All-Time Top 100 Players: Why Are So Few Contemporary Players on List?

Incomparable Michael Jordan, a mere five years after failing to earn a spot on his high school varsity basketball team in Wilmington, N.C., as a sophomore, emerged as unanimous national college player of the year at North Carolina.

One takes the risk of making a colossal blunder by doing anything reflecting a mite negatively on His Airness. But a question lingers: Where does MJ rank among the 100 players who had the most impact while in college?

An observer could assemble a compelling argument that the ultra-confident Jordan is the greatest team sport athlete of all time. At first glance, the prospect of not including him among the top 10 to 20 basketball collegians in history resembles the futility of his chances to legitimately earn a spot on the Chicago White Sox major league roster. He quickly discovered that the single most difficult thing to do in any professional team sport is to consistently make contact with 90-mile-per-hour fastballs and wicked sliders (hit .202 with 114 strikeouts in 127 games for Birmingham in the AA Southern League in 1994).

Similarly, it is a simplistic copout to accept the instant visibility of an icon such as Jordan and automatically cite him among the 10 most influential players in college history. Jordan's prolific pro career featuring 10 scoring titles, six NBA championships and multiple MVP awards somewhat distorts his collegiate impact. Notwithstanding the appeal of Jordan's game-winning basket as a freshman in the closing seconds of the 1982 national final against Georgetown, a closer examination of the raw facts shows that other players were more efficient more often at the collegiate level.

Extended impact is a vital factor in the elite player equation. In order to whittle the illustrious field to a manageable number, candidates for most influential had to play a minimum of three major-college seasons to be included among the Top 20 of the premier 100 players. Such restrictive criteria eliminates from Top 20 consideration many underrated junior college jewels, "one 'n done" freshmen phenoms/top five NBA draft picks such as Shareef Abdur-Rahim, Carmelo Anthony, Michael Beasley, Chris Bosh, Mike Conley Jr., Kevin Durant, Tyreke Evans, Derrick Favors, Kevin Love, Stephon Marbury, O.J. Mayo, Greg Oden, Derrick Rose, Tyrus Thomas, Tristan Thompson, John Wall and Marvin Williams plus all-time greats such as Georgia Tech guard Kenny Anderson, Seattle forward Elgin Baylor (one of three seasons was at small-school level), Kansas center Wilt Chamberlain, Massachusetts forward Julius Erving, Memphis State guard Penny Hardaway, Detroit forward-center Spencer Haywood, LSU guard Chris Jackson, Michigan State guard Magic Johnson, California guard Jason Kidd, North Carolina forward Bob McAdoo, Indiana forward George McGinnis, Purdue forward Glenn Robinson, Indiana guard Isiah Thomas and Michigan forward Chris Webber.

Jordan's 33.4-point NBA playoff scoring average in his 13 seasons with the Chicago Bulls more than doubled the NCAA Tournament scoring average he compiled for North Carolina. Jordan averaged 16.5 points per NCAA playoff game with the Tar Heels, scoring 20 or more in only two of 10 postseason games from 1982 through 1984. Most fans don't remember his inauspicious playoff debut when he garnered a meager six points, one rebound, no assists and no steals in 37 minutes of a 52-50 opening-round victory against James Madison in the East Regional. He was Carolina's third-best player at the time behind Sam Perkins and James Worthy.

Moreover, Jordan's final NCAA Tournament appearance prior to leaving school early to dominate the NBA was nothing to write home about, either. The college player of the year was restricted to six points in the first 35 minutes of the 1984 East Regional semifinals against Indiana, finishing with 13 points, one rebound, one assist and one steal in 26 foul-plagued minutes when the top-ranked Tar Heels were eliminated (72-68).
Of course, the celestial Jordan seemed to progress every year with the Bulls while most of his "human" counterparts were fortunate to maintain their game. Few, if any of his peers, come close to being in the same league with him during their professional days.

But Jordan's heavenly NBA career followed much more of a down-to-earth college stint. Standouts not included among the Top 20 players in the following list, although they probably had equally distinguished college careers as Jordan in terms of sustained impact, include Terry Dischinger (Purdue), Tim Duncan (Wake Forest), Bailey Howell (Mississippi State), Dan Issel (Kentucky), Rick Mount (Purdue), Calvin Murphy (Niagara), Shaquille O'Neal (LSU), David Robinson (Navy), Ralph Sampson (Virginia), Lionel Simmons (La Salle), Wayman Tisdale (Oklahoma), Wes Unseld (Louisville) and Jimmy Walker (Providence).

Again, Jordan is the greatest of all time if you include his pro career. But from an all-time great perspective, he averaged a modest 17.7 points, 5 rebounds and 1.8 assists per game with Carolina. Naturally, it's somewhat contrived to rank him No. 23, but no one else deserves to be linked to that number. Guaranteeing acclaim among the 100 most influential college players was becoming one of the 11 four-time All-Americans, six players who averaged at least 20 points and 20 rebounds
per game in their careers (minimum of two seasons) or any of the three-time All-Americans who earned first-team acclaim at least one year.

Any four-time All-American such as Arnie Ferrin, Tony Lavelli, Kevin O'Shea and Darnell Valentine is automatically included among the following thought-provoking assessment of the 100 most influential college basketball players while they were in school (minimum of two varsity seasons):

  1. Lew Alcindor, C, UCLA (88-2 team record, .978; 26.4 ppg, 15.5 rpg, 63.9 FG%)
    The only individual selected the Final Four's Most Outstanding Player three times averaged 25.7 points and 18.8 rebounds and shot 64.1 percent from the floor in six Final Four games from 1967 through 1969. Alcindor, who later changed his name to Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, is the only player to couple three unanimous first-team All-American seasons with three NCAA titles. Of the 10 different individuals to average more than 23 points per game for a national champion a total of 12 times, Alcindor achieved the feat all three of his seasons with the Bruins. He is also the only player to hit better than 70 percent of his field-goal attempts in two NCAA title games. UCLA '67, the first varsity season for Alcindor, set the record for largest average margin of victory for a champion when the Bruins started a dazzling streak of 10 consecutive Final Four appearances. They won their 12 NCAA playoff games with Alcindor manning the middle by an average margin of 21.5 points. The three Alcindor-led UCLA teams rank among the seven NCAA champions with average margins of victory in a tournament of more than 19 points per game. He led the nation in field-goal percentage in 1967 and 1969 and finished fourth in 1968. Ranked among the nation's leading scorers in 1967 (2nd), 1968 (12th) and 1969 (29th). Ranked among the nation's leading rebounders in 1967 (4th), 1968 (9th) and 1969 (16th). Both of UCLA's defeats with Alcindor manning the middle were by two points. It's no wonder a perceptive scribe wrote that the acronym NCAA took on a new meaning during the Alcindor Era--"No Chance Against Alcindor." A player that graces the sport once in a lifetime also lost only one of 117 high school games for Power Memorial in New York.

  2. Oscar Robertson, F-G, Cincinnati (79-9, .898; 33.8 ppg, 15.2 rpg, 53.5 FG%, 78 FT%)
    Averaged at least 29 points and 10 rebounds per game each of his three years in the NCAA tourney. Led the country in scoring all three varsity seasons. First player to lead the nation's scorers in both his sophomore and junior seasons. Ranked among the nation's top 20 in rebound percentage and field-goal percentage all three seasons. The textbook definition of an all-around player also ranked among the leaders in free-throw percentage in 1958 (33rd) and 1959 (35th). Had six games of at least 50 points, including a school-record 62 against North Texas State and 56 when he personally outscored Seton Hall (118-54). Amassed 33 consecutive double-doubles (double figures in scoring and rebounding).

  3. Pete Maravich, G, Louisiana State (49-35, .583; 44.2 ppg, 6.4 rpg, 5.1 apg)
    All-time leading scorer in Division I holds NCAA records for most 50-point games (10) and most 40-point games (56). Dazzling ballhandler never scored fewer than 30 points in back-to-back games and tallied under 20 just once (17 at Tennessee as a sophomore) in his three varsity seasons. The son of LSU coach Press Maravich was outscored by a teammate in just one regular-season game en route to three consecutive national scoring titles. "Pistol Pete" scored an amazing 48.2 percent of LSU's points in his three-year career en route to setting a bevy of NCAA scoring records. The three-time SEC Player of the Year likely would have averaged more than 50 ppg if there had been a three-point arc at the time. The most disconcerting things about his career were failing to participate in the NCAA playoffs, an anemic 7-13 mark during his career in contests decided by fewer than four points and SEC setbacks each year against bottom-feeder teams--ninth-place Ole Miss as a sophomore, tenth-place Alabama as a junior and ninth-place Alabama as a senior. But when doubts creep in, just watch some old video of him and you'll be forced to acknowledge that his off-the-chart creativity revolutionized the game.

