. shortstops in miscues while with the Cards. . . . Played basketball for Hope from 1908 through 1910.

VANCE LAW, Brigham Young
Infielder hit .256 with the Pittsburgh Pirates, Chicago White Sox, Montreal Expos, Chicago Cubs and Oakland A's in 11 years from 1980 through 1991. He posted a career-high .293 batting average (eighth in N.L.) with the Cubs in 1988 when he was named an All-Star. Appeared in at least 130 games in six of seven seasons from 1983 through 1989, including a 25-inning marathon on May 8-9, 1984, against the Milwaukee Brewers. Participated in league championship series with the White Sox in 1983 and Cubs in 1989. The son of pitcher Vern Law also pitched in seven big league games. . . . The 6-2, 185-pounder averaged 6.8 ppg in three basketball seasons for the Cougars from 1974-75 through 1976-77. Played for BYU with his brother (Veryl).

RICK LEACH, Michigan
Backup first baseman-outfielder, a first-round pick in the 1979 amateur draft, hit .268 in 10 years from 1981 through 1990 with the Detroit Tigers, Toronto Blue Jays, Texas Rangers and San Francisco Giants. The lefthander's best season was with the Blue Jays in 1986 when he hit .309. . . . Averaged 15.5 ppg for Michigan's junior varsity basketball team in 1975-76. . . . Star quarterback with the Wolverines from 1976 through 1978 with 34 rushing touchdowns was a fifth-round draft choice of the Denver Broncos in 1979 after being named Co-MVP of the Rose Bowl. Finished third in 1978 Heisman Trophy voting.

HANK LEIBER, Arizona
Three-time All-Star outfielder hit .288 with 101 homers for the New York Giants and Chicago Cubs in 10 years from 1933 through 1942. Posted a .331 average (seventh in N.L.) with 22 HRs (sixth) and 107 RBI (fifth) in his first full season in 1935. Appeared in back-to-back World Series (1936 and 1937). Hit .364 in '37 series vs. the Yankees (including two hits in a six-run second inning of Game Four in the Giants' lone victory) after missing most of the campaign following a beaning by Bob Feller in spring training. Ranked among the N.L. top eight in home runs three times (1935-39-40). Swatted a total of 41 dingers in his first two years with the Cubs (1939 and 1940). Righthander pitched a complete game but lost his only big league start with the Giants in 1942. Co-owner and manager of the Tucson Cowboys minor league team in the 1940s. . . . The 6-1 1/2, 200-pounder scored 16 points in nine basketball games in 1931. His top performance was a six-point second-half "outburst" in a 40-37 loss to New Mexico State. Played football for three seasons, scoring a total of 12 touchdowns, including a 55-yard interception return in 1929 that was the school record for a number of years. First UA product to play major league baseball.

DAVE LEMANCZYK, Hartwick (N.Y.)
Righthander compiled a 37-63 record with the Detroit Tigers, Toronto Blue Jays and California Angels in eight years from 1973 through 1980. Member of A.L. squad for All-Star Game in 1979 in a season he had three shutouts with the Blue Jays and their first one-hitter. Two years earlier, he finished seventh in the A.L. in innings pitched (252) and his 13 victories tied a record for a first-year expansion team. . . . The 6-4 Lemanczyk averaged 4.5 ppg and 3.5 rpg for teams compiling a 51-21 record from 1969-70 through 1971-72. Hartwick participated in the NCAA Division II Tournament in 1970 and 1971.

DAVE LEONHARD, Johns Hopkins (Md.)
Righthander compiled a 16-14 record and 3.15 ERA with the Baltimore Orioles in six years with 1967 through 1972. Appeared in two World Series (1969 and 1971). Traded to the California Angels in June 1973 but failed to play for them. . . . Washington College (Md.) transfer averaged 4.8 ppg and 1.7 rpg with Johns Hopkins in 1961-62.

EMIL "DUTCH" LEVSEN, Iowa State
Righthander compiled a 21-26 record with the Cleveland Indians in six years from 1923 through 1928. Levsen registered 16 victories in 1926 when he ranked fifth in the A.L. in that category. Last hurler to register complete game wins in both ends of a doubleheader with a pair of four-hitters against the Boston Red Sox. . . . Basketball letterman for the Cyclones in 1918-19.

BILL LINDSAY, Guilford (N.C.)
Third baseman hit .242 in 16 games with the Cleveland Naps in 1911. . . . The 6-3 Lindsay was basketball captain for Guilford in 1905.

DANNY LITWHILER, Bloomsburg (Pa.)
Outfielder hit .281 with the Philadelphia Phillies, St. Louis Cardinals, Boston Braves and Cincinnati Reds in 11 seasons from 1940 through 1944 and 1946 through 1951. He was an All-Star in 1942 when he played the entire campaign without an error for the Phillies, ranking among the N.L. leaders in hits (eighth with 160), total bases (seventh with 230) and triples (fourth with nine). Acquired in mid-season, Litwhiler started the first four games of the 1943 World Series for the Cardinals. The next year, he hit a home run in Game Five of the World Series against the St. Louis Browns. . . . The 5-10, 190-pounder was a member of Bloomsburg's JV basketball squad his first three years. Converted his only free-throw attempt in his lone varsity game (54-22 over Mansfield State as a freshman in 1935). Coached college baseball for Florida State (products included Dick Howser and Woody Woodward) and Michigan State (Steve Garvey and Kirk Gibson). Litwhiler invented a number of devices to improve the game, including the radar gun to measure pitching speed.

DON LOCK, Wichita State
Outfielder hit .238 with 122 home runs for the Washington Senators, Philadelphia Phillies and Boston Red Sox in eight seasons from 1962 through 1969. Ranked among the A.L. top 10 in home runs in 1963 (27) and 1964 (28). Homered in his debut but was plagued by strikeouts, averaging more than 105 whiffs annually in a five-year span from 1963 through 1967. Traded by the New York Yankees to the Senators for Dale Long on July 11, 1962. Traded by the Senators to the Phillies for Darold Knowles and cash on November 30, 1966. . . . The 6-2 Lock was a starting guard for the Shockers as a junior in 1956-57 (7 ppg) and as a senior in 1957-58 (10.1 ppg), leading them in field-goal percentage both seasons under coach Ralph Miller.

KENNY LOFTON, Arizona
Lefthander hit .299 and stole 622 bases in 17 seasons from 1991 through 2007 with the Houston Astros, Cleveland Indians, Atlanta Braves, Chicago White Sox, San Francisco Giants, Pittsburgh Pirates, Chicago Cubs, New York Yankees, Philadelphia Phillies, Los Angeles Dodgers and Texas Rangers. Four-time Gold Glove center fielder led the Indians with a .325 batting mark (fourth in A.L.) and paced the majors with 70 stolen bases in 1993. After being traded to Cleveland, he hit .285 for the Indians in 1992 and led the A.L. in stolen bases with 66, a record for an A.L. rookie. Six-time All-Star led the A.L. in stolen bases five consecutive years from 1992 through 1996, hitting a career-high .349 in 1994. Paced the A.L. with 13 triples in 1995 before stealing six bases in the World Series against the Braves. Returned to the Series in 2002 with the Giants. Tied a major league record by scoring at least one run in 18 consecutive contests. . . . Averaged 4.8 ppg and 2.6 apg in four seasons (1985-86 through 1988-89) with the Wildcats under coach Lute Olson. Set school records for steals in a season (67 in 1988-89) and career (200). Leader in steals for 1988 Final Four team compiling a 35-3 record.

DAVEY LOPES, Iowa Wesleyan
Four-time All-Star second baseman hit .263 with the Los Angeles Dodgers, Oakland A's, Chicago Cubs and Houston Astros in 16 seasons from 1972 through 1987. Led the N.L. in stolen bases in back-to-back campaigns in 1975 (77) and 1976 (63) after finishing runner-up in 1974 (59). Swiped five bases in a game on August 24, 1974, to tie a 70-year-old N.L. record before establishing a since-broken N.L. mark with 38 consecutive successful thefts the next year. Pilfered 47 bases at age 39. Appeared in four World Series with the Dodgers in an eight-year span from 1974 through 1981, swatting two homers in Game One of the 1978 World Series against the New York Yankees. Posted a .424 batting average in postseason competition with runners in scoring position. Compiled a 144-195 managerial record for the Milwaukee Brewers in three years from 2000 through 2002. . . . The 5-9 NAIA All-District 15 selection averaged 16.9 ppg and 3.4 rpg as an All-Iowa Intercollegiate Athletic Conference first-team choice freshman in 1964-65 and 12.1 ppg as a sophomore in 1965-66 before transferring to Washburn (Kan.).

TERRELL LOWERY, Loyola Marymount
Outfielder hit .282 with the Chicago Cubs, Tampa Bay Devil Rays and San Francisco Giants from 1997 through 2000 after previously being in the farm systems of the Texas Rangers and New York Mets. Went 15 for 34 from the plate (.441) with the Giants in 2000, including five hits in a single game against the Milwaukee Brewers. . . . Two-time All-WCC first-team selection and league-leading scorer. He scored a career-high 48 points against Idaho State as a junior in 1990-91 when he finished among the top five nationally in scoring (28.5 ppg) and assists (9.1 apg). The 6-3 Oakland product ranked eighth in the country in scoring as a senior with 26 ppg. Lowery, a teammate of Hank Gathers and Bo Kimble, scored at least 16 points as a sophomore in each of the last three NCAA playoff outings for the Lions' 1990 West Regional runner-up.

LARRY LUCCHINO, Princeton
Key executive with the Baltimore Orioles (1979 through 1993), San Diego Padres (1994 to 2001) and Boston Red Sox for more than 20 years. Driving force behind the construction of Camden Yards was part-owner of the Padres. He was instrumental in the Red Sox' hiring Theo Epstein in November 2002 as the youngest G.M. in baseball history prior to their capturing the 2004 World Series. Lucchino, after earning his law degree at Yale, was employed by the U.S. Congress to litigate his first case--the Watergate hearings--along with Hillary Clinton. Survived non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in the 1980s and prostate cancer in the 1990s. . . . Teammate of Bill Bradley when he scored a Final Four-record 58 points against Wichita State in the 1965 national third-place game. Averaged 2.9 ppg in 36 varsity contests as a backup to Princeton A.D. Gary Walters for three years. Scored 14 points in three NCAA Tournament games in 1967 against coaches Bucky Waters, Dean Smith and Lou Carnesecca.

JERRY LUMPE, Southwest Missouri State
Infielder hit .268 in a 12-year career from 1956 through 1967 with the New York Yankees, Kansas City Athletics and Detroit Tigers. Played in 1957 and 1958 World Series with the Yankees. Lefthanded swinger was an All-Star in 1964 with the Tigers, but his best season was with the Athletics in 1962 when he hit .301 (eighth in A.L.) and managed 193 hits (runner-up), including 34 doubles (fifth) and 10 triples (runner-up). . . . Played in 1952 NAIA Tournament final for championship team. He averaged 3.7 ppg in his 44-game college career.

DON LUND, Michigan
Outfielder hit .240 in a seven-year career (1945, 1947 through 1949 and 1952 through 1954) with the Brooklyn Dodgers, St. Louis Browns and Detroit Tigers. His only season as a regular was 1953 when he was the Tigers' right fielder. Coached baseball at his alma mater, winning the national championship in 1962, before running the Tigers' farm system until 1970. . . . First-round selection as a fullback/linebacker by the Chicago Bears in the 1945 NFL draft. Rejected $100 a game offer from the Bears and never played pro football. . . . He was a 6-0, 200-pound starting guard as a junior for the Wolverines' basketball team and starting center as a senior. Averaged 4.4 ppg in 46 outings. In his history of Michigan basketball, Jeff Mortimer wrote of the school's World War II squads: "Lund, rejected for military service because of a trick knee, was the mainstay of these teams." Following his playing career, he served as baseball coach for his alma mater (won 1962 College World Series), farm system director for the Tigers and associate athletic director at his alma mater.

TONY LUPIEN, Harvard
Lefthanded first baseman hit .268 in six seasons (1940, 1942 through 1945 and 1948) with the Boston Red Sox, Philadelphia Phillies and Chicago White Sox. Ranked sixth in triples with nine in the A.L. and N.L. in back-to-back seasons (1943 and 1944). The former baseball coach at Dartmouth was co-author of the book "The Imperfect Diamond: The Story of Baseball's Reserve Clause and the Men Who Fought to Change It." . . . The 5-10, 185-pound guard was captain of the 1938-39 Harvard basketball squad. The previous season, he was the school's second-leading scorer in conference competition with 5.4 ppg.

WALT LYNCH, Niagara
Catcher went 1 for 2 in three games with the Boston Red Sox in 1922. . . . The 6-0 Lynch was a basketball letterman for Niagara from 1919-20 through 1922-23.

TED LYONS, Baylor
Member of Baseball Hall of Fame spent his entire 21-year career with the Chicago White Sox (1923 through 1942 and 1946) after never playing in the minors. Managed the White Sox from 1946 through 1948. Three-time 20-game winner compiled a 260-230 record and 3.67 ERA in 594 games, completing almost three-fourths of his 484 starts. Righthander pitched a no-hitter against the Boston Red Sox in 1926. In 1939, the All-Star hurled 42 consecutive innings without issuing a walk. Ranked among the A.L. top six in ERA nine times, including a league-best 2.10 mark in 1942. . . . Earned four basketball letters with Baylor from 1919-20 through 1922-23. Consensus first-team selection on All-Southwest Conference squad as a sophomore and senior.

JIM LYTTLE, Florida State
Backup outfielder, a first-round pick in 1966 amateur draft, hit .248 with the New York Yankees, Chicago White Sox, Montreal Expos and Los Angeles Dodgers in eight years from 1969 through 1976. The lefthanded swinger's best season was 1970 when he hit .310 with the Yankees. . . . The 6-0 point guard led the Seminoles in free-throw shooting in 1965-66 (75.9%) when he averaged 12.4 ppg.

DAVE MADISON, Louisiana State
Righthander compiled an 8-7 record with the New York Yankees, St. Louis Browns and Detroit Tigers in three years (1950, 1952 and 1953). Ranked among the A.L.'s top 10 pitchers in games appeared and games finished in 1952. Traded by the Browns with Bud Black, Jim Delsing and Ned Garver to the Tigers for Dick Littlefield, Marlin Stuart, Don Lenhardt and Vic Wertz on August 14, 1952. . . . The 6-3 guard was a basketball letterman for LSU from 1939-40 through 1942-43.

ED MADJESKI, Seton Hall
Catcher hit .241 with the Philadelphia Athletics, Chicago White Sox and New York Giants in four years from 1932 through 1934 and 1937. . . . The 5-11, 175-pounder was a basketball letterman with the Pirates from 1928-29 through 1930-31.

CHRIS MAHONEY, Fordham
Righthander lost one of the two games he pitched for the Boston Red Sox in 1910. . . . Three-year basketball letterman with Fordham from 1907 through 1909.

JERRY MALLETT, Baylor
Outfielder went 4 for 15 with the Boston Red Sox in 1959. . . . The 6-5 forward, a two-time All-SWC first-team selection, averaged 15.3 ppg and 12.7 rpg for Baylor from 1954-55 through 1956-57 under coach Bill Henderson. Led the Bears in scoring as a senior with 16.5 ppg and paced them in rebounding all three seasons.

BILLY MARTIN, Georgetown
Shortstop was hitless in three at-bats in one game for the Boston Braves in 1914. . . . Four-year basketball letterman for the Hoyas earlier in the decade.

JERRY MARTIN, Furman
Outfielder hit .251 in 11 years from 1974 through 1984 with the Philadelphia Phillies, Chicago Cubs, San Francisco Giants, Kansas City Royals and New York Mets. Valuable backup hit three pinch homers for the Phillies in 1978 in his last year with three consecutive divisional champions. The next two years as a regular with the Cubs, Martin collected 42 homers and 146 RBI. His 34 doubles in 1979 ranked ninth in the N.L. His father, Barney Martin, pitched in one game for the Cincinnati Reds in 1953. The free-swinger, suspended in 1984 for involvement with drugs, served a three-month sentence in the Fort Worth Correctional Institute with Royals teammate Willie Wilson. . . . Martin, a transfer from Spartanburg (S.C.) Community College, was Furman's second-leading scorer as a junior in 1969-70 (16 ppg) under coach Frank Selvy and third-leading scorer as a senior in 1970-71 (12.7 ppg) under coach Joe Williams. The 6-1, 195-pound guard was named MVP in the 1971 Southern Conference Tournament after leading the Paladins to the title with 22-, 36- and 19-point performances to pace the tourney in scoring. He collected five points and two rebounds as a starter for them in their inaugural NCAA Tournament game, a 105-74 defeat against Digger Phelps-coached Fordham in the 1971 East Regional. Excerpt in school guide: "Fine defensive performer is an excellent rebounder (5.6 rpg as a junior) who jumps well despite height."

