Shed Your Helmets and Shoulder Pads: Are You Ready For Some Basketball?

The NCAA Tournament commenced in 1939, which was one year after the NIT triggered national postseason competition. An overlooked "versatile athlete" feat occurring in 1938 that never will be duplicated took place at Arkansas, where the quarterback for the football squad (Jack Robbins) repeated as an All-SWC first-team basketball selection, leading the Razorbacks (19-3) to the SWC title. After the season, Robbins became an NFL first-round draft choice by the Chicago Cardinals (5th pick overall) and senior football/basketball teammates Jim Benton (11th pick) and Ray Hamilton (41st pick) went on to become wide receivers for at least six years in the NFL. Yes, that was a shatterproof achievement - three members of a league championship basketball squad who promptly were among the top 41 selections in the same NFL draft.

Many other ex-college hoopsters also displayed their wares on the gridiron. Following is exhaustive research you can tackle regarding former college basketball players who made a name for themselves in football:

JOE ABBEY, Texas/North Texas State
End caught 13 passes for 177 yards with the Chicago Bears and New York Bulldogs in 1948 and 1949. . . . The 6-1, 200-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1948 for North Texas.

LOUIS "DUKE" ABBRUZZI, Rhode Island
Back rushed for 26 yards in six carries, caught two passes for 55 yards and returned eight kickoffs in three games with Boston in 1946. . . . The 5-10, 175-pounder lettered in basketball from 1939 through 1941.

NEAL ADAMS, Arkansas
End caught 28 passes for 494 yards and five touchdowns in four years with the New York Giants from 1942 through 1945 before catching 15 passes for 225 yards and two touchdowns with the AAFC's Brooklyn franchise. . . . The 6-3, 195-pounder was a three-year basketball letterman in the early 1940s. Third-leading scorer with six points when Arkansas lost to Washington State in the 1941 NCAA Tournament national semifinals.

AL AKINS, Washington/Washington State
Back rushed for two touchdowns, caught one TD pass and intercepted two passes in AAFC with Cleveland, Brooklyn and Buffalo in three years from 1946 through 1948. . . . The 6-1, 195-pound forward was a basketball letterman for Washington in 1944 after lettering with Washington State the previous two years. He averaged 6 ppg in 1941-42 and 6.2 ppg in 1942-43.

FRANK AKINS, Washington State
Fullback was 28th-round draft choice by Washington in 1943. The 5-10, 205-pounder rushed 244 times for 1,142 yards and seven touchdowns and caught 16 passes for 150 yards with the Redskins in four years through 1946. He led the NFL in rushing attempts with 147 in 1945 on his way to finishing second in rushing yards with 797 behind Philadelphia's Steve Van Buren. . . . Averaged 1.7 ppg for NCAA Tournament runner-up in 1941. Played briefly in Western Regional final victory over Arkansas, 64-53.

ERMAL ALLEN, Kentucky
Quarterback-defensive back intercepted four passes for Cleveland (AAFC) in 1947 under coach Paul Brown after playing in college under Paul "Bear" Bryant. Third-round draft choice by the NFL's Chicago Cardinals (18th pick overall). Allen was an assistant football coach at UK before joining the Dallas Cowboys in 1962 as offensive backfield coach. He retired at the conclusion of the 1983 campaign after 13 years as head of research and development for the Cowboys. . . . The 5-11, 165-pound starting forward averaged 4.9 points per game and was a first-team All-SEC Tournament selection for the Wildcats' first NCAA playoff squad under coach Adolph Rupp in 1942 before beginning a four-year stint in the U.S. Army.

JOHN AMBROSE, Catholic (D.C.)
Center for the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1932. . . . Captain of both the football and basketball teams for Catholic.

WARREN AMLING, Ohio State
Member of College Football Hall of Fame is one of few athletes to earn consensus All-American honors at two positions (guard in 1945 and tackle in 1946). Member of 1944 Ohio State football team that finished with a 9-0 record, won the Big Ten title and finished second behind Army in the final Associated Press poll. . . . Three-year letterman for the Buckeyes' basketball team from 1944-45 through 1946-47. Starting guard on Final Four squads in 1945 and 1946. Second-team All-Big Ten selection in basketball in 1945-46.

EDDIE ANDERSON, Notre Dame
End caught two touchdown passes for the Chicago Cardinals in four years with them from 1922 through 1925. . . . The 5-10, 175-pound guard was a three-year basketball letterman for the Irish in the early 1920s.

KEN ANDERSON, Augustana (Ill.)
Quarterback passed for 32,838 yards and 197 touchdowns in 15 seasons (1971 through 1985) with the Cincinnati Bengals after becoming their third-round draft choice. Four-time Pro Bowl selection (1976-77-82-83) played in Super Bowl XVI. . . . Swingman finished Augustana career as the fifth-leading scorer in school history with 1,044 points. Led the team in field-goal and free-throw shooting as a freshman and sophomore. High school teammate of Hall of Famer Dan Issel. . . . Quote from Augustana coach Jim Borcherding in school guide: "His outstanding ability and leadership qualities make him an inspiration both to his teammates and to the fans."

WINNIE ANDERSON, Colgate
End caught seven passes for 74 yards with the New York Giants in 1936. . . . The 6-0, 185-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1932.

J.B. ANDREWS, Texas-El Paso
Back rushed 10 times for 52 yards and completed eight of 19 passes in two games for St. Louis in 1934. . . . The 205-pounder was a three-year basketball letterman in the early 1930s.

LOU ANDRUS, Brigham Young
Linebacker played eight games for the Denver Broncos in 1967 after he was their 11th-round draft choice. . . . The 6-6, 230-pounder averaged 2.1 ppg and 3.2 rpg in 11 basketball games as a sophomore in 1962-63. He led the freshman squad in scoring the previous year with 15.9 ppg.

FRED ANSON, Virginia Military
Started on offense and defense. Intercepted a pass and returned it for a touchdown in a 1949 game against Army team whose staff included a man named Vince Lombardi. In a 14-13 victory over Georgia Tech, Anson's 45-yard run from scrimmage and deft punting (three out-of-bounds punts) proved pivotal. He rushed and received for more than 150 of the Keydets' 200 total yards in a 27-0 triumph over Virginia Tech. . . . Four-year basketball letterman averaged 10.6 ppg from 1947-48 through 1950-51. Led VMI in scoring average as a sophomore (13.5 ppg) and free-throw shooting as a senior (71.9%).

CLARENCE APPLEGRAN, Illinois
Guard played four games with Detroit in 1920. . . . The 6-2, 200-pounder was a basketball letterman for the Illini.

MARGER APSIT, Southern California
Back rushed 11 times for 41 yards and caught one pass for 24 yards with Frankfort, Brooklyn, Green Bay and Boston in three years from 1931 through 1933. . . . The 5-11, 200-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1929.

JOE ARENAS, Nebraska-Omaha
The 5-11 back, an eighth-round NFL draft choice in 1951, scored 16 touchdowns (10 rushing/six receiving) for the San Francisco 49ers in seven years through 1957. He led the league in kickoff return average in 1953 (34.4). . . . Averaged 6.2 ppg in 1949-50 and 1950-51.

ARNIE ARENZ, St. Louis
Back played three games with Boston in 1934. . . . The 6-2, 215-pounder was a basketball letterman from 1932 through 1934.

JUSTIN ARMOUR, Stanford
The 6-4, 210-pound wide receiver, a fourth-round draft choice of Buffalo in 1995, caught 26 passes as a Bills rookie for 300 yards and three touchdowns. He played briefly with the Philadelphia Eagles in 1997 and Denver Broncos in 1998 before becoming an expansion pick by Cleveland. Had a career-high 37 receptions for 538 yards and four TDs with the Baltimore Ravens in 1999. Managed 20 TD catches for Stanford, including one his senior year when he had 11 receptions at UCLA as an All-Pac-10 Conference first-team selection. Bill Walsh was his coach when he had two receptions in a 24-3 victory over Penn State in the Blockbuster Bowl following the 1992 campaign. . . . Played five basketball games for the Cardinal in 1992-93, collecting three points and four rebounds.

CHARLES "PEE WEE" ARMSTRONG, Mississippi State
Threw winning pass that handed Army its first defeat in 1935 with a score of 13-7. . . . Three-year basketball letterman from 1935 through 1937.

NEILL ARMSTRONG, Oklahoma A&M
Offensive end-defensive back played with the Philadelphia Eagles for five years from 1947 through 1951 after being their first-round draft choice (8th pick overall). His NFL career included 76 pass receptions for 961 yards and 11 touchdowns plus nine interceptions. Also played one season with the Winnipeg Blue Dombers in the Canadian Football League in the early 1950s. . . . The 6-2, 190-pounder played in one basketball game under legendary coach Hank Iba in 1944.

SARK ARSLANIAN, Dixie (Utah)
Head football coach for Weber State (50-26-2 record in eight years from 1965 through 1972) and Colorado State (45-47-4 in nine years from 1973 through 1981). . . . Played junior college basketball in the late 1940s.

DOUG ATKINS, Tennessee
Member of College Football Hall of Fame and Pro Football Hall of Fame. Eight-time Pro Bowl participant played 17 NFL seasons (1953 through 1969) as a defensive end with the Cleveland Browns, Chicago Bears and New Orleans Saints. He was a first-round NFL draft selection (11th pick overall) after competing in two Cotton Bowls and one Sugar Bowl. . . . Atkins originally enrolled on a basketball scholarship at Tennessee, where he played one season of varsity basketball before concentrating on football. The 6-5, 210-pound center averaged 9.9 points per game for the 1950-51 Volunteers, ranking third on the team in scoring. He was selected by the Minneapolis Lakers in the 1953 NBA draft.

CHARLES "CHICK" ATKINSON, Idaho
Coached BYU's football team to an 18-49-3 record in seven years from 1949 through 1955. . . . J.C. recruit was a two-year basketball letterman (class of '40) when school was a member of the Pacific Coast Conference.

CARL BACCHUS, Missouri
End caught three touchdown passes with Cleveland in 1927 and four with Detroit in 1928. . . . The 6-0, 205-pounder was a three-year basketball letterman in the mid-1920s.

MORRIS "RED" BADGRO, Southern California
Member of Pro Football Hall of Fame was an offensive and defensive end with the New York Yankees (1927 and 1928), New York Giants (1930 through 1935) and Brooklyn Dodgers (1936) in a nine-year NFL career that was interrupted by a stint in major league baseball. Hit .257 in two seasons (1929 and 1930) as an outfielder with the St. Louis Browns after becoming a three-time All-Pro with the Giants. . . . Earned varsity basketball letters for the Trojans in 1924-25 and 1926-27. Named to the first five on the All-Pacific Coast Conference team as a forward in 1926-27 when he was USC's MVP.

STEVE BAGARUS, Notre Dame
Back rushed for 343 yards and one touchdown, caught 80 passes for nine TDs and had five interceptions with Washington and Los Angeles Rams in four years from 1945 through 1948. The 6-0, 170-pound led the NFL as a rookie in punt returns (21 for 251 yards). . . . Member of Irish basketball squad in the early 1940s.

FRANCIS "REDS" BAGNELL, Penn
Considered one of the best tailbacks in America in 1950 when he set two national single-game records for total offense and placed third in the Heisman Trophy voting behind Ohio State's Vic Janowicz and SMU's Kyle Rote. Completed 14 consecutive passes in a 42-26 victory over Dartmouth. Selected by the New York Giants in the 11th round of 1951 NFL draft. . . . Averaged 2.2 ppg in 1949-50 when he collected more fouls (56) than points (50).

RUSS BAILEY, West Virginia
Center played with the Akron Pros, the NFL's first champion in 1920. . . . The 5-11, 180-pounder was a three-year basketball letterman.

AL "BUBBA" BAKER, Colorado State
Played in three Pro Bowl games (1979 through 1981) during 13-year NFL career from 1978-90 as a defensive end with the Detroit Lions, St. Louis Cardinals, Cleveland Browns and Minnesota Vikings. Second-round draft pick was named NFC rookie of the year by The Sporting News in 1978. . . . Averaged 4.1 points and 3.5 rebounds per game as a 6-6, 255-pound forward-center for the CSU Rams from 1974-75 through 1977-78.

TERRY BAKER, Oregon State
Member of College Football Hall of Fame won the 1962 Heisman Trophy as a senior quarterback after rushing 115 times for 538 yards (4.7 per carry), completed 112 of 203 passes for a nation-leading 1,738 yards and 15 touchdowns. Baker, the first Heisman Trophy winner west of the Mississippi River, also led the country in total offense (2,276 yards) and touchdowns responsible (24). His 99-yard run from scrimmage for a TD accounted for the only points in a 6-0 victory against Villanova in the 1962 Liberty Bowl as he was named MVP. First-round draft choice played in the NFL with the Los Angeles Rams (1963 through 1965) and in the Canadian Football League with Edmonton (1967). . . . The 6-3 guard averaged 7.4 points per game in 1960-61, 10.7 in 1961-62 and 13.4 in 1962-63. Baker set a school single-season record by hitting 87 percent of his free throws as a sophomore before becoming an All-West Regional selection in the NCAA Tournament in 1962 and 1963. He was the second-leading scorer for the Beavers' 1963 Final Four team. Excerpt from school guide: "Referred to by Sports Illustrated as 'Best Athlete in College.' Leader of fastbreak offense."

LARRY BALL, Louisville
Fourth-round pick was one of only two first-year players on the Miami Dolphins' undefeated team in 1972. Linebacker was traded to the Detroit Lions at the end of training camp in 1975, and one year later moved to Tampa Bay in the expansion draft. After one year with the Buccaneers, he returned for two more seasons with the Dolphins. . . . Played in eight basketball games as a sophomore for the Cardinals' varsity team, collecting five points and nine rebounds, before he was persuaded by Louisville football coach Lee Corso to concentrate on the gridiron. The 6-6, 220-pounder averaged 6.8 ppg and 9.3 rpg on U of L's 10-4 freshman squad in 1967-68.

LOU BARLE, Minnesota-Duluth
Back caught two passes for 16 yards with Cleveland in 1939. . . . Paced the Northern Intercollegiate Conference in scoring in 1937-38 after sparking the Bulldogs to three straight league titles (1935 through 1937). The 6-1, 205-pounder played for a couple of NBL championship teams with Oshkosh.

CHARLIE BARNES, Northeast Louisiana
End was a 19th-round draft choice of Buffalo in 1961. The 6-5, 230-pounder caught one pass for 13 yards with the Dallas Texans. . . . Collected 11 points and 25 rebounds in four basketball games in 1960-61.

ERICH BARNES, Purdue
Defensive back intercepted 45 passes in 14 seasons (1958 through 1971) with the Chicago Bears, New York Giants and Cleveland Browns. Fourth-round draft choice played in six Pro Bowls (1960-62-63-64-65-69) and six NFL championship games. . . . Basketball teammate of eventual "Fearsome Foursome" DE Lamar Lundy was a 6-3, 190-pound forward-center who played briefly for the Boilermakers' varsity basketball team as a sophomore in 1955-56.