  4. Bill Walton, C, UCLA (86-4, .956; 20.3 ppg, 15.7 rpg, 65.1 FG%)
    Averaged 28.8 points and 17.8 rebounds per game at the Final Four in 1972 and 1973. His championship game-record 44 points against Memphis State in 1973 when he hit 21 of 22 field-goal attempts will probably never be duplicated. Ranked among the nation's top four in field-goal percentage in 1972 (4th), 1973 (2nd) and 1974 (2nd). Ranked among the nation's top 10 rebounders all three seasons. He joined Oscar Robertson (Cincinnati '58) as the only players in history during the freshman team era to be named national player of the year in their first season of varsity competition. Walton was headliner of the first major-college team in history to compile back-to-back perfect-record seasons. Walton, who paced three consecutive league champions in scoring and rebounding, is the only player to be a three-time first-team NCAA unanimous All-American and first-team Academic All-American. He shot an NCAA Tournament-record 68.6 percent from the floor in 12 playoff games.

  5. Jerry Lucas, C, Ohio State (78-6, .929; 24.3 ppg, 17.2 rpg, 62.4 FG%)
    Final Four Most Outstanding Player in 1960 and 1961. Three-time Big Ten Conference MVP led the nation in field-goal percentage all three seasons from 1960 through 1962. Paced the country in rebounding in 1961 and 1962 after finishing 11th in 1960. Ranked among the nation's leading scorers in 1960 (8th), 1961 (11th) and 1962 (38th) and 43rd in free-throw percentage in 1962. Lucas departed with the three best single-season rebounding totals in Big Ten history. He became the first player ever to gain five individual national statistical titles in a career (two for rebounding and three for shooting). He had 20 games with at least 20 rebounds and managed streaks of 38 and 24 consecutive double-doubles (double figures in scoring and rebounding).

  6. Larry Bird, F, Indiana State (81-13, .862; 30.3 ppg, 13.3 rpg, 53.3 FG%, 82.2 FT%)
    Indiana transfer ranked among the nation's top three scorers in 1977 (3rd), 1978 (2nd) and 1979 (2nd). Two-time MVC Player of the Year ranked among the nation's top seven rebounders in 1977 and 1979. Had eight games with at least 44 points, including a school-record 49 against Wichita State. How good would the Hoosiers have been in the '70s if Bird had stayed put?

  7. David Thompson, F, North Carolina State (79-7, .919; 26.8 ppg, 8.1 rpg, 55.3 FG%)
    Three-time ACC Player of the Year ranked among the nation's leading scorers in 1973 (17th), 1974 (5th) and 1975 (3rd). Incredible leaper ranked 19th in the nation in field-goal percentage in 1973. He had a total of 33 30-point games, including a school-record 57 against Buffalo State. You had to see him to believe his high-wire act.

  8. Bill Russell, C, San Francisco (71-8, .899; 20.7 ppg, 20.3 rpg, 51.6 FG%)
    Grabbed an incredible 50 rebounds at the 1956 Final Four (23 against SMU in the semifinals and 27 against Iowa in the championship game). No other player has retrieved more than 41 missed shots in two Final Four games or more than 21 in the final. One of six players to average more than 20 points and 20 rebounds per game in his career. Ranked among the nation's leading rebounders in 1954 (7th), 1955 (4th) and 1956 (4th). Ranked among the nation's leaders in field-goal percentage in 1954 (15th), 1955 (7th) and 1956 (9th).

  9. Bill Bradley, F, Princeton (62-21, .747; 30.2 ppg, 12.1 rpg, 51.3 FG%, 87.6 FT%)
    The former U.S. Senator (D-N.J.) and presidential candidate for 2000 holds the record for most points in a single Final Four game (58 against Wichita State in 1965 national third-place game). He scored 39 points in the second half of the consolation game. The Rhodes Scholar was the only player to have a double-digit season scoring average (30.5 points per game) for Princeton's Final Four team. Bradley also holds the career playoff record for highest free-throw percentage (minimum of 50 attempts). He was 89 of 96 from the foul line (90.6 percent) from 1963 through 1965. In five of his nine playoff games, Bradley made at least 10 free throws while missing no more than one attempt from the charity stripe. He made 16 of 16 free throws against St. Joseph's in the first round of the 1963 East Regional and 13 of 13 foul shots against Providence in the 1965 East Regional final to become the only player to twice convert more than 12 free throws without a miss in playoff games. He led the nation in free-throw percentage in 1965 after finishing 2nd in 1963 and 14th in 1964. Ranked among the nation's top five scorers in 1963 (5th), 1964 (4th) and 1965 (3rd). Set a mark for most points in an Ivy League contest when he poured in 51 against Harvard. He is the only Princeton player to score 40 or more points in a game, a feat he achieved 11 times. Bradley led three consecutive Ivy League champions in scoring and rebounding.

  10. Elvin Hayes, F-C, Houston (81-12, .871; 31 ppg, 17.2 rpg, 53.6 FG%)
    He is the only player to lead an NCAA tournament in scoring by more than 60 points (167 points in five games in 1968). Hayes became the only player in tournament history to collect more than 40 points and 25 rebounds in the same game when he amassed 49 points and 27 rebounds in a 94-76 decision over Loyola of Chicago in the first round of the '68 Midwest Regional. He holds the records for most rebounds in a playoff series (97 in five games as a senior in 1968) and career (222 in 13 games). He had five tourney games with at least 24 rebounds, including the first three playoff contests in 1968, before being held to five in a 101-69 national semifinal loss against UCLA. Hayes also holds the record for most playoff field goals in a career with 152. Ranked among the nation's top six rebounders in 1966 (5th), 1967 (6th) and 1968 (3rd). Ranked among the nation's leading scorers in 1966 (11th), 1967 (4th) and 1968 (3rd). Had 52 games with at least 30 points and 25 contests with a minimum of least 20 rebounds.

  11. Tom Gola, F-C, La Salle (101-17, .856; 20.9 ppg, 18.7 rpg)
    The only individual to earn NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player and NIT Most Valuable Player awards in his career. Ranked among the nation's top rebounders in 1952 (9th), 1953 (19th), 1954 (3rd) and 1955 (6th). Ranked among the nation's leading scorers all four seasons--1952 (41st), 1953 (55th), 1954 (21st) and 1955 (18th). Also finished 22nd in the nation in free-throw percentage in 1953. Concluded his career with 2,462 points and 2,201 rebounds. His total of points and rebounds (4,663) is the highest in NCAA history.

  12. Jerry West, F-G, West Virginia (81-12, .871; 24.8 ppg, 13.3 rpg, 50.8 FG%)
    He is the only player to score at least 25 points in eight consecutive tournament games. West is also the only player to rank among the top five in scoring average in both the NCAA Tournament (30.6 points per game) and NBA playoffs (29.1 ppg). He had 62 contests with at least 20 points. Ranked among the nation's leading scorers in 1958 (65th), 1959 (5th) and 1960 (4th). Ranked among the nation's top 25 in field-goal percentage in 1958 and 1959 and in rebound percentage in 1960.

  13. George Mikan, C, DePaul (81-17, .827; 19.1 ppg)
    Led the nation in scoring in 1945 and 1946. NIT Most Valuable Player in 1945. Leading scorer in NIT in 1944 and 1945 when he averaged 28.2 points in six games. Set a school single-game scoring record that still exists (53 points vs. Rhode Island State in NIT). Had 13 games with at least 30 points.

  14. Ralph Sampson, C, Virginia (112-23, .830; 16.9 ppg, 11.4 rpg, 3.5 bpg, 56.8 FG%)
    Named national player of the year by AP, UPI and USBWA in 1981, 1982 and 1983, and by NABC in 1982 and 1983. Wooden Award winner in 1982 and 1983. Naismith Award winner in 1981, 1982 and 1983. NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1981, 1982 and 1983. Three-time ACC Player of the Year ranked among the nation's top 15 rebounders in 1980 (15th), 1981 (10th), 1982 (15th) and 1983 (8th). Leading rebounder and second-leading scorer for third-place team in 1981 NCAA Tournament (29-4 record). NIT Most Valuable Player in 1980.