MIKE MARTIN, Wingate (N.C.) Junior College
One of the all-time five winningest college baseball coaches boasts the highest winning percentage among DI mentors, winning almost three-fourths of his games with Florida State. He has guided the Seminoles to the College World Series a total of 15 times (1980-86-87-89-91-92-94-95-96-98-99-00-08-10-12). . . . Played for Wingate in the mid-1960s before the institution became a four-year school. One of his J.C. basketball teammates was Morris "Mo" McHone, who went on to coach the San Antonio Spurs in 1983-84. Martin coached basketball for Tallahassee (Fla.) Community College in the early 1970s.

ROGER MASON, Saginaw Valley State (Mich.)
Righthander compiled a 22-35 record and 4.02 ERA with the Detroit Tigers, San Francisco Giants, Houston Astros, Pittsburgh Pirates, San Diego Padres, Philadelphia Phillies and New York Mets in nine years from 1984 through 1994. Posted a 1.17 ERA in 1993 World Series with the Phillies in four relief appearances against the Toronto Blue Jays. Never yielded a run in seven NLCS relief appearances with the Pirates and Phillies from 1991 through 1993. . . . The 6-6 Mason was a multiple-year basketball letterman for Saginaw Valley in the late 1970s.

GORDY MASSA, Holy Cross
Lefthanded hitting catcher went 7 for 17 from the plate in eight games for the Chicago Cubs in 1957 and 1958. . . . Senior walk-on in 1956-57 when the 6-3, 210-pounder provided added depth for the Crusaders after they suffered several injuries to low post players. Versatile athlete was selected as a center in 10th round of 1957 NFL draft by the New York Giants.

CHRISTY MATHEWSON, Bucknell
Often regarded as baseball's greatest pitcher, the righthander compiled a 372-188 record and 2.13 ERA with 79 shutouts for the New York Giants in 17 years from 1900 to 1916 before winning his lone start with Cincinnati in 1916. Led the N.L. in ERA five times (1905-08-09-11-13). Hall of Famer ranked among the N.L. top five in victories 12 years in a row from 1903 through 1914. Paced the N.L. in strikeouts on five occasions in a six-year span from 1903 through 1908. Won 30 games or more in three consecutive seasons, leading the Giants in their 1905 World Series victory over the Philadelphia Athletics by hurling three shutouts in six days. Also appeared in three straight World Series from 1911 through 1913. . . . The 6-2 Mathewson also played football and basketball at the turn of the 20th Century for Bucknell (class of '02).

LEN MATUSZEK, Toledo
Lefthanded swinger hit .234 in seven seasons from 1981 through 1987 with the Philadelphia Phillies, Toronto Blue Jays and Los Angeles Dodgers. Appeared in 1985 N.L. Championship Series with the Dodgers. Backup outfielder assumed first-base duties from Pete Rose in 1984 after the Hall of Famer left the Phillies. . . . Two-year basketball letterman was a starter for Toledo's 1975-76 squad that compiled an 18-7 record. The 6-2, 190-pounder averaged 5.4 ppg in his three-year career under coach Bob Nichols.

ARNOLD "BAKE" McBRIDE, Westminster (Mo.)
Fleet outfielder hit .299 with the St. Louis Cardinals, Philadelphia Phillies and Cleveland Indians in 11 injury-plagued seasons from 1973 through 1983. Lefthanded swinger hit .312 over the first five years of his major league career. N.L. Rookie of the Year in 1974 when he hit .309 with the Cardinals was named to the N.L. All-Star team two years later. Posted career highs of 33 doubles (eighth in N.L.) and 87 RBI in 1980 when he helped the Phillies capture the World Series by hitting a game-winning three-run homer in the opener before singling in the tying run and scoring the game winner in their 8th-inning rally in Game Two. . . . McBride stayed in his hometown to attend Westminster on a basketball scholarship, averaging 12.7 ppg and 8.1 rpg in 21 games in 1968-69 and 1969-70. "We played (basketball) all day and all night," McBride said of his days on the playgrounds of Fulton. "We played as long as we could. That's all we did." He was open to switching to baseball, which he didn't play in high school, after severely tearing a tendon in his left ankle during a pickup basketball game his senior year. Nonetheless, he set the Westminster record in the 200-meter dash while participating in track.

BILL McCAHAN, Duke
Righthander compiled a 16-14 record with the Philadelphia Athletics in four seasons from 1946 through 1949. He joined the Athletics after serving as a test pilot during World War II. Hurled a seven-inning shutout in his first major league game and a no-hitter vs. Washington on September 3, 1947. . . . McCahan was a three-year letterman for Duke basketball teams that finished second in the Southern Conference Tournament in 1940 and won title in 1941 and 1942. Named to United Press all-tourney team in 1942 when the 5-11, 200-pound guard finished second on the Blue Devils in scoring. Played briefly for Syracuse in the National Basketball League in the 1946-47 season.

HARRY "MOOSE" McCORMICK, Bucknell
Lefthanded outfielder hit .285 with the New York Giants, Pittsburgh Pirates and Philadelphia Phillies in five seasons (1904, 1908, 1909, 1912 and 1913). Ranked seventh in the N.L. in batting average in 1909 with a .291 mark. Played in back-to-back World Series with the Giants in his last two years in the majors. Known as the man who created the role of the pinch hitter. . . . Four-sport athlete (class of 1904) returned to his alma mater and coached basketball and baseball.

BEN McDONALD, Louisiana State
Righthander posted a 20-17 record in 1996 and 1997 with the Milwaukee Brewers after signing as a free agent following the 1995 season. First pick overall in 1989 amateur draft compiled a 58-53 mark with the Baltimore Orioles from 1989 through 1995, including a team-record seven victories to start the 1994 campaign when he finished fourth in the A.L. with 14 wins. . . . Played in 32 games, starting six, as a 6-6 freshman forward for LSU in 1986-87 under coach Dale Brown. Averaged 2.8 ppg with a high of 13 against Auburn, but didn't appear in the NCAA Tournament for the Tigers' Midwest Regional runner-up. Played in six basketball games the next season before concentrating on his baseball career.

MEL McGAHA, Arkansas
Former manager of the Cleveland Indians (1962) and Kansas City Athletics (June 11, 1964-May 14, 1965). Compiled a 123-173 record (.416). . . . The first player in Arkansas history to earn four letters in basketball (1943-44 through 1946-47). Played for the New York Knickerbockers of the Basketball Association of America in 1948-49. Posted a 32-15 coaching record for Arkansas A&M College (now known as Arkansas-Monticello) during two seasons in 1953-54 and 1954-55.

MARTY McLEARY, Mount Vernon Nazarene (Ohio)
Righthander compiled a 2-0 record in 12 games with the San Diego Padres and Pittsburgh Pirates in three seasons (2004, 2006 and 2007). He also pitched in the farm systems of the Boston Red Sox and Florida Marlins. . . . The 6-5 McLeary arrived at MVNU to play basketball but switched to baseball instead after sitting out his first year because he failed to meet eligibility requirements.

GORDON McNAUGHTON, Loyola of Chicago
Righthander started two of six games he pitched with the Boston Red Sox in 1932. . . . The 6-1 McNaughton was a basketball player for the Ramblers in the late 1920s.

SCOTT MEDVIN, Baldwin-Wallace (Ohio)
Righthander compiled a 3-2 record with the Pittsburgh Pirates and Seattle Mariners in three years from 1988 through 1990. After beginning his Organized Baseball career in the Detroit Tigers' farm system, he was traded to the San Francisco Giants. Subsequently swapped by the Giants with Jeff Robinson to the Pirates for Rick Reuschel. . . . The 6-1 Medvin briefly played junior varsity basketball in the early 1980s before concentrating on baseball.

SAM MELE, New York University
Major league outfielder for 10 years from 1947 through 1956 and manager of the Minnesota Twins for seven years from 1961 through 1967. Hit .267 in 1,046 games with the Boston Red Sox, Washington Senators, Chicago White Sox, Baltimore Orioles, Cincinnati Reds and Cleveland Indians. Played for two different teams in a single season four times in a seven-year span from 1949 through 1955. Led the A.L. with 36 doubles for the Senators in 1951 and drove in six runs in one inning in a 1952 game for the White Sox. Compiled a 524-436 managerial record from 1961 through 1967 with the Twins, winning the 1965 A.L. title with a 102-60 mark. . . . The 6-0, 180-pound guard played two seasons of varsity basketball before entering the military. Named to the first five on the All-Metropolitan New York team as a sophomore in 1942-43 when he was the Violets' leading scorer in the NCAA Tournament (losses against Georgetown and Dartmouth).

ARTHUR "BUD" METHENY, William & Mary
Lefthanded outfielder hit .247 with the New York Yankees in four seasons from 1943 to 1946. Appeared in 1943 World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals. Ranked 10th in the A.L. in home runs in 1944 with 14. . . . The 5-11 Metheny was a basketball letterman for William & Mary from 1935-36 through 1937-38. Longtime baseball and all-time winningest basketball coach for Old Dominion.

LAMBERT "DUTCH" MEYER, Texas Christian
Second baseman hit .264 with the Chicago Cubs, Detroit Tigers and Cleveland Indians in six seasons (1937-40-42-42-45-46). In 1945 in Meyer's first season with the Indians after failing to succeed Tigers legend Charlie Gehringer, he ranked among the A.L. top nine in batting average (.292), slugging percentage (.418), hits (153), total bases (219), doubles (29), triples (8) and extra-base hits (44). Cleveland traded him to the New York Yankees after the 1946 campaign but he never played for them. Army veteran paced the East Texas League with a .375 batting average in 1950 as Gladewater's player-manager before managing in the Texas League and Carolina League. . . . Basketball letterman for TCU in 1934-35 and 1935-36. Played in Sugar Bowl and first-ever Cotton Bowl as QB Sammy Baugh's favorite target.

GENE MICHAEL, Kent State
Former New York Yankees general manager was a switch-hitting shortstop who hit .229 in 10 seasons from 1966 through 1975 with the Pittsburgh Pirates, Los Angeles Dodgers, Yankees and Detroit Tigers. Nicknamed "Stick," he was a master of the hidden ball trick, pulling it off five times in his major league career. Michael compiled a 206-200 record in a four-year managerial career with the Yankees (1981 and 1982) and Chicago Cubs (1986 and 1987). . . . The 6-2, 180-pounder led Kent State in scoring with 14 ppg in 1957-58. He also chipped in with 4.9 rpg.

JIMMY MILES, Delta State (Miss.)
Righthander lost his only decision in 13 games with the Washington Senators in 1968 and 1969. . . . The 6-2 Miles averaged 5.2 ppg and 8.9 rpg for Delta State in 1964-65.

RUDEL "RUDY" MILLER, Western Michigan
Third baseman went 1 for 4 in two games with the Philadelphia Athletics in 1929. . . . The 6-1 Miller was a basketball letterman for WMU from 1920-21 through 1923-24.

RUPERT MILLS, Notre Dame
First baseman hit .201 in 41 games with the Newark Pepper in the Federal League in 1915. . . . He was a 6-2 center for the Irish's basketball squad from 1912-13 through 1914-15.

RYAN MINOR, Oklahoma
Third baseman with the Baltimore Orioles replaced Cal Ripken Jr. in lineup on September 20, 1998, ending Ripken's major league record of 2,632 consecutive games played. Minor, the 6-7 brother of Giants first baseman Damon Minor, hit .177 with five home runs in four seasons from 1998 through 2001 with the Orioles and Montreal Expos. . . . Forward averaged 16.5 ppg en route to finishing his career No. 6 on the Sooners' all-time scoring list (1,946 points). Two-time All-Big Eight first-team selection was conference player of the year as a junior when he averaged 23.6 ppg and 8.4 rpg. Holds school record with 30 consecutive successful free throws. Played in the NCAA Tournament in 1995 and 1996. Member of 1994 College World Series champion was a second-round draft choice of the Philadelphia 76ers in 1996 (32nd pick overall).

WILLIE MITCHELL, Mississippi State
Lefthander compiled an 84-92 record and 2.88 ERA with the Cleveland Indians and Detroit Tigers in 11 A.L. seasons from 1909 through 1919. Ranked among the league top eight in strikeouts three consecutive years from 1913 through 1915. Led the Indians in wins, losses, games, complete games and strikeouts in 1914. . . . The 6-0 Mitchell was a basketball letterman for MSU in 1909.

DANNY MOELLER, Millikin (Ill.)
Switch-hitting outfielder hit .243 with the Pittsburgh Pirates, Washington Senators and Cleveland Indians in seven years in 1907, 1908 and 1912 through 1916. Runner-up in the A.L. in stolen bases in 1913 with 62. Managed 10 triples in each of his four seasons as a regular. On July 19, 1915, he stole second, third and home in the opening inning against Cleveland. . . . The 5-11 Moeller was captain of Millikin's basketball squad in 1905-06.

FREDDIE MONCEWICZ, Boston College
Shortstop struck out in his only at-bat with the Boston Red Sox in 1928. . . . BC basketball letterman in 1924-25.

ZACH MONROE, Bradley
Righthander compiled a 4-2 record and 3.38 ERA in 24 games with the New York Yankees in 1958 and 1959. Member of World Series team as a rookie. . . . Scored nine points in four basketball games for the Braves in 1950-51.

DAN MONZON, Buena Vista (Iowa)
Infielder hit .244 with the Minnesota Twins in two years in 1972 and 1973. Traded to the Montreal Expos in 1974 but he didn't play for them. . . . Connected on half of his 10 field-goal attempts in six games with Buena Vista in 1964-65.

WALLY MOON, Texas A&M
Two-time All-Star outfielder-first baseman hit .289 with the St. Louis Cardinals and Los Angeles Dodgers in 12 N.L. seasons from 1954 through 1965. Lefthanded swinger homered in first at-bat en route to earning N.L. Rookie of the Year acclaim over Hank Aaron in 1954 when Moon led the league in plate appearances (716) and ranked among the top six in hits (193), triples (9), runs (106) and stolen bases (18). Paced the N.L. in triples in 1959 with 11. Gold Glove left fielder in 1960 between participating in two World Series with the Dodgers (1959 and 1965). Finished fourth in the 1959 MVP voting ahead of Willie Mays (6th), Frank Robinson (9th) and Ken Boyer (10th). . . . The 5-11 Moon averaged 4.3 ppg with the Aggies in 1948-49 and 1949-50.

JIM MOONEY, East Tennessee State
Righthander compiled a 17-20 record with the New York Giants and St. Louis Cardinals in four seasons from 1931 through 1934. Notched six straight victories as a Giants rookie following his August 1931 debut. Appeared in 1934 World Series with the Cardinals' Gas House Gang against the Detroit Tigers. Served as his alma maater's baseball coach for 27 years from 1939 through 1966. . . . All-around athlete was a star halfback for ETSU's football squad and standout basketball player although both teams were less successful than the school's baseball team.

ED MORGAN, Tulane
First baseman hit .313 with the Cleveland Indians and Boston Red Sox in seven years from 1928 through 1934. He posted career highs of 26 home runs (sixth in A.L.), 47 doubles (third) and 136 RBI (sixth) with the Tribe in 1930 before hitting a career-high .351 (third) the next season. . . . Three-year basketball letterman with the Green Wave from 1923-24 through 1925-26.

LYLE MOUTON, Louisiana State
Outfielder hit .280 for the Chicago White Sox, Baltimore Orioles, Milwaukee Brewers and Florida Marlins in seven seasons from 1995 through 2001. Also played in Japan. . . . The 6-3 Mouton averaged 8.2 ppg and 3.2 rpg as a sophomore in 1988-89 before dropping off coach Dale Brown's basketball team to concentrate on baseball. Started in LSU's backcourt with All-American Chris Jackson when the Tigers lost to Texas-El Paso in the West Regional of the NCAA playoffs.

JOE MOWRY, Iowa
Switch-hitting outfielder posted a .233 batting average with the Boston Braves in three seasons from 1933 through 1935. . . . Basketball letterman for the Hawkeyes in 1929-30 and 1930-31.

DICK MURPHY, Ohio University
Lefthanded swinger appeared in six games with the Cincinnati Reds in 1954. . . . The 5-11 Murphy was a basketball letterman from 1951-52 through 1953-54 under Jim Snyder, the school's all-time winningest coach. He averaged 8.6 ppg as a sophomore, 10.8 ppg as a junior and 10.7 ppg as a senior.