ROOSEVELT BARNES, Purdue
Linebacker with the Detroit Lions for four seasons from from 1982 through 1985 after being picked in the 10th round. Football letterman in 1981 when he led the team in tackles for loss with nine. . . . Averaged 2.7 ppg and 1.1 rpg as a senior in 1980-81 under Gene Keady, a former college football player. The 6-2 guard collected 14 points and 23 rebounds in 24 games for the Boilermakers' 1980 Final Four basketball team after scoring 39 points in 43 games the previous two seasons. College teammate of longtime coach Kevin Stallings played briefly for Fort Wayne in the CBA. Excerpt from school's NIT guide: "Known around the Big Ten as a defensive specialist. Probably Purdue's most emotional cager. Quickness, strength and jumping ability are his strongest assets."

CONNOR BARWIN, Cincinnati
Second-round draft choice in the 2009 NFL by the Houston Texans (46th pick overall) led all rookie defensive ends with 4.5 sacks before missing almost all of the 2010 campaign after undergoing surgery on his right ankle. As a tight end with UC, he had three touchdown passes his first three years, notching a career-high 31 receptions as a junior. Switched to defensive end as senior in 2008 and led the Big East Conference in sacks with 11. First-team all-league selection played in the Senior Bowl after competing in the Orange Bowl. . . . The 6-4, 240-pounder collected 43 points and 61 rebounds in 34 basketball games for the Bearcats in 2005-06 and 2006-07, scoring six points against NCAA playoff-bound Pittsburgh as a freshman.

JOHN BATORSKI, Colgate
End caught two passes for 27 yards with the AAFC's Buffalo franchise in 1946. . . . The 6-2, 235-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1942.

CLIFF BATTLES, West Virginia Wesleyan College
Halfback became member of College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame. Led the NFL in rushing as a rookie with Boston in 1932 and in his final season with Washington in 1937. First NFL player to rush for 200 yards in a game (215 yards in 16 carries for the Boston Redskins against the New York Giants in 1933). . . . The 6-1, 195-pounder played four seasons of varsity basketball in college.

SAMMY BAUGH, Texas Christian
Member of College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame is considered by many as the finest quarterback in history. Consensus All-American in 1936. Passed for 21,886 yards and 186 touchdowns in 16 years (1937 through 1952) with the Washington Redskins. First-round pick led the NFL in passing five times, in punting five times and in pass interceptions once. Five-time All-Pro participant held almost all of the NFL's passing records when he retired. His 44-yard gallop was the longest run from scrimmage in a 3-2 victory over LSU in the 1936 Sugar Bowl before helping the Horned Frogs defeat Marquette, 16-6, in the 1937 Cotton Bowl. . . . Three-year letterman in basketball at TCU was an honorable mention selection on the All-Southwest Conference team as a senior in 1936-37.

FRANK BAUSCH, Kansas
Center-linebacker with Boston, Chicago Bears and Philadelphia Eagles for eight years from 1934 through 1941. . . . Younger brother of Olympic decathlon champion Jim Bausch was a two-year basketball letterman as a guard.

HUBERT "HUB" BECHTOL, Texas Tech/Texas
Co-MVP of the 1946 Cotton Bowl was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1991. Navy veteran was the first consensus All-American for the Longhorns, making headlines catching passes from QB Bobby Layne. End caught 19 passes for 192 yards and one touchdown and chipped in with two interceptions for the AAFC's Baltimore franchise in three years from 1947 through 1949. In 1947 he was the first-round pick by the NFL Pittsburgh Steelers (5th overall) and second-round selection by Baltimore (9th overall). . . . The 6-3, 200-pounder was a basketball letterman for Texas Tech before transferring following WWII.

WAYLAND BECKER, Marquette
End had 28 pass receptions for 422 yards and two touchdowns with the Chicago Bears, Brooklyn, Green Bay Packers and Pittsburgh Steelers in six years from 1934 through 1939. . . . The 6-0, 195-pounder was a basketball letterman in the mid-1930s.

DICK BEETSCH, Northern Iowa
Set NCAA Small College Division (now Division II) record for most pass receptions in a season in 1953 when he caught 54 passes for 837 yards and nine touchdowns as a sophomore. . . . He averaged 12 points per game in four seasons of basketball, leading the team in scoring as a sophomore (13.3 ppg) and senior (13.8).

BOBBY BELL, Minnesota
Member of the College Football Hall of Fame and Pro Football Hall of Fame. He was a consensus All-American choice as a tackle and winner of the Outland Award as the nation's outstanding interior lineman in 1962. Selected in the seventh round of the 1963 AFL draft by the Dallas Texans. As a linebacker, the nine-time All-Pro selection intercepted 25 passes in his 12-year career with the Kansas City Chiefs. Bell played in two Super Bowls (I and IV). . . . He became the first African-American basketball player for Minnesota when he appeared in three games in the 1960-61 season, collecting four points and four rebounds.

CARLOS BELL, Houston
Tight end was a fourth-round NFL draft choice of the New Orleans Saints in 1971. . . . The 6-5, 235-pounder averaged 3.1 ppg and 2.2 rpg for the Cougars' 1968 Final Four team. He collected nine points and five rebounds in seven minutes against UCLA in the national semifinals. Bell also played a portion of the next season with UH.

DEMETRIUS BELL, Northwestern State
Buffalo Bills' seventh-round draft choice as an offensive lineman in 2008 after earning All-Southland Conference first-team acclaim. . . . The 6-6, 265-pounder averaged 3.9 ppg and 3.2 rpg in three seasons from 2003-04 through 2006-07 (did not play for the Demons' 2006 NCAA playoff team). Absentee father Karl Malone, the NBA All-Star power forward, impregnated his mother when she was barely a teenager.

HENRY "HEINIE" BENKERT, Rutgers
Back played four years in the NFL with the New York Giants (1925), Pottsville (1926), Orange (1929) and Newark (1930). . . . The 5-9, 165-pounder was a two-year basketball letterman, averaging 3.5 ppg in 1924-25.

JOE BENNETT, Georgia
Four-year starter at tackle and captain of football team in 1923. . . . Three-year basketball letterman from 1922 through 1924.

MARTELLUS BENNETT, Texas A&M
Tight end, a second-round choice in the 2008 NFL draft (61st pick overall), had 205 receptions for 2,231 yards and 14 touchdowns with the Dallas Cowboys, New York Giants and Chicago Bears in his first six years from 2008 through 2013. He had 105 catches for 1,246 yards and 10 TDs in three years with the Aggies (career-high of 133 yards and 2 TDs against Baylor as sophomore when earning All-Big 12 Conference second-team honors). . . . The 6-6 Bennett averaged 1.9 ppg and 1.5 rpg as a freshman in 2005-06 before playing in only four games the next season under coach Billy Gillispie. Bennett had one field goal and five rebounds in 10 minutes of a 58-57 second-round defeat against Glen Davis-led LSU in the 2006 NCAA playoffs before the Tigers wound up at the Final Four.

SID BENNETT, Northwestern
Offensive lineman with Chicago and Milwaukee in 1920 and 1922. . . . The 5-10, 190-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1917.

CHUCK BENSON, Southern Illinois
The 6-4 Benson was a 13th-round draft choice of the NFL's Cincinnati Bengals as a wide receiver in 1969. . . . Led the Salukis in rebounding as a junior (11.9 ppg, 8.5 rpg) and senior (13.9 ppg, 8.4 rpg) after they captured the 1967 NIT.

GEORGE BENSON, Northwestern
Back played one game with the AAFC's Brooklyn franchise in 1947. Selected in 19th round of 1942 NFL draft by the Green Bay Packers. . . . The 6-1, 205-pounder was a three-year basketball letterman in the early 1940s.

JIM BENTON, Arkansas
Standout end with the Cleveland Rams, Chicago Bears and Los Angeles Rams for nine seasons (1938 through 1940 and 1942 through 1947) after leading the nation's major-college players in pass receptions in 1937 en route to becoming a second-round NFL draft choice (11th pick overall). Starter for two NFL champions (Bears '43 and Rams '45). Caught 288 passes for 4,801 yards and 45 touchdowns, finishing NFL career ranked second behind all-time great Don Hutson in pass receptions, receiving yardage and receiving touchdowns. Led the league in pass receptions in 1946 and in pass reception yardage in 1945 and 1946. Caught 10 passes for 303 yards in a 1945 game. . . . The 6-3, 185-pound forward was the Razorbacks' third-leading scorer in SWC play (7.2 points per game) as a senior in 1937-38 when they won the league title with an 11-1 mark and compiled a 19-3 overall record.

JERRY BERNDT, Wisconsin-Superior
Compiled a 29-18-2 coaching record for Penn from 1981 through 1985 before posting losing marks with Rice (6-27 from 1986 through 1988) and Temple (11-33 from 1989 through 1992). Ivy League coach of the year in 1984 while in the midst of capturing four straight conference titles. His 1990 Temple squad was the nation's most improved team, going from 1-10 to 7-4. Offensive Coordinator for Missouri in the early 21st Century. . . . College letterman in multiple sports, including basketball, in the late 1950s with UWS before transferring to Bowling Green.

CONNIE MACK BERRY, North Carolina State
End caught 46 passes for 783 yards and eight touchdowns (six in 1944) with the Detroit Lions, Green Bay Packers, Cleveland Rams and Chicago Bears in seven NFL years from 1939 to 1946. . . . The 6-3, 215-pounder was an All-Southern Conference second-team selection as a basketball center in 1937 and 1938.

JULIUS "JULIE" BESCOS, Southern California
End was a member of USC's undefeated 1932 national championship football team and captained the 1934 squad. . . . As a basketball guard, he was the Trojans' MVP in 1934 and twice earned All-Pacific Coast Conference first-team honors. He was USC's coach in 1942, posting a 12-8 record.

KEIRON BIGBY, Brown
Wide receiver played one game with the Washington Redskins in 1987. Set a Brown record for yards returned via interceptions with 216 in 1984. . . . The 5-10, 175-pounder averaged 2.9 ppg as a freshman in 1983-84 and 13.6 ppg as a sophomore in 1984-85.

DARRYL BISHOP, Kentucky
Made more tackles (348) than any defensive back in UK history. Two-time All-SEC selection still holds UK career record in interceptions (14) and return yardage (376). Remembered for interception return touchdowns against Vanderbilt (43 yards) and Mississippi State (97 yards). Selected by the Cincinnati Bengals in 16th round of 1974 NFL draft. . . . The 6-3 Bishop hit 4 of 7 field-goal attempts in five games as a walk-on under coach Adolph Rupp in 1971-72.

DON BLACKMON, Tulsa
Linebacker had five interceptions with the New England Patriots in seven years from 1981 through 1987 after being their fourth-round draft choice. Three-time All-Missouri Valley Conference selection was MVC Defensive Player of the Year as a senior. Holds school career record for most tackles for a loss (40). . . . The 6-3, 230-pounder collected 42 points and 32 rebounds in 12 basketball games in 1977-78.

EARL "RED" BLAIK, Miami (Ohio)/Army
College Football Hall of Fame coach, boasting six undefeated teams, compiled a 121-33-10 record at Dartmouth (1934 through 1940) and Army (1941 through 1958). . . . After graduating from Miami, he enrolled at Army and became the first Cadet to compete against Navy in three sports in one season (football, basketball and baseball).

MATT BLAIR, Northeastern Oklahoma A&M
Linebacker played 12 years with the Minnesota Vikings (1974-85) after being their second-round draft choice out of Iowa State. He intercepted 16 passes and recovered 16 fumbles, appeared in six Pro Bowl games (1978 through 1983) and two Super Bowls during his pro career. His blocked punt accounted for the Vikings' only touchdown in a Super Bowl IX loss against the Pittsburgh Steelers. Defensive MVP of the 1971 Sun Bowl. . . . Played in 1970 NJCAA Tournament with team that finished in seventh place.

DEAN BLEVINS, Oklahoma
Starting quarterback much of the time for the Sooners during their run of four Big Eight Conference championships from 1974 through 1977, including national titles the first two years of that stretch. . . . Averaged 2.5 ppg for OU's basketball team in 1974-75, shooting only 26.2% from the floor. He posted a career-high 10 points against Kansas State. TV and radio sports director in Oklahoma City served as a college football analyst and sideline reporter for ABC, ESPN and CBS. Voted Oklahoma Sportscaster of the Year on four occasions.

MATT BLUNDIN, Virginia
Quarterback was a second-round pick by the Kansas City Chiefs in the NFL draft after passing for 2,696 yards and 25 touchdowns in his college career. Also played briefly with the Detroit Lions. Named ACC offensive football player of the year as a senior when he threw 224 passes over the entire regular season without incurring a single interception. Managed nine 200-yard passing games with the Cavaliers. Threw a 75-yard scoring strike to Herman Moore against Clemson in 1989. Appeared in three straight Bowls--defeats in Florida Citrus (vs. Illinois), Sugar (vs. Tennessee) and Gator (vs. Oklahoma). . . . Started most of his sophomore basketball season, when he averaged six points and 5.8 rebounds per game. The 6-7, 230-pound forward finished his four-year basketball career with averages of 3.6 ppg and 4.5 rpg. He averaged 4.7 ppg and 5.6 rpg in seven NCAA Tournament games from 1989 through 1991. Believed to be the only athlete to play in three Bowl games and three NCAA tourneys in three consecutive years.

BILL BOELTER, Drake
In 1922, he went 70 yards for one touchdown and at least 35 for four other TDs in a 48-6 victory at Mississippi State. The Bulldogs boasted a 17-4 football record during his career. . . . The 170-pounder played three years of basketball at Drake. He might have been the only athlete ever to be named on the first All-Missouri Valley teams in both football and basketball for three consecutive seasons.

LYNN BOMAR, Vanderbilt
End caught five touchdown passes with the New York Giants in 1925 and 1926. . . . The 6-1, 210-pounder was a basketball letterman from 1922 through 1924.

J.R. BOONE, Tulsa
Halfback rushed for 497 yards and five touchdowns and caught 69 passes for 1,251 yards and seven touchdowns with the Chicago Bears, San Francisco 49ers and Green Bay Packers in six years from 1948 through 1953. He was a 20th-round pick in the 1948 NFL draft. Tulsa's leading rusher in 1947 with 661 yards, averaging 5.3 per carry. Also paced the team in scoring with 61 points and kickoff returns with 270 yards on eight returns (33.8 average) his senior season. . . . The 5-8, 160-pounder played basketball briefly as a teammate of eventual NFL executive Jim Finks in 1947-48.

ALBIE BOOTH, Yale
Member of College Football Hall of Fame was an All-American single wing tailback in 1929, 1930 and 1931. Gained nationwide attention when he scored all of Yale's points in a 21-13 victory over Army. . . . The 5-6, 145-pound forward was named to the All-Eastern Intercollegiate League second five as a senior in 1930-31. Captain of basketball squad in 1931-32.

GEORGE BORK, Northern Illinois
First college football player to pass for more than 3,000 yards in a season (completed 244 of 374 passes for 3,077 yards and 32 touchdowns in nine games in 1963). Led the NCAA college division in passing and total offense in 1962 and 1963. Played in the Canadian Football League with the Montreal Alouettes in the mid-1960s. . . . Paced the Interstate Intercollegiate Athletic Conference in scoring and was named to the first team on the IIAC all-star squad as a junior in 1961-62 (21.7 points per game) and as a senior in 1962-63 (23.2 ppg). Had a 44-point game against Winona State on February 20, 1962.