  15. Bob Pettit, F-C, Louisiana State (59-15, .797; 27.4 ppg, 14.6 rpg)
    Of the nearly 60 different players to score more than 225 points in the NCAA playoffs and/or average over 25 points per tournament game (minimum of six games), he is the only one to score more than 22 points in every postseason contest (six games in 1953 and 1954). He was perhaps the most consistent big scorer in NCAA Tournament history with a single-digit differential between his high game (36 points) and his low game (27). Pettit wasn't named to the 1953 All-Tournament team despite leading the Tigers to the Final Four and averaging 30.5 points per game in four NCAA playoff contests. He averaged the same number of points in two tourney games the next year. Ranked among the nation's leaders in scoring in 1952 (3rd), 1953 (9th) and 1954 (2nd), field-goal percentage in 1953 (9th) and 1954 (13th) and rebounding in 1954 (11th).

  16. Bernard King, F, Tennessee (61-20, .753; 25.8 ppg, 13.2 rpg, 59 FG%)
    Led the nation in field-goal percentage as a freshman in 1975. Ranked among the nation's top 12 scorers all three seasons. Three-time SEC Player of the Year ranked among the nation's top 10 rebounders as a sophomore and junior. He had five games with at least 40 points. Probably would have placed higher if he didn't forgo his final year of eligibility.

  17. Austin Carr, G, Notre Dame (61-24, .718; 34.6 ppg, 7.3 rpg, 52.8 FG%, 81.4 FT%)
    Carr averaged 47.2 ppg in his last six NCAA playoff contests to finish with a tourney record 41.3-point average. Ranked second in the nation in scoring in 1970 and 1971. Ranked 25th in the nation in field-goal percentage in 1970 and among the nation's leaders in free-throw percentage in 1970 (25th) and 1971 (29th). Accounted for 18 of the 20 times in Irish history when a player scored 45 or more points, including a school-record 61 against Ohio University.

  18. Bob Lanier, C, St. Bonaventure (65-12, .844; 27.6 ppg, 15.7 rpg, 57.6 FG%)
    Ranked among the nation's leading scorers in 1968 (11th), 1969 (8th) and 1970 (9th). Also ranked among the nation's top 15 in rebounding while ranking among the top 21 in field-goal percentage all three seasons. Boasts the top five single-game rebound totals in Bonnies history plus four of the top five single-game scoring outputs, including a school-record 51 against Seton Hall.

  19. Adrian Dantley, F, Notre Dame (68-19, .782; 25.8 ppg, 9.8 rpg, 56.2 FG%, 80 FT%)
    Ranked among the nation's top four scorers in 1975 (2nd) and 1976 (4th). Ranked 17th in the nation in free-throw percentage in 1974 and 18th in field-goal percentage in 1976. Averaged 25.4 points and 8.3 rebounds in eight NCAA Tournament games. Scored a career-high 49 points against Air Force.

  20. Rick Barry, F, Miami, Fla. (65-16, .802; 29.8 ppg, 16.5 rpg, 52.2 FG%, 84.7 FG%)
    Led the nation in scoring in 1965 after finishing 4th in 1964. Ranked among the nation's leading rebounders in 1963 (18th), 1964 (11th) and 1965 (4th). Ranked among the nation's top 20 in free-throw percentage all three seasons. Barry was able to stay ahead of Utah State's Wayne Estes in the 1965 scoring race by amassing six 50-point games, including a national-high and school record 59 against Rollins. Barry finished that season with an amazing points-and-rebounds average of 55.7 per contest. He hauled down a school-record 29 rebounds against Oklahoma City and retrieved 27 missed shots to equal Rollins' entire team total. He probably would have ranked higher if his four 50-point outbursts as a senior came against major universities rather than picking-on-patsy small colleges.

  21. Wilt Chamberlain, C, Kansas (42-8, .840; 29.9 ppg, 18.3 rpg)
    NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1957 and 1958. Ranked among the nation's top four scorers in 1957 (4th) and 1958 (3rd). Ranked 4th in the nation in rebounding percentage in 1957 and 1958. Final Four Most Outstanding Player in 1957 (55 points, 25 rebounds). Had three games with at least 45 points, including a school-record 52 in his varsity debut. Grabbed a minimum of 24 rebounds in seven contests. Definitely would have ranked higher if the Philadelphia native didn't leave college early after just two seasons.

  22. Patrick Ewing, C, Georgetown (121-23, .840; 15.3 ppg, 9.2 rpg, 3.4 bpg, 62 FG%)
    Two-time Big East Player of the Year ranked among the nation's leaders in field-goal percentage in 1984 (3rd) and 1985 (7th). Four-time All-American ranked among the nation's leading rebounders in 1983 (24th) and 1984 (27th). Powered the Hoyas to three Final Fours.

  23. Michael Jordan, G-F, North Carolina (88-13, .871; 17.4 ppg, 5 rpg, 54 FG%)
    NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1983 and 1984. Named national player of the year by AP, UPI, USBWA and NABC in 1984. Naismith Award and Wooden Award winner in 1984. Ranked among the nation's leading scorers in 1983 (61st) and 1984 (55th). Scored a career-high 39 points in a 72-65 victory over Georgia Tech.

  24. Cazzie Russell, F, Michigan (65-17, .793; 27.1 ppg, 8.5 rpg, 50.5 FG%, 82.8 FT%)
    Averaged at least 24 points per game each of his three years in the NCAA tourney. Two-time Big Ten Conference MVP ranked among the nation's leading scorers in 1964 (24th), 1965 (10th) and 1966 (3rd). Ranked among the nation's top 35 in free-throw percentage all three seasons. Set a school record for most points in a regulation game with 48 against Northwestern. He had 23 outings with at least 30 points.

  25. Elgin Baylor, F, Seattle (45-9, .833; major-college stats: 31.2 ppg, 19.8 rpg, 49.8 FG%, 78.4 FT%)
    NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1958 and consensus second-team All-American in 1957 after transferring from a small college. Led the nation in rebounding in 1957 and finished 3rd in 1958. Ranked among the nation's leading scorers in 1957 (3rd) and 1958 (2nd). Ranked among the nation's leaders in field-goal percentage in 1957 (26th) and 1958 (17th) and placed 39th in free-throw percentage in 1957. Leading scorer and rebounder for 1958 national runner-up (24-7 record) when he was Final Four Most Outstanding Player. Averaged 27 points in five NCAA Tournament games.

  26. Hank Luisetti, F, Stanford (68-12, .850; 16.1 ppg)
    NCAA consensus All-American in 1936, 1937 and 1938 when he powered Stanford to three consecutive PCC championships. Led the nation in scoring in 1936 and 1937. A couple of decades ahead of his time, he is credited with revolutionizing basketball by introducing his running one-handed shot. His school-record 50 points vs. Duquesne at Cleveland almost doubled the Dukes' output in a 92-27 victory.

  27. Chet Walker, F, Bradley (69-14, .831; 24.4 ppg, 12.8 rpg, 55.2 FG%)
    Ranked among the nation's leading scorers in 1960 (27th), 1961 (8th) and 1962 (10th). Ranked among the nation's top 20 in field-goal percentage in 1960 (4th), 1961 (8th) and 1962 (18th). Ranked among the nation's leaders in rebound percentage in 1960 (16th) and 1961 (26th). He had 22 games with at least 30 points.

  28. Alex Groza, C, Kentucky (124-12, .912; 14.5 ppg)
    NCAA consensus first-team All-American in 1947 and 1949, and consensus second-team All-American in 1948. Final Four Most Outstanding Player in 1948 (37 points in final two games) and 1949 (52 points). Ranked 6th in the nation in scoring and 17th in field-goal percentage in 1949. Leading scorer for NCAA champions in 1948 (36-3 record) and 1949 (32-2).

  29. Bob Kurland, C, Oklahoma A&M (99-22, .818; 14.1 ppg)
    NCAA consensus first-team All-American in 1944, 1945 and 1946. Final Four Most Outstanding Player in 1945 (37 points in final two games) and 1946 (52 points). Leading scorer for NCAA Tournament champions in 1945 (27-4 record) and 1946 (31-2). Averaged 22.8 points in six NCAA Tournament games in 1945 and 1946 (6-0 record). Scored a school-record 58 points in an 86-33 rout of St. Louis.

  30. Earvin "Magic" Johnson, G, Michigan State (51-11, .823; 17.1 ppg, 7.6 rpg, 7.9 apg, 81.6 FT%)
    NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1979. Second-leading scorer and rebounder for 1979 NCAA Tournament champion (26-6 record). Final Four Most Outstanding Player in 1979 (53 points, 17 rebounds, 15 assists, 68.0 FG%, 86.4 FT%). He had eight triple-doubles. Would have ranked higher if he didn't leave college after his sophomore season.