CHARLES "BUDDY" MYER, Mississippi State
Infielder, primarily a second baseman, hit .303 with the Washington Senators and Boston Red Sox in 17 A.L. seasons from 1925 through 1941. Beat out 60 bunts in a single season and hit over .300 nine times. Led the league in stolen bases in 1928 (30) and batting average in 1935 (.349). Ranked among the A.L. top nine in on-base percentage four times (1934-35-37-38) and top 10 in triples five years (1927-31-32-33-35). Two-time All-Star participated in two World Series (1925 and 1933). . . . Basketball letterman for MSU in 1923-24.

PETE NAKTENIS, Duke
Lefthander compiled an 0-1 record in 10 games with the Philadelphia Athletics and Cincinnati Reds in 1936 and 1939. . . . The 6-1 Naktenis was a basketball letterman for the Blue Devils in 1934-35.

CHARLES "COTTON" NASH, Kentucky
First baseman went 3 for 16 (.188) in three short stints with the Chicago White Sox (1967) and Minnesota Twins (1969 and 1970). Traded by the California Angels with cash to the White Sox for Bill "Moose" Skowron on May 6, 1967. . . . The 6-5, 220-pound forward averaged 22.7 ppg and 12.3 rpg in three-year varsity basketball career from 1961-62 through 1963-64 under coach Adolph Rupp. Nash was an NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1964 and consensus second-team All-American in 1962 and 1963.

PHIL NASTU, Bridgeport (Conn.)
Lefthander registered a 3-5 record and 4.50 ERA with the San Francisco Giants from 1978 through 1980, starting 14 games in 1979. Traded to the Chicago Cubs but never played for them. . . . The 6-2 Nastu played for Bridgeport from 1972-73 through 1975-76, averaging 13.6 ppg and 4.2 rpg as a senior for an Elite Eight team compiling a 24-5 record.

EARLE "GREASY" NEALE, West Virginia Wesleyan College
Lefthanded-swinging outfielder hit .259 with the Cincinnati Reds and Philadelphia Phillies for eight years from 1916 to 1924, hitting .357 for the Reds with a team-high 10 hits in the infamous "Black Sox" 1919 World Series. Pro Football Hall of Famer compiled a 63-43 record as coach of the Philadelphia Eagles for 10 years from 1941 through 1950, winning back-to-back NFL titles by shutting out their opponents in championship games in 1948 and 1949. Guided Washington and Jefferson (Pa.) to the 1922 Rose Bowl before coaching Virginia and West Virginia. He starred as an end on Jim Thorpe's pre-World War I Canton Bulldogs. . . . Class of 1915 at WVWC.

CAL NEEMAN SR., Illinois Wesleyan
Catcher hit .224 in seven years from 1957 through 1963 with the Chicago Cubs, Philadelphia Phillies, Pittsburgh Pirates, Cleveland Indians and Washington Senators. His best year was as a rookie with the Cubs when he led N.L. catchers in putouts and double plays and hit .258 with 17 doubles, 10 home runs and 39 RBI. . . . Leading scorer as a 6-1, 190-pound freshman in 1947-48 with 12 ppg. The next year, he set a school single-season scoring record in helping Illinois Wesleyan compile a 19-6 record and capture the College Conference of Illinois championship. Three of the defeats were on the road against perennial powers DePaul, Duquesne and Seton Hall. Following the 1948-49 campaign, Neeman signed a baseball contract with the New York Yankees. His departure freed up a spot at the school for Arkansas native Bobby Winkles, who went on to become a prominent manager. Neeman's brother, Earl, was a two-time MVP for Illinois Wesleyan in the mid-1950s. One of Neeman's sons, Cal Jr., was a basketball standout as a freshman for Louisiana College in the mid-1970s before dropping out of school.

GRAIG NETTLES, San Diego State
Two-time Gold Glove third baseman hit 390 home runs with 1,314 RBI in 22 years from 1967 through 1988 with the Minnesota Twins, Cleveland Indians, New York Yankees, San Diego Padres, Atlanta Braves and Montreal Expos. Lefthanded swinger holds A.L. record for most homers by a third baseman (319). He hit an A.L. high of 32 homers in 1976 before posting career highs of 37 homers (runner-up) and 107 RBI (seventh) the next season. Homered in the same game with his brother, Jim, an outfielder with the Detroit Tigers. Six-time All-Star was homerless in five World Series (four with the Yankees and one with the Padres) covering 24 contests. The highlight of Nettles' career was four dazzling stops in Game Three of the 1978 World Series to help the Yankees win their first of four consecutive games. . . . Averaged 5.3 ppg while earning basketball letters in his hometown for San Diego State in 1963-64 and 1964-65. The 6-0 Nettles shot 87.8 percent from the free-throw line (36 of 41) as a sophomore in 1963-64.

BILL NICHOLSON, Washington College (Md.)
Lefthanded-swinging outfielder hit .268 with 235 home runs and 948 RBI in 16 years from 1936 through 1953 with the Philadelphia Athletics, Chicago Cubs and Philadelphia Phillies. Five-time All-Star led the N.L. in home runs and RBI in 1943 and 1944. Also ranked among the N.L. top four in homers from 1940 through 1942. Homerless in seven games in the 1945 World Series with the Cubs but had a series-high eight RBI. Runner-up by one vote to Marty Marion for 1944 MVP honors. After swatting four consecutive homers in a July 23, 1944 doubleheader at the Polo Grounds, he was intentionally walked with the bases loaded in the seventh inning on orders of Giants manager Mel Ott. . . . The 6-0, 205-pounder played guard for two years on Washington College's basketball squad in the mid-1930s.

JOE NIEKRO, West Liberty State (W.Va.)
Knuckleballer compiled a 221-204 record and 3.59 ERA with the Chicago Cubs, San Diego Padres, Detroit Tigers, Atlanta Braves, Houston Astros, New York Yankees and Minnesota Twins in 22 years from 1967 through 1988. Only homer he hit in his career came off brother (Phil) in 1976. All-Star in 1979 when he led the N.L. in victories (21) and shutouts (5) with the Astros. Runner-up in the N.L. in ERA in 1982 (2.47) in the midst of six straight seasons from 1979 through 1984 finishing among the top five in innings pitched. Appeared in 1987 World Series with the champion Twins against the St. Louis Cardinals. . . . Played basketball for West Liberty in the mid-1960s.

TIM NORDBROOK, Loyola (New Orleans)
Infielder, primarily a shortstop, hit .178 with the Baltimore Orioles, California Angels, Chicago White Sox, Toronto Blue Jays and Milwaukee Brewers in six A.L. seasons from 1974 through 1979. . . . The 6-1 Nordbrook was a basketball letterman for Loyola (La.) in 1968-69.

IRV NOREN, Pasadena City (Calif.)
Outfielder hit .275 with the Washington Senators, New York Yankees, Kansas City A's, St. Louis Cardinals, Chicago Cubs and Los Angeles Dodgers in 11-year career from 1950 through 1960. Appeared in three World Series with the Yankees (1952, 1953 and 1955). Lefthanded swinger was an All-Star in 1954 when he hit .319 (fourth in A.L.). . . . The 6-0, 190-pounder was named player of the year for the California junior college state champions in 1945.

BILLY NORTH, Central Washington
Switch-hitter posted .261 batting average with the Chicago Cubs, Oakland Athletics, Los Angeles Dodgers and San Francisco Giants in 11 years from 1971 through 1981. Paced the A.L. in stolen bases in 1974 (54) and 1976 (75). In 1973, he was A.L. runner-up in runs scored (98) while leading center fielders in putouts and assists. Hit a lowly .080 in nine World Series games with the A's (1974) and Dodgers (1978). . . . Collected two points and two rebounds in four CWU basketball games in 1967-68.

JIM NORTHRUP, Alma (Mich.) College
Outfielder hit .267 with 153 homers and 610 RBI in 12 seasons with the Detroit Tigers (1964 to 1974), Montreal Expos (1974) and Baltimore Orioles (1975). The lefthanded hitter had three straight seasons with more than 20 home runs from 1968 through 1970. He still holds the major league standard for hitting two grand slam homers in consecutive at-bat pitches and is co-holder of a record three grand slams in one week. Appeared in the 1968 World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals, hitting a vital seventh-inning triple in Game Seven after swatting a grand slam in the previous contest. On August 28, 1969 vs. Oakland, he became the first Tiger since Ty Cobb to go six-for-six in a single game. In 1973, Northrup had a second eight-RBI outing. . . . Played three seasons of basketball for Alma before he was signed by the Tigers after his junior year in 1960. As a sophomore, the 6-3, 190-pounder was the school's second-leading scorer (12.8 ppg) and third-leading rebounder (6.6 rpg). Northrup was a star quarterback in college, where he also participated in track and golf.

EDDIE O'BRIEN, Seattle
Bonus baby infielder-outfielder played five seasons (1953 and 1955 through 1958) with the Pittsburgh Pirates, hitting .236 in 231 games. Twin brother of former major leaguer Johnny O'Brien, a teammate at Seattle. . . . Averaged 12.1 ppg in 1950-51, 10.6 in 1951-52 and 16.5 in 1952-53. Third-team All-American selection on Converse and United Press All-American squads as a senior when he finished second in the nation in field-goal shooting (54 percent). Averaged 15.3 ppg in three NCAA Tournament contests in 1953. Finished college career as Seattle's second-leading career scorer (behind Johnny) with 1,237 points. Selected by the Milwaukee Hawks in 1953 NBA draft.

JOHNNY O'BRIEN, Seattle
Bonus baby infielder/pitcher played six seasons (1953 and 1955 through 1959) with the Pittsburgh Pirates, St. Louis Cardinals and Milwaukee Braves. Hit .250 and compiled 1-3 pitching record in 339 games. As a second baseman for the Pirates on July 3, 1956, he became the last N.L. position player to earn a victory on the mound until catcher Brent Mayne achieved the feat for the Colorado Rockies against the Atlanta Braves in August 2000. Traded by the Pirates with Gene Freese to the Cardinals for Dick Schofield and cash. Twin brother of former major leaguer Eddie O'Brien, a teammate with Seattle. . . . The 5-9, 160-pound guard scored 2,733 points in three varsity seasons (1950-51 through 1952-53), averaging 20.7 ppg as a sophomore, 28.4 as a junior and 28.6 as a senior (third among major-college players). Scored 51 points against Gonzaga on February 15, 1953. NCAA consensus All-American second-team choice as a junior and consensus first-team selection as a senior. Averaged 32 points per game in three games in the 1953 NCAA Tournament. Became the first college player to crack the 1,000-point plateau in a season when he scored 1,051 in 37 games in 1951-52. Selected by the Milwaukee Hawks in the 1953 NBA draft.

JACK OGDEN, Swarthmore (Pa.)
Righthander compiled a 25-34 record with the New York Giants, St. Louis Browns and Cincinnati Reds in five years (1918, 1928, 1929, 1931 and 1932). Brother of pitcher Curly Ogden won 15 games for the Browns in 1928 when he finished fourth in the A.L. with 31 starts. Jack was a star hurler for Baltimore's seven consecutive International League champions from 1919 through 1925. . . . The 6-0, 190-pounder competed with Swarthmore's basketball squad during the 1918 season.

WARREN "CURLY" OGDEN, Swarthmore (Pa.)
Righthander registered an 18-19 record and 3.79 ERA with the Philadelphia Athletics and Washington Senators in five years from 1922 through 1926. Brother of pitcher Jack Ogden started Game Seven of the 1924 World Series for the Senators as a decoy to get Bill Terry out of the New York Giants' lineup. . . . The 6-1 1/2, 180-pounder competed as a center for Swarthmore's basketball squad in 1919, 1920 and 1922.

MARV OLSON, Luther (Iowa)
Second baseman hit .241 with the Boston Red Sox in three years from 1931 through 1933. Traded to the New York Yankees early in the 1933 campaign but never played for them. . . . All-conference selection in basketball was team MVP.

JIM "SHUFFLES" O'NEILL, Holy Cross
Earned the 1952 College World Series Moust Outstanding Player award when he became the only pitcher to win three games in a single CWS as HC captured the championship. . . . Basketball teammate of Hall of Famer Bob Cousy in 1949-50 (1.5 ppg) when the Crusaders won their 26 regular-season games before dropping both of their contests in the NCAA playoffs. The next season, the 6-4 O'Neill averaged 5.6 ppg and 7.6 rpg while shooting a team-high 84.8% from the free-throw line. In 1951-52, he averaged 6.2 ppg.

LUCAS O'REAR, Northern Iowa
Didn't sign with the Cincinnati Reds after they selected him as a pitcher in the 13th round of 2010 MLB draft although UNI had dropped its baseball program. . . . The 6-7, 255-pounder averaged 4.1 ppg and 4.4 rpg as an enforcer for the Panthers in 2010 when they upset NCAA Tournament favorite Kansas in the second round. Contributed 5.2 ppg and 5.5 rpg the previous season to earn the first of back-to-back Missouri Valley Conference Sixth Man of the Year awards. Missed the final month of his senior campaign in 2010-11 after fracturing his right ankle.

OSSIE ORWOLL, Luther (Iowa)
Lefthanded pitcher/first baseman hit .294 and compiled a 6-7 record with the Philadelphia Athletics in two years in 1928 and 1929. . . . Played four years of basketball with Luther the first half of the 1920s.

JOE OSTROWSKI, Scranton (Pa.)
Lefthander compiled a 23-25 record with the St. Louis Browns and New York Yankees in five A.L. seasons from 1948 through 1952. Began pro career in the Boston Red Sox' organization. Pitched two scoreless innings in 1951 World Series for the Yanks against the New York Giants. . . . Known as Kasmer Ostrowski in 1942-43 when the six-footer led Scranton in scoring with 15.1 ppg before serving in the Army Air Corps as a medic during WWII.

PHIL PAGE, Penn State
Lefthander compiled a 3-3 record with the Detroit Tigers from 1928 through 1930 and Brooklyn Dodgers in 1934. . . . The 6-2 Page was a basketball letterman for the Nittany Lions in 1926-27.

JAMES PARK, Kentucky
Compiled a 4-5 record and 3.02 ERA with the St. Louis Browns in three years from 1915 through 1917. Park, a lawyer, lost in 1944 as the Republican candidate for the U.S. Senate against incumbent Alben W. Barkley. . . . Scored a total of 24 points for the Wildcats in 1911-12 and 1913-14. Also played quarterback for the school's football squad. Cum Laude graduate from the UK Law School in 1920.

CLARENCE "ACE" PARKER, Duke
Despite whacking a home run in his first major league at bat, the infielder hit only .179 with the Philadelphia Athletics in two years in 1937 and 1938. . . . Basketball letterman for the Blue Devils in 1935-36. He also played in the NFL.

LeROY PARMELEE, Eastern Michigan
Righthander compiled a 59-55 record with the New York Giants, St. Louis Cardinals, Chicago Cubs and Philadelphia Athletics in 10 seasons from 1929 through 1937 and 1939. In July 1933, he beat Dizzy Dean of the Cardinals, 1-0, striking out 13 and walking none. Two weeks later, Parmelee lost a 15-inning, 1-0 game to the Cincinnati Reds. Led the N.L. in hit batsmen four times in a five-year span (1933-35-36-37) and in wild pitches twice (1933 and 1937). . . . The 6-1 Parmelee was a basketball letterman for EMU in 1924-25 and 1925-26.

CLAUDE PASSEAU, Millsaps (Miss.)
Five-time All-Star from 1941 to 1946 compiled a 162-150 record and 3.32 ERA with the Pittsburgh Pirates, Philadelphia Phillies and Chicago Cubs in 13 N.L. seasons from 1935 through 1947. Led the league in games started in 1937, triggering a streak of seven successive seasons finishing among the top eight in that category. He won Game 3 in 1945 World Series with a one-hit shutout for the Cubs against the Detroit Tigers. . . . The 6-3 Passeau played college hoops in the late 1920s and early 1930s.

LES PEDEN, Texas A&M
Catcher went 7 for 28, including a homer, in nine games with the Washington Senators in 1953. He was originally signed by the Chicago Cubs. . . . The 6-1 Peden was a basketball letterman for A&M in 1941-42 and 1942-43.

RAY PEPPER, Alabama
Outfielder hit .281 with both of the St. Louis franchises (Cardinals and Browns) in five seasons from 1932 through 1936. Ranked 10th in the A.L. with 101 RBI in 1934 in his first year with the Browns after they purchased him from the Cards. . . . Basketball letterman for the Crimson Tide as a 6-2 guard in 1926-27.