FRED "BUZZ" BORRIES, Navy
All-American halfback in 1934 was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1960. He scored 18 touchdowns in his three varsity seasons, including all three of Navy's TDs in the 1934 opener when the Midshipmen defeated William & Mary, 20-7, en route to an 8-1 record. . . . Three-year starter for Navy basketball squads that compiled a combined 36-7 mark. Borries averaged 13.5 ppg in an era when the teams for which he played averaged only 44 per outing. He was the leading scorer as a junior.

TODD BOUMAN, St. Cloud State (Minn.)
Threw eight touchdown passes for the Minnesota Vikings in 2001, including four with 348 yards vs. the Tennessee Titans in his first start. Backup QB for the New Orleans Saints and Green Packers from 2003 through 2006. . . . South Dakota State transfer averaged 7.1 ppg and 3.3 rpg from 1993-94 through 1995-96.

TONY BOVA, St. Francis (Pa.)
End caught 60 passes for 1,129 yards and seven touchdowns primarily with the Pittsburgh Steelers in six years from 1942 through 1947. The 6-1, 190-pounder led the NFL in average yards per pass reception with 24.6 in 1943. He also had one interception and recorded one safety. . . . Bova was a basketball letterman in 1942.

BILL BOWMAN, William & Mary
Fullback was a third-round draft choice by the Detroit Lions in 1954 (37th pick overall). The 6-2, 210-pounder rushed 144 times for 557 yards and three touchdowns and caught 50 passes for 429 yards and three TDs with the Lions and Pittsburgh Steelers in three years through 1957. He returned one kickoff for a TD as a rookie. . . . Fouled out with four points in his only basketball game in 1953-54.

CODY BOYD, Washington State
Claimed off waivers from the Pittsburgh Steelers during Labor Day weekend 2007 by the Washington Redskins but didn't play in NFL. Tight end caught 44 passes for 604 yards and two touchdowns for WSU from 2003 through 2006. The 6-8 Boyd blocked two Idaho field-goal attempts in his first collegiate game. . . . Rejected one shot in playing two basketball games for the Cougars in 2003-04 before sustaining a shoulder injury lifting weights.

W.A. "JUNIOR" BOYD, Westminster (Mo.)
Back scored two touchdowns for the Chicago Cardinals in 1930 and 1931. . . . The 5-11, 175-pounder earned 16 letters in four sports, including basketball.

LON BOYETT, Cal State Northridge
Tight end for the San Francisco 49ers in 1978. . . . Averaged 7.8 ppg and 4.7 rpg in 1975-76 and 1976-77.

ORDELL BRAASE, South Dakota
Defensive end with the Baltimore Colts in 12 NFL seasons (1957 through 1968) after being their 14th-round draft choice in 1954. Played in two Pro Bowl games (1967 and 1968) and four NFL championship games. Member of 1958, 1959 and 1968 NFL championship teams. Appeared in Super Bowl III against the New York Jets. . . . The 6-4, 215-pound center in basketball was a first-team selection in the All-North Central Conference when he averaged 7.8 points per game in 1952-53 and 11 points in 1953-54.

MARK BRADFORD, Stanford
Wide receiver caught 169 passes for 2,431 yards and 14 TDs with the Cardinal from 2003 through 2007. He had nine pass receptions in the 2006 opener at Oregon before suffering a season-ending foot injury the next week. Posted team-high 51 catches as a senior. Signed as an undrafted free agent by the Dallas Cowboys in 2008 before becoming a practice squad member of the San Francisco 49ers. . . . The 6-2, 205-pounder scored eight points in 11 games in 2003-04 and 2004-05. Played two minutes in 2004 NCAA playoff opening-round victory against Texas-San Antonio.

DON BRANBY, Colorado
Seventh-round choice of the New York Giants as an end in 1953 NFL draft (80th pick overall) after competing in the East-West Shrine Game. AP All-American in 1952 when he set a school record with seven fumble recoveries. Coached Montana State and in the Canadian Football League (British Columbia Lions and Ottawa Roughriders). . . . Averaged 3.7 ppg in basketball, leading the Buffs in free-throw percentage in 1951-52.

WES BRADSHAW, Baylor
Back played in eight NFL games with Rock Island and Buffalo in 1924 and 1926. . . . Earned a basketball letter in 1922.

ROBERT BRANNON, Arkansas
Played briefly as a defensive end for the Cleveland Browns and New Orleans Saints in 1987. . . . The 6-7, 245-pound Brannon averaged 2.8 ppg and 1.9 rpg while shooting 64% from the floor (16 of 25) under coach Eddie Sutton in 1982-83. The J.C. teammate of All-American guard Alvin Robertson appeared briefly in an NCAA playoff game victory over Gene Keady-coached Purdue.

DARRELL "PETE" BREWSTER, Purdue
Receiver caught 210 passes for 3,758 yards and 21 touchdowns in nine seasons (1952 through 1960) with the Cleveland Browns and Pittsburgh Steelers. Second-round draft choice by the Chicago Cardinals (21st pick overall). Played in two Pro Bowl games (1956 and 1957) and started for Cleveland in five NFL championship games. Member of the Browns' 1954 and 1955 NFL champions. . . . The 6-3, 200-pound forward-center was the Boilermakers' fourth-leading scorer as a junior (6.8 points per game) and senior (5.9 ppg). Selected by the Milwaukee Hawks in 1952 NBA draft.

JOHNNY BRIGHT, Drake
Member of Canadian Football League Hall of Fame ranked second on the CFL all-time rushing list at end of his 13-year career. He led the nation's major college players in total offense yardage in 1949 (1,950) and 1950 (2,400) and finished fifth in 1951 Heisman Trophy voting. Concluded career as major college leader in all-time total offense yardage (5,903). First-round choice by the Philadelphia Eagles in the 1952 NFL draft (5th pick overall). . . . Scored 35 points in 17 games for the 1949-50 Bulldogs basketball team.

MARLIN BRISCOE, Nebraska-Omaha
First black starting quarterback in the NFL passed for 1,589 yards and 14 touchdowns as a rookie after being drafted in the 14th round by the Denver Broncos in 1968. His 11-year pro career also included stints with the Buffalo Bills, Miami Dolphins, San Diego Chargers, Detroit Lions and New England Patriots. Converted to wide receiver in his second season, he caught 224 passes for 3,537 yards and 30 TDS. Briscoe was an All-NFL selection with the Bills in 1970 when he had 57 receptions for 1,036 yards and eight TDS. Member of the Dolphins' 1972 undefeated team caught two passes to help them beat Minnesota in Super Bowl VIII the next year. . . . The 5-11, 175-pounder averaged 9.5 ppg and 3.6 rpg in 14 basketball games for UNO in 1964-65.

MAURICE "FOOTSIE" BRITT, Arkansas
Football letterman in the late 1930s played with the Detroit Lions for one season in 1941 after being their 13th-round draft choice. The 6-4 Britt's only reception was a 45-yard touchdown. . . . Earned a basketball letter in 1939. The first recipient of the top three combat decorations in a single war (WWII), he took part in the African, Sicillian and Italian campaigns. Awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor after suffering numerous wounds, including one that caused his right arm to be amputated. Elected Lieutenant Governor of Arkansas in 1966, becoming one of the first two Republicans to serve in their state's top two offices since Reconstruction.

EARL BRITTON, Illinois
Back with the Chicago Bears, Brooklyn, Dayton, Frankfort and Chicago Cardinals in five years from 1925 through 1929. . . . Started three of the six basketball games he played in 1924 when the Illini won the Big Ten title.

LUTHER BROUGHTON, Furman
Tight end caught six passes for one touchdown with the Carolina Panthers in 1998 after being the Philadelphia Eagles' fifth-round draft choice the previous year. His best NFL season was with the Eagles in 1999 when he caught 26 passes for 295 yards and four TDs. . . . Forward scored five points in five games for the Paladins in 1994-95.

BRYAN BROWN, Mississippi
Defensive coach as a graduate assistant for his alma mater after serving in a similar capacity with Rutgers and Delta State (Miss.). Defensive back was a four-year letterman totaling 70 tackles and returning an interception for a tuchdown as a sophomore against Tennessee. . . . Collected two points, six assists and two steals in 14 Ole Miss basketball games as a freshman in 2002-03.

DARYL BROWN, Tufts (Mass.)
The 5-9, 180-pounder scored five career touchdowns via kickoff returns in college. The safety was the leading kickoff return artist in the country in 1976 with a 34.3-yard average before becoming a ninth-round draft choice of the Cleveland Browns in 1977. . . . Senior captain set a school single-game record with 16 assists en route to averaging 6.7 apg in 1976-77.

DAVID BROWN, Lafayette
End led the Leopards in receiving as a junior and senior when he caught 66 passes for 947 yards and five TDs. . . . The 6-3 forward was one of the nation's top 20 scorers in 1965-66 when he averaged 25.3 ppg (and team-high 10.6 rpg). Finished his career with averages of 17 ppg and 8.6 rpg.

JIM BROWN, Syracuse
Movie actor is member of College Football Hall of Fame and Pro Football Hall of Fame. Earned All-American honors in football and lacrosse. Averaged 6.2 yards per carry as a senior in 1956 and scored 43 points in a game against Colgate. Co-MVP in 1957 Cotton Bowl. The first-round draft choice established NFL career records for yards rushing (12,312), rushing attempts (2,359), rushing average (5.2 per carry), touchdowns (126) and years leading league in rushing (eight) in his nine seasons (1957 through 1965) with the Cleveland Browns. Nine-time Pro Bowl selection. . . . Averaged 14 points per game for the Orangemen basketball team as a sophomore and 11.3 as a junior. He is reluctant to specifically say why he quit the team before his senior season when Syracuse participated in the NCAA Tournament for the first time, but indicated it was because of a racial quota. "Well, they basically didn't want to start more than two blacks (Vinnie Cohen and Manny Breland) although nobody could outrun, outjump or outshoot me," said Brown, who was selected in the ninth round of the 1957 NBA draft by the Syracuse Nationals. "It really was a tragedy the way athletics were handled there at the time," said Cohen, who went on to become a Washington, D.C., lawyer for 40 years. Excerpt from school guide: "Brownie is a powerfully built youth, who helps under the boards, and is an excellent shot as well." His son Jimmy, a two-time All-MEAC first-team selection, played for three NCAA Tournament teams with North Carolina A&T from 1983 through 1985 after transferring from Southern Cal and was the Aggies' leading scorer as a senior with 18.2 points per game.

LARRY BROWN, Georgia
Tight end played eight games with the Tennessee Titans in 1999. First-team All-SEC selection in 1998 when he caught 31 passes, including one for 68 yards. Football teammate of Champ Bailey and Hines Ward managed three pass receptions in the 1998 Peach Bowl against Virginia. . . . The 6-5, 250-pound forward averaged 6.3 ppg and 4.2 rpg as an occasional starter for the Bulldogs' 1998 NIT team. The previous year, he averaged 4.6 ppg and 3.3 rpg while shooting a team-high 60.3% from the floor for their 24-9 NCAA playoff squad coached by Tubby Smith. He scored the winning basket with three seconds remaining in Georgia's 1997 SEC Tournament quarterfinal victory over Arkansas after supplying 18 points in an earlier game against league regular-season champion South Carolina. Played against eventual NCAA runner-up Syracuse in a West Regional semifinal overtime game.

GREGG BROWNING, Denver
Sixth-round draft choice of the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1945 caught one pass as an end for the New York Giants in 1947. . . . The 6-0, 190-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1942.

FRANK BROYLES, Georgia Tech
Retired Arkansas athletic director compiled a 149-62-6 record in 20 seasons as head football coach at Missouri (1957) and Arkansas (1958 through 1976). Guided 10 teams to bowl games, winning the AP and UPI national title in 1964. Quarterback was SEC Player of the Year in 1944. Third-round selection by the Chicago Bears in 1946 NFL draft (19th pick overall). He threw for a career-high 304 yards against Tulsa in the 1945 Orange Bowl. . . . Four-year starting guard in basketball for Tech. Named to the second five on SEC All-Tournament team in 1944, 1945 and 1947. Second-leading scorer for Tech with a 10.4-point average as a senior in 1946-47.

CLENNIE BRUNDIDGE, Army
Army's all-time leading receiver for 29 years (147 receptions for 2,279 yards and 14 touchdowns from 1975 through 1978). Tight end finished 12th in the nation in pass receiving as a sophomore in 1976 (47 receptions for 657 yards and six touchdowns). Still holds school record for most 100-yard receiving games with eight. . . . The 6-4 Brundidge was a starting forward for the Cadets as a freshman and junior member of the 1977-78 squad that participated in the NIT under coach Mike Krzyzewski. Averaged 8.3 ppg and 5.7 rpg.

JUNIOUS "BUCK" BUCHANAN, Grambling
Pro Football Hall of Famer was the first pick overall in the 1962 AFL draft by the Dallas Texans. The 6-7, 285-pound defensive tackle missed only one game because of injury in his 13-year pro career, which included a streak of eight consecutive seasons being named to either the AFL All-Star Team or NFL Pro Bowl. Instrumental in the Kansas City Chiefs' victory over the heavily-favored Minnesota Vikings in Super Bowl IV. . . . Concentrated solely on football after earning a basketball letter as a freshman in 1958-59. Buchanan and teammate Ernie Ladd both intended on only playing basketball for Grambling before legendary coach Eddie Robinson kept both from transferring by allegedly giving them a key to the cafeteria's kitchen so they could go there and eat whenever they were hungry if the pair would come out for the football squad.

RAY BUIVID, Marquette
QB who finished third in voting for the 1936 Heisman Trophy guided the school to the first-ever Cotton Bowl. Completed 41% of his passes for 500 yards and 11 touchdowns (first rookie to throw five TD passes in a single game), rushed for 89 yards in 51 carries and caught two passes for 12 yards with the Chicago Bears in 1937 and 1938. . . . The 6-1 Buivid was a basketball letterman in 1935-36.

GENE BULLARD, Louisiana College
Tackle was selected in the 21st round of 1953 NFL draft by the New York Giants. . . . Played center for LC's basketball squad in the early 1950s. Also threw the shot put, javelin and discus, placing first in a couple of events at the 1952 Gulf States Conference meet.

BILL BURGE, Richmond
First UR receiver to catch five touchdown passes in a season (1939 for 7-1-2 team). Also played first base for the school's baseball team in 1940 when it went undefeated in Southern Conference competition. . . . Burge, a 6-4 center, led the Spiders in scoring as a junior (8.3 ppg in 1938-39) and senior (7.6 ppg in 1939-40) after averaging 6.1 ppg as a sophomore.

DALE BURNETT, Emporia State (Kan.)
Back rushed for five touchdowns, caught 19 TD passes and recorded two defensive TDs (one interception/one fumble recovery) with the New York Giants during the entire decade of the 1930s. Played in five NFL title games, winning world championships in 1934 and 1938. . . . The 6-1, 185-pounder was all-conference in basketball for two seasons.