  31. Ed Macauley, C-F, St. Louis (77-29, .726; 13.6 ppg)
    NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1949 and consensus first-team All-American in 1948. Led the nation in field-goal percentage in 1949. Ranked among the nation's leaders in scoring (38th) and free-throw percentage (32nd) in 1949. NIT Most Valuable Player in 1948. St. Louis was atop the initial list in mid-January 1949 when a weekly ranking ritual began as the Associated Press announced the results of the first basketball poll.

  32. Tim Duncan, C, Wake Forest (97-31, .758; 16.5 ppg, 12.3 rpg, 3.8 bpg, 57.7 FG%)
    Named national player of the year by AP and NABC in 1997. Wooden Award winner in 1997. NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1996 and 1997. Led the nation in rebounding in 1997 after finishing 5th in 1995 and 4th in 1996. Ranked among the nation's leaders in blocked shots in 1994 (5th with 3.8 bpg), 1995 (6th with 4.2 bpg), 1996 (8th with 3.8 bpg) and 1997 (9th with 3.3 bpg). Improved by leaps and bounds from a forgettable debut when he was scoreless in a loss to NCAA Division II Alaska-Anchorage.

  33. Dan Issel, C-F, Kentucky (71-12, .855; 25.8 ppg, 13 rpg, 51.9 FG%)
    NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1970 and consensus second-team All-American in 1969. Ranked among the nation's leading scorers in 1969 (11th) and 1970 (4th). Averaged 29.3 points and 11.3 rebounds in six NCAA Tournament games. He scored at least 40 points eight times in his senior season, including a school-record 53 at Ole Miss, to help UK become the most prolific scoring team in SEC history (96.8 points per game).

  34. Rick Mount, G, Purdue (56-20, .737; 32.3 ppg, 2.9 rpg, 84.3 FT%)
    NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1969 and 1970. Ranked among the nation's top six scorers in 1968 (6th), 1969 (2nd) and 1970 (3rd). Ranked among the nation's top 20 in free-throw percentage in 1968 (15th), 1969 (15th) and 1970 (20th). Set a Big Ten Conference record with 61 points against Iowa (13 of his 27 field goals would have been behind the current three-point line).

  35. David Robinson, C, Navy (106-25, .809; 21 ppg, 10.3 rpg, 4.1 bpg, 61.3 FG%)
    Named national player of the year by AP, UPI, USBWA and NABC in 1987. Wooden Award and Naismith Award winner in 1987. NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1987 and consensus second-team All-American in 1986. Led the nation in rebounding in 1986 between finishing 7th in 1985 and 4th in 1987. Led the nation in blocked shots in 1986 (5.9 per game) and 1987 (4.5 per game). Ranked among the nation's leading scorers in 1985 (13th), 1986 (14th) and 1987 (3rd). Ranked among the nation's top 20 in field-goal percentage in 1985 (4th), 1986 (17th) and 1987 (19th). Averaged 28.6 points and 12.3 rebounds in seven NCAA Tournament games. He had 29 contests with at least 30 points. Similar to Tim Duncan, Robinson improved immensely from a college debut when he was scoreless.

  36. Shaquille O'Neal, C, Louisiana State (64-29, .688; 21.6 ppg, 13.5 rpg, 4.6 bpg, 61 FG%)
    Named national player of the year by AP and UPI in 1991. NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1991 and 1992. Led the nation in rebounding in 1991 between finishing 9th in 1990 and 2nd in 1992. Led the nation in blocked shots with 5.2 per game in 1992 after finishing 6th with 3.6 per game in 1990 and 3rd with 5 per game in 1991. Ranked among the nation's leading scorers in 1991 (7th) and 1992 (15th). Would have ranked higher if he didn't leave college early (after junior season).

  37. Bailey Howell, F-C, Mississippi State (61-14, .813; 27.1 ppg, 17 rpg, 52.5 FG%)
    NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1959 and consensus second-team All-American in 1958. Led the nation in field-goal percentage in 1957 before finishing 14th in 1958 and 27th in 1959. Ranked among the nation's top 10 scorers in 1957 (9th), 1958 (4th) and 1959 (4th). Ranked among the nation's top 10 rebounders in 1957 (6th), 1958 (9th) and 1959 (2nd). He had 13 games with at least 35 points, including a school-record 47 against Union, plus the top six rebounding efforts in MSU history.

  38. Wayman Tisdale, C, Oklahoma (84-20, .808; 25.6 ppg, 10.1 rpg, 57.8 FG%)
    NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1984 and 1985, and consensus first-team All-American in 1983. Ranked among the nation's top eight scorers in 1983 (8th), 1984 (5th) and 1985 (7th). Ranked among the nation's leading rebounders in 1983 (18th) and 1985 (23rd). The three-time Big Eight Conference Player of the Year had 25 games with more than 30 points.

  39. Wes Unseld, C, Louisville (60-22, .732; 20.6 ppg, 18.9 rpg, 55.8 FG%)
    NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1967 and 1968. Ranked among the nation's top four rebounders in 1966 (2nd), 1967 (3rd) and 1968 (4th). Ranked 4th in the nation in field-goal percentage and 31st in scoring in 1968. Scored a school-record 45 points against Georgetown College. Grabbed at least 25 rebounds in eight games.

  40. Phil Ford, G, North Carolina (99-25, .798; 18.6 ppg, 6.1 apg, 52.7 FG%, 80.8 FT%)
    Named national player of the year by NABC and USBWA in 1978. Wooden Award winner in 1978. NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1978, consensus first-team All-American in 1977 and consensus second-team All-American in 1977. Leading scorer for 1977 NCAA Tournament runner-up (28-5 record).

  41. Clyde Lovellette, C, Kansas (56-21, .727; 24.5 ppg, 10.2 rpg)
    NCAA consensus first-team All-American in 1951 and 1952. Led the nation in scoring in 1952 after finishing 4th in 1950 and 6th in 1951. Leading scorer and rebounder for 1952 NCAA Tournament champion (28-3 record). Final Four Most Outstanding Player in 1952 with 66 points in last two games. Only player to lead the nation in scoring average while playing for a team reaching the NCAA Tournament championship game. He is also the only individual to crack the 30-point plateau in the national semifinals and final in the same season.

  42. Mark Aguirre, F, DePaul (79-10, .888; 24.5 ppg, 7.9 rpg, 54.6 FG%)
    Named national player of the year by AP, UPI and USBWA in 1980. Naismith Award winner in 1980. NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1980 and 1981. Ranked among the nation's top 20 scorers in 1979 (18th), 1980 (9th) and 1981 (15th). Leading scorer and second-leading rebounder for third-place team in 1979 NCAA Tournament (26-6 record). Had 12 games with at least 34 points.

  43. Jimmy Walker, G, Providence (67-14, .827; 25.2 ppg, 6.3 rpg)
    NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1967 and consensus first-team All-American in 1966. Led the nation in scoring in 1967 after finishing 53rd in 1965 and 24th in 1966. Had eight games with at least 40 points.

  44. Calvin Murphy, G, Niagara (45-32, .584; 33.1 ppg, 4 rpg, 84.9 FT%)
    NCAA consensus first-team All-American in 1969 and 1970, and consensus second-team All-American in 1968. Ranked among the nation's top eight scorers in 1968 (2nd), 1969 (3rd) and 1970 (8th). Ranked 4th in the nation in free-throw percentage in 1970. Had 14 games with at least 42 points, including a school-record 68 against Syracuse.

  45. Arnie Ferrin, F, Utah (68-22, .756; 13.7 ppg)
    NCAA consensus first-team All-American in 1945 and second-team All-American in 1944, 1947 and 1948. Ranked 48th in the nation in scoring in 1948. Final Four Most Outstanding Player as a freshman in 1944.

  46. Terry Dischinger, F, Purdue (44-26, .629; 28.3 ppg, 13.7 rpg, 55.3 FG%, 81.9 FT%)
    NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1961 and 1962 and consensus second-team All-American in 1960 failed to participate in NCAA Tournament and NIT. Ranked among the nation's top seven scorers in 1960 (7th), 1961 (4th) and 1962 (4th). Ranked among the nation's leaders in field-goal percentage in 1960 (6th), 1961 (4th) and 1962 (17th). Ranked among the nation's leaders in free-throw percentage in 1960 (40th), 1961 (11th) and 1962 (12th). Had a total of 58 double-doubles (double figures in scoring and rebounding).