GARY PETERS, Grove City (Pa.)
Lefthander compiled a 124-103 record and 3.25 ERA with the Chicago White Sox and Boston Red Sox in 14 years from 1959 through 1972. A.L. Rookie of the Year in 1963 by going 19-8 with four shutouts and league-best 2.33 ERA. Two-time All-Star paced the A.L. in victories with 20 in 1964 before leading the league in ERA in 1966 with a 1.98 mark. A good hitter, he had 19 career home runs and was often used as a pinch-hitter. . . . The 6-2 Peters played basketball for Grove City in the mid-1950s.

JIM PETERSON, Penn
Righthander compiled a 2-6 record with the Philadelphia Athletics and Brooklyn Dodgers in 1931, 1933 and 1937. . . . The 6-0 Peterson was a basketball letterman for the Quakers from 1928-29 through 1930-31.

FRED "TED" PETOSKEY, Michigan
Outfielder hit .167 with the Cincinnati Reds in 10 games in 1934 and 1935. . . . Guard averaged 3 ppg from 1931-32 through 1933-34. Also played end for the school's football squad.

LEE PFUND, Wheaton (Ill.)
Righthander compiled a 3-2 pitching record for the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1945. . . . Wheaton's all-time winningest basketball coach had three sons play under him and each scored more than 1,150 points for the school. Wheaton won the first NCAA Division II Tournament title under him in 1957.

JACK PHILLIPS, Clarkson (N.Y.)
First baseman hit .283 with the New York Yankees, Pittsburgh Pirates and Detroit Tigers in nine years from 1947 through 1957. Appeared in 1947 World Series with the Yankees against the Brooklyn Dodgers. Coached his alma mater's baseball team. . . . Starting center and leading scorer as a 6-4 senior in 1942-43 when Clarkson went 14-1 (losing only to national power St. John's).

AL PIEROTTI, Washington & Lee (Va.)
Pitched for the Boston Braves in 1920 and 1921. The 5-10, 200-pounder also was a lineman for numerous pro football teams in seven years during the 1920s. . . . Basketball captain helped school's 1917 squad to an undefeated 17-0 record.

LOU PINIELLA, Tampa
Hit .291 with 102 homers and 766 RBI as an outfielder during 18 seasons (1964 and 1968 through 1984) with the Baltimore Orioles, Cleveland Indians, Kansas City Royals and New York Yankees. Named A.L. Rookie of the Year in 1969 after hitting .282 for the Royals. All-Star in 1972 when he led the A.L. in doubles (33) and was runner-up in batting average (.312). Hit .319 in 22 World Series games with the Yankees in 1976, 1977, 1978 and 1981. Compiled a 1,835-1,713 managerial record in 23 years with the Yankees (1986 through 1988), Cincinnati Reds (1990 through 1992), Seattle Mariners (1993 through 2002), Tampa Bay Devil Rays (2003 through 2005) and Chicago Cubs (2007 to 2010). Led the Reds to a four-game sweep of the Oakland A's in the 1990 World Series. . . . Accepted a college basketball scholarship in 1961 after establishing a Tampa city single-season high school scoring record that stood until 1984. Less than a year after enrolling at UT, the 6-2 Piniella signed to play baseball with the Indians.

HENRY "COTTON" PIPPEN, Texas Western
Righthander compiled a 5-16 record with the St. Louis Cardinals, Philadelphia Athletics and Detroit Tigers in three years (1936, 1939 and 1940). . . . The 6-2 Pippen was a basketball letterman in 1929-30.

CLARKE "PINKY" PITTENGER, Toledo
Infielder hit .263 in seven seasons (from 1921 to 1929) with the Boston Red Sox, Chicago Cubs and Cincinnati Reds. His highest average was .312 in 1925 with the Cubs. . . . He still holds Toledo's single-game scoring standard with 49 points at Bluffton (Ohio) on December 13, 1918.

HUGH POLAND, Western Kentucky
Lefthanded swinging catcher hit .185 with the New York Giants, Boston Braves, Philadelphia Phillies and Cincinnati Reds in five N.L. seasons from 1943 through 1948 (excluding 1945). Traded by the Giants with Connie Ryan to the Braves for Ernie Lombardi on April 27, 1943. . . . WKU basketball letterman from 1931-32 through 1933-34.

CHARLES "ELMER" PONDER, Oklahoma
Righthander compiled a 17-27 record with the Pittsburgh Pirates and Chicago Cubs in four years (1917 and 1919 through 1921). Ranked ninth in the N.L. in ERA in 1920 with a 2.62 ERA. . . . The 6-0 Ponder was a basketball letterman for OU in 1913-14 and 1915-16.

PAUL POPOVICH, West Virginia
Switch-hitting infielder hit .233 in 11 seasons (1964 and 1966 through 1975) with the Chicago Cubs, Los Angeles Dodgers and Pittsburgh Pirates. Traded by the Dodgers with Ron Fairly to the Montreal Expos for Maury Wills and Manny Mota on June 11, 1969, before immediately being traded to the Cubs. Switch-hitter went three-for-three in pinch-hitting appearances for the Pirates in the 1974 N.L. Championship series. . . . Averaged 3.3 ppg in a reserve role in his one season of varsity basketball with the Mountaineers (1959-60) before signing a pro baseball contract. Led freshman team in scoring with 18.8 average. Teammate of All-American Jerry West on a squad that compiled a 26-5 record and played in the 1960 NCAA Tournament under coach Fred Schaus. Popovich sank 5 of 6 field-goal attempts in a second-round 82-81 loss against NYU. Excerpt from school guide: "Brings poise and confidence, born of extensive baseball training."

JOHN "BOB" POSER, Wisconsin
Righthander compiled a 1-1 record with the St. Louis Browns in 1935 after appearing in one game with the Chicago White Sox in 1932. . . . The 6-0 Poser was a basketball letterman with the Badgers from 1929-30 through 1931-32.

CUM POSEY, Penn State/Duquesne
Founder and co-owner of the Homestead Greys professional baseball team that won eight consecutive National Negro League titles. . . . Posey was the first African American to complete in intercollegiate athletics for Penn State in 1910-11. He later attended Duquesne. A legend in Pittsburgh sports history was owner/player for the famed Leondi Club, an independent basketball team that was the National Negro Championship team for many years.

CURTIS PRIDE, William & Mary
Born with 95 percent hearing disability, he is one of the few deaf athletes to ever play major league baseball. Outfielder made major league debut with Montreal Expos in 1993 and hit .444 in 10 games. His best season was in 1996 when he collected 17 doubles and 10 homers while hitting .300 for the Detroit Tigers. Lefthanded swinger hit .250 in his first 11 seasons through 2006 with seven franchises (the Expos, Tigers, Boston Red Sox, Atlanta Braves, Montreal Expos, New York Yankees and Anaheim/California Angels). Appeared in 2004 A.L. Divisional Series with the Angels. . . . Averaged 5.6 ppg and 3.1 apg in four seasons from 1986-87 through 1989-90 with the Tribe. The 6-0, 185-pound guard led the team in steals three times and in assists twice. Named to the Colonial Athletic Association All-Rookie team as a freshman and to the CAA All-Defensive team as a sophomore and junior. Excerpt from school guide: "Strong player for his size. Exceptionally quick player has moves to penetrate. Frustrates other ball handlers with his ability to make the big steal."

DON PRINCE, Campbell
Righthander pitched in one game for the Chicago Cubs in 1962. . . . The 6-4 Prince also played basketball for Campbell in 1956-57 and 1957-58.

DON PROHOVICH, Holy Cross
Lefthanded-hitting catcher was in the minors when he and $15,000 was traded by the White Sox to the Cubs for utilityman Earl Averill Jr. on August 13, 1960. It was the first swap of players between the two Chicago franchises. . . . Teammate of Basketball Hall of Famer Tom Heinsohn averaged 5.4 ppg and 4.7 rpg with the Crusaders from 1953-54 through 1955-56. Member of 1954 NIT champion (scored five points in final against Duquesne) before collecting four points, eight rebounds and team-high five assists in a 74-72 loss against eventual Final Four participant Temple in the 1956 NCAA playoffs.

JOHN PYECHA, Appalachian State
Righthander lost his only pitching appearance with the Chicago Cubs on April 24, 1954. . . . The 6-5 Pyecha led Appalachian State in scoring, rebounding and field-goal shooting in 1951-52 (15.8 ppg, 14.7 rpg, 46.7 FG%) and 1954-55 (26.3 ppg, 14.5 rpg, 59.5 FG%).

DON RADER, Oregon
Lefthanded swinging utilityman went 10 for 35 in 13 games with the Chicago White Sox in 1913 and Philadelphia Phillies in 1921. . . . The 5-10 Rader was a basketball letterman for Oregon in 1912.

DENNIS RASMUSSEN, Creighton
The 6-7 lefthander, a first-round pick by the California Angels in the 1980 amateur draft, compiled a 91-77 record in 12 seasons from 1984 through 1995 with the San Diego Padres, New York Yankees, Cincinnati Reds, Chicago Cubs and Kansas City Royals. His best year was 1986, when he posted an 18-6 mark with the Yanks to finish runner-up in the A.L. in won-loss percentage (.750). . . . Forward averaged 5.1 ppg in three seasons from 1977-78 through 1979-80 under Bluejays coach Tom Apke before signing a pro baseball contract. Excerpt from school guide: "Super sub proved a valuable contributor. Anchoring an important sixth-man role, Rasmussen sparks the Bluejay offense with deadeye shooting."

GARY REDUS SR., Athens (Ala.) State
Outfielder-first baseman hit .252 with 322 stolen bases for the Cincinnati Reds, Philadelphia Phillies, Chicago White Sox, Pittsburgh Pirates and Texas Rangers in 13 seasons from 1982 through 1994. Ranked among the N.L. top seven in stolen bases three straight campaigns from 1983 through 1985 before finishing third in the A.L. in 1987 with a career-high 52. Blasted two grand slams in a five-day span in 1988. Traded by the Reds with Tom Hume to the Phillies for John Denny and Jeff Gray on December 11, 1985. Appeared in the N.L. Championship Series with the Pirates three consecutive years from 1990 through 1992. . . . The 6-1 J.C. transfer played basketball for Athens. His son, Gary "G" Jr., also performed at the juco level before he was named to the Summit League All-Newcomer Team in 2008-09 with Centenary prior to transferring to South Alabama.

RON REED, Notre Dame
Righthander compiled a 146-140 pitching record and 3.46 ERA in 19 seasons from 1966 through 1984 with the Atlanta Braves, St. Louis Cardinals, Philadelphia Phillies and Chicago White Sox. He was an All-Star in 1968, notched a career-high 18 wins in 1969 and led all N.L. relievers in victories with 13 in 1979. Posted a 1.69 ERA in a total of five World Series relief appearances for the Phillies in 1980 and 1983. . . . The 6-5, 205-pound forward averaged 18.9 ppg and 14.3 rpg in three varsity seasons from 1962-63 through 1964-65. Averaged 20 points and team-high 17.7 rebounds as a junior and team-high 21 points and 13.2 rebounds as a senior. Named to Helms Foundation 36-man All-American team as a senior. . . . Third-round selection of the Detroit Pistons in the 1965 NBA draft played two seasons with the franchise, averaging eight points and 6.4 rebounds per game.

STEVE RENKO, Kansas
Righthander compiled a 134-146 pitching record and 3.99 ERA in 15 seasons from 1969 through 1983 with the Montreal Expos, Chicago Cubs, Chicago White Sox, Oakland Athletics, Boston Red Sox, California Angels and Kansas City Royals. On October 3, 1972, Renko struck out seven consecutive Mets. His best season was 1973 when he sported a 15-11 mark and 2.81 ERA (seventh in N.L.) for the Expos. . . . The 6-5, 230-pounder averaged 9.9 ppg and 5.8 rpg as a sophomore in 1963-64 under coach Dick Harp before concentrating on his career as a football quarterback and baseball pitcher. Excerpt from school guide: "Versatile shooter, tough rebounder and promising playmaker."

XAVIER RESCIGNO, Manhattan
Righthander compiled a 19-22 record in three years from 1943 through 1945 with the Pittsburgh Pirates. Rescigno was 10-8 in 1944, when he led N.L. relievers in victories with eight. . . . The 5-10 1/2, 175-pounder played basketball for the Jaspers in 1932 and 1933.

PAUL REUSCHEL, Western Illinois
Righthander compiled a 16-16 record and 4.03 ERA with the Chicago Cubs and Cleveland Indians in five years from 1975 through 1979. Brother of pitcher Rick Reuschel ranked 10th among N.L. relievers in appearances in 1977 with 69. . . . The 6-4, 220-pounder averaged 12.1 rpg for WIU in 1966-67 and 1967-68. His team-high rebounding average of 15.2 in 1966-67 is the fifth-best in school history.

KENDALL RHINE JR., Georgia
RHP was a first-round pick in 1992 MLB draft (37th pick overall) by the Houston Astros as a supplemental choice after they failed to sign first-rounder John Burke the previous year. Member of Georgia's 1990 national championship team compiled a 4-9 record in six minor-league seasons in the farm systems of the Astros and Toronto Blue Jays. . . . The 6-7 Rhine averaged 5.8 ppg and 3.7 rpg from 1989-90 through 1992-93 under Hugh Durham, the Bulldogs' all-time winningest coach. Rhine's father led Rice in scoring and rebounding all three seasons from 1961-62 through 1963-64 before averaging 9 ppg and 11 rpg for the ABA's Houston Mavericks in 1968-69.

NOLEN RICHARDSON, Georgia
Backup infielder hit .247 with the Detroit Tigers, New York Yankees and Cincinnati Reds in six seasons (1929-31-32-35-38-39). . . . Captain of the Bulldogs' basketball squad as a senior in 1925-26.

DAVE RICKETTS, Duquesne
Catcher hit .249 in six seasons (1962, 1965 and 1967 through 1970) with the St. Louis Cardinals and Pittsburgh Pirates. Switch-hitter played with the Cardinals in 1967 and 1968 World Series. Coach, instructor and minor league manager in the Cardinals' organization since 1976. . . . The 6-2, 190-pound guard was a three-year starter who led the Dukes in scoring in his senior season with a 17.9-point average in 1956-57, finishing fourth in the nation in free-throw percentage with an 86.2 mark. Sophomore member of team that compiled a 22-4 record and finished sixth in the final AP poll after winning the NIT. He converted a school-record 42 consecutive free-throw attempts.

DICK RICKETTS, Duquesne
Compiled a 1-6 pitching record in his only season with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1959. . . . The 6-8, 215-pound forward/center was a second-team consensus All-American choice as a junior in 1953-54 and first five consensus All-American selection as a senior in 1954-55 when he had three 30-point outbursts and all 19 free-throw attempts in a game against Dayton. School's all-time leading scorer averaged 17.7 ppg and 12.2 rpg in starting all 111 games in his four-year Duquense career. First-round pick of the Milwaukee Hawks in the 1955 NBA draft is still the Dukes' all-time leading scorer. Played three seasons in the NBA with the St. Louis Hawks and Rochester/Cincinnati Royals, averaging 9.6 ppg and 6.3 rpg. . . . Following pro sports career, he was an executive with Eastman Kodak. Died of leukemia on March 6, 1988.

DENNY RIDDLEBERGER, Old Dominion
Lefthander compiled a 4-4 record and 2.77 ERA with the Washington Senators and Cleveland Indians in three years from 1970 through 1972. Originally signed by the Pittsburgh Pirates, he was traded by them to the Senators for George Brunet. Ranked fifth in the A.L. in pitching appearances in 1971 with 57. . . . The 6-3 Riddleberger averaged 5.7 ppg and 2.5 rpg for ODU in 1965-66.

JIM RIGGLEMAN, Frostburg State (Md.)
Compiled a 662-824 managerial record (.445) in 12 years with the San Diego Padres (1992 to 1994), Chicago Cubs (1995 through 1999), Seattle Mariners (2008) and Washington Nationals (2009 to 2011). Resigned as the Nationals skipper in mid-season on the heels of them winning 11 of 12 games when the franchise failed to give him a contract extension. . . . Two-year basketball letterman averaged 7.2 ppg in early 1970s and was considered an outstanding ball-handling guard.

RAY RIPPELMEYER, Southern Illinois/Southeast Missouri State
Longtime pitching coach for the Philadelphia Philles and Cincinnati Reds won 114 games as a minor league hurler. The reliever compiled a 1-2 record with the Washington Senators in 1962. He had three hits in six major league at-bats with one homer. . . . The 6-3, 200-pounder led the SIU Salukis in scoring (15.3 ppg) and rebounding (10.9 rpg) as a sophomore in 1952-53 after averaging 7.9 ppg the previous season. Switching colleges when he signed a pro baseball contract with the Milwaukee Braves' organization, Rippelmeyer paced SEMO in scoring in 1953-54 and 1954-55 and earned All-Missouri Intercollegiate Athletic Association first-team honors both years. He finished his college career with 1,192 points.