RUSSELL "PEANUTS" BURT, Canisius
Back caught a touchdown pass for the Buffalo Bisons in 1924. . . . The 5-8, 170-pounder played basketball multiple seasons for Canisius.

LOU BUSH, Massachusetts
Halfback twice scored five touchdowns in a single game en route to scoring a total of 39 TDs in 1931 and 1932. Led the nation with 20 TDs as a freshman. . . . Paced Massachusetts State's basketball squad in scoring during each of his three years, including its undefeated season in 1933-34 when he was a senior.

MIKE BUSH, Washington State
Wide receiver had 16 touchdown receptions in two seasons for WSU bowl teams. Caught a 46-yard TD pass against Purdue in the Sun Bowl following the 2001 campaign. The next year, he played in the Rose Bowl against Oklahoma. . . . The 6-6, 190-pounder was the leading scorer (15.9 ppg) and second-leading rebounder (5.2 rpg) for the Cougars as a junior in 2000-01 after being their leading rebounder (6.4 rpg) and second-leading scorer (13.2) as a sophomore.

SAM BUSICH, Ohio State
End caught six passes for 57 yards and one touchdown with Boston in 1936 before catching 13 passes for 136 yards the next year with the Cleveland Rams. . . . The 6-3, 185-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1935 and 1936 with the Buckeyes.

YOUNG BUSSEY, Louisiana State
Defensive back-quarterback was an 18th-round draft choice by the Chicago Bears in 1940. The next year, the 5-9, 180-pounder passed for five touchdowns and had two interceptions with the Bears. . . . Basketball letterman in the late 1930s participated in numerous landing assaults in the South Pacific during WWII before dying as head beachmaster in early January 1945 in the Phillipines.

CHRIS CAGLE, Southwestern Louisiana/Army
Back passed for 749 yards and six touchdowns, rushed for 391 yards and two TDs and had 13 pass receptions for 194 yards and two TDs with the New York Giants and Brooklyn in five years from 1930 through 1934. . . . The 5-10, 170-pounder was a four-year basketball letterman in the mid-1920s.

JIM "J.R." CALLAHAN, Texas/Texas Tech
Back passed for 359 yards and two touchdowns and rushed for 86 yards and two touchdowns with Detroit Lions in 1946. . . . Basketball letterman in 1942 and 1943.

EDDIE CAMERON, Washington & Lee (Va.)
Football Hall of Famer was selected as a fullback on the All-South Atlantic team in 1923. Longtime athletic director at Duke. . . . Three-year basketball letterman. Went on to coach his alma mater before coaching Duke from 1928 to 1942.

JOHN CAMERON, Central Michigan
Guard played for Detroit in 1926. . . . He was a basketball letterman in 1922.

JORDAN CAMERON, Brigham Young/Southern California
Backup receiver for the Trojans after transferring from junior college became a pass-catching force as a tight end prospect, catching 16 passes for 126 yards and one touchdown as a senior. Fourth-round pick of the Cleveland Browns in the 2011 NFL draft. . . . The 6-5 Cameron grabbed one rebound in three games for the Trojans in 2008-09 under coach Tim Floyd. Redshirt freshman forward for BYU in 2006-07 before enrolling at Ventura (Calif.) Community College. His sister, Brynn, was a standout guard for the USC women's basketball squad who became Baby Mama of Heisman Trophy winner Matt Leinart before dating Blake Griffin. Cameron's brother, Colby, threw for 44 touchdowns as a QB for Louisiana Tech in 2012 and 2013.

MALCOLM "CAM" CAMERON, Indiana
Assistant coach of the NFL's San Diego Chargers for five years before he was named head coach of the Miami Dolphins in 2007 (1-15 mark was the worst in team history). Offensive coordinator for the Baltimore Ravens from 2008 to mid-December 2012 when he was replaced by former Indianapolis Colts coach Jim Caldwell. Head coach at his alma mater for five years from 1997 through 2001 (18-37 record). Class of '83 member played quarterback for the Hoosiers' football squad. Assistant coach at Michigan under Bo Schembechler before becoming an assistant for three years with the Washington Redskins. Stepfather Tom Harp was Indiana State's head football coach in the mid-1970s. . . . Collected 33 points and 12 rebounds in 30 games for the Hoosiers' basketball squad in 1981-82 and 1982-83. Teammate of All-Americans Ted Kitchel and Randy Wittman scored two points in 1982 NCAA Tournament Mideast Regional first-round 94-62 win over Robert Morris. Played briefly vs. Oklahoma team featuring Wayman Tisdale in 1983 playoffs. Said coach Bob Knight: "He was a kid who really understood his role on the team. He did everything he possibly could to help the team become better, in practice, the times that he played, and the way he handled himself in the locker room. Has a real understanding of what it takes, from a variety of directions, to be good."

FRANK CAMP JR., Transylvania (Ky.)
Louisville's all-time winningest football coach with a 118-95-2 record in 23 years from 1947 through 1969. Participated in 1958 Sun Bowl. His squads included such standouts as Johnny Unitas, Lenny Lyles and Doug Buffone. . . . Three-sport standout was captain of the basketball team (class of '30).

BOB CAREY, Michigan State
Consensus All-American was captain and leading pass receiver on undefeated and untied 1951 MSU football team. First-round choice of the Los Angeles Rams in 1952 finished his four-year NFL career with the Chicago Bears in 1958. Carey had 36 of his 47 career receptions as a rookie, including a 61-yard touchdown. . . . A 6-5, 215-pound forward-center in basketball, he averaged 8.8 points per game in three varsity seasons with the Spartans. Excerpt from school guide: "Extremely fast for his size (6-5, 220). Ranks as finest all-around athlete in school history."

HAROLD CARMICHAEL, Southern (La.)
Wide receiver caught 590 passes for 8,985 yards and 79 touchdowns in his 14-year career with the Philadelphia Eagles (1971 through 1983) and Dallas Cowboys (1984). He was a seventh-round draft choice. Four-time Pro Bowl participant established an NFL record for most consecutive games with a pass reception (127). Participated in Super Bowl XV. . . . Former Southern basketball coach Dick Mack said the 6-8 Carmichael was a starter his last two seasons with the Jaguars and their top rebounders. He averaged 9.8 ppg and 10.6 rpg in 11 games in 1969-70.

CHUCK CARNEY, Illinois
Member of College Football Hall of Fame was a consensus All-American choice as an end in 1920. Only Illini athlete to earn All-American honors in both football and basketball. He played offensive line for the pro football Columbus Panhandlers in 1922. . . . The Helms Foundation named him to its 10-man All-American basketball teams for the 1919-20 and 1921-22 seasons and named him player of the year for the 1921-22 season. The 6-1, 190-pounder led the Big Ten in scoring with 15.7 points per game in 1919-20 and 14.3 in 1921-22. Sketch in Spalding Official Basketball Guide: "Possessed of reach, height, speed and a good eye for the basket, he had all the requisites of a star. No guard was able to hold him in check."

REG CAROLAN, Idaho
Played seven NFL seasons (1962 through 1968) with the San Diego Chargers and Kansas City Chiefs as an offensive and defensive end. He was an eighth-round draft choice of the Los Angeles Rams in 1961. Caught 23 passes for 364 yards and five touchdowns. Pro Bowl selection in 1963 participated in Super Bowl I as a tight end with the Chiefs. . . . The 6-6, 235-pounder played three varsity years in the early 1960s with Idaho's basketball team, averaging 4 points and 4.7 rebounds per game.

FRED CARR, Texas Western
All-Pro linebacker was a first-round draft choice (fifth pick overall) who played 10 seasons with the Green Bay Packers (1968 through 1977). The 6-5, 240-pounder had eight career interceptions (including a touchdown in 1976) and participated in the 1972 NFL playoffs. He was selected as the outstanding lineman in the 1971 AFC-NFC Pro Bowl. Defensive MVP in the 1967 Sun Bowl. . . . Suited up for defending NCAA champion's last five games in 1966-67, collecting a total of 27 points and 30 rebounds. He had 12 points and a game-high 12 rebounds when the Miners were eliminated by Pacific, 72-63, in the West Regional semifinals.

HARLAN CARR, Syracuse
Back rushed for two touchdowns and caught one TD pass with Buffalo-Pottsville in 1927. . . . The 5-10, 165-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1925.

JIMMY CARR, Morris Harvey (W. Va.)
Starting left cornerback for the Philadelphia Eagles' 1960 NFL title team played nine pro seasons, including with the Chicago Cardinals and Washington Redskins. He had 13 of his 15 career interceptions with the Eagles after playing one year with the CFL's Montreal Alouettes in 1958. Carr served 24 years as an NFL assistant coach. He also coached two years in the USFL as the defensive coordinator for the Denver Gold in 1983 and 1984 and three years in NFL Europe in the mid-1990s. . . . The 1962 NAIA Hall of Fame selection lettered three years in basketball. Morris Harvey, now known as the University of Charleston, participated in the NAIA Tournament in 1953 and 1954.

VICTOR CARROLL, Nevada-Reno
Intercepted four passes for two touchdowns and had eight pass receptions for two TDs with Boston, Washington and New York Giants in 12 years from 1936 through 1947. . . . The 6-3, 235-pounder was a three-year basketball letterman in the mid-1930s.

JOHN CARSON, Georgia
End caught 173 passes for 2,591 yards and 15 touchdowns with the Washington Redskins and Houston Oilers in seven years from 1954 through 1960. He was a 15th-round draft choice by Cleveland in 1953 after leading the Bulldogs in receiving in back-to-back seasons. . . . The 6-3, 200-pounder was a basketball letterman for the Bulldogs in 1952 and 1953 (7.4 ppg in eight games). He was Georgia's first four-letter winner (also baseball and golf).

GORDON CARVER, Duke
Captain of 1944 football squad while in medical school. Quarterback led the Blue Devils to their first bowl victory (29-26 over Alabama in 1945 Sugar Bowl) after they led the nation in scoring the previous season. Track sprinter also played defensive back. Selected by the Chicago Cardinals in 15th round of 1945 NFL draft (144th pick overall). . . . All-Southern Conference first-team selection in basketball as a junior and senior after being a second-team choice as a sophomore in 1942-43. Led Duke in scoring as a sophomore (11.9 ppg) and junior (13.3 ppg).

SHANTE CARVER, Arizona State
Defensive end registered 11 1/2 quarterback sacks in four years with the Dallas Cowboys after being their first-round pick (23rd overall) in the 1994 NFL draft. He had 41 sacks during his ASU career and led the team in tackles as a senior with 79. All-Pacific-10 Conference first-team selection as a junior and second-team choice as a senior. . . . The 6-5, 250-pounder played nine games during the 1992-93 season for a Sun Devils hoop squad decimated with injuries. He had one field goal in three attempts, hit both of his free throws, grabbed seven rebounds and registered three steals in 21 minutes.

RICK CASARES, Florida
Fullback for 12 NFL seasons (1955 through 1966) with the Chicago Bears, Washington Redskins and Miami Dolphins. Second-round draft choice in 1954 (18th pick overall) led the league in rushing (1,136 yards) and touchdowns (14) in 1957. The five-time Pro Bowl selection (1956 through 1960) ranks second on the Bears' career rushing list behind Walter Payton with 5,675 yards. . . . Casares, a 6-2, 205-pound forward, led the Gators in scoring and rebounding and was an All-SEC second-team selection in both of his varsity seasons--14.9 points and 11.3 rebounds as a sophomore in 1951-52 and 15.5 points and 11.5 rebounds as a junior in 1952-53.

CHRIS CHAMBERS, Wisconsin
The wide receiver, a second-round pick in 2001 (52nd pick overall), caught 540 passes for 7,648 yards and 58 touchdowns in 10 years with the Miami Dolphins, San Diego Chargers and Kansas City Chiefs. Led the NFL in yards per reception as a rookie (18.4) before earning Pro Bowl status in 2005. Caught 16 TD passes his last three years in college when he led Wisconsin in receiving each of those seasons. Had five receptions in 2000 Rose Bowl win over Stanford and victory over UCLA in the Sun Bowl the next year. . . . Chambers, 5-11, grabbed three rebounds in seven basketball games for the Badgers under coach Dick Bennett in 1997-98.

LYNN CHANDNOIS, Michigan State
Halfback amassed 2,093 yards, 6.5-yard rushing average, 31 touchdowns and 20 interceptions with the Spartans. He was a unanimous All-American as a senior in 1949 when he averaged 6.9 yards per carry in 129 rushing attempts and returned seven pass interceptions for a nation-leading 183 yards. The three-time All-Pro rushed for 1,934 yards in seven seasons with the Pittsburgh Steelers after entering the NFL as a first-round draft choice in 1950. The halfback accounted for over 1,500 yards in total offense in 1953. He returned three kickoffs for touchdowns en route to setting team records for kickoff return average in a career (29.6) and a single season (league-high 35.2 in 1952). Gale Sayers (30.6) is the only NFL player to finish his career with a higher kickoff return average than Chandnois, who also led the NFL in that category in 1951 (32.5). . . . The 6-2 sophomore forward scored 15 points in 11 games for the school's basketball squad in 1946-47 and 1947-48.

ANDY CHISICK, Villanova
Center-linebacker intercepted a pass for the Chicago Cardinals in 1941 after being their seventh-round draft choice the previous year. . . . The 6-1, 205-pounder was a basketball letterman for Villanova's 25-5 squad in 1937-38.

SAM CLANCY, Pittsburgh
Defensive end had 49 sacks in 11 seasons in pro football with the Seattle Seahawks, Cleveland Browns and Indianapolis Colts in the NFL and Pittsburgh and Memphis in the USFL. Seattle's 11th-round draft choice in 1982 played in two AFC championship games with the Browns. Coached for the Barcelona Dragons in NFL Europe. . . . The 6-7, 235-pound basketball center was a member of the gold-medal winning U.S. team in the 1979 Pan American Games. Averaged 14.4 points and 11.6 rebounds per game for Pitt from 1977-78 through 1980-81. Two-time Eastern 8 first-team selection was chosen in the third round of 1981 NBA draft by the Phoenix Suns after finishing his college career as the Panthers' all-time leading rebounder. Played 1981-82 season with Billings in the CBA, averaging 11.5 points and 8.3 rebounds per game. Quote in school guide from former West Virginia coach Gale Catlett: "Clancy is Superman in shorts. He's one of the best players I've seen and that includes some great ones." Clancy's son was the leading scorer and rebounder for Southern California's East Regional runner-up in the 2001 NCAA Tournament.

STU CLANCY, Holy Cross
The 5-10, 185-pound back rushed for four touchdowns and caught one TD pass with Newark, Staten Island and the New York Giants in six years from 1930 through 1935. . . . Basketball letterman from 1928 through 1930 was captain of the team as a senior.

EARL "DUTCH" CLARK, Colorado College
Member of College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame. Halfback and quarterback was named to All-NFL team in six of his seven seasons with Portsmouth (1931 and 1932) and Detroit (1934 through 1938). Led the NFL in scoring in 1932, 1935 and 1936. Player-coach of Detroit in 1937 and 1938) and head coach of Cleveland Rams from 1939 through 1942. First-team QB on the 1928 AP All-American team. Scored at least one touchdown in 21 consecutive college football games. . . . The 6-0, 180-pounder was an All-Rocky Mountain Conference choice in basketball all four seasons (first team as a freshman and senior, second team as a junior and third team as a sophomore). Sketch in Spalding Official Guide: "There isn't a man who could match Clark as a floor guard. The best dribbler ever to bounce a ball in the conference."