  47. Artis Gilmore, C, Jacksonville (48-6, .889; 24.3 ppg, 22.7 rpg, 57.4 FG%)
    NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1971. Only major-college player to average more than 22 points and 22 rebounds per game in his career. Led the nation in rebounding in 1970 and 1971. Ranked among the nation's top 50 scorers in 1970 (21st) and 1971 (50th). Ranked among the nation's leaders in field-goal percentage in 1970 (10th) and 1971 (14th). Leading scorer and rebounder for 1970 national runner-up (27-2 record). Averaged 24 points and 19.2 rebounds in six NCAA Tournament games. Grabbed a school-record 34 rebounds against St. Peter's and had eight games during his senior season when he blocked a minimum of 10 shots, including a school-record 14 rejections at Miami (Fla.).

  48. Julius Erving, F, Massachusetts (41-11, .788; 26.3 ppg, 20.2 rpg)
    One of six players to average more than 20 points and 20 rebounds per game in his career. Ranked among the nation's top 25 scorers in 1970 (tied for 24th) and 1971 (12th). Ranked among the nation's top three rebounders in 1970 (2nd) and 1971 (3rd). Had 16 games with at least 30 points.

  49. Danny Manning, F, Kansas (113-34, .769; 20.1 ppg, 8.1 rpg, 2.3 apg, 59.3 FG%)
    NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1987 and 1988, and consensus second-team All-American in 1986. Named national player of the year by NABC in 1988. Naismith Award and Wooden Award winner in 1988. Three-time Big Eight Conference MVP ranked among the nation's top 15 scorers in 1987 (15th) and 1988 (12th). Ranked among the nation's leaders in field-goal percentage in 1986 (22nd) and 1987 (8th). Leading scorer and rebounder for 1988 NCAA Tournament champion (27-11 record) and leading scorer and second-leading rebounder for 1986 Final Four team (35-4). Final Four Most Outstanding Player in 1988 (56 points, 17 rebounds, eight blocked shots, 55.6 FG%). Averaged 20.5 points and 7.3 rebounds per game in 16 NCAA Tournament contests (13-3 record).

  50. Grant Hill, G-F, Duke (118-23, .837; 14.9 ppg, 6 rpg, 3 apg, 1.7 spg, 53.2 FG%)
    NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1994 and consensus second-team All-American in 1993. Ranked 17th in the nation in field-goal percentage in 1992. Fifth-leading scorer and second-leading rebounder for 1991 NCAA championship team (32-7 record), second-leading rebounder and third-leading scorer for 1992 NCAA championship team (34-2), and leading scorer and second-leading rebounder for 1994 NCAA runner-up (28-6). Named to All-NCAA Tournament team in 1992 and 1994. Averaged 13.5 points, 6.7 rebounds and 4.3 assists in 20 NCAA Tournament games (18-2 record).

  51. Bob Cousy, G, Holy Cross (99-19, .839; 15.2 ppg)
    NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1950. Ranked among the nation's leading scorers in 1948 (21st), 1949 (12th) and 1950 (15th). Third-leading scorer as a freshman for 1947 NCAA champion (27-3 record).

  52. Billy McGill, C, Utah (72-14, .837; 27 ppg, 12.9 rpg, 53 FG%)
    NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1962 and consensus first-team All-American in 1961. Led the nation in scoring in 1962 after finishing 5th in 1961. Ranked among the nation's leaders in field-goal percentage in 1961 (15th) and 1962 (8th). Ranked among the nation's leaders in rebound percentage in 1961 (25th) and 1962 (18th). Leading scorer and rebounder for fourth-place team in 1961 NCAA Tournament (23-8 record). Averaged 23.7 points and 10.7 rebounds in seven NCAA Tournament games. Had 13 contests with at least 40 points, including a school-record 60 against Brigham Young.

  53. Chris Jackson, G, Louisiana State (43-21, .672; 29 ppg, 3 rpg, 3.6 apg, 86.3 FT%, 37.2 3FG%)
    NCAA consensus first-team All-American in 1989 and 1990. Compiled highest scoring average for a freshman in NCAA history (30.2 ppg). Ranked among the nation's leading scorers in 1989 (2nd) and 1990 (8th). Only player to compile single-game scoring outbursts higher than Pete Maravich in SEC competition against Ole Miss (55), Florida (53) and Tennessee (50). Had 28 contests with at least 30 points. Probably would have moved way up the list if he had remained in college another year or two.

  54. Paul Silas, C, Creighton (57-25, .695; 20.5 ppg, 21.6 rpg)
    Holds NCAA record for most rebounds in a three-year career. One of six players to average more than 20 points and 20 rebounds in his career. Paced the nation in rebounding in 1963 while finishing 3rd in 1962 and 2nd in 1964. He would have led in 1962 if the titlist was determined by rebounding average instead of percentage of highest individual recoveries out of the total by both teams. Ranked among the nation's leading scorers in 1962 (37th) and 1963 (33rd). Owns the top 13 single-game rebounding totals in school history with all of them being at least 27 caroms.

  55. Marvin Barnes, C-F, Providence (76-14, .844; 20.7 ppg, 17.9 rpg, 51.5 FG%)
    NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1974. Led the nation in rebounding in 1974 after finishing 7th in 1972 and 2nd in 1973. Ranked 29th in the nation in scoring in 1974. Second-leading scorer and leading rebounder for 1973 national fourth-place team (27-4 record). Scored a school-record 52 points against Austin Peay. He grabbed 20 or more rebounds in a game 29 times.

  56. Alonzo Mourning, C, Georgetown (94-35, .729; 16.7 ppg, 8.6 rpg, 3.8 bpg, 56.6 FG%)
    NCAA consensus first-team All-American in 1992 and consensus second-team All-American in 1990. Led the nation in blocked shots (five per game) in 1989 before finishing 26th with 2.2 per game in 1990 and 2nd with five per game in 1992. Ranked 20th in the nation in rebounding and 37th in scoring in 1992.

  57. Lionel Simmons, F, La Salle (100-31, .763; 24.6 ppg, 10.9 rpg, 1.9 bpg, 50.1 FG%)
    Named national player of the year by AP, UPI, NABC and USBWA in 1990. Naismith Award and Wooden Award winner in 1990. NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1990 and consensus second-team All-American in 1989. Ranked among the nation's leading scorers in 1987 (64th), 1988 (25th), 1989 (3rd) and 1990 (11th). Ranked among the nation's top 25 rebounders in 1987 (24th), 1988 (8th), 1989 (5th) and 1990 (19th). Concluded his career with 3,217 points and 1,429 rebounds. His total of points and rebounds (4,646) is the second-highest in NCAA history.

  58. Art Heyman, F, Duke (69-14, .831; 25.1 ppg, 10.9 rpg)
    Named national player of the year by AP, UPI and USBWA in 1963. NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1963 and consensus second-team All-American in 1962. Ranked among the nation's top 15 scorers in 1961 (9th), 1962 (14th) and 1963 (9th). Leading scorer and rebounder for third-place team in 1963 NCAA Tournament (27-3 record). Final Four Most Outstanding Player in 1963 (51 points, 19 rebounds). Finished his three-year varsity career as "Mr. Consistency." He averaged a career-low 24.9 points per game as a senior after averaging 25.2 as a sophomore and 25.3 as a junior. His rebounding averages were equally consistent (10.9, 11.2 and 10.8).

  59. John Lucas, G, Maryland (92-23, .800; 18.3 ppg, 3.4 rpg, 4.7 apg, 52.5 FG%)
    NCAA consensus first-team All-American in 1975 and 1976. Ranked 17th in the nation in free-throw percentage in 1975. Averaged 22.2 points in five NCAA Tournament games.

  60. Christian Laettner, F, Duke (123-26, .826; 16.6 ppg, 7.8 rpg, 57.4 FG%, 80.6 FT%, 48.5 3FG%)
    Named national player of the year by AP, UPI, USBWA and NABC in 1992. Naismith Award and Wooden Award winner in 1992. NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1992 and consensus second-team All-American in 1991. Ranked 33rd in the nation in scoring in 1992. Leading scorer and rebounder for NCAA Tournament champions in 1992 (34-2 record) and 1991 (32-7). Leading rebounder and second-leading scorer for Final Four team in 1990 NCAA Tournament (29-9). Final Four Most Outstanding Player in 1991 (46 points, 17 rebounds, 91.3 FT%) averaged 17.7 points and 7.3 rebounds in 23 NCAA Tournament games (21-2 record). Remembered most for a couple of game-winning baskets in key NCAA playoff contests. All-time playoff scoring leader (407 points) despite tallying fewer than 15 points in six of his first seven tournament games. Probably the most overrated individual in ESPN's greatest player poll (12th ahead of luminaries such as Elgin Baylor, Tim Duncan, Patrick Ewing, Tom Gola, Elvin Hayes, Magic Johnson, Michael Jordan, George Mikan, David Robinson and Ralph Sampson).