EPPA RIXEY JR., Virginia
Compiled a 266-251 record with 3.15 ERA in 21 seasons (1912 through 1917 and 1919 through 1933) with the Philadelphia Phillies and Cincinnati Reds. He never played a minor league game and appeared in the 1915 World Series with the Phillies. Missed the 1918 campaign while serving overseas with an Army chemical-warfare division. Rixey won 19 or more games six years, including 1922 when he led the N.L. with 25 victories with the Reds. Ranked among the N.L. top six in ERA six times (1912-16-21-23-24-25). In his next-to-last season, he pitched a string of 27 consecutive scoreless innings at age 42. Only Philly lefty to reach the 20-win plateau from 1916 until Chris Short achieved the feat in 1966. The N.L.'s winningest lefthanded pitcher until Warren Spahn broke his record was selected to the Hall of Fame in 1963. . . . The 6-5, 210-pound Rixey, who also played golf for Virginia, earned basketball letters in 1911-12 and 1913-14.

MEL ROACH, Virginia
Bonus baby utilityman hit .238 in eight years (1953, 1954 and 1957 through 1962) with the Milwaukee Braves, Chicago Cubs and Philadelphia Phillies. The longtime backup to Red Schoendienst hit .309 in 44 games in 1958 and .300 in 48 games in 1960 for the Braves. Traded by the Braves to the Cubs for Frank Thomas on May 9, 1961. . . . The 6-1, 190-pounder earned a basketball letter by averaging 9.3 ppg in 1952-53 in the Cavaliers' final season prior to joining the ACC before he received a substantial bonus from the Braves.

ROBIN ROBERTS, Michigan State
Hall of Famer compiled a 286-245 record and 3.41 ERA in 19 seasons from 1948 through 1966 with the Philadelphia Phillies, Baltimore Orioles, Houston Astros and Chicago Cubs. Righthander was a 20-game winner for six consecutive seasons with the Phillies (1950 through 1955), leading the N.L. in victories the last four years in that span. Ranked among the N.L. top six in ERA seven times (1950-51-52-53-54-55-58) and finished runner-up in the A.L. in 1962 (2.78). The seven-time All-Star lost his only World Series start in 1950, 2-1, when the Yankees' Joe DiMaggio homered off him in the 10th inning. . . . Roberts played three seasons of basketball with the Spartans from 1944-45 through 1946-47. He averaged 10.6 ppg as a freshman (team's third-leading scorer as he was eligible because of WWII), 9.8 as a sophomore (second-leading scorer) and 9.0 as a junior (second-leading scorer). The 6-0, 190-pound forward led the team in field-goal percentage as a junior captain. Sketch from school basketball guide: "Regarded by newsmen as one of the greatest players today in college basketball. A poll by Detroit Free Press named him the 'most valuable' collegiate player in Michigan. He is not especially fast, but he's extremely well-coordinated, passes exceptionally well, and is a beautiful one-hand shot artist."

JIM ROBERTSON, Bradley
Catcher, who was originally signed by the New York Yankees, hit .187 with the Philadelphia/Kansas City Athletics in 1954 and 1955. . . . The 5-9 Robertson scored two points in one basketball game for the Braves in 1948-49.

EARL ROBINSON, California
Outfielder hit .268 in four seasons from 1958 to 1964 with the Los Angeles Dodgers and Baltimore Orioles. Collected 12 doubles and eight home runs with the Orioles in 1961. Shortstop for Cal's 1957 national championship team. . . . Three-time All-PCC second-team selection averaged at least 10 ppg each of three varsity seasons as a 6-1, 190-pound guard for Cal under coach Pete Newell from 1955-56 through 1957-58. Robinson, the school's first significant black hoopster, averaged 15.5 points in four NCAA Tournament games his last two years. He led the Bears in scoring in two of the four playoff contests.

JACKIE ROBINSON, UCLA
Member of Baseball Hall of Fame was an infielder who hit .311 with 137 homers as a regular on six N.L. pennant winners with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 10 seasons from 1947 through 1956. After becoming Rookie of the Year in 1947, Robinson was named MVP in 1949 when he led the N.L. with a .342 batting average and 37 stolen bases. Also finished runner-up in batting average in 1950, third in 1951 and fourth in 1952. Ranked among the N.L. top nine in runs scored seven times and top seven in stolen bases on nine occasions. The six-time All-Star homered in the 1952 All-Star Game. He had two homers and seven doubles in World Series competition. . . . Football, basketball and track standout at Pasadena City College in 1937-38 and 1938-39. Named to All-Southern California Junior College Conference Western Division all-star basketball team both years, a span in which UCLA was winless in league competition. First athlete in UCLA history to letter in football, basketball, baseball and track. The 5-11 forward compiled the highest scoring average in the Pacific Coast Conference both of his seasons at UCLA (12.3 ppg per league contest in 1939-40 as an all-league second-team selection and 11.1 in 1940-41). In his last UCLA athletic outing, he accounted for more than half of the Bruins' output with 20 points in a 52-37 loss to Southern California. Caught a TD pass in 1941 College All-Star Game vs. Chicago Bears.

JEFF ROBINSON, Azusa Pacific (Calif.)
Compiled a 47-40 record and 4.79 ERA with the Detroit Tigers, Baltimore Orioles, Texas Rangers and Pittsburgh Pirates in six years from 1987 through 1992. His best season was in 1988 when the 6-6 righthander posted a 13-6 mark and 2.98 ERA with six complete games for the Tigers. . . . Two-time NAIA All-District 3 honoree in the early 1980s left college as the No. 9 all-time scorer in Azusa Pacific history with 1,193 points.

ELWIN CHARLES "PREACHER" ROE, Harding (Ark.)
Five-time All-Star lefthander compiled a 127-84 record and 3.43 ERA with the St. Louis Cardinals, Pittsburgh Pirates and Brooklyn Dodgers in 12 years (1938 and 1944 through 1954). Ranked among the N.L. top three in winning percentage four times in a five-year span (15-6 in 1949, 22-3 in 1951, 11-2 in 1952 and 11-3 in 1953). Led the N.L. in strikeouts in 1945 when he ranked among the league's top eight in ERA for the first of five times through 1951. Posted a 2.54 ERA in three World Series with the Dodgers against the New York Yankees (1949-52-53). . . . Also played basketball for Harding (class of '39). While coaching high school girls basketball in Hardy, Ark. (Sharp County) as a substitute teacher in the winter of 1945, Roe got in a tussle with a referee and sustained a fractured skull.

WALLY ROETTGER, Illinois
Outfielder hit .285 with the St. Louis Cardinals, New York Giants, Cincinnati Reds and Pittsburgh Pirates in eight N.L. seasons from 1927 through 1934. Appeared in 1931 World Series with the Cardinals after he was traded by the Reds for fellow college basketball player Taylor Douthit (California) on June 15, 1931. Brother of Oscar Roettger, a first baseman-pitcher with the New York Yankees, Brooklyn Dodgers and Philadelphia Athletics. . . . Letterman for the Illini's basketball squad in 1921-22 and 1922-23.

ORLIN "BUCK" ROGERS, Virginia
Lefthander lost his only decision in two games with the Washington Senators in 1935. . . . Basketball letterman for the Cavaliers from 1932-33 through 1934-35.

GARRY ROGGENBURK, Dayton
Lefthander compiled a 6-9 pitching record during five A.L. seasons (1963, 1965, 1966, 1968, 1969) with the Minnesota Twins, Boston Red Sox and Seattle Pilots. Started two games as a rookie. . . . The 6-6, 190-pound forward led the Flyers in scoring all three of his varsity seasons (16.1 ppg as a sophomore and junior and 16 ppg as a senior) and led the team in rebounding as a sophomore (13.8 rpg) and junior (12.5 rpg). He grabbed a school-record 32 rebounds against Miami (Ohio) in his third varsity game. Named to third team on Helms All-American squad as a senior in 1962 when Dayton won the NIT under coach Tom Blackburn. Selected in the fourth round of the 1962 NBA draft by the Philadelphia Warriors.

ROBERT "RED" ROLFE, Dartmouth
Third baseman hit .289 in 10 years with the New York Yankees. The four-time All-Star led the A.L. in triples with 15 in 1936 and paced the league in hits (213), doubles (46) and runs (139) in 1939. Rolfe appeared in six of the seven World Series from 1936 through his final season in 1942, hitting .400 against the New York Giants in '36. He compiled a 278-256 record in four years as manager of the Detroit Tigers from 1949 through 1952. . . . The 5-11 1/2, 170-pounder appeared in two basketball games for Dartmouth as a freshman in 1927-28 and four contests as a junior in 1929-30. He coached the Toronto Huskies of the Basketball Association of America for the last 44 games of the 1946-47 campaign after coaching Yale to a 48-28 record in four years from 1943-46. Rolfe has the highest winningest percentage (.632) of any individual who coached Yale more than two seasons.

EMERSON "STEVE" ROSER, Clarkson (N.Y.)
Righthander compiled a 6-5 record and 4.04 ERA with the New York Yankees and Boston Braves in three years from 1944 through 1946 before retiring from baseball because of an elbow injury. He posted a 4-3 mark as a rookie under Yankees manager Joe McCarthy. . . . The 6-4 Roser was a center for Clarkson before passing up his senior season after signing a professional baseball contract in 1940.

AL RUBELING, Towson State
Infielder hit .249 with the Philadelphia Athletics and Pittsburgh Pirates in four years from 1940 to 1944. . . . Played basketball for Towson in the early 1930s.

TERRY RUPP, Tampa
Baseball coach for Maryland played the sport in college with Tino Martinez. . . . Two-time All-SSC second-team selection averaged 12.7 ppg, 8.1 rpg and 3.1 apg while shooting 57.1% percent from the floor and 82.5% from the free-throw line in the late 1980s. Played in three NCAA Division II Tournaments. His best season was as a senior in 1988-89 when he contributed 17.6 ppg and 8.7 rpg.

LLOYD RUSSELL, Baylor
Played in two games with the Cleveland Indians in 1938. . . . The 5-11 Russell was a basketball letterman for Baylor in 1934-35.

MARIUS RUSSO, Long Island University
Compiled a 45-34 record and 3.13 ERA in six seasons (1939 through 1943 and 1946) with the New York Yankees. All-Star in 1941 when he finished fourth in the A.L. with a 3.09 ERA. The lefthander registered a pair of 2-1 World Series victories (over the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1941 and St. Louis Cardinals in 1943). . . . Played for two of the premier teams in college basketball history when LIU went 24-2 in 1934-35 and 26-0 in 1935-36 under coach Clair Bee. Named to the first five on the 1935-36 Metropolitan New York Basketball Writers Association All-Star Team.

EDWARD "EBBA" ST. CLAIRE, Colgate
Switch-hitting catcher hit .249 with the Boston/Milwaukee Braves and New York Giants in four seasons from 1951 through 1954. He posted a .282 batting average as a rookie. Traded by the Braves with Johnny Antonelli, Billy Klaus, Don Liddle and $50,000 to the Giants for Bobby Thomson and Sam Calderone. . . . The 6-1 St. Claire was a basketball letterman for Colgate in 1941-42.

JOHN "JACK" SANFORD, Richmond
First baseman hit .209 in 47 games with the Washington Senators in 1940, 1941 and 1946 (after a stint in the U.S. Air Force). Coached college baseball squads for Elon and Barton. . . . The 6-3 Sanford was a basketball letterman for Richmond in 1938-39.

TED SAVAGE, Lincoln (Mo.)
Served as director of target marketing for the St. Louis Cardinals. Outfielder hit .233 in nine seasons (1962, 1963 and 1965 through 1971) with the Philadelphia Phillies, Pittsburgh Pirates, St. Louis Cardinals, Chicago Cubs, Los Angeles Dodgers, Cincinnati Reds, Milwaukee Brewers and Kansas City Royals. His best season was with Milwaukee in 1970 when he hit .279 with 12 homers and 50 RBI. . . . The 6-0, 175-pounder led Jefferson City, Mo.-based Lincoln in scoring average with 13.5 ppg in 1955-56. The next season, he averaged 14.5 ppg and 5.6 rpg.

JOHNNY SCALZI, Georgetown
Appeared in two games for the Boston Braves in 1931. . . . The 5-7 Scalzi was a basketball letterman for the Hoyas earlier in the same year.

VICTOR "BIFF" SCHLITZER, Dayton
Righthander compiled a 10-15 record and 3.60 ERA with the Philadelphia Athletics, Boston Red Sox and Buffalo franchise in 1908, 1909 and 1914. . . . The 5-11 Schlitzer played basketball for the Flyers from 1903 through 1905.

AL SCHMELZ, Arizona State
Righthander pitched in two games for the New York Mets in 1967. . . . The 6-3 Schmelz, a teammate of Joe Caldwell, averaged 2.5 ppg and 2 rpg with the Sun Devils in 1962-63.

TED SCHREIBER, St. John's
Infielder hit .160 in 39 games with the New York Mets in 1963. . . . The 5-11 Schreiber scored 11 points in five games with St. John's in 1957-58 under legendary coach Joe Lapchick.

HOWIE SCHULTZ, Hamline (Minn.)
First baseman hit .241 with the Brooklyn Dodgers, Philadelphia Phillies and Cincinnati Reds in six years from 1943 through 1948. His best season was with Brooklyn in 1944 when he hit .255 with 32 doubles, 11 homers and 83 RBI. . . . The 6-6, 200-pounder (also played professional basketball). Coached Anderson in the NBA to a 21-14 record in 1949-50.

HAROLD "HAL" SCHUMACHER, St. Lawrence (N.Y.)
Righthander compiled a 158-121 record and 3.36 ERA with the New York Giants in 13 years from 1931 through 1942 and 1946. Teammate of Carl Hubbell ranked among the N.L. top eight in ERA, victories and innings pitched three consecutive campaigns from 1933 through 1935. His best season was 1934 when he posted a 23-10 mark. Two-time All-Star appeared in three World Series (1933, 1936 and 1937). Widely considered one of the better-hitting hurlers of his day, swatting 15 homers over his major league career. . . . Also played basketball and football for St. Lawrence (class of '33).

DON SCHWALL, Oklahoma
Righthander compiled a 49-48 pitching record and 3.72 ERA in seven seasons from 1961 through 1967 with the Boston Red Sox, Pittsburgh Pirates and Atlanta Braves. Named A.L. Rookie of the Year in 1961 when the All-Star posted a 15-7 mark and 3.22 ERA for the Red Sox. . . . As a 6-5, 190-pound sophomore forward in 1956-57, he led the Sooners in rebounding with 8.7 per game and finished as the team's second-leading scorer with a 15.9-point average under coach Doyle Parrack. The All-Big Seven Conference second-team selection scored 23, 20 and 30 points in three defeats against Wilt Chamberlain-led Kansas. Dropped off OU's squad in December of his junior year after signing a bonus contract with the Red Sox for a reported $50,000. Excerpt from school guide: "Became highest-scoring sophomore in Sooner history. Tremendous rebounder and has exceptional speed for a man his size. Can work inside or outside."

BAYARD "BUD" SHARPE, Penn State
Lefthanded swinging first baseman-outfielder hit .222 with the Boston Beaneaters and Pittsburgh Pirates in 1905 and 1910. . . . Basketball letterman for Penn State in 1902.

JEFF SHAW, Rio Grande (Ohio)
The first overall pick in the January 1986 amateur draft was a reliever with the Cleveland Indians, Montreal Expos, Chicago White Sox, Cincinnati Reds and Los Angeles Dodgers, notching 203 saves in 12 seasons from 1990 through 2001. Righthander posted a 2.43 ERA in 293 relief appearances in the last four years of 1990s. Free-agent acquisition notched a league-high 42 saves with the Reds in 1997 before becoming the first pitcher in major league history to lead two different clubs in saves in the same season (23 with the Reds and 25 with the Dodgers in 1998). Two-time All-Star contributed 43 saves in 2001 (runner-up in N.L.). . . . He averaged 1.3 ppg as a 6-2, 170-pound freshman guard for the 1984-85 Rio Grande squad that compiled a 31-5 record and reached the second round of the NAIA Tournament.