ROY CLAY, Colorado State
Back was an eighth-round draft choice of the New York Giants in 1944. . . . The 6-0, 185-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1939 and 1940.

JOHNNY CLEMENT, Southern Methodist
Fourth-round draft choice of the Chicago Cardinals in 1941. The 6-0, 190-pound back completed 40.9% of his passes for 14 touchdowns and rushed 300 times for 1,085 yards and eight TDs with the Cards and Pittsburgh Steelers in four years (1941 and 1946 through 1948). He also was an All-AAFC selection with Chicago in 1949 when he had six TD passes and five rushing TDs. . . . Basketball letterman in 1940.

BEN COATES, Livingstone (N.C.)
Holds NFL single-season record for most receptions by a tight end with 96 in 1994. Appeared in the Super Bowl with the New England Patriots following the 1996 season and then as a member of the Baltimore Ravens in Super Bowl XXXV. Pro Bowl selection was a fifth-round draft choice in 1991. He caught 499 passes for 5,555 yards and 50 touchdowns (nine in 1996 and eight apiece in 1993 and 1997) in 10 pro seasons. . . . The 6-5, 245-pounder played basketball one season for Livingstone.

ARNOLD COLEMAN, Hofstra
Flying Dutchmen's top wide receiver for two seasons in 1975 and 1976 when he had 44 receptions for 782 yards and seven touchdowns. . . . VCU transfer played in the 1977 NCAA Tournament against Digger Phelps-coached Notre Dame when he led Hofstra in assists (4.9 apg) while averaging 6.2 ppg and 2 rpg.

BEN COLEMAN, Wake Forest
Offensive lineman, an All-ACC selection as a senior, was a second-round draft choice by the Phoenix Cardinals in 1993 (32nd pick overall). The 6-5, 310-pounder also played five seasons with Jacksonville before one each with San Diego and Washington. . . . He hit one of two field-goal attempts and grabbed one rebound in four games for the Demon Deacons in 1990-91.

CONRAD "CORNIE" COLLIN, Creighton
Halfback was All-Missouri Valley Conference twice and outstanding punter as well. Played for the Chicago Bears in the first college all-star football game in 1934 although he never competed in an NFL game. . . . All-league first-team selection in basketball in 1932 and 1933. Led the MVC in scoring in 1933.

A.H. "RIP" COLLINS, Louisiana State
Running back was a sixth-round draft choice by New York (AAFC). Rushed for 88 yards, caught six passes for 161 yards, notched one interception and punted for a 42.1-yard average as a rookie in 1949. The next two years in the NFL with Baltimore and Green Bay, he rushed for 105 yards, caught 20 passes for 300 yards and intercepted three passes. All-SEC first-team selection as a fullback in 1947. . . . The 6-0, 190-pounder was a guard for LSU's basketball team from 1945 to 1947.

GEORGE CONNOR, Holy Cross/Notre Dame
Member of College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame was Outland Trophy winner (outstanding interior lineman) as a tackle on Notre Dame's 1946 national championship team. Consensus All-American football choice in 1946 and 1947. Earned All-America honors as a tackle at Holy Cross in 1943 before transferring to Notre Dame. First-round draft choice by the New York Giants in 1946 (5th pick overall). Played offensive/defensive tackle and linebacker with the Chicago Bears for eight years from 1948 through 1955, earning All-NFL first-team honors from 1949 through 1953. . . . Averaged 2.5 points per game as a 6-3, 225-pound center on the Irish's 1946-47 basketball team. Basketball letterman with Holy Cross in 1943 and 1944.

BOYD CONVERSE, Southeastern Oklahoma State
Coached briefly for Wichita State after guiding Kilgore (Tex.) Junior College to a national title in 1966. . . . Three-sport letterman (class of '54) coached Paris (Tex.) Community College to the NJCAA baseball tournament crown in 1959.

GENE COOK, Toledo
End caught one pass for 43 yards with the Detroit Lions in 1959. . . . The 6-3, 215-pounder averaged 5.1 ppg and 4.2 rpg as a three-year basketball letterman from 1955-56 through 1957-58.

FRED COOKE, Wake Forest
Started for the Deacons at linebacker as a sophomore and tight end as a junior before his senior season was marred by a knee injury. . . . Recruited by Billy Packer, Cooke was a member of Wake's freshman basketball squad in 1966-67 before concentrating on football.

ANDRE COOPER, Florida State
Caught nine passes for 98 yards with the Denver Broncos in 1999, starting one game. As a freshman in 1993, he was a member of FSU's first national championship team. MVP in 1996 Orange Bowl (victory over Notre Dame). Two-time All-ACC receiver's 15 touchdowns in 1995 is a school single-season record. . . . The 6-2 Cooper collected 29 points, 11 rebounds and 8 assists in seven Seminoles basketball games as a freshman in 1993-94.

THURLOW COOPER, Maine
Tight end was a 16th-round draft choice by the Cleveland Browns in 1956. The 6-5, 225-pounder caught 36 passes for 491 yards and eight touchdowns with the New York Titans in three years from 1960 through 1962. . . . He averaged 10.4 ppg in 1955-56 after averaging 6.7 ppg and 6.1 rpg the previous season.

OLIE CORDILL, Rice
Halfback was a first-round draft choice of the Cleveland Browns (5th pick overall) in 1940. He rushed 24 times for 73 yards and caught 14 passes for 158 yards and two touchdowns as a rookie. . . . The 6-2, 190-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1938.

BOB COWAN, Indiana
Back caught 21 passes for five touchdowns and made three interceptions with two AAFC franchises (Cleveland and Baltimore) in three years from 1947 through 1949. . . . Averaged 1.7 ppg in 19 basketball contests for IU in 1942-43.

CHARLEY COWAN, New Mexico Highlands
Three-time Pro Bowl participant was an offensive tackle for 14 seasons with the Los Angeles Rams (1961 through 1974) after being selected in the fourth round. . . . The 6-4, 260-pound basketball center averaged 15 points and 15.6 rebounds per game in his college career (20.7 points and 18.3 rebounds as a junior and 19.5 points and 18.3 rebounds as a senior). Excerpt from school guide: "Rugged under the basket but moves with the grace of a cat playing at the post. He will drive the basket from either side and also has a good hook shot."

NORM COX, Texas Christian
Back played for the AAFC's Chicago franchise in 1946 and 1947. . . . The 6-2, 210-pounder was a starting forward with TCU's basketball squad in 1945.

CLYDE CRABTREE, Northwestern/Florida
Back rushed for one touchdown and caught one TD pass with Frankfort-Minn. in 1930. . . . The 5-8, 160-pounder was a basketball letterman for the Gators in 1928 and 1929.

GARY CRANE, Arkansas State
Linebacker played in six games with the Denver Broncos in 1969 after being their 14th-round draft choice. . . . The 6-5, 230-pounder averaged 6.6 ppg and 3.2 rpg in his four-year basketball career from 1964-65 through 1967-68.

MILAN CREIGHTON, Arkansas
Three-year All-SWC selection as an end played with the Chicago Cardinals for seven years from 1931 through 1937. The 6-0 Creighton caught 19 passes for 246 yards. At the age of 27, he was named coach of the Cardinals and served in that capacity for four years from 1935 through 1938 (compiling a 16-26-4 record), introducing the spread formation to the NFL. . . . All-SWC second-team guard in basketball as a junior in 1929-30.

HERBERT "FRITZ" CRISLER, University of Chicago
Member of College Football Hall of Fame compiled a 116-32-9 record in 18 seasons as football coach at Minnesota (1930 and 1931), Princeton (1932 through 1937) and Michigan (1938 through 1947). The only team he coached with a losing record was in his first year. His last seven Michigan teams finished in the top 10 in the final Associated Press Poll. The 1947 Wolverines had a 10-0 record, defeated Southern Cal in the Rose Bowl (49-0) and finished second in the final AP poll behind Notre Dame. . . . Named to third five on All-Big Ten Conference basketball team in 1919-20 when the University of Chicago was a member of the league.

CHUCK CRIST, Penn State
Defensive back had 20 interceptions with the New York Giants, New Orleans Saints and San Francisco 49ers in seven years from 1972 through 1978. . . . The 6-2, 205-pounder averaged more than 10 points per game for the Nittany Lions in his last two seasons under coach John Bach, leading them in field-goal accuracy (49.3%) as a junior and free-throw marksmanship (77.5%) as a senior.

TOMMY CRONIN, Loras/Marquette
Halfback rushed for one touchdown with the Green Bay Packers in 1922. . . . The 5-9, 170-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1920.

HENRY "DOC" CRONKITE, Kansas State
End played with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1934. . . . The 6-5, 210-pounder was a two-year basketball letterman with the Wildcats.

KYLE "BUDDY" CRUZE, Tennessee
End led the Volunteers in pass receptions in 1955 and 1956. Selected by the Chicago Bears in 12th round of 1956 NFL draft before playing with the College All-Stars in the annual game against the NFL champions. . . . SMU transfer averaged 6.4 ppg and 4.7 rpg for the Vols in 1953-54.

HAROLD "COOKIE" CUNNINGHAM, Ohio State
Offensive end played three years of professional football with Cleveland (1927), Chicago Bears (1929) and Staten Island (1931). . . . Three-year basketball letterman in the mid-1920s. The 6-3, 210-pounder played for Columbus (NBL) in 1937-38.

ARMAND CURE, Rhode Island
Back played with the Baltimore Colts (AAFC) in 1947. . . . Three-year basketball letterman in the early 1940s. Member of NIT teams in 1941 and 1942. The 6-0, 195-pounder played professionally for the Providence Steamrollers in 1946-47.

RONALD CURRY, North Carolina
Four-year starter set Carolina career records for total offense, passing yards, rushing yards by a quarterback and rushing touchdowns by a QB. Most Outstanding Player in the 2002 Peach Bowl before becoming a seventh-round draft choice by the Oakland Raiders. He was activated for the Super Bowl as a rookie. Converted to wide receiver in 2003 and succeeded all-time great Tim Brown the next year, catching 50 passes for 679 yards and six TDs. In 2006, he had NFL-career highs of 62 receptions and 727 yards. Curry totaled 193 catches for 2,347 yards and 13 TDs in seven years through 2008 (28 receptions of more than 20 yards in three full seasons from 2004 through 2007). . . . Averaged 4.2 ppg, 2.5 rpg and 3 apg in 1998-99 and 2000-01 (missed 1999-2000 campaign after rupturing his right Achilles' tendon in football). Team leader in assists, including career-high 10 in ACC Tournament opener against Clemson, during 2000-01 when he directed Carolina to a No. 1 ranking and an 18-game winning streak. Collected 16 points and 10 assists in two NCAA playoff contests in 2001.

ED DANOWSKI, Fordham
All-American halfback in 1933. He completed 311 of 645 passes for 3,867 yards and 39 touchdowns, rushed 455 times for 1,232 yards and punted 31 times for 37.9-yard average in seven-year pro career with the New York Giants from 1934 through 1939 and 1941. Member of NFL champions in 1934 and 1938. Received first-team All-NFL honors in 1935 and 1938. . . . Earned a letter with Fordham's basketball team in 1932-33.

RUSS DAUGHERITY, Illinois
Played two games with Frankfort in 1927. . . . The 5-10, 175-pounder was a three-year basketball letterman in the mid-1920s.

CARL "RED" DAUM, Akron
Back passed for one touchdown, caught two TD passes and returned one interception for a TD with Akron's professional team in five years from 1922 through 1926. . . . The 5-7, 165-pounder was a three-year basketball letterman in the early 1920s.

BOB DAVIS, Kentucky
Halfback passed for four touchdowns, rushed for three TDs, had two receptions for TDs, returned 56 punts for a 10.3-yard average and 27 kickoffs for a 19.1-yard average, and intercepted 19 passes with Cleveland, Philadelphia and Boston in five years (1938, 1942 and 1944 through 1946). The 6-1, 180-pounder led the NFL in punt returns (22 for 271 yards) in 1944 with Boston. . . . Basketball letterman for UK in 1937.

BOB DAVIS, Virginia
Quarterback was a second-round draft choice of the Houston Oilers in 1967 before finishing his seven-year pro career with the New York Jets (1970 through 1972) and New Orleans Saints (1973). Passed for 1,553 yards and 14 touchdowns (10 in his best pro season in 1971). The ACC Player of the Year had a college-career high of 312 passing yards in a game against Clemson in 1966 and an 85-yard scoring strike against VMI the same season. . . . Davis was the top player off the bench for Virginia's basketball squad in 1964-65 when he averaged 9.1 ppg and 4.1 rpg.

CHARLES DAVIS, Purdue
Starting tight end most of four years from 2002 through 2005 caught 60 passes his last two seasons, including a 61-yard TD against archrival Indiana as a junior when he was a second-team All-Big Ten Conference selection by the media. Fifth-round NFL draft choice by the Pittsburgh Steelers in 2006. . . . Upon return from 2004 Sun Bowl, the 6-6, 260-pounder averaged 2.9 ppg and 3.1 rpg in 19 basketball games for the Boilermakers in coach Gene Keady's swan song.

DARREL "MOUSE" DAVIS, Western Oregon
Best known as the innovative "Father of the Run-and-Shoot" offense. June Jones and Neil Lomax, a couple of Davis' quarterbacks when he was Portland State's head coach in the mid-1970s, helped the Vikings lead the nation in passing and total offense for six consecutive years. Jones and Davis worked together on the same coaching staff with five teams--USFL's Houston Gamblers and Denver Gold, NFL's Detroit Lions and Atlanta Falcons and the University of Hawaii. . . . Three-sport letterman in college was named Western Oregon's Outstanding Athlete as a senior in 1954-55. Basketball teams in 1952 and 1953 made appearances in the NAIA District 2 playoffs.

ERNIE DAVIS, Syracuse
First African-American to win the Heisman Trophy (1961). Halfback was consensus All-American choice in 1960 and 1961 after Syracuse won the 1959 national championship. Member of College Football Hall of Fame averaged 6.6 yards per carry and scored 35 touchdowns. Co-MVP in 1960 Cotton Bowl before being named MVP in 1961 Liberty Bowl. Selected by the Washington Redskins as the first player picked in the 1962 NFL draft. His rights were acquired for the great Bobby Mitchell by the Cleveland Browns, who signed Davis that summer before be was diagnosed with leukemia. He never played in the NFL and died on May 18, 1963. . . . A 6-2, 205-pound forward on the 1960-61 Syracuse varsity basketball team, his rebound average (9.6) was highest on the team and his scoring average (10.2) ranked second.