  61. Ralph Beard, G, Kentucky (130-10, .929; 10.9 ppg)
    NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1947 and 1948, and consensus first-team All-American in 1949. Second-leading scorer for NCAA champions in 1948 (36-3 record) and 1949 (32-2). Played for 1946 NIT champion.

  62. Chris Mullin, G-F, St. John's (98-30, .766; 19.5 ppg, 4.1 rpg, 55 FG%, 84.8 FT%)
    Named national player of the year by UPI and USBWA in 1985. Wooden Award winner in 1985. NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1985 and consensus second-team All-American in 1984. Three-time Big East Conference MVP ranked among the nation's leaders in free-throw percentage in 1983 (8th) and 1984 (3rd). Ranked among the nation's leading scorers in 1983 (62nd), 1984 (15th) and 1985 (59th). Leading scorer and third-leading rebounder for Final Four team in 1985 NCAA Tournament (31-4 record).

  63. Sam Perkins, F-C, North Carolina (117-21, .848; 15.8 ppg, 8.6 rpg, 1.8 bpg, 57.6 FG%)
    NCAA consensus first-team All-American in 1983 and 1984, and consensus second-team All-American in 1982. Ranked 12th in the nation in field-goal percentage in 1981 and 20th in free-throw percentage in 1984. Second-leading scorer and leading rebounder for 1982 NCAA Tournament champion (32-2 record). Second-leading scorer and rebounder for 1981 national runner-up (29-8).

  64. Keith Lee, C-F, Memphis State (96-20, .828; 18.8 ppg, 10.4 rpg, 2.5 bpg, 51.7 FG%)
    NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1985 and consensus first-team All-American in 1983. Consensus second-team All-American in 1984. Ranked among the nation's top 25 rebounders in 1982 (21st), 1983 (13th) and 1984 (16th). Leading scorer and rebounder for Final Four team in 1985 NCAA Tournament (31-4 record). Lee is the only major-college player to score more than 2,000 points over four seasons and have his highest and lowest average separated by fewer than two points per game.

  65. Danny Ainge, G, Brigham Young (81-38, .689; 20.9 ppg, 4.6 rpg, 52.6 FG%, 81.6 FT%)
    Named national player of the year by NABC in 1981. Wooden Award winner in 1981. NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1981. Ranked 9th in the nation in scoring in 1981 and 20th in free-throw percentage in 1978.

  66. Kent Benson, C, Indiana (100-19, .840; 15.3 ppg, 9 rpg, 53.6 FG%)
    NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1976 and consensus first-team All-American in 1977. Leading rebounder and second-leading scorer for last undefeated team in 20th Century (1976 NCAA champion with 32-0 record). Final Four Most Outstanding Player in 1976 (41 points, 18 rebounds). Averaged 19.6 points and 10.9 rebounds in eight NCAA Tournament games in 1975 and 1976 (7-1 record). Named MVP of 1974 Collegiate Commissioners Association Tournament.

  67. Kermit Washington, F-C, American (50-25, .667; 20.1 ppg, 20.2 rpg, 50.1 FG%)
    NCAA consensus second-team All-American in 1973. One of six major-college players to average more than 20 points and 20 rebounds per game in his career. Led the nation in rebounding in 1972 and 1973 after finishing second in 1971. Grabbed at least 26 rebounds in each of the last five games of his senior year. He collected 40 points and 26 rebounds in a 90-68 triumph over Georgetown in the Eagles' regular-season finale to preserve his status as the last Division I player to average more than 20 points and 20 rebounds for an entire season.

  68. Charles "Cotton" Nash, F-C, Kentucky (60-18, .769; 22.7 ppg, 12.3 rpg)
    NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1964 and consensus second-team All-American in 1962 and 1963. Ranked among the nation's top 40 scorers in 1962 (26th), 1963 (40th) and 1964 (31st). Grabbed 30 rebounds as a sophomore in a game against Temple.

  69. Si Green, G, Duquesne (65-17, .793; 19.8 ppg, 11.6 rpg)
    NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1956 and consensus first-team All-American in 1955. Ranked among the nation's leading scorers in 1955 (40th) and 1956 (13th). Averaged 21.3 points in eight NIT games in 1954 (runner-up), 1955 (champion) and 1956 (lost in quarterfinals).

  70. Darrell Griffith, G, Louisville (101-25, .802; 18.5 ppg, 4.6 rpg, 52.3 FG%)
    Wooden Award winner and NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1980. Ranked 21st in the nation in scoring in 1980 when he was Final Four Most Outstanding Player (57 points, 15 assists, 62.2 FG%). Leading scorer for 1980 NCAA champion (33-3 record).

  71. Johnny Dawkins, G, Duke (95-38, .714; 19.1 ppg, 4 rpg, 4.2 apg, 50.8 FG%)
    Naismith Award winner in 1986. NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1986 and consensus first-team All-American in 1985. Ranked among the nation's leading scorers in 1984 (62nd) and 1986 (46th). Leading scorer, runner-up in assists and third-leading rebounder for 1986 national runner-up (37-3 record). Averaged 23.8 points and 5.3 rebounds in nine NCAA Tournament games.

  72. Sean Elliott, F, Arizona (105-28, .789; 19.2 ppg, 6.1 rpg, 51.2 FG%)
    Named national player of the year by AP and NABC in 1989 (only non-UCLA player from Pac-8/10 named national POY). Wooden Award winner in 1989. NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1988 and 1989. Leading scorer and rebounder for 1988 Final Four team (35-3 record). Averaged 23.6 points, 6.8 rebounds and 3.4 assists in 10 NCAA Tournament games. Of the more than 60 different players to score at least 2,500 points and/or rank among the top 25 in career scoring average, he is the only one to have a winning NCAA playoff record in his career plus post higher scoring, rebounding and field-goal shooting career playoff averages than he compiled in the regular season.

  73. Cliff Hagan, F-C, Kentucky (86-5, .945; 19.2 ppg, 13.4 rpg)
    NCAA consensus first-team All-American in 1952 and 1954. Ranked among the nation's leading scorers in 1952 (9th) and 1954 (18th). Ranked among the nation's leading rebounders in 1952 (12th) and 1954 (30th). Leading scorer for 1954 undefeated team that chose not to participate in national postseason competition (25-0 record). Fifth-leading scorer for 1951 NCAA Tournament champion (32-2). Established SEC Tournament records for most points in a single game (42 against Tennessee) and in an entire tourney (110 in four games) as a junior in 1952.

  74. Charlie Scott, G-F, North Carolina (73-18, .802; 22.1 ppg, 7.1 rpg)
    NCAA consensus second-team All-American in 1969 and 1970. Ranked among the nation's leading scorers in 1969 (53rd) and 1970 (17th). Leading scorer and third-leading rebounder for fourth-place team in 1969 NCAA Tournament (27-5 record). Second-leading scorer and fourth-leading rebounder for 1968 national runner-up (28-4). Had 16 games with at least 30 points.

  75. Larry Johnson, F, UNLV (69-6, .920; 21.6 ppg, 11.2 rpg, 64.3 FG%)
    Named national player of the year by NABC and USBWA in 1991. Naismith Award and Wooden Award winner in 1991. NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1991 and consensus first-team All-American in 1990. Ranked among the nation's leaders in field-goal percentage in 1990 (11th) and 1991 (8th). Ranked among the nation's leading scorers in 1990 (61st) and 1991 (34th) and among the nation's top 20 rebounders in 1990 (11th) and 1991 (20th). Leading scorer and rebounder for 1990 NCAA Tournament champion (35-5 record) and 1991 Final Four team (34-1). Averaged 20.2 points and 11.5 rebounds in 11 NCAA Tournament games.