LARRY SHEETS, Eastern Mennonite (Va.)
Designated hitter/outfielder hit .266 with 94 homers in eight seasons from 1984 through 1990 and 1993 with the Baltimore Orioles, Detroit Tigers and Seattle Mariners. In 1987, the lefthanded batter hit .316 (ninth in A.L.) and collected 31 home runs (including five two-homer games) and 94 RBI en route to being named MVP of an Orioles squad that included Cal Ripken Jr. and Eddie Murray. One of his blasts was onto the roof of Chicago's Comiskey Park. Also ranked sixth in the A.L. in slugging percentage in 1987. . . . At the end of the 20th Century, the 6-4, 210-pounder was Eastern Mennonite's all-time second-leading rebounder (1,025) and ninth-leading scorer (1,217 points). Sheets was a first-team All-Old Dominion Athletic Conference selection in 1981-82 and a second-team All-ODAC choice in 1982-83.

ROLLIE SHELDON, Connecticut
Compiled a 38-36 pitching record in five seasons (1961, 1962 and 1964 through 1966) with the New York Yankees, Kansas City Athletics and Boston Red Sox. As a rookie, the righthander was 11-5 (sixth in league in won-loss percentage) with the A.L. champion Yankees after going 15-1 in Class D ball the previous year. Sheldon appeared in two games for the Yanks in the 1964 World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals. . . . The 6-4 sophomore forward was the third-leading scorer with 13.5 ppg for the Huskies' NCAA Tournament team in 1959-60. He also averaged 7.1 rpg for coach Hugh Greer.

ROY SHERID, Albright (Pa.)
Righthander compiled a 23-24 record with the New York Yankees in three seasons from 1929 through 1931. Ranked ninth in the A.L. in ERA as a rookie with a 3.61 mark. Pitched in a game at Cleveland on August 11, 1929, when teammate Babe Ruth slugged his 500th career homer. . . . The 6-2 Sherid was a center for Albright's basketball squad in 1926-27 and 1927-28.

FRANCIS "PETE" SHIELDS, Mississippi
First baseman hit .208 in 23 games with the Cleveland Indians in 1915. . . . Guard for Ole Miss in 1910-11 and 1911-12.

JOHN SHOEMAKER, Miami (Ohio)
Compiled more than 2,000 career victories as a minor-league manager in the Los Angeles Dodgers' organization. Also served briefly in a similar capacity with the Florida Marlins. . . . Shoemaker averaged 9.9 ppg and 2.6 rpg in 1976-77 and 1977-78. Tied eventual Ohio State and NBA coach Randy Ayers with a team-high 20 points in an opening-round 84-81 victory over defending NCAA champion Marquette before Miami was eliminated in the next round by eventual 1978 titlist Kentucky. Shoemaker was selected by the Chicago Bulls in sixth round of NBA draft (119th pick overall).

EDDIE SHOKES, Duke
First baseman hit .119 in 32 games with the Cincinnati Reds in 1941 and 1946. . . . The 6-0 Shokes was a basketball letterman for Duke in 1939-40 and 1940-41.

NORM SIEBERN, Southwest Missouri State
First baseman-outfielder hit .272 with 132 home runs in 12 seasons (1956 and 1958 through 1968) with the New York Yankees, Kansas City Athletics, Baltimore Orioles, California Angels, San Francisco Giants and Boston Red Sox. Lefthanded swinger's best season was 1962 when he hit .308 (fifth in A.L.) with 25 homers and 117 RBI (league runner-up) for the Athletics. Ranked among the A.L. top five in doubles in back-to-back years (1960 and 1961). Three-time All-Star played in the 1956 and 1958 World Series with the Yankees and 1967 World Series with the Red Sox. . . . Member of Southwest Missouri squads that won back-to-back NAIA Tournament titles in 1952 and 1953. He averaged 1.5 ppg in 32 contests.

SONNY SIEBERT, Missouri
Righthander compiled a 140-114 pitching record in 12 seasons from 1964 through 1975 with the Cleveland Indians, Boston Red Sox, Texas Rangers, St. Louis Cardinals, San Diego Padres and Oakland A's. He won at least 10 games in eight consecutive years from 1965 through 1972. Pitched a no-hitter for the Indians against the Washington Senators on June 10, 1966, en route to leading the A.L. in winning percentage with a 16-8 record (.667). Ranked among the A.L. top seven in ERA three straight campaigns from 1965 through 1967. Two-time All-Star (1966 and 1971) hit six of his 12 career home runs in 1971, including two in one game. . . . A 6-3, 190-pound guard, he played two seasons of varsity basketball for the Tigers in 1956-57 and 1957-58 under coach Sparky Stalcup before signing a pro baseball contract. Averaged 13.4 ppg as a sophomore (school record at the time for scoring by a first-year player) and 16.7 as a junior when he was an All-Big Eight Conference second-team selection. Led Mizzou in scoring in his junior season, including a 31-point outburst against Oklahoma on February 15, 1958. Sketch in school guide: "Feathery jump shooter who owns a wide repertoire of shots. Handles the ball well to clear many of his shot tries. Good driver can play either outside or in."

JOHN "HI" SIMMONS, Northeast Missouri State
Missouri's all-time winningest baseball coach (481-284 record in 34 years) captured the 1954 NCAA title. School's baseball stadium is named after him. . . . All-conference center was senior captain of 1927-28 basketball squad.

JOHN SIMMONS, New York University
Outfielder hit .215 in 62 games with the Washington Senators in 1949. . . . Starting guard averaged 8.7 ppg for NYU's 17-6 NCAA Tournament team in 1943.

KEN SINGLETON, Hofstra
Outfielder, a first-round pick in the 1967 amateur draft (third overall), hit .282 with 246 home runs and 1,065 RBI with the New York Mets, Montreal Expos and Baltimore Orioles in 15 years from 1970 through 1984. Switch-hitter exceeded 20 HRs in five seasons, including a high of 35 (fifth in A.L.) in 1979 with the Orioles. Runner-up in the A.L. in bases on balls five times (1975-77-78-79-83) after finishing runner-up in the N.L. in the same category in 1973 when he paced the league in on-base percentage (.425). Three-time All-Star hit .345 in two World Series with Baltimore (1979 and 1983). . . . Played freshman basketball for Hofstra in the mid-1960s.

DAVE SISLER, Princeton
Righthander compiled a 38-44 record in seven seasons from 1956 through 1962 with the Boston Red Sox, Detroit Tigers, Washington Senators and Cincinnati Reds. The son of Hall of Fame first baseman George Sisler became an executive vice president, vice chairman of the board, and branch director of St. Louis-based A.G. Edwards & Sons, Inc., the largest brokerage firm headquartered outside New York, with 5,300 investment brokers in over 500 branch locations throughout 48 states and the District of Columbia. He graduated magna cum laude in 1953 from Princeton before serving in the U.S. Army as a private first class. . . . The 6-4, 190-pound forward averaged 9.7 ppg in two seasons before forfeiting his senior year of eligibility when he signed a contract including a reported $40,000 bonus with the Red Sox. He was an All-Ivy League second-team selection for Princeton's first NCAA Tournament team in 1952. The previous year as a sophomore, he posted a 7-1 pitching record for Princeton's only baseball squad ever to participate in the College World Series.

PETE SIVESS, Dickinson (Pa.)
Righthander compiled a 7-11 record with the Philadelphia Phillies in three years from 1936 through 1938. Traded by Philadelphia to the New York Yankees on April 8, 1939, but he never played for them. . . . The 6-3 Sivess scored 41 points in 14 games with Dickinson in 1935-36.

BILL "MOOSE" SKOWRON, Purdue
Six-time All-Star first baseman hit .282 with 211 homers and 888 RBI with the New York Yankees, Los Angeles Dodgers, Washington Senators, Chicago White Sox and California Angels in 14 years from 1954 through 1967. Best season was 1960 when he finished among the A.L.'s top eight in batting average, slugging percentage, hits, total bases, doubles, homers and RBI. Hit .293 with eight homers and 29 RBI in eight World Series with the Yankees and Dodgers. . . . Teammate of eventual All-American Carl McNulty scored 18 points in eight games in 1949-50.

FOSTER "STEVE" SLAYTON, New Hampshire
Righthander pitched in three games for the Boston Red Sox in 1928. . . . The 6-0 Slayton was a basketball letterman for UNH from 1925-26 through 1927-28.

ROY SMALLEY JR., Drury (Mo.)
Shortstop hit .227 with the Chicago Cubs, Milwaukee Braves and Philadelphia Phillies in 11 N.L. seasons from 1948 through 1958. Ranked among the N.L. top six in triples in 1949 (10) and 1950 (9). Led N.L. shortstops in assists, double plays and total chances in 1950 with the Cubs. He was the last regular shortstop for the Cubs prior to the debut of "Mr. Cub" (Ernie Banks). Father of shortstop Roy Smalley III, the first selection overall in the 1974 amateur draft before playing 13 years with four different A.L. teams. . . . The 6-3 Smalley was one of Drury's top scorers in 1942-43 and 1943-44.

ART SMITH, Columbia
Righthander compiled an 0-1 record in starting two of three games with the Chicago White Sox in 1932. . . . The 6-0 Smith, a two-year basketball letterman for Columbia, graduated in 1931.

LEE SMITH, Northwestern (La.) State
All-time major league career saves leader when he retired, notching 478 in 18 seasons from 1980 through 1997 with the Chicago Cubs, Boston Red Sox, St. Louis Cardinals, New York Yankees, Baltimore Orioles, California Angels, Cincinnati Reds and Montreal Expos until Trevor Hoffman broke his mark in 2006. Set a record in 1991 (subsequently broken) for most saves in a season by a N.L. pitcher with 47 for the Cardinals. Righthander led the N.L. in saves three times (1983-91-92) and the A.L. once (1994). Seven-time All-Star selection posted a career 71-92 record and lost league championship series games with the Cubs in 1984 and Red Sox in 1988. . . . The 6-5, 215-pound forward averaged 3.4 ppg and 1.9 rpg with the Demons in his only season of college basketball (1976-77). He scored eight points in a 97-92 loss at Lamar when teammate Billy Reynolds set a school single-game Division I record with 42 points.

NATE SMITH, Tennessee State
Catcher went 2 for 9 in five games with the Baltimore Orioles in 1962. . . . Basketball letterman for TSU in 1953-54 and 1954-55.

JIM SNYDER, Eastern Michigan
Second baseman hit .140 with the Minnesota Twins in three seasons (1961-62-64). Traded by the Philadelphia Phillies to the Chicago White Sox for Bobby Winkles in July, 1958. Compiled a 45-60 record as manager of the Seattle Mariners in 1988. . . . Basketball letterman for EMU in 1951-52.

ROB SPERRING, Pacific
Infielder hit .211 with the Chicago Cubs and Houston Astros in four years from 1974 through 1977. Traded by the Cubs with Bill Madlock to the San Francisco Giants for Bobby Murcer, Steve Ontiveros and a minor leaguer on February 11, 1977. . . . After averaging 22 ppg for Pacific's freshman squad in 1967-68, he averaged 8.7 ppg and 2.9 rpg in his three-year varsity basketball career from 1968-69 through 1970-71. Teammate of All-American center John Gianelli hit seven of eight field-goal attempts en route to scoring 21 points in two NCAA playoff games as a senior. Sperring averaged a career-high 10.9 ppg as a junior.

PAUL SPLITTORFF, Morningside (Iowa)
Lefthander spent his entire 15-year career from 1970 through 1984 with the Kansas City Royals, compiling a 166-143 pitching record and 3.81 ERA. Led the A.L. in winning percentage in 1977 with a 16-6 mark (.727). He became the Royals' first 20-game winner en route to becoming their all-time winningest hurler. Retired the last 26 Oakland batters on August 3, 1975, when he threw one of his two one-hitters. Posted a 2.68 ERA in four league championship series before appearing in the 1980 World Series. . . . College basketball commentator averaged 14.9 ppg and 6.7 rpg in 1967-68 to rank second on the Chiefs' team that season in both categories. The previous year, the 6-3 Splittorff averaged 11 ppg and 7.1 rpg as a sophomore.

HOMER SPRAGINS, Mississippi State
Righthander relieved in four games for the Philadelphia Phillies in 1947. . . . The 6-1 Spragins was a basketball letterman for MSU from 1939-40 through 1941-42.

FREDDY SPURGEON, Kalamazoo (Mich.)
Infielder, primarily a second baseman, hit .285 with the Cleveland Indians in four seasons from 1924 through 1927. Led the A.L. in sacrifice hits with 35 in 1926 when he ranked runner-up in singles (147) and seventh in runs scored (101). . . . The 5-11 1/2 Spurgeon played basketball for Kalamazoo in 1921-22.

BILL STEINECKE, DePaul
Catcher went hitless in four at-bats in four games with the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1931. . . . Basketball letterman for DePaul in 1926-27.

DAVE STENHOUSE, Rhode Island
Righthander, an All-Star as a rookie, compiled a 16-28 record with the Washington Senators in three seasons from 1962 through 1964. Father of Mike Stenhouse, an outfielder-first baseman with three different major league teams in the mid-1980s after playing basketball for Harvard. . . . Dave (6-0) was an All-Yankee Conference selection each year while scoring 1,077 points from 1952-53 through 1954-55, including a career-high 17.1 ppg as a junior. He led URI in free-throw shooting as a senior (73.3%).

MIKE STENHOUSE, Harvard
Outfielder-first baseman, a lefthander swinger who didn't sign with the Oakland Athletics after being their first-round pick in the 1979 amateur draft (26th choice overall), hit .190 with the Montreal Expos, Minnesota Twins and Boston Red Sox in five seasons from 1982 through 1986. Son of Dave Stenhouse, an All-Star pitcher as a rookie with the Washington Senators in 1962 after being a three-time All-Yankee Conference basketball selection with Rhode Island, led the American Association in batting average, slugging percentage and on-base percentage in 1983. . . . Mike (6-1) averaged 4.1 ppg for Harvard's basketball team in 1977-78.

RIGGS STEPHENSON, Alabama
Infielder-outfielder hit .336 in 14 years from 1921 through 1934 with the Cleveland Indians and Chicago Cubs. Batted .319 or better in 12 major league seasons. In 1927, his first full season with the Cubs, he led the N.L. with 46 doubles. Ranked among the N.L. top five in on-base percentage three consecutive campaigns from 1927 through 1929. In the Cubs' 1929 pennant-winning season, Stephenson combined with Hall of Famers Kiki Cuyler and Hack Wilson to become the first outfield in N.L. history to have each starter finish with more than 100 RBI. The 5-10, 185-pounder hit .378 in nine World Series games with the Cubs in 1929 and 1932. . . . Guard was a basketball letterman with the Crimson Tide in 1920. He injured his shoulder while playing football in college.

JIMMY STEWART, Austin Peay State
Switch-hitting utilityman batted .237 in 10 years (1963 through 1967 and 1969 through 1973) with the Chicago Cubs, Chicago White Sox, Cincinnati Reds and Houston Astros. He played in 1970 World Series with the Reds. Traded by the Reds with Tommy Helms and Lee May to the Astros for Joe Morgan, Denis Menke, Jack Billingham, Cesar Geronimo and Ed Armbrister on November 29, 1971. . . . Stewart was the third-leading scorer for the Governors in 1959-60 (11.5 ppg) and 1960-61 (10.4 ppg) when they participated in the NCAA Division II Tournament. The 6-0, 165-pounder was an All-Volunteer State Athletic Conference selection both years.

TIM STODDARD, North Carolina State
Righthander pitched in 485 games, all as a reliever, in 13 seasons (1975 and 1978 through 1989) with the Chicago White Sox, Baltimore Orioles, Chicago Cubs, San Diego Padres, New York Yankees and Cleveland Indians. Compiled a 41-35 record with 3.95 ERA and 76 saves. Recorded 26 saves (fourth in A.L.) for the Orioles in 1980 the year after being the winning pitcher for them in Game Four of the 1979 World Series against the Pittsburgh Pirates. Had a part as a menacing pitcher in the comedy film, Rookie of the Year. . . . Played three seasons from 1972-73 through 1974-75 for N.C. State as a 6-7, 230-pound forward under coach Norman Sloan. Averaged 7.9 ppg and 5.3 rpg as a sophomore, 5.5 ppg and 4.5 rpg as a junior, and 5.6 ppg and 4.8 rpg as a senior as the Wolfpack won 69 of 76 games in that span. Starting forward opposite All-American David Thompson on 1974 NCAA champion. Stoddard was actually State's third choice off the Hammond (Ind.) High School team of 1971. Guard Pete Trgovich headed to UCLA and forward Junior Bridgeman chose Louisville. Wolfpack assistant coach Sam Esposito, a former major league infielder who doubled as the baseball coach, had Stoddard around to pitch the school to three straight ACC baseball titles from 1973 through 1975. Sketch in school guide: "Filled a vital role as a starter with his rebounding and defensive play. Has proven himself a clutch performer on numerous occasions."