GLENN DAVIS, Army
Member of College Football Hall of Fame was a consensus All-American for three consecutive national championships teams from 1944 through 1946. The 5-10, 170-pound halfback averaged 8.3 yards per carry (still an NCAA career record) and scored 59 touchdowns for Army teams that compiled a 34-2-2 record in his four seasons. Averaged 11.5 yards per carry in back-to-back campaigns (1944 and 1945). Still holds school record for yards per catch average (18.9 on 45 receptions; six of his 14 receiving TDs were in 1946). Davis, "Mr. Outside," teamed with Felix "Doc" Blanchard, "Mr. Inside," to comprise one of the most heralded backfields in college football history. Won Heisman Trophy as a senior and was runner-up the previous two years. Also attended Cal Poly-Pomona. First-round draft choice by the Detroit Lions in 1947 (2nd pick overall). Rushed for 616 yards and four touchdowns in two NFL seasons (1950 and 1951) with the Los Angeles Rams. . . . Member of Army basketball teams as a junior in 1944-45 and as a senior in 1945-46.

ROBERT "BOB" DAVIS, Georgia Tech
Consensus All-America tackle, a fourth-round draft choice of the New York Giants in 1947, played for Boston in 1948. He was a three-time All-SEC first-team selection. . . . The 6-4, 235-pounder, a three-year basketball letterman, was captain as a senior forward-center in 1945-46. He scored 102 points in 16 games in 1944-45.

MATT DAVISON, Nebraska
Split end led the Huskers in pass receptions as a sophomore (32 for 394 yards), junior (29 for 441) and senior (21 for 389). Had a miracle diving catch of a deflected touchdown pass that forced overtime and allowed visiting Nebraska to beat Missouri and preserve a run at a national championship. Leading Husker receiver in three Bowl games, catching a pair of third-quarter TD passes in a 66-17 victory over Northwestern in 2000 Alamo Bowl. . . . Started two Big 12 Conference basketball games in 1999-2000 when he averaged 2.4 ppg in 15 contests.

LEN DAWSON, Purdue
Member of Pro Football Hall of Fame completed 2,136 passes for 28,731 yards and 239 touchdowns in 19 seasons (1957 through 1975) with the Cleveland Browns, Dallas Texans and Kansas City Chiefs. First-round draft choice of the Pittsburgh Steelers went on to become a seven-time All-Pro. Quarterbacked the Chiefs to victory over Minnesota in Super Bowl following 1969 season. . . . Played in two games as a 6-0, 180-pound guard for Purdue's basketball team in the 1956-57 campaign.

LOWELL "RED" DAWSON, Wisconsin-River Falls/Tulane
Quarterback in 1932 Rose Bowl for Tulane after transferring. College football coach for Tulane, Minnesota and Pittsburgh and with the professional Buffalo Bills. . . . Played basketball multiple seasons for River Falls.

RANDY DEAN, Northwestern
Quarterback was fifth-round draft choice of the New York Giants in 1977. The 6-3, 195-pounder played three years with them, throwing for one touchdown and rushing for another. . . . Appeared in two basketball games in 1973-74 under coach Tex Winter (played four minutes, grabbed one rebound and missed two free throws).

VERN DEN HERDER, Central College (Iowa)
Defensive lineman played in four Super Bowls with the Miami Dolphins during his 12-year NFL career (1971 through 1982). Ninth-round draft choice was an All-Pro defensive left end for undefeated 1972 team (17-0). . . . The 6-6, 220-pound basketball center finished his four-season career at Central College as the school's all-time leading scorer (15.5 ppg) and rebounder (12.4 rpg). He grabbed a school-record 29 rebounds in a game his senior season (1970-71) en route to a Central single-season mark of 397 caroms.

MIKE DeNOIA, Scranton (Pa.)
Selected as a back by the Pittsburgh Steelers in 20th round of 1950 NFL draft. . . . Averaged team-high 11.7 ppg in 1947-48 and was runner-up with 10 ppg in 1948-49 under prominent coach Buck Freeman.

DAN DeSANTIS, Niagara
Back-punter caught four passes and made two interceptions with the Philadelphia Eagles in 1941. . . . The 6-0, 180-pounder was a four-year basketball letterman.

AUBREY DEVINE, Iowa
All-American quarterback when the Hawkeyes won 20 consecutive games in the early 1920s. He dropkicked the field goal that snapped Notre Dame's 20-game winning streak and ran for four touchdowns against Minnesota. . . . Three-year basketball letterman from 1920 through 1922.

DAN DEVINE, Minnesota-Duluth
College Football Hall of Famer coached Notre Dame to a national champinship in 1977 after directing the Green Bay Packers to the NFC Central Division title five years earlier. Guided the Fighting Irish to a 53-16-1 mark in six seasons from 1975 through 1980. Also coached Missouri to six bowl games in the 1960s (92-38-7 record in 13 years from 1958 through 1970). . . . Played guard for Duluth's basketball squad in 1942-43 and 1945-46. Captained the Bulldogs as a senior and paced the club in scoring that season. He was a quarterback for the school's football team.

BILL DEWELL, Southern Methodist
Fourth-round draft choice of the Philadelphia Eagles in 1939 (29th pick overall). End caught 177 passes for 2,657 yards and 17 touchdowns with the Chicago Cardinals in seven years (1940, 1941 and 1945 through 1949). First-team all-league selection in 1946 when he led the NFL in average per reception (23.8) and TD receptions (7). . . . Three-time All-SWC first-team pick in basketball in the late 1930s.

DICK DIETRICK, Pittsburgh
End was selected in 29th round of 1954 NFL draft by the Los Angeles Rams after leading the Panthers in pass receptions with 13 in 1953. . . . The 6-3 Dietrick averaged 7.6 ppg and 8 rpg (second on team) in 1953-54.

LAVVIE DILWEG, Marquette
End caught 12 touchdown passes and returned two interceptions for TDs with Milwaukee/Green Bay Packers in nine years from 1926 through 1934. . . . The 6-3, 200-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1926.

MIKE DITKA, Pittsburgh
Member of College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame. The tight end caught 427 passes for 5,812 yards and 43 touchdowns in 12 NFL seasons (1961 through 1972) with the Chicago Bears, Philadelphia Eagles and Dallas Cowboys. The first-round draft choice participated in two Super Bowls with Dallas (V and VI) after playing five Pro Bowls with the Bears (1962 through 1966). Coached Super Bowl winner in 1985 season when the Bears compiled an 18-1 overall record. Registered a 112-68 mark in 11 years (1982-92) as coach of the Bears. Coached the New Orleans Saints in the late 1990s between stints as a network analyst. . . . The 6-2, 205-pound forward averaged 2.8 points and 2.6 rebounds per game in two seasons with the Panthers (1958-59 and 1959-60) after playing in high school under Press Maravich, the father of Pete Maravich, the NCAA's all-time leading scorer. Sketch in school basketball guide: "A natural athlete who never quits. If Pitt wins a few games, there is a good chance he will be in the thick of things."

AL DIXON, Iowa State
Seventh-round draft choice as a tight end by the New York Giants in 1977. The 6-5, 230-pounder caught 84 passes for 1,248 yards and eight touchdowns with the Giants, Kansas City Chiefs, Philadelphia Eagles and San Francisco 49ers in eight years through 1984. . . . Averaged 10 ppg and 10 rpg while shooting 60.7% from the floor for the Cyclones in four games in 1975-76. He collected five points and two rebounds in three contests the next season.

BOBBY DODD, Tennessee
Compiled a 165-64-8 coaching record with Georgia Tech in 22 years from 1945 through 1966. Won his first eight of 13 bowl games with the Yellow Jackets. . . . All-SEC second-team selection in basketball as a junior in 1929-30. He was captain of the team as a senior.

BOB DONNELLY, Connecticut
Halfback had a 69-year interception return for a TD against Rutgers and threw a 72-yard TD pass in a game against Buffalo in 1939. Captained both football and basketball teams as a senior. . . . All-conference first-team forward in basketball as a junior and senior averaged 14.7 ppg in his three-year hoop career from 1938-39 through 1940-41, including back-to-back 25-point outings and a career-high 30-point explosion against Rhode Island in 1939-40. He never played on a losing team for UConn in either sport.

VINCE DOOLEY, Auburn
Auburn MVP in 1954 Gator Bowl. Coached Georgia to the 1980 national championship and six SEC titles. Compiled a 201-66-10 record as 20 teams played in bowl games in his 25 seasons from 1964 through 1988. . . . Averaged 6.3 points per game as a starting guard in 1951-52 in his only season of varsity basketball with Auburn before concentrating on football.

DEMAR DOTSON, Southern Mississippi
Starting offensive right tackle for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in 2012. Started season finale on defensive line for USM against SMU in 2008. . . . The 6-9, 275-pound J.C. recruit averaged 3.9 ppg and 3.6 rpg while shooting 58.5% from the floor for USM in 2006-07 and 2007-08 under coach Larry Eustachy.

BEN DOUGLAS, Grinnell (Iowa)
Back caught five pass for 86 yards and one touchdown and intercepted two passes for the NFL's Brooklyn Dodgers in 1933. . . . Two-time All-MVC second-team selection in basketball (1929-30 and 1930-31).

PAT DOWLING, DePaul
End played with the Chicago Cardinals in 1929. . . . The 5-11, 185-pounder was a basketball letterman for the Blue Demons.

FERD DREHER, Arkansas State/Denver
End was a 10th-round draft choice of the Chicago Bears in 1938. He caught three passes for 69 yards and one touchdown. . . . The 6-3, 205-pounder was a basketball letterman with Denver in 1937 and 1938.

BEN DREITH, Northern Colorado
Refereed three Super Bowls and eight NFL championship games. At one point, he worked 28 consecutive playoff games. Threw one final flag for an infraction, receiving a $165,000 settlement from the NFL in early 1993 nearly two years after the EEOC ruled that the league violated the Age Discrimination in Employment Act. . . . Forward averaged 7.1 ppg in 1949-50 when the school was known as Colorado State College.

JOHN "PADDY" DRISCOLL, Northwestern
Back passed for 16 touchdowns, rushed for 25 and caught four TD passes with the Chicago Cardinals and Bears through the entire 1920s. . . . The 5-11, 160-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1916.

LYLE "HOOT" DRURY, St. Louis
End caught a touchdown pass with the Chicago Bears in 1931. . . . The 6-4, 185-pounder was a basketball letterman from 1928 through 1930.

ELBERT DUBENION, Bluffton (Ohio)
Wide receiver caught 294 passes for 5,294 yards and 35 touchdowns in nine-year career with the Buffalo Bills. Dubenion, a 14th-round draft choice of the NFL's Cleveland Browns in 1959, was an All-AFL selection in 1964 when he led the league in yards per pass reception with a 27.1 average. . . . The 5-11, 185-pounder was regarded as a solid rebounder and defensive player for Bluffton in the late 1950s. He scored a total of 235 points as a freshman but had only 40 as a senior. Dubenion said he basically played basketball to keep in shape.

DICK DUDEN, Navy
End caught two passes for the New York Giants in 1949. . . . The 6-3, 210-pounder was a three-year basketball letterman in the mid-1940s.

RICKEY DUDLEY, Ohio State
Tight end was selected by the Oakland Raiders in the first round (9th pick overall) of the 1996 NFL draft. Scored 29 touchdowns in five seasons with the Raiders before hooking on with the Cleveland Browns in 2001 and Tampa Bay Buccaneers in 2002. Caught a TD pass for the Bucs in the playoffs following the 2002 campaign. Played two seasons of football for the Buckeyes, catching nine passes for 106 yards and two touchdowns as a junior in 1994 and 37 passes for 575 yards and seven TDs as a senior in 1995. Offensive MVP in the 1996 Florida Citrus Bowl. . . . In four seasons as a 6-7, 240-pound forward for Ohio State's basketball team, he started 47 of 100 games. Dudley averaged 13.3 ppg and 7.5 rpg as a senior in 1994-95 when he led the Buckeyes in rebounding and finished third in scoring. In 1992, he collected three points and five rebounds in a 78-55 victory over Connecticut in the second round for the Buckeyes' Southeast Regional runner-up.

JACK DUGGER, Ohio State
Consensus All-American end on the 1944 OSU football team that finished second behind Army in the final AP poll. Second-round NFL draft choice by Pittsburgh in 1945. Played pro football with three different franchises from 1946 through 1949. . . . Three-year letterman in basketball was a 6-4, 205-pound starting forward for the Buckeyes' Final Four teams in 1944 and 1945. Played briefly for Syracuse in the National Basketball League in 1946-47.

WESLEY DUKE, Mercer
Tight end earned a spot on the Denver Broncos' roster in 2005 as a free agent and caught a touchdown pass. His cousin, Rufus Mayes, played 11 seasons in the NFL from 1969 through 1979 with Chicago, Cincinnati and Philadelphia. . . . The 6-5, 225-pounder, whose trademark thunderous dunks earned him a spot in ESPN's Slam Dunk Championships, averaged 9.8 ppg and 5.9 rpg for the Bears from 2001-02 through 2004-05.

JIM DUNCAN, Maryland-Eastern Shore
Fourth-round draft choice (107th pick overall) by the Baltimore Colts in 1968. Defensive back intercepted two passes and returned 42 kickoffs for two touchdowns and a 32.6-yard average in three years from 1969 through 1971. Member of Super Bowl V champion led the NFL in kickoff return average (35.4) in 1970. . . . The 6-2, 200-pounder also played basketball for the Hawks.

KEN DUNEK, Memphis State
Tight end played in two games with the Philadelphia Eagles in 1980. . . . The 6-6, 235-pounder averaged 2.9 ppg and 1.4 rpg for the Tigers in 1977-78 after transferring from Paducah (Ky.) Junior College.

TONY DUNGY, Minnesota
The first NFL head coach to defeat all 32 teams compiled a 139-69 coaching record with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and Indianapolis Colts in 13 years from 1996 through 2008. He became the first African-American coach to win the Super Bowl (XLI with the Colts). Other notable NFL firsts for him were becoming the youngest assistant coach at age 25 and youngest coordinator at age 28. His memoir, Quiet Strength: The Principles, Practices, and Priorities of a Winning Life, reached No. 1 on the hardcover nonfiction section of the New York Times Best Seller list the fall of 2007. Defensive back-quarterback had nine interceptions with the Pittsburgh Steelers and San Francisco 49ers in three years from 1977 through 1979. Member of the Steelers' Super Bowl XIII champion that defeated Dallas, 35-31, at the Orange Bowl. . . . The 6-0, 185-pounder averaged 2.6 ppg in 16 contests with the Gophers in 1973-74 under coach Bill Musselman. Dungy was a teammate and roommate of longtime NBA coach Flip Saunders.

JOSEPH "RED" DUNN, Marquette
Back-placekicker passed for 48 touchdowns, rushed for five TDs and caught one TD pass for Milwaukee/Green Bay Packers in eight years from 1924 through 1931. . . . The 5-11, 175-pounder was a basketball letterman for four years the first half of the 1920s.

ELWYN DUNSTAN, Portland
Tackle played with the Chicago Cardinals and Cleveland in four years from 1938 through 1941. . . . The 6-3, 235-pounder was a three-year basketball letterman in the mid-1930s.

DON DURDAN, Oregon State
Back caught one touchdown pass, rushed for 132 yards and had two interceptions as a rookie with San Francisco (AAFC) in 1946. . . . The 5-9, 175-pounder was a basketball letterman with the Beavers from 1941 to 1943.