  76. Tyler Hansbrough, F-C, North Carolina (124-22, .849; 20.2 ppg, 8.6 rpg, 53.6 FG%, 79.1 FT%)
    NCAA unanimous Player of the Year in 2008. NCAA consensus first-team All-American in 2007 and unanimous first-team All-American in 2008 and 2009. ACC's all-time leading scorer set an NCAA career record for most free throws made (982). Ranked among the nation's leaders in field-goal percentage (30th in 2006 and 50th in 2008), scoring (48th in 2006, 12th in 2008 and 20th in 2009) and rebounding (17th in 2008 and 74th in 2009). Leading scorer and rebounder for 2009 NCAA Tournament titlist (34-4 record) and 2008 Final Four team (36-3). Averaged 19.1 points and 8.6 rebounds in 17 NCAA Tournament games from 2006 through 2009 (14-3 record).

  77. Bill Cartwright, C, San Francisco (96-23, .808; 19.1 ppg, 10.2 rpg, 58.9 FG%)
    NCAA consensus second-team All-American in 1977 and 1979. Ranked among the nation's leaders in field-goal percentage in 1978 (2nd) and 1979 (22nd). Three-time WCC Most Valuable Player averaged 24.6 points and nine rebounds in five NCAA Tournament games. Scored a career-high 43 points against Florida State.

  78. Don Schlundt, C, Indiana (67-27, .713; 23.3 ppg, 9.1 rpg)
    NCAA consensus first-team All-American in 1954 and consensus second-team All-American in 1953. Ranked among the nation's leading scorers in 1952 (44th), 1953 (7th), 1954 (16th) and 1955 (12th). Ranked among the nation's leaders in free-throw percentage in 1953 (7th) and 1955 (40th). Leading scorer and rebounder for 1953 NCAA Tournament champion (23-3 record). Averaged 27 points in six NCAA Tournament games. Erupted for at least 30 points in 21 contests.

  79. Dave Stallworth, F, Wichita State (81-31, .723; 24.3 ppg, 10.5 rpg, 53.2 FG%)
    NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1964 and consensus second-team All-American in 1965. Ranked among the nation's top 25 scorers in 1963 (21st), 1964 (15th) and 1965 (14th). Ranked among the nation's leaders in field-goal percentage in 1963 (22nd), 1964 (21st) and 1965 (10th). Had 20 games with at least 30 points.

  80. Tom Stith, F, St. Bonaventure (65-12, .844; 27 ppg, 9.4 rpg, 52.7 FG%)
    NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1961 and consensus first-team All-American in 1960. Ranked among the nation's leading scorers in 1959 (71st), 1960 (2nd) and 1961 (3rd). Ranked among the nation's leaders in field-goal percentage in 1959 (6th), 1960 (19th) and 1961 (16th). Averaged 29 points in three NCAA Tournament games and 24.8 points in five NIT games. Managed eight contests with more than 40 points.

  81. Calbert Cheaney, F, Indiana (105-27, .795; 19.8 ppg, 5.4 rpg, 55.9 FG%)
    Named national player of the year by AP, UPI, NABC and USBWA in 1993. Won Naismith Award and Wooden Award in 1993. NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1993. Ranked among the nation's leading scorers in 1991 (47th) and 1993 (24th). Leading scorer and third-leading rebounder for 1992 Final Four team (27-7 record). Averaged 21.5 points and 7.7 rebounds in 13 NCAA Tournament games.

  82. Frank Ramsey, F, Kentucky (86-5, .945; 14.8 ppg, 11.4 rpg)
    NCAA consensus second-team All-American in 1954. Ranked among the nation's leading scorers in 1952 (66th) and 1954 (54th). Second-leading scorer for undefeated 1954 team that bypassed national postseason competition (25-0 record). Second-leading rebounder and fourth-leading scorer for 1951 NCAA Tournament champion (32-2).

  83. Frank Selvy, F, Furman (59-21, .738; 32.5 ppg)
    NCAA consensus first-team All-American in 1954 and consensus second-team All-American in 1953. Holds NCAA record for most points in a single game with 100 against Newberry on February 13, 1954. Led the nation in scoring in 1953 and 1954 after finishing 5th in 1952. He scored 50 or more in seven games as a senior en route to becoming the first player to score 1,000 points in a single season (1,209) and average 30 or more for a career.

  84. Scott May, F, Indiana (86-6, .935; 17.7 ppg, 6.6 rpg, 51.3 FG%)
    Named national player of the year by AP, UPI and NABC in 1976. Naismith Award winner in 1976. NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1976 and consensus first-team All-American in 1975. Ranked 19th in the nation in scoring in 1976. Leading scorer and second-leading rebounder for undefeated 1976 NCAA Tournament champion (32-0 record).

  85. Fred Hetzel, F-C, Davidson (66-13, .835; 25.7 ppg, 13.8 rpg, 55.4 FG%)
    NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1965 and consensus second-team All-American in 1964. Ranked among the nation's top 15 scorers in 1963 (15th), 1964 (12th) and 1965 (8th). Ranked among the nation's leading rebounders in 1963 (31st), 1964 (30th) and 1965 (16th). Ranked among the nation's leaders in field-goal percentage in 1963 (18th), 1964 (20th) and 1965 (6th). Three-time Southern Conference MVP scored a school-record 53 points against Furman.

  86. J.J. Redick, G, Duke (116-23, .835; 19.9 ppg, 91.2 FT%, 40.6 3FG%)
    NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 2005 and 2006. Ranked among the nation's leaders in free-throw percentage (5th in 2003, 2nd in 2004, 2nd 2005 and 25th in 2006, scoring (9th in 2005 and 2nd in 2006), three-point field-goal percentage (40th in 2005 and 22nd in 2006) and three-point field goals per game (5th in 2005 and 2006). Leading scorer and fifth-leading rebounder for 2004 Final Four team (31-6 record). Averaged 15.9 points and 3.1 rebounds in 14 NCAA Tournament games from 2003 through 2006 (10-4 record).

  87. Rod Hundley, G-F, West Virginia (65-25, .722; 24.5 ppg, 10.6 rpg)
    NCAA consensus first-team All-American in 1957 and consensus second-team All-American in 1956. Ranked among the nation's top 25 scorers in 1955 (23rd), 1956 (7th) and 1957 (20th). Set a school single-game scoring standard with 54 points against Furman.

  88. Mike Gminski, C, Duke (87-37, .702; 19 ppg, 10.2 rpg, 53.1 FG%)
    NCAA consensus first-team All-American in 1979 and consensus second-team All-American in 1980. Ranked 20th in the nation in rebounding and 33rd in scoring in 1980. Leading rebounder and second-leading scorer for 1978 national runner-up (27-7 record). First player in major-college history to score 1,000 points before his 19th birthday.

  89. Ron Lee, G, Oregon (72-40, .643; 18.6 ppg, 5.2 rpg)
    NCAA consensus second-team All-American in 1975. Averaged 20.8 points and 6 rebounds in five NIT games in 1975 and 1976 (3-2 record). NIT Most Valuable Player in 1975. Only player in Pacific-8 Conference history to be named to the all-league first team four consecutive years during the 20th Century.

  90. Andy Phillip, F, Illinois (49-12, .803; 12 ppg)
    NCAA consensus first-team All-American in 1942 and 1943, and consensus second-team All-American in 1947. In an incredible achievement, Phillip (Marine Corps) and Oklahoma's Gerry Tucker (Army) returned to All-American status in 1946-47 after missing three seasons while serving in the military.

  91. Mike O'Koren, F, North Carolina (95-27, .779; 15.1 ppg, 7 rpg, 3 apg, 57.2 FG%)
    NCAA consensus second-team All-American in 1979 and 1980. Ranked 2nd in the nation in field-goal percentage in 1978. Leading rebounder and third-leading scorer for 1977 NCAA Tournament runner-up (28-5 record).

  92. John Moir, F, Notre Dame (62-8-1, .880; 11.6 ppg)
    NCAA consensus first-team All-American in 1936, 1937 and 1938. Moir, an immigrant from Scotland, didn't pick up a basketball until he completed his high school education in Niagara Falls.

  93. Howard Porter, F, Villanova (66-22, .750; 22.8 ppg, 14.9 rpg)
    NCAA consensus second-team All-American in 1971. Ranked among the nation's leading scorers in 1969 (63rd), 1970 (54th) and 1971 (30th). Ranked among the nation's top 20 rebounders in 1969 (19th), 1970 (15th) and 1971 (15th). Ranked 29th in the nation in field-goal percentage in 1971. Leading scorer and rebounder for 1971 NCAA Tournament runner-up (27-7 record). Final Four Most Outstanding Player in 1971 (47 points, 24 rebounds). Averaged 24.1 points and 12.9 rebounds in nine NCAA Tournament games.