GEORGE STONE, Louisiana Tech
Lefthander compiled a 60-57 record and 3.89 ERA with the Atlanta Braves and New York Mets in nine N.L. years from 1967 through 1975. Led the N.L. in won-loss percentage in 1973 (12-3 mark with the Mets after winning eight straight decisions at the end of the year) before appearing in the World Series and notching a save in Game 2 against the Oakland A's. . . . The 6-3 Stone was a basketball letterman for Tech in 1964-65 and 1965-66 (averaged 14.7 ppg and 6.5 rpg as teammate of noted women's coach Leon Barmore).

JOHN STUPER, Butler County (Kan.)
Eccentric righthander won nine games as a rookie for the 1982 World Series champion St. Louis Cardinals (hurled four-hit victory against Milwaukee in Game 6) and 32 overall with the Cards and Cincinnati Reds in a four-year career ended by an arm injury. Oversaw the best four-year period in Yale baseball history. . . . Two-time all-conference basketball player in junior college.

DICK SUCH, Elon (N.C.)
Righthander compiled a 1-5 record with the Washington Senators in 1970. . . . The 6-4 forward averaged 8.9 ppg and 7.4 rpg in 1964-65 and 10.5 ppg and 6.9 rpg in 1965-66.

BILLY SULLIVAN, Portland
Lefthanded swinging catcher-utilityman hit .289 with the Chicago White Sox, Cincinnati Reds, Cleveland Indians, St. Louis Browns, Detroit Tigers, Brooklyn Dodgers and Pittsburgh Pirates in 12 seasons from 1931 through 1933, 1935 through 1942 and 1947. He posted a career-high .351 batting average in 1936 in his first season with the Indians. Participated in 1940 World Series with the Tigers. . . . The 6-0 Sullivan was a basketball letterman for the Pilots in the late 1920s.

JOHN "CHAMP" SUMMERS, Nicholls State/Southern Illinois-Edwardsville
Outfielder-designated hitter hit .255 in 11 years from 1974 through 1984 with the Chicago Cubs, Cincinnati Reds, Detroit Tigers, San Francisco Giants and San Diego Padres. The Vietnam veteran, one of the first players to get a tattoo (Playboy bunny on shoulder), hit over .300 with a total of 37 homers in 1979 and 1980 with the Tigers. Lefthanded hitter appeared in 1984 World Series with the Padres. Managed the independent Gateway Grizzlies in the Frontier League. . . . The 6-2, 205-pounder averaged 18.8 ppg in two varsity seasons for SIUE (team-high 22.5 ppg in 1969-70 and team second-best 16.7 ppg in 1970-71). Averaged a team-high 15.7 ppg for Nicholls State (La.) in 1964-65 and 10.6 ppg in half a season in 1965-66 before entering the Army.

DARRELL SUTHERLAND, Stanford
Righthander compiled a 5-4 record with the New York Mets and Cleveland Indians in four years from 1964 through 1966 and 1968. The brother of 13-year major league utilityman Gary Sutherland, a USC hoopster, was 3-1 with a 2.81 ERA in 1965 with the Mets. . . . The 6-4 guard averaged 8.1 ppg and 2.2 rpg for the Cardinal from 1960-61 through 1962-63 under coach Howie Dallmar. He led the team in free-throw percentage as a junior (80.2%).

GARY SUTHERLAND, Southern California
Utilityman hit .243 in 13 seasons from 1966 through 1978 with seven teams (Philadelphia Phillies, Montreal Expos, Houston Astros, Detroit Tigers, Milwaukee Brewers, San Diego Padres and St. Louis Cardinals). Selected by Montreal in an expansion draft, the brother of four-year major league pitcher Darrell Sutherland, a Stanford hoopster, had more than 500 at-bats in one season with the Expos (1969) and two with the Tigers (1974 and 1975). Ranked fourth in the A.L. in singles in 1974 with 131. . . . The 6-0, 175-pound guard was the Trojans' fifth-leading scorer in 1963-64 when he averaged 7.4 ppg as the shortest man on coach Forrest Twogood's squad.

EVAR SWANSON, Knox College (Ill.)
Outfielder hit .303 with the Cincinnati Reds and Chicago White Sox in five years (1929, 1930 and 1932 through 1934) after playing end with the NFL's Chicago Cardinals for three seasons from 1925 through 1927. As a MLB rookie, he was runner-up in steals with 33 and finished eighth in triples with 12. . . . Although only 5-9, he played all five positions when school was known as Lombard College.

KEN SZOTKIEWICZ, Georgia Southern
Shortstop hit .107 in 47 games with the Detroit Tigers in 1970. Lefthanded swinger was the third pick overall in secondary phase of back-to-back amateur drafts (1967 and 1968). . . Basketball letterman in 1966-67.

JIM TABOR, Alabama
Third baseman hit .270 with the Boston Red Sox and Philadelphia Phillies in nine seasons from 1938 through 1947 (served in U.S. Army in 1945 during WWII). His 95 RBI in 1939 was overshadowed by fellow Red Sox rookie Ted Williams. Ranked among the A.L. top nine in RBI in 1941 (career-high 101) and 1943 (85) after finishing sixth in doubles in 1939 with 33. In a July 4, 1939, doubleheader against the Philadelphia Athletics, he hit four homers (three in the nightcap including two grand slams). His first professional home run came in his initial exhibition game (grand slam off Indians Hall of Famer Bob Feller). . . . Basketball letterman with the Crimson Tide as a 6-2 guard in 1936-37.

LAWRENCE "LEO" TANKERSLEY, Texas Christian
Catcher played one game with the Chicago White Sox in 1925. . . . The 6-0 Tankersley was a basketball letterman for TCU in 1922-23 and 1923-24.

TED TAPPE, Washington State
Lefthanded-swinging outfielder hit .259 with the Cincinnati Reds (1950 and 1951) and Chicago Cubs (1955). . . . The 6-3, 185-pound guard was the leading scorer in the 1949 NJCAA national tournament with 81 points in four games in helping Olympic Junior College (Bremerton, Wash.) to a fourth-place finish. He was the Cougars' third-leading scorer (6.8 ppg) the next year in his only season with them under coach Jack Friel before signing a pro baseball contract.

WILBUR "ARLIE" TARBERT, Ohio State
Outfielder hit .247 in 39 games with the Boston Red Sox in 1927 and 1928. . . . The 6-0 Tarbert was a basketball letterman for OSU in 1924-25 and 1925-26.

GEORGE "BIRDIE" TEBBETTS, Providence
Four-time All-Star catcher hit .270 with the Detroit Tigers, Boston Red Sox and Cleveland Indians in 14 A.L. seasons from 1936 through 1942 and 1946 through 1952. Hitless in 11 at-bats in 1940 World Series with the Tigers against the Cincinnati Reds. Compiled a 748-705 managerial record (.515) with the Reds, Milwaukee Braves and Indians from 1954 through 1958 and 1961 through 1966. . . . Scored six points in four games for PC in 1932.

WAYNE TERWILLIGER, Western Michigan
Second baseman hit .240 in nine seasons (1949 through 1951, 1953 through 1956, 1959 and 1960) with the Chicago Cubs, Brooklyn Dodgers, Washington Senators, New York Giants and Kansas City Athletics. He collected eight consecutive hits for the Cubs as a rookie in 1949. Minor league manager for 15 seasons in the farm systems of the New York Yankees, Washington Senators and Texas Rangers (1961-68, 1973 and 1975-80). Served as a major league coach with the Senators, Texas Rangers and Minnesota Twins (1969-71, 1972 and 1981-94). . . . The 5-11, 165-pounder was a two-year letterman for WMU's basketball team, averaging 5.6 ppg in his final season in 1947-48.

DAVE THIES, St. Mary's (Minn.)
Righthander pitched nine games for the Kansas City A's in 1963, compiling an 0-1 record and 4.62 ERA. . . . The 6-4, 200-pounder was a two-year all-conference basketball selection who finished his college career in 1959 as the school's all-time leading scorer with 1,794 points.

KEITH "KITE" THOMAS, Kansas State
Outfielder hit .233 with the Philadelphia Athletics and Washington Senators in two seasons (1952 and 1953). . . . Averaged 5.1 ppg for the Wildcats in 1946-47.

MATT THORNTON, Grand Valley State (Mich.)
Lefthander, a first-round selection in 1998 amateur draft (22nd pick overall), compiled a 26-23 record and 3.55 ERA with the Seattle Mariners and Chicago White Sox in his first seven major league seasons from 2004 through 2010. All-Star selection in 2010. . . . The 6-6 Thornton averaged 5.8 ppg and 2.4 rpg for GVSU from 1995-96 through 1997-98. He shot 54.7% from the floor his last two seasons.

JIM UMBRICHT, Georgia
Righthander compiled a 9-5 record and 3.00 ERA in 88 games in five seasons from 1959 through 1963 with the Pittsburgh Pirates and Houston Colt .45s before dying of cancer on April 9, 1964. . . . The 6-4 swingman captained Georgia's team as a senior in 1951-52 after averaging 6.4 ppg the previous season and 3.3 ppg in 1949-50.

CECIL UPSHAW, Centenary
Reliever compiled a 34-36 record with 3.13 ERA and 86 saves in nine seasons (1966 through 1969 and 1971 through 1975) with the Atlanta Braves, Houston Astros, Cleveland Indians, New York Yankees and Chicago White Sox. Posted 2.84 ERA in three relief appearances for the Braves in the 1969 N.L. Championship Series. Led the Braves in saves five times, including a career-high 27 (runner-up in N.L.) for the 1969 Western Division champions. . . . The 6-6, 185-pound forward averaged 13.7 ppg and six rpg from 1961-62 through 1963-64. Led the team in scoring as a junior (15.4) and finished as Centenary's third-leading career scorer. Excerpt from school guide: "Deadly shooter from the corner but lacks strength to battle the boards with the bigger boys."

TOM "HERB" UPTON, Southeast Missouri State/Penn
Shortstop hit .225 with the St. Louis Browns and Washington Senators in three seasons from 1950 through 1952. Traded by Washington with Irv Noren to the New York Yankees for Jackie Jensen, Spec Shea, Jerry Snyder and Archie Wilson on May 3, 1952, but he never played for them. Brother of Bill Upton, a pitcher for the Philadelphia Athletics in 1954. . . . Led SEMO in scoring three years the last half of the 1940s and was the school's career scoring leader upon graduation. While serving in the military, he was All-EIBL first-team selection with Penn in 1945-46 when the 6-0 Upton averaged 9 ppg as the Quakers' captain.

JOE VANCE, Southwest Texas State
Righthander compiled a 3-2 record in 15 games with the Chicago White Sox and New York Yankees in 1935, 1937 and 1938. . . . Basketball letterman for Southwest Texas State in 1927-28 and 1928-29.

RAY VAN CLEEF, Rutgers
College World Series Most Outstanding Player in 1950 when outfielder hit .417 (10-for-24 after going 7-for-9 in first two games) to help Rutgers finish in third place. . . . The 5-6 Van Cleef averaged 3.6 ppg from 1948-49 through 1950-51.

JEFF VAN NOY, Utah State
Outfielder was hitless in seven at-bats with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1951. . . . The 6-1, 200-pounder was a two-year basketball letterman (1946-47 and 1947-48). Led the nation in interceptions with eight in 1948.

INMAN "COOT" VEAL, Auburn
Shortstop hit .231 in six seasons from 1958 through 1963 with the Detroit Tigers, Washington Senators and Pittsburgh Pirates. Named to The Sporting News Rookie All-Star Team in 1958 after hitting .256 for the Tigers. . . . Veal led Auburn in scoring as a sophomore under coach Joel Eaves in his only season of varsity basketball (10.9 ppg in 1951-52) before the 6-1, 165-pounder signed a pro baseball contract.

BOB VEALE, Benedictine College (Kan.)
Compiled a 120-95 pitching record and 3.08 ERA in 13 seasons from 1962 through 1974 with the Pittsburgh Pirates and Boston Red Sox. Lefthander led the N.L. in strikeouts with 250 in 1964, the first of four consecutive years he won at least 16 games and ranked among the top seven in strikeouts. Ranked third in the N.L. in ERA in 1968 with a 2.05 mark. Two-time N.L. All-Star twice struck out 16 batters in a game. He participated in 1971 World Series with the Pirates. . . . Alabama product scored 1,160 points in three seasons from 1955-56 through 1957-58 as a 6-5, 205-pound center for the Atchison, Kan.-based school that was then called St. Benedict's.

WILL VENABLE, Princeton
Lefthanded outfielder hit .250 with the San Diego Padres in his first six seasons from 2008 to 2013. Venable, who didn't play baseball his freshman year in college, finished among the N.L. top 10 in triples (8th with 7) and stolen bases (9th with 29) in 2010. Son of 12-year major league outfielder Max Venable was their seventh-round choice in the 2005 amateur draft. . . . All-Ivy League first-team selection as a junior and second-team choice as a senior averaged 9.3 ppg under coach John Thompson III from 2001-02 through 2004-05. Scored a team-high 16 points and contributed game highs of 8 rebounds and 3 steals in a 2004 NCAA tourney setback against Texas.

BILL VIRDON, Drury (Mo.)
Outfielder hit .267 with the St. Louis Cardinals and Pittsburgh Pirates in 12 N.L. seasons from 1955 through 1965 and 1968. N.L. Rookie of the Year with the Cardinals in 1955 after he was acquired from the New York Yankees in a deal involving Enos Slaughter. Lefthanded swinger was runner-up in the N.L. in batting average in 1956 with a .319 mark (.211 for the Cards and .334 for the Pirates). Led the N.L. in triples in 1962 with 10 after ranking among the top five three straight years from 1956 through 1958. Gold Glove center fielder in 1962 two years after helping the Pirates win the World Series over the Yankees with three doubles and five RBI. Compiled a 995-921 managerial record with the Pirates, Yankees, Houston Astros and Montreal Expos in 13 seasons from 1972 through 1984. Boasts the distinction of being named Manager of the Year in both the American League (Yankees in 1974) and National League (Astros in 1980). . . . The 6-0 Virdon played basketball for Drury in 1949.

FREDERICK "MYSTERIOUS" WALKER, University of Chicago
Compiled a 7-23 record and 4.00 ERA with the Cincinnati Reds, Cleveland Indians, Brooklyn Superbas, Pittsburgh Rebels and Brooklyn Tip-Tops in five years (1910 and 1912 through 1915). . . . Letterman in basketball among other sports coached Dartmouth (1918), Rhode Island (1919), DePauw IN (1922), Michigan State (1923 and 1924), Drury MO (1925 and 1926), Loyola NO (1927), Texas (1928 through 1931) and Wheaton IL (1937 through 1940).

FRED WALTERS, Mississippi State
Catcher hit .172 in 40 games for the Boston Red Sox in 1945. . . . Three-year basketball letterman from 1935 through 1937.

PRESTON WARD, Southwest Missouri State
First baseman-outfielder hit .253 in nine seasons (1948, 1950, and 1953 through 1959) with the Brooklyn Dodgers, Chicago Cubs, Pittsburgh Pirates, Cleveland Indians and Kansas City Athletics. In 1958, the lefthanded swinger was hitting .338 with Cleveland when he was shipped to Kansas City. . . . The 6-4, 190-pound Ward was the second-leading scorer for Southwest Missouri's teams in 1946-47 (8.1 ppg) and 1948-49 (12.2 ppg). Named to the first five on the All-Missouri Intercollegiate Athletic Association team both of those seasons. Selected by St. Louis Bombers in 1949 NBA draft.

HAL WARNOCK, Arizona
Outfielder hit .286 in six games with the St. Louis Browns in 1935. . . . Three-year basketball letterman from 1931-32 through 1933-34.

RAY WASHBURN, Whitworth (Wash.)
Righthander compiled a 72-64 record with the St. Louis Cardinals and Cincinnati Reds in 10 years from 1961 through 1970. Tossed a no-hitter against the San Francisco Giants in 1968 when he posted a miniscule 2.26 ERA and career-high 14 victories. Pitched in five World Series games in a four-year span from 1967 through 1970 (with the Cards in back-to-back years and with the Reds in his final campaign). . . . Led Whitworth in scoring and was named All-Evergreen Conference both his junior and senior seasons in 1958-59 (23.5 ppg) and 1959-60 (19 ppg and 15.5 rpg). The 6-1, 205-pound Washburn helped Columbia Basin to the Northwest Junior College basketball title in 1957-58 before returning to Whitworth, where he earned a letter as a freshman. "I didn't do too bad," Washburn said. "But I was too small to go on. I wasn't quick enough to play out front."