SCOTT EATON, Oregon State
Defensive back intercepted 11 passes in five years for the New York Giants after being their eighth-round draft choice in 1967. . . . The 6-3 forward was a three-year basketball letterman with the Beavers, averaging 6 ppg and 2.8 rpg while shooting 44.6% from the floor and 64.8% from the free-throw line. Eaton averaged 9.9 ppg as a senior when he shared OSU's 1966 Paul Valenti Award, which is given annually to the player who displays the most desire and determination. He scored eight points against Seattle in the 1964 NCAA playoffs and a total of 19 points in two West Regional contests in 1966 (vs. Houston and Utah).

JOEL EAVES, Auburn
All-SEC end in 1936 was a seventh-round choice of Boston in the 1937 NFL draft. Assistant football coach at his alma mater from 1949 to 1963. . . . Auburn won nearly 70 percent (214-99 record) of its basketball games during a 14-year span with him as coach.

O.G. "OX" ECKHARDT, Texas
Rushed for two touchdowns with the New York Giants in 1928. . . . The 6-1, 190-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1923.

TERRENCE EDWARDS, Georgia
Set SEC career standard with 3,093 yards receiving by catching a school-record 204 passes (including 30 for touchdowns). Brother of former Bulldogs All-American tailback Robert Edwards signed as a free agent with the Atlanta Falcons in 2003 and caught one pass in six games. . . . Collected 26 points and 14 rebounds in 14 basketball games the second half of the 1998-99 season.

ED EHLERS, Purdue
Back selected by the Chicago Bears in 31st round of 1947 NFL draft. . . . The 6-3 Ehlers averaged 9.8 ppg in 1942-43 and 1946-47.

DON ELIASON, Hamline (Minn.)
End caught one pass for 36 yards with Brooklyn in 1942 and one for nine yards with Boston in 1946. . . . (insert text on college basketball career). Played one professional game for Boston in 1946-47.

BRUCE ELLINGTON, South Carolina
Wide receiver/back rushed 17 times for 125 yards and one touchdown and caught 17 passes for 211 yards and one touchdown in 2011. Returned a kickoff 45 yards in 30-13 victory over Nebraska in Florida Citrus Bowl. . . . The Gamecocks' leading scorer as a 5-9 freshman point guard with 12.8 ppg in 2010-11 before averaging 11.1 ppg the next season.

PETE "BUMP" ELLIOTT, Michigan
Executive director of the Pro Football Hall of Fame earned All-American honors as a quarterback for the Wolverines' 1948 national champion. Big Ten Conference MVP led Michigan to a 49-0 victory over USC in the 1948 Rose Bowl. Former head coach at Nebraska (4-6 record in 1956), California (10-21 from 1957 through 1959) and Illinois (1960 through 1966) led Cal and the Illini to Rose Bowl berths. . . . A four-year starter as a 6-0, 190-pound guard on Michigan teams from 1945-46 through 1948-49. Captain of squad as a sophomore and member of Big Ten championship team in 1947-48. First-team all-conference choice as a junior and second-team selection as a senior. Second-team pick on Helms All-American team in 1947-48 when he scored a team-high 15 points in Michigan's first NCAA Tournament victory, a 66-49 decision over Columbia in the Eastern Regional third-place game. Excerpt from school guide: "At times his defensive work was almost uncanny as he held high-scoring opposition practically scoreless in several games. Outstanding at recovering rebounds."

HERB ELLIS, Texas A&M
Center-linebacker for New York in 1949. . . . The 6-2, 205-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1945.

PERCY ELLSWORTH, Virginia
Defensive back intercepted 20 passes for 326 yards and three touchdowns in six years with the New York Giants and Cleveland Browns from 1996 through 2001. Starting safety in 1994 Independence Bowl (20-10 win over TCU). Managed six of his 10 "picks" in college as a senior, intercepting future NFL teammate Danny Kanell twice in the Cavaliers' victory over Florida State. . . . The 6-2, 200-pounder made four of six field-goal tries and each of his four free-throw attempts (all in an NCAA playoff first-round victory against Nicholls State) in 15 games with the Cavaliers' basketball squad in 1994-95. He appeared in all four of their tourney contests for the Midwest Regional finalist eliminated by eventual runner-up Arkansas.

WEERT ENGLEMANN, South Dakota State
Back scored 10 touchdowns for the Green Bay Packers in four years from 1930 through 1933. . . . The 6-3, 190-pounder was an All-North Central Conference performer in basketball. He won the discus title as a senior at the Drake Relays after winning the triple jump the previous year. Englemann missed by one-fourth of a point of earning a spot on the 1928 U.S. Olympic decathlon team.

FRED W. ENKE, Arizona
Seventh-round draft choice passed for 4,169 yards and 31 touchdowns in seven seasons (1948 through 1954) with the Detroit Lions, Philadelphia Eagles and Baltimore Colts. Led the nation his senior year in total offense with 1,941 yards (535 rushing and 1,406 passing) as a third-team AP All-American. . . . Three-year All-Border Conference first-team selection in basketball under his father (coach Fred A. Enke) was co-captain as a senior swingman in 1947-48. The younger Enke was the Wildcats' fifth-leading scorer each of his last two years as he helped them capture three consecutive league titles and assemble a homecourt winning streak that reached 81 in a row until ending in 1951.

REX ENRIGHT, Notre Dame
Fullback rushed for three touchdowns with the Green Bay Packers in 1926 and 1927. . . . The 5-10, 195-pounder was the second-leading scorer for the Irish in 1922-23 (5.2 ppg) and 1923-24 (6 ppg).

MIKE EPPLEY, Clemson
The Tigers' football squad went to three bowl games, posting a combined 37-6-2 mark, and won the '81 national title with him on their roster. QB threw 28 touchdown passes for the Tigers, leading them in passing in 1983 and 1984 with a total of 2,904 yards. . . . The 6-2, 185-pound Eppley was a starter at point guard his last three seasons on basketball squads with breakeven or losing records, finishing his career with averages of 4 points and 3.9 assists per game from 1981 through 1984.

BRAD EVANS, Duke
End caught 26 passes for 328 yards and two receiving touchdowns in 1970 and 1971. . . . The 6-3 guard led the Blue Devils' freshman squad in scoring before serving as a part-time starter for coach Vic Bubas' final team in 1968-69 and scoring a career-high 26 points in a game against Penn State as a junior in 1969-70 (averaged 7.1 ppg, 2.4 rpg and 2.1 apg).

DICK EVANS, Iowa
End caught 13 passes for 145 yards with the Green Bay Packers and Chicago Cardinals in four years from 1940 through 1943. Three-year football letterman for Iowa in the late 1930s. . . . The 6-3, 205-pounder averaged 3.9 ppg as a starting center for the Hawkeyes' basketball team in 1939-40. Played professionally in the NBL with Hammond, Sheboygan and Chicago for three seasons from 1940-41 through 1942-43.

RAY EVANS, Kansas
The only Kansas athlete to earn All-American recognition in football and basketball had his jersey No. 15 retired in 1997. Member of College Football Hall of Fame earned All-American honors as a back in 1942 and 1947 in a career interrupted by World War II. Led the nation's major-college players in passes attempted (200) and completed (101) and interceptions (10) in 1942 for a rare triple crown. Paced Kansas to the Big Six championship and a trip to the Orange Bowl in 1947. First-round draft choice of the Chicago Bears in 1944 (9th pick overall). Tailback rushed for two touchdowns with the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1948 before becoming a prominent Kansas City bank official. . . . Four-year basketball letterman was the second-leading scorer for the Jayhawks in the 1942 NCAA Tournament. Earned Helms Foundation All-American honors in 1941-42 and 1942-43.

CHUCK EVERETT, Drake
Back scored four touchdowns in his first collegiate appearance. Led the Missouri Valley Conference in scoring as a sophomore. . . . Forward finished among the MVC's top 10 scorers in three basketball seasons in the mid-1920s.

WILBUR "WEEB" EWBANK, Miami (Ohio)
Member of Pro Football Hall of Fame is the only head coach to win championships in both the NFL (Baltimore Colts in 1958 and 1959) and AFL (New York Jets in 1968). . . . Two-year basketball letterman for Miami (1926-27 and 1927-28) compiled a 5-13 record as head basketball coach at his alma mater in 1938-39 and an 8-12 mark as Brown's head basketball coach in 1946-47.

CHARLES FABIAN, The Citadel
Earned football letter in 1951. . . . Captain of 1950-51 basketball squad his senior season after averaging 8.5 ppg in 1949-50.

GEORGE FARMER, UCLA
Last Bruins athlete to compete in three sports in the same year was selected to the 1969 East-West Shrine All-Star game. Father of former UCLA wide receiver and volleyball star Danny Farmer also played the same football position. His father-in-law, Steve Miletich, played basketball for crosstown rival USC in the early 1940s. Third-round draft choice caught 119 passes for 995 yards and 10 touchdowns with the Chicago Bears and Detroit Lions in six years from 1970 through 1975. . . . Teammate of Lew Alcindor played six games in 1968-69, collecting six points (2 of 3 from floor and 2 of 2 from free-throw line). He also competed in track.

JESSE FATHERREE, Louisiana State
All-SEC first-team selection in 1935 when he scored a 94-yard rushing touchdown against Georgia. Competed in 1936 Sugar Bowl. . . . Basketball letterman as a guard in 1933 and 1934.

JEFF FAULKNER, Southern (La.)
Defensive end registered 5 1/2 sacks with six different NFL teams (Kansas City Chiefs, Indianapolis Colts, Phoenix Cardinals, New Orleans Saints, Washington Redskins and New York Jets) in six years from 1987 to 1996. . . . The 6-4 product of the Virgin Islands averaged 6.1 ppg and 3.2 rpg in four basketball seasons from 1982-83 through 1985-86.

DON FAUROT, Missouri
Hall of Famer spent 19 years as head football coach (100-80-10 record from 1935 through 1956) and 30 years as athletic director for Mizzou. Alma mater's all-time winningest coach guided the Tigers to four bowl games in the 1940s. Faurot is best known as the inventor of the Split T formation. In 1972, the Tigers' football stadium was named in his honor (Faurot Field). . . . Captained the Tigers' basketball team as an undergraduate.

BEATTIE FEATHERS, Tennessee
An 82-yard touchdown run helped him become the first NFL player to rush for 1,000 yards or more in a season when he had 1,004 yards (9.9 per carry) as a rookie with the Chicago Bears in 1934. Member of College Football Hall of Fame was a consensus All-American halfback in 1933. Rushed for 1,980 yards and 16 touchdowns in seven NFL seasons with the Bears (1934 through 1937), Brooklyn Dodgers (1938 and 1939) and Green Bay Packers (1940). . . . Regular for the 1931-32 Volunteers' basketball squad.

AL FEENEY, Notre Dame
Center kicked six extra points for Canton in 1921. . . . The 6-0, 210-pounder was captain of the Irish's 13-2 basketball team in 1913.

JOHN "FRITZ" FERKO, West Chester State/Mount St. Mary's
Tackle played for the Philadelphia Eagles in 1937 and 1938. . . . The 6-1, 240-pounder participated in basketball with Mount St. Mary's in 1933.

WES FESLER, Ohio State
Member of College Football Hall of Fame was consensus All-American end in 1928, 1929 and 1930. Three-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection was named to Grantland Rice's all-time All-American team in 1939. Coach at Pittsburgh (1946), Ohio State (1947 through 1950) and Minnesota (1951 through 1953). He was Woody Hayes' predecessor with the Buckeyes, guiding them to a 17-14 victory over California in the 1950 Rose Bowl. . . . The 6-0, 185-pounder was a second-team All-Big Ten basketball selection as a sophomore and a first-team choice as a senior when he was an NCAA All-American. He also played three years of minor league baseball.

JIM FINKS, Tulsa
Former NFL executive was a defensive back and quarterback with the Pittsburgh Steelers for seven years (1949 through 1955). He had seven interceptions in his first three NFL campaigns. Selected to the Pro Bowl following 1952 season after leading NFL in touchdown passes with 20. The 12th-round draft pick led the NFL in passes attempted (344), passes completed (165) and passing yardage (2,270) in 1955. Finished his NFL career with 8,622 yards passing and 55 touchdowns before playing for Calgary in the Canadian Football League in 1957. . . . The 6-0, 170-pound Finks was a four-year varsity basketball player at Tulsa, leading the team in scoring average as a sophomore with 8.9 points per game in 1946-47. Held school single-game scoring record at the time with 28 points against Drake.

RAY FLAHERTY, Gonzaga
End caught 20 touchdown passes with the New York Yankees/Giants in nine seasons from 1927 through 1935 (coached his alma mater in 1930). Helped the Giants advance to the NFL championship game three straight seasons from 1933 through 1935. Compiled an 80-37-5 record as coach of the Boston/Washington Redskins, New York Yankees and Chicago Hornets. Coached the Redskins to two NFL titles and four divisional crowns. Pro Football Hall of Famer is credited with inventing the screen pass (introduced in 1937 title game). . . . Four-sport athlete including basketball (class of '26).

TONY FLANAGAN, Georgia
First African-American QB for the Bulldogs in the mid-1970s. . . . Averaged more than 10 ppg each of the first three seasons of his basketball career that lasted from 1974-75 through 1977-78.

WILLIAM "HOOT" FLANAGAN, Pittsburgh
Back rushed for five touchdowns and returned two interceptions for TDs with Pottsville in 1925. . . . The 6-0, 165-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1924.

JACK FLAVIN, Georgetown
Three-sport athlete shares the NCAA record for longest punt in a football game with 99 yards against Holy Cross in 1922. . . . The 5-11 Flavin averaged 7.6 ppg for the Hoyas from 1918-19 through 1922-23. He led the team with a 12.5 scoring average in 1920-21 when he was captain of the squad.

LONDON FLETCHER, St. Francis (Pa.)/John Carroll (Ohio)
St. Louis Rams starting middle linebacker for their 1999 Super Bowl championship team despite his small stature (5-10, 240). Also appeared in 2002 Super Bowl for the Rams before signing huge free-agent contract with the Buffalo Bills. . . . Point guard started two games for St. Francis as a freshman in 1993-94 when he averaged three points per game. After transferring back home to Cleveland, he collected 109 points and 52 rebounds in 27 games for John Carroll before quitting basketball midway through the 1995-96 campaign to concentrate on football.

HANK FOLDBERG, Texas A&M/Army
End caught 31 passes for 331 yards with Brooklyn and Chicago in the AAFC in 1948 and 1949. . . . The 6-1, 200-pounder was a basketball letterman with Army in 1947.

JAMES FRANCIS, Baylor
All-American linebacker in 1989 was the Houston Post's SWC MVP before becoming an NFL first-round draft choice (12th pick overall) by the Cincinnati Bengals. Registered 33 sacks and returned three of his 11 interceptions for touchdowns with the Bengals in nine years from 1990 through 1998. . . . The 6-5, 245-pounder averaged 3 ppg and 3.6 rpg in 1986-87 and 1987-88. Hit two of four field-goal attempts in a 75-60 defeat against Memphis State in the opening round of the 1988 Midwest Regional.