  94. Tom McMillen, F, Maryland (73-17, .811; 20.5 ppg, 9.8 rpg, 55.5 FG%)
    NCAA consensus second-team All-American in 1973. Ranked 14th in the nation in field-goal percentage in 1973. Averaged 21.5 points and six rebounds in two NCAA Tournament games and 22.8 points in four games as NIT Most Valuable Player for 1972 champion.

  95. Mike Maloy, C, Davidson (73-13, .845; 19.3 ppg, 12.9 rpg)
    NCAA consensus second-team All-American in 1969. Ranked 19th in the nation in scoring and 20th in rebounding in 1969. Ranked 15th in the nation in field-goal percentage in 1968. Averaged 22.3 points and 12.4 rebounds in seven NCAA Tournament games.

  96. Luke Harangody, F, Notre Dame (93-43, .684; 19.2 ppg, 9.5 rpg, 78.2 FT%)
    NCAA consensus second-team All-American from 2008 through 2010. Ranked among the nation's scoring leaders in 2008 (30th), 2009 (8th) and 2010 (10th). Ranked among the nation's rebounding leaders in 2008 (12th), 2009 (6th) and 2010 (43rd). Averaged 9.4 points and 9.2 rebounds in five NCAA Tournament games in 2007, 2008 and 2010 (2-3 record). Averaged 23.8 points and 10.5 rebounds in four NIT games for 2009 semifinalist (3-1 record).

  97. Jim McMillian, F, Columbia (63-14, .818; 22.8 ppg, 9.6 rpg, 51.3 FG%)
    Three-time All-American ranked among the nation's leading scorers in 1968 (41st) and 1970 (25th). Averaged 16.7 points and 11.3 rebounds in three NCAA Tournament games.

  98. Tony Lavelli, F, Yale (57-40, .588; 20.2 ppg)
    NCAA consensus first-team All-American in 1949 and consensus second-team All-American in 1946 and 1948. Led the nation in scoring in 1949 after finishing 3rd in 1948. Ranked among the nation's leaders in free-throw percentage in 1948 (23rd) and 1949 (6th).

  99. Darnell Valentine, G, Kansas (81-38, .681; 15.4 ppg, 3.6 rpg, 5.4 apg)
    Four-time All-American averaged 15.8 points, 5.8 assists and 2.5 steals in four NCAA Tournament games in 1978 and 1981. Led the Big Eight Conference in steals three times and in assists on two occasions.

  100. Kevin O'Shea, G, Notre Dame (69-27, .719; 11.7 ppg)
    NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1948 and consensus second-team All-American in 1950.

40 HONORABLE MENTION

Steve Alford, G, Indiana (92-35 from 1984-87, .724; 19.5 ppg, 2.8 rpg, 53.3 FG%, 89.8 FT%)

Kenny Anderson, G, Georgia Tech (45-20 in 1990 and 1991, .692; 23 ppg, 5.6 rpg, 7 apg, 2.6 spg)

Len Bias, F, Maryland (88-44 from 1983-86, .667; 16.4 ppg, 5.7 rpg, 53.6 FG%)

Dave Bing, G, Syracuse (52-24 from 1964-66, .684; 24.8 ppg, 10.3 rpg, 49.5 FG%)

Michael Brooks, F, La Salle (72-46 from 1977-80, .610; 23.1 ppg, 12 rpg, 53.8 FG%)

Marcus Camby, C, Massachusetts (88-13 from 1994-96, .871; 15.1 ppg, 6.9 rpg, 3.7 bpg, 50.1 FG%)

Billy Cunningham, F, North Carolina (42-27 from 1963-65, .609; 24.8 ppg, 15.4 rpg)

Ernie DiGregorio, G, Providence (68-18 from 1971-73, .791; 20.5 ppg, 3.4 rpg, 7.7 apg, 81.2 FT%)

Walter Dukes, C, Seton Hall (80-12 from 1951-53, .889; 19.9 ppg, 18.9 rpg)

Dale Ellis, F, Tennessee (79-41 from 1980-83, .658; 17.5 ppg, 5.8 rpg, 59.5 FG%)

Danny Ferry, F, Duke (117-27 from 1986-89, .813; 15.1 ppg, 7 rpg, 3.5 apg, 38.8 3FG%)

Darrell Floyd, G, Furman (49-35 from 1954-56, .583; 32.1 ppg, 8.6 rpg)

Jack Givens, F, Kentucky (100-21 from 1975-78, .826; 16.6 ppg, 6.4 rpg, 51.5 FG%, 79.8 FT%)

Gail Goodrich, G, UCLA (78-11 from 1963-65, .876; 19 ppg, 4.7 rpg)

David Greenwood, F, UCLA (101-18 from 1976-79, .849; 14.6 ppg, 8.7 rpg, 54.3 FG%)

Clem Haskins, F, Western Kentucky (86-15 from 1965-67, .851; 22.1 ppg, 10.6 rpg)

Walt Hazzard, G, UCLA (68-20 from 1962-64, .773; 16.1 ppg, 5.5 rpg)

Ned "Dickie" Hemric, F, Wake Forest (66-48 from 1952-55, .579; 24.9 ppg, 17.3 rpg)

Joe Holup, C, George Washington (81-23 from 1953-56, .779; 21.4 ppg, 19.5 rpg, 58.3 FG%)

Jim Jackson, F, Ohio State (70-23 from 1990-92, .753; 19.2 ppg, 5.9 rpg, 50.3 FG%)

Tony Jackson, F, St. John's (57-19 from 1962-64, .750; 21.4 ppg, 13.3 rpg)

Marques Johnson, F, UCLA (106-16 from 1974-77; .869; 14.4 ppg, 7.8 rpg, 56.8 FG%)

Dwight "Bo" Lamar, G, Southwestern Louisiana (87-20 from 1970-73, .813; 31.2 ppg, 3.6 rpg)

Alfred "Butch" Lee, G, Marquette (100-16 from 1975-78, .862; 15.1 ppg, 3.3 rpg, 84.8 FT%)

Clyde Lee, C, Vanderbilt (65-14 from 1964-66, .823; 21.4 ppg, 15.5 rpg)

Kyle Macy, G, Purdue/Kentucky (94-31 from 1976 and 1978-80, .752; 14.3 ppg, 2.5 rpg, 51.4 FG%, 88.3 FT%)

Jim McDaniels, F, Western Kentucky (62-19 from 1969-71, .765; 27.6 ppg, 13.8 rpg, 53 FG%)

Sidney Moncrief, F, Arkansas (102-20 from 1976-79, .836; 16.9 ppg, 8.3 rpg, 60.6 FG%)

Charles "Stretch" Murphy, C, Purdue (41-8 from 1928-30, .837; 11.7 ppg)

Calvin Natt, F, Northeast Louisiana (76-32 from 1976-79, .704; 23.9 ppg, 11.9 rpg, 57.4 FG%)

Akeem Olajuwon, C, Houston (88-16 from 1982-84, .846; 13.3 ppg, 10.7 rpg, 4.5 bpg, 63.9 FG%)

Robert Parish, C, Centenary (87-21 from 1973-76, .806; 21.6 ppg, 16.9 rpg, 56.4 FG%)

Glenn Robinson, F, Purdue (47-15 in 1993 and 1994, .758; 27.5 ppg, 9.7 rpg, 38.5 3FG%)

John Roche, G, South Carolina (69-16 from 1969-71, .812; 22.5 ppg, 2.5 rpg, 82.1 FT%)

Lennie Rosenbluth, F, North Carolina (60-16 from 1955-57, .789; 26.9 ppg, 10.4 rpg)

Isiah Thomas, G, Indiana (47-17 in 1980 and 1981, .734; 15.4 ppg, 3.5 rpg, 5.7 apg, 53.4 FG%)

Kelly Tripucka, F-G, Notre Dame (92-26 from 1978-81, .780; 15.3 ppg, 5.4 rpg, 54.8 FG%)

Joseph "Jo Jo" White, G, Kansas (88-23 from 1966-69, .793; 15.3 ppg, 4.9 rpg)

Sidney Wicks, C-F, UCLA (86-4 from 1969-71, .956; 15.8 ppg, 9.9 rpg, 51.1 FG%)

Keith Wilkes, F, UCLA (86-4 from 1972-74, .956; 15 ppg, 7.4 rpg, 51.4 FG%)

Jason "Jay" Williams, G, Duke (95-13 from 2000-02, .880; 19.3 ppg, 3.7 rpg, 6 apg, 39.3 3FG%)