JOHNNIE WATSON, Marshall
Shortstop went 3 for 12, including a pair of doubles, in four games with the Detroit Tigers in 1930. . . . The 6-0 Watson was a basketball letterman with Marshall from 1926-27 through 1929-30.

MONTE WEAVER, Emory & Henry (Va.)
Righthander compiled a 71-50 record with the Washington Senators and Boston Red Sox in nine A.L. years from 1931 through 1939. As a rookie, ranked fifth in the A.L. in victories in 1932 with 22. Appeared in 1933 World Series with the Senators against the New York Giants, dueling Carl Hubbell into the 11th inning of Game Four before losing, 2-1. . . . The 6-0 Weaver played center for Emory & Henry's basketball team in the mid-1920s. Taught mathematics at his alma mater after his pro career.

BILLY WERBER, Duke
Third baseman hit .271 in 11 seasons (1930 and 1933 through 1942) with the New York Yankees, Boston Red Sox, Philadelphia Athletics, Cincinnati Reds and New York Giants. Led the A.L. in stolen bases in 1934, 1935 and 1937. Paced the N.L. in runs in 1939 with 115. Werber hit .326 in 11 World Series games with the Reds in 1939 and 1940. He was the initial player to bat in a televised major league game (Reds vs. Brooklyn on August 26, 1939) and the only player ever to hit four consecutive doubles in a game in both leagues. . . . First Duke player to earn All-American honors in basketball. The 5-10, 170-pounder was named to the 10-man Christy Walsh Syndicate All-American team following his senior season in 1929-30 when the Blue Devils were 18-2. Second-leading scorer for Southern Conference Tournament runner-up as a junior and senior when he was an all-tourney selection both years.

JOHN WERHAS, Southern California
Third baseman hit .250 in 89 games with the Los Angeles Dodgers and California Angels in 1964, 1965 and 1967. . . . The 6-2, 200-pound forward averaged 10.5 ppg and 5.5 rpg for the Trojans in 66 varsity games under coach Forrest Twogood from 1957-58 through 1959-60, leading them in scoring average as a junior (14.3 ppg) and senior (14.8 ppg). He was a first-team All-Pacific Coast Conference selection as a junior when he finished among the top 10 in league statistics in scoring (fourth with 16.7 ppg), free-throw percentage (third at 84.9%) and rebounding (10th with 7.8 rpg). Werhas was an eighth-round draft choice of the Minneapolis Lakers in 1960.

BILL WHITE, Hiram (Ohio)
Five-time All-Star first baseman hit .286 with the New York/San Francisco Giants, St. Louis Cardinals and Philadelphia Phillies in 13 N.L. seasons in 1956 and from 1958 through 1969. Homered for the Giants in his first major league at-bat (5/7/56). Ranked among the N.L. top 10 in RBI five times (1961-62-63-64-66). Placed among the N.L. top eight in both doubles and triples three straight campaigns from 1959 through 1961. Gold Glover seven consecutive years from 1960 through 1966. Managed an amazing total of 14 hits in back-to-back doubleheaders against the Chicago Cubs on July 17/18, 1961. Participated in 1964 World Series with the Cards against the New York Yankees. Traded by St. Louis with Dick Groat and Bob Uecker to Philadelphia for Pat Corrales, Art Mahaffey and Alex Johnson on October 27, 1965. Longtime broadcaster for the Yanks. . . . The 6-0 lefthander was a three-sport collegiate letterman, including basketball ("two undistinguished years" in the early 1950s according to White's biography). In the late 1950s, he played pickup games with Cardinal teammates/former college hoopsters George Crowe, Bob Gibson and Dick Rickettts.

JOHN "JACK" WHITE, Fordham
Switch-hitting infielder was hitless in seven at-bats with the Cincinnati Reds in 1927 and 1928. . . . Three-year basketball letterman for Fordham from 1924 through 1926.

SAMMY WHITE, Washington
Catcher hit .262 in 11 seasons with the Boston Red Sox (1951 through 1959), Milwaukee Braves (1961) and Philadelphia Phillies (1962). The 1953 All-Star hit over .280 three times with the Red Sox. Ranked among the A.L. top 10 in doubles three straight years from 1953 through 1955. On June 18, 1953, he scored three runs in one inning when the Red Sox tallied 17 in the seventh against the Detroit Tigers. . . . Averaged 10.1 ppg as a 6-3, 195-pound forward with the Huskies in three varsity seasons from 1946-47 through 1948-49. Named to first five on All-Pacific Coast Conference Northern Division team as a junior and senior. Sketch in school guide: "White's variations on traditional tosses not only make him a treacherous offensive weapon, but one of the greatest crowd pleasers to perform under the Husky banner in many a moon. Perhaps the fastest man on club, and although his forte is offensive punch, he is far from impotent on defense."

FRANK WHITMAN, Eureka (Ill.)
Infielder, primarily a shortstop, managed just one hit in 22 at-bats in 20 games with the Chicago White Sox in 1946 and 1948. . . . One of Eureka's leading scorers as a freshman in 1942-43. The 6-2 Whitman also played in 1948-49 after serving in the U.S. Army.

BOB WILL, Mankato (Minn.) State
Lefthanded outfielder hit .247 with the Chicago Cubs in six seasons from 1957 through 1963 (excluding 1959). His only year as a regular was 1960 when he finished eighth in the N.L. with nine triples. The next campaign, he led the N.L. with 52 pinch-hit appearances. . . . The 5-10 1/2 Will was an all-conference athlete in three different sports during his college career. Basketball team captain in 1954-55 (8.5 ppg and 2.5 rpg) also served same role for football squad that he led in total yards and touchdowns.

EDWIN "DIB" WILLIAMS, Hendrix (Ark.)
Infielder hit .267 with the Philadelphia Athletics and Boston Red Sox in six A.L. seasons from 1930 through 1935. Hit .320 in the 1931 World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals. In 1933, he posted career highs in batting average (.289), homers (11) and RBI (73) with the Athletics. . . . Oklahoma A&M transfer played basketball in the mid-1920s.

FRED "CY" WILLIAMS, Notre Dame
Outfielder hit .292 with the Chicago Cubs and Philadelphia Phillies in 19 N.L. seasons from 1912 through 1930. The 6-2 lefthander led the N.L. in home runs four years (1916-20-23-27). Tied Babe Ruth for major league lead in round-trippers with 41 in 1923. Ranked among the N.L. top 10 in slugging percentage eight consecutive campaigns from 1920 through 1927. Finished among the N.L. top four in total bases four times (1920-22-23-24), top eight in batting average three times (1920-24-26) and top 10 in RBI five times (1916-22-23-24-27). His 11 pinch-hit homers remained a major league career mark until 1960. . . . Forward for Irish's basketball squad in 1909-10.

JIM WILLIS, Northwestern State (La.)
Righthander compiled a 2-2 record and 3.39 ERA with the Chicago Cubs in 1953 and 1954. Traded by the Cubs to the Cincinnati Reds but he never returned to the majors. . . . Guard was a basketball letterman for the Demons in 1944-45 and from 1947-48 through 1949-50.

DESI WILSON, Fairleigh Dickinson
Lefthanded swinger hit .271 with the San Francisco Giants in 1996. Reserve first baseman was traded by the Texas Rangers with Rich Aurilia to the Giants for John Burkett on December 22, 1994. . . . Northeast Conference player of the year in 1989-90. Leading scorer (23.8 ppg) and rebounder (9.2 rpg) for 1990-91 league co-champion. He is FDU's all-time leading scorer with 1,902 points.

JIM WILSON, San Diego State
Righthander compiled an 86-89 record with the Boston Red Sox, St. Louis Browns/Baltimore Orioles, Philadelphia Athletics, Boston/Milwaukee Braves and Chicago White Sox in 12 years from 1945 through 1958 (excluding 1947 and 1950). All-Star three consecutive campaigns from 1954 through 1956 before leading the A.L. in shutouts in 1957 with five. He hurled a no-hitter against Robin Roberts and the Philadelphia Phillies on June 12, 1954. . . . Basketball letterman for the Aztecs in 1941-42 when they participated in the NAIA Tournament.

JOHNNY WILSON, Anderson (Ind.)
Outfielder with the Chicago American Giants of the Negro baseball league in 1948. . . . Still holds Anderson's career scoring average record of 23.3 ppg (including 24.6 ppg in 1947-48 and 25.4 ppg in 1948-49). Aspired to attend Indiana but remained in hometown at small college when he was not recruited by the Hoosiers due to the Big Ten Conference's unspoken policy at the time of not recruiting African-American players.

EDDIE WINEAPPLE, Providence
Lefthander pitched in one game for the Washington Senators in 1929. . . . Earned All-American honors after scoring 13.9 ppg with the Friars in 1929. He left PC after one year to play professional basketball with Syracuse.

DAVE WINFIELD, Minnesota
Hall of Fame outfielder, a first-round pick in 1973 amateur draft (fourth choice overall), hit .283 with 465 home runs, 1,833 RBI and 3,110 hits in 22 seasons (1973 through 1988 and 1990 through 1995) with the San Diego Padres, New York Yankees, California Angels, Toronto Blue Jays, Minnesota Twins and Cleveland Indians. Led the N.L. in total bases in 1979 with 333 before ranking among the A.L. top four in batting average in 1984 (.340) and 1988 (.322). Seven-time Gold Glover appeared in 12 All-Star Games after never playing in the minors. Participated in World Series with the Yankees (1981) and Blue Jays (1992). . . . Played two seasons of varsity basketball as a 6-6, 220-pound forward with the Gophers, averaging 6.9 ppg and 5.4 rpg as a junior in 1971-72 and 10.5 ppg and 6.1 rpg as a senior in 1972-73. He played the entire game, collecting eight points and eight rebounds against eventual Final Four participant Florida State, in Minnesota's first NCAA Tournament appearance in 1972 under coach Bill Musselman. . . . Selected by the Atlanta Hawks in the fifth round of the 1973 NBA draft and the Utah Stars in the sixth round of the 1973 ABA draft. Didn't play college football, but was chosen in the 17th round of the 1973 NFL draft by the Minnesota Vikings. Excerpt from school guide: "Recruited out of intramural ranks to lend depth, became a starter and was a giant in the stretch drive. Amazing athlete leaps like a man catapulted. Soft touch from medium range."

BOBBY WINKLES, Illinois Wesleyan
Coached Arizona State to College World Series titles in 1965, 1967 and 1969 before managing the California Angels in 1973 and through the first 74 games of 1974 (170-213 major league record). Reggie Jackson, Rick Monday and Sal Bando were among the more than 20 future major leaguers he coached at ASU. . . . Led Illinois Wesleyan in scoring as a senior in 1950-51 (12 ppg). The 5-9, 170-pound guard was a first-team selection in the College Conference of Illinois.

RANDY WINN, Santa Clara
A.L. All-Star in 2002 was one of the most consistent switch-hitters in the majors, hitting .284 and stealing 215 bases in 13 seasons from 1998 through 2010. When he retired, Winn was the active player with most games (1,717) without appearing in the postseason after playing for the New York Yankees and St. Louis Cardinals in 2010. Ranked among the A.L. top three in triples in 1998 and 2002 and top eight in stolen bases three straight years from 2002 through 2004. In 2005 with the Seattle Mariners and San Francisco Giants, the outfielder fell one stolen base shy of becoming the first switch-hitter ever with at least 45 doubles, 20 home runs and 20 steals in a single season. His 51-hit effort in September 2005 marked the most safeties by a Giants player in any single month in 30 years. Selected by Tampa Bay in third round of Expansion Draft before making his big league debut. . . . The 6-2 Winn played basketball for the Broncos in 1992-93 and 1993-94 (1.4 ppg in 17 games). Backcourtmate of eventual two-time NBA Most Valuable Player Steve Nash.

WALTER "LEFTY" WOLF, Lebanon Valley (Pa.)
Lefthander pitched in eight games for the Philadelphia Athletics in 1921. . . . The 5-10 Wolf played college basketball from 1920-21 through 1923-24.

CHUCK WORKMAN, Central Missouri State
Outfielder-third baseman hit .242 in six seasons (1938, 1941 and 1943 through 1946) with the Cleveland Indians, Boston Braves and Pittsburgh Pirates. Lefthanded batter finished second in the N.L. in home runs in 1945 with 25 for the Braves. . . . Led team in scoring as sophomore (8.9 ppg in 1934-35) and junior (10.5) and was second-leading scorer as a senior (9.5). Leading scorer in tourney with 38 points in three games when Central Missouri won the first National Intercollegiate Tournament (now NAIA Tournament) at Kansas City in 1937. The 6-0, 175-pounder was a first five selection on the Missouri Intercollegiate Athletic Association all-star team as a sophomore and junior.

ALBERT "AB" WRIGHT, Oklahoma A&M
Outfielder hit .248 with the Cleveland Indians in 1935 and Boston Braves in 1944. . . . The 6-3 Wright was a basketball letterman in 1928-29 for Oklahoma A&M, which is now known as Oklahoma State.

FRANK WURM, Middlebury (Vt.)
Lefthanded pitcher walked five batters in 1/3 of an inning for the Brooklyn Dodgers on Labor Day, 1944. . . . The 6-1 Warum was acknowledged as Middlebury's best basketball player in 1945-46 while studying on the G.I. Bill after service in Italy during World War II.

CHRIS YOUNG, Princeton
Pittsburgh Pirates' third-round selection in 2000 is a righthander who compiled a 53-43 pitching record and 3.79 ERA in his first nine seasons through 2012. Tied a major league record with 25 straight starts on the road without a defeat before bowing at Los Angeles to the Dodgers on 4/15/07. Won a start for the San Diego Padres in 2006 N.L. Divisional Series against eventual World Series champion St. Louis Cardinals. Montreal Expos pitching prospect in 2004 when he was traded to the Texas Rangers. Moved into the Rangers' starting rotation in 2005 when he compiled a 12-7 record. He became the first Princeton product to start a major league game since former hoopster Dave Sisler for the Washington Senators nearly 43 years earlier. All-Star in 2007 signed as a free agent with the New York Mets in 2011 after missing parts of the previous three seasons with arm injuries. . . . The 6-10 center was an All-Ivy League first-team selection in 1999-2000 (13.8 ppg, 6.3 rpg, 3.5 apg, 2.9 bpg) after earning second-team acclaim as a freshman the previous season (12.9 ppg, 5.3 rpg, 2.9 apg, 53.6 FG%). Played under coach Bill Carmody before he departed for Northwestern.

JOHN YOUNG, Chapman (Calif.)
First baseman went 2 for 4 in two games with the Detroit Tigers in 1971. Traded by Detroit to the St. Louis Cardinals on December 9, 1974, but he never played for the Cards. . . . The 6-3 Young played sparingly for Chapman's basketball squad in the late 1960s.

NORMAN "BABE" YOUNG, Fordham
First baseman-outfielder hit .273 in eight N.L. seasons (1936, 1939 through 1942 and 1946 through 1948) with the New York Giants, Cincinnati Reds and St. Louis Cardinals. Lefthander had a career-high 25 home runs (fourth in N.L.) in 1941 to cap back-to-back years with more than 100 RBI for the Giants (fifth in league in 1940 and runner-up in 1941). After serving in the Coast Guard during World War II, he returned to the Giants and led the N.L. with 32 pinch-hitting appearances in 1946. Whacked a pair of three-run homers to support Reds teammate Ewell Blackwell's no-hitter against the Boston Braves on June 18, 1947. . . . Young earned a letter with Fordham's 10-5 basketball team in 1935-36.

TOM ZACHARY, Guilford (N.C.)
Lefthander compiled a 186-191 record and 3.72 ERA with seven different big league teams (Philadelphia A's, Washington Senators, St. Louis Browns, New York Yankees, Boston Braves, Brooklyn Dodgers and Philadelphia Phillies) in 19 years from 1918 through 1936. Runner-up in the A.L. in ERA in 1924 with a 2.75 mark. Led A.L. hurlers in games started with 33 in 1925 with the Senators before surrendering Babe Ruth's 60th home run of 1927. Won two World Series starts with the Senators in 1924 and one with the Yankees in 1928. In 1929, he became the only major league pitcher to win as many as 12 games in a season without a defeat. . . . The 6-1, 185-pounder lettered in basketball in 1916.

JOE ZAPUSTAS, Fordham
Outfielder went 1 for 5 in two games with the Philadelphia Athletics in 1933. . . . The 6-1 Zapustas was a basketball letterman for Fordham in 1932-33.