LAMONT FRAZIER, Missouri
In his one-season football career in 1994 after his hoop eligibility expired, he was a backup tight end. . . . Starting swingman averaged 8.2 ppg, 3.5 rpg and 3.4 apg for the Tigers' 1994 Elite Eight team that went undefeated in Big Eight Conference competition.

TED FRITSCH, Wisconsin-Stevens Point
Fullback-placekicker rushed for 2,100 yards and 31 touchdowns and kicked 36 field goals in nine seasons with the Green Bay Packers (1942 through 1950). He led the NFL in scoring in 1946 with 100 points. . . . Two-year basketball letterman for Stevens Point in 1940-41 and 1941-42.

JUSTIN GAGE, Missouri
After beginning his college football career as a quarterback, he became a wide receiver who caught a then school-record 13 passes vs. Baylor in November 2001 en route to finishing his junior campaign one reception shy of the school single-season mark of 75. Gage set new standards the next year with 16 catches against Bowling Green and 82 receptions overall for 1,075 yards and nine touchdowns before competing in the East-West Shrine Game. He was a two-time first-team All-Big 12 Conference selection who set virtually every Mizzou career receiving record, including receptions (200), receiving yards (2,704), touchdown passes (18) and consecutive games with a reception (34). Fifth-round draft choice of the Chicago Bears in 2003 had two TD receptions as a rookie. Signed with the Tennessee Titans in 2007 and promptly caught a career-high 55 passes before managing a career-high 6 TD receptions the next year. Amassed 201 receptions for 2,958 yards and 16 TDs through 2010. Had 10 receptions for 135 yards with the Titans in a 13-10 playoff loss against the Baltimore Ravens following the 2008 season. . . . Averaged 2.1 ppg and 2.9 rpg from 1999-2000 through 2001-02. Participated in two NCAA tournaments against Final Four-bound teams from the ACC.

XZAVIER GAINES, Syracuse/Northwest Missouri State
Texas product quit the Syracuse football squad--where he was the third-string quarterback as a junior--in October 2004 to focus solely on basketball. . . . Second-team All-MIAA small forward in 2005-06 after playing sparingly for the hoop Orange (two points and six rebounds in 11 games in 2002-03 and 2004-05). Member of 2003 NCAA titlist.

ARNOLD GALIFFA, Army
Member of College Football Hall of Fame was a consensus All-American selection in 1949 and finished fourth in voting for Heisman Trophy. Quarterback of Cadet teams that compiled a 31-2-3 record from 1946 through 1949. Selected in the 18th round by the Green Bay Packers in the 1950 NFL draft. Played sparingly in the NFL (New York Giants in 1953 and San Francisco 49ers in 1954) before going to the CFL. . . . Army's third-leading scorer in basketball as a freshman (6.2 points per game) and as a junior (9.1) before becoming second-leading scorer as a senior (9.2). . . . Served as an aide to Gen. Matthew Ridgeway and Gen. Mark Clark during the Korean War before becoming an executive with U.S. Steel.

BOB GAMBOLD, Washington State
Long-time assistant coach in college (Washington State, Oregon State, Stanford and Illinois) and the pros (Denver Broncos and Houston Oilers) was a quarterback with the Philadelphia Eagles in 1953. He completed 115 of 260 passes in his three-year college football career. . . . The 6-4, 195-pound forward averaged 7.4 points per game in his three-year varsity basketball career from 1948-49 through 1950-51. He was an All-PCC Northern Division selection as a senior when he led the Cougars with 9.5 ppg.

REUBEN GANT, Oklahoma State
Tight end played seven years with the Buffalo Bills after being their first-round draft choice in 1974 (18th pick overall), catching 127 passes for 1,850 yards (14.6 average) and 15 touchdowns. NFL teammate of O.J. Simpson enjoyed his best season in 1977 with 41 receptions for 646 yards. Gant was a member of team that lost to San Diego in the 1980 AFC championship game. He led OSU in receiving yards as a senior with 447 (19 receptions). . . . He averaged 1.4 points and 1.5 rebounds in 17 games for the Cowboys' basketball team in 1971-72 and 1972-73.

BOB GANTT, Duke
End is the Blue Devils' first two-time first-team All-American, pacing them in scoring in 1943. . . . He was an All-Southern Conference first-team selection on the basketball court in 1942-43.

ANTONIO GATES, Kent State
Tight end caught two touchdown passes in 2003 while starting most of his free-agent rookie season with the San Diego Chargers. The next year, he set an NFL record with 13 TD receptions by a TE. Gates was equally prolific in 2005 when the only unanimous choice to the AP All-Pro team caught 89 passes for 1,101 yards and 10 TDs. Seven-time All-Pro (consecutive seasons) managed a career-high 1,157 receiving yards in 2009 before signing a lucrative five-year, $36 million contract ($20 million guaranteed). . . . The 6-4 Gates, a Michigan State transfer, was a second-team All-MAC selection in 2002 when the Golden Flashes finished as runner-up in the South Regional (16 ppg and team-high 8.1 rpg). He moved up to first-team status the next year when he led them with 20.6 ppg and 7.7 rpg. Gates set a school single-season scoring record with 640 points as a senior.

BRUCE GEHRKE, Columbia
End caught nine passes for 109 yards and one touchdown with the New York Giants in 1948 after being their fourth-round draft choice (24th pick overall). . . . The 6-2, 190-pounder was a four-year basketball letterman, averaging 9.5 ppg as a senior. He scored nine points in two NCAA playoff games in 1948 against Kentucky and Michigan.

BRIAN GENERALOVICH, Pittsburgh
Played football with Pitt before being picked as a defensive end in drafts by the Pittsburgh Steelers (NFL) and Boston Patriots (AFL). . . . Averaged 15.5 ppg and 8.6 rpg from 1961-62 through 1963-64 before being selected by the New York Knicks in the third round of the 1964 NBA draft (19th pick overall). He led the Panthers in rebounding as a sophomore and played in the 1963 NCAA Tournament.

PETE GENT, Michigan State
Flanker and tight end caught 68 passes for 989 yards and four touchdowns in five seasons with the Dallas Cowboys from 1964 through 1968. . . . Author of several novels, including "North Dallas Forty", "The Franchise" and "The Last Magic Summer". His most recent title is "The Conquering Heroes", a cynical look at a fictional renegade college basketball program. . . . Three-time All-Big Ten Conference selection (third-team as sophomore and junior and second-team as senior) averaged 17.4 points and 8.3 rebounds per game in leading the Spartans in scoring each of his three varsity seasons from 1961-62 through 1963-64. The 6-4, 200-pound forward scored 34 points against Bowling Green State his senior year when he ranked 62nd in the country in scoring with 21.1 ppg. Excerpt from school guide: "Fine playmaker with excellent ability in shooting, driving, dribbling and passing. Hardnosed competitor."

DALE GENTRY, St. Mary's/Washington State
All-West Coast first-team selection earned All-American first-team honors by the New York Sun as an end. He played in the annual East-West Shrine Game. Following his discharge from the Navy, he played three seasons with the Los Angeles Dons (1946 through 1948). Gentry caught 74 passes for 1,001 yards and five touchdowns, earning All-Pro second-team honors his first two years. . . . The 6-3, 208-pound forward-center averaged 4 points per game in his three-year varsity basketball career. He was the Cougars' fifth-leading scorer in 1941 when the senior averaged 5.3 ppg for the NCAA Tournament runner-up.

GORHAM GETCHELL, Temple
End caught two passes for Baltimore (AAFC) in 1947. . . . The 6-4, 220-pounder was a two-year basketball letterman with the Owls in the early 1940s. Played professionally for Pittsburgh in 1946-47.

FRED GIBSON, Georgia
Fourth-round NFL draft choice by the Pittsburgh Steelers in 2005 joined the Miami Dolphins in 2006 and St. Louis Rams in 2007. Returned a kickoff for 91 yards and a touchdown against Clemson the first time he touched the ball as a college sophomore and was the second-leading receiver the next season (43 catches for 758 yards and four TDs) with 2002 team that compiled the Bulldogs' first 13-win season, first SEC title in 20 years, a Sugar Bowl victory over Florida State and a final national ranking of #3 (highest since 1980). As a freshman flanker, he became the first Georgia player ever to have four consecutive 100-yard games in receiving. Caught two first-quarter TD passes against Purdue in a 34-27 overtime victory in First Capital One Bowl following the 2003 campaign. Instrumental in helping Georgia post three straight seasons of 10 or more victories, three consecutive bowl victories and three national top six rankings in a row. Received All-SEC first-team honors as a senior when he hauled in a career-high 49 receptions. . . . The 6-4, 200-pounder averaged 4.9 ppg in 18 basketball contests in 2001-02 before appearing in four games the next year. He scored 13 points at Florida, including six in the final 51 seconds. Gibson played in two NCAA playoff games.

OLIVER GIBSON, Notre Dame
Defensive tackle was a fourth-round draft choice by the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1995. . . . Collected eight points and five rebounds in seven games for the Irish's basketball team in 1990-91. His lone field goal was a three-pointer.

JOE GILLIAM SR., West Virginia State
Head football coach for Tennessee State (20-23-1 record in four years from 1989 through 1992) after serving at TSU as a long-time assistant including when his son, Joe Jr., attended there before becoming the first African-American quarterback to start a regular-season NFL game (with the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1974). Senior previously coached Kentucky State to a 2-13-1 mark. OVC coach of the year in 1990. . . . Played football (QB) and basketball for West Virginia State after returning from a stint in the U.S. Armed Services. Teammate of Earl Lloyd, the first African-American to compete in the NBA. Gilliam averaged 8.9 ppg in 1949-50.

GEORGE GIPP, Notre Dame
Member of College Football Hall of Fame earned All-American football honors in 1919 and 1920. Held the school's rushing record for more than 50 years. . . . Legendary halfback scored 12 points in four games for the 1918-19 Irish basketball team.

ANDREW GLOVER, Grambling
Tight end with the Oakland Raiders, Minnesota Vikings and New Orleans Saints caught at least one touchdown pass each of his 10 seasons in the NFL from 1991 through 2000. Finished pro career with 208 receptions for 2,478 yards and 24 TDs. Tenth-round draft choice started every game for the Raiders in 1994. His best season was in 1998 with the Vikings when he caught 35 passes for 522 yards and five TDs. . . . Nicknamed "Poncho", the 6-6, 245-pounder averaged 9.3 ppg and 5.6 rpg from 1987-88 through 1990-91. Glover was an All-SWAC second-team selection as a senior when he led the Tigers with 16.2 ppg and 8.6 rpg and paced the league in field-goal shooting (61.1%).

JOHN "JACK" GOCKE, West Virginia
Booted one of the longest punts in school history (72 yards). He was also a righthanded pitcher responsible for more than half (18 of 31) of West Virginia's baseball victories over three seasons from 1935-37. Went on to become a physician. . . . The 6-1 Gocke became the top scorer of the first 40 years of Mountaineer basketball. The center-forward led the team in scoring as a sophomore (10.5), junior (11.6) and senior (11.9).

TONY GONZALEZ, California
After catching 53 passes for 768 yards and five touchdowns as a junior in 1996 for Cal's Aloha Bowl squad, the first-team All-America tight end declared for the NFL draft and was selected in the first round by the Kansas City Chiefs. Became the Chiefs' all-time leader in pass receptions by a tight end midway through the 2000 season en route to a league-best 1,069 for 12,463 yards and 88 TDs through 2010. In 2006, he became their all-time leader in yards from scrimmage before going to the Atlanta Falcons. Caught 70 or more passes 11 times in 12 years from 1999 through 2010, including a career-high 102 in 2004. . . . Gonzalez, who averaged 6.4 ppg and 4.3 rpg from 1994-95 through 1996-97, scored a career-high 29 points vs. Washington State en route to setting a school freshman record by shooting 64 percent from the floor. He averaged 18 points and shot 61 percent from the floor in the Bears' first two NCAA Tournament games in 1997.

EUGENE GOODLOW, Kansas State
Wide receiver caught 115 passes for 1,677 yards and 10 touchdowns with the New Orleans Saints in four years from 1983 through 1986 after being their third-round draft choice in 1982. . . . Scored 38 points in 19 games for the Wildcats' basketball squad in 1977-78 and 1978-79.

DEMETRI GOODSON, Gonzaga/Baylor
Brother of NFL running back Mike Goodson transferred to Baylor, where he became a starting cornerback in 2012. . . . He started all 35 basketball games for the Zags in 2010-11, averaging 5.2 ppg and 2.6 apg. His most memorable moment came in the 2009 NCAA playoffs when he scored on a length-of-the-court drive with .9 seconds remaining to beat Western Kentucky in the second round.

TOD GOODWIN, West Virginia
End caught 33 passes for 511 yards and six touchdowns with the New York Giants in 1935 and 1936. The 6-0, 180-pounder led the NFL with 26 pass receptions as a rookie. . . . He was a basketball letterman in 1933.

JOHN GOODYEAR, Marquette
Back was an eighth-round draft choice by the Washington Redskins in 1942. . . . The 6-0, 190-pounder was a basketball letterman in the early 1940s.

KELVIN GRADY, Michigan
Slot receiver had a brother, Kevin, who was a running back for the Wolverines. On October 17, 2009, they became the first pair of brothers to score a touchdown in the same game for Michigan as far as could be determined by the school's record books. The next year, Kelvin had a career-long 43-yard reception and career-long 15-yard rush against Massachusetts en route to catching 17 passes for 211 yards. . . . Kelvin started as a 5-9 point guard most of his freshman season in 2007-08 before his minutes were drastically reduced as a sophomore the next campaign when the Wolverines reached the NCAA Tournament for the first time in 11 years.

JIMMY GRAHAM, Miami (Fla.)
Tight end selected in the third round of 2010 NFL draft (95th pick overall) by the New Orleans Saints managed five TD receptions as a rookie. In 2009, he had five TDs in his lone football season with the Hurricanes. . . . Graham started at least nine games each of his four seasons as a forward (4.2 ppg and 4.2 rpg while shooting 50.8% from the floor from 2005-06 through 2008-09), finishing his career among the school's all-time Top 10 in blocked shots with 104.

MILT GRAHAM, Colgate
Tackle played with the Boston Patriots for three years from 1961 through 1963 after competing in the Canadian Football League with the Ottawa Rough Riders (CFL All-Star in 1958 and member of Grey Cup championship team in 1960). He had been selected as an end by the Chicago Bears in the 14th round of the 1956 NFL draft. . . . The 6-6, 235-pound center averaged 8.7 ppg and 9.9 rpg from 1953-54 through 1955-56. He led the team with 9.8 rpg as a sophomore and was team captain as a senior.

OTTO GRAHAM, Northwestern
Member of College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame. Quarterback earned All-American honors and finished third in Heisman Trophy voting as a senior in 1943. First-round draft choice of the Detroit Lions in 1944 (4th pick overall). Played 10 seasons (1946 through 1955) with the Cleveland Browns and quarterbacked team to championship game each year (All-America Football Conference from 1946 through 1949 and NFL from 1950 through 1955). Compiled a 105-17-4 playing record in regular-season pro competition, completing 1,464 of 2,626 passes for 23,584 yards and 174 touchdowns. Five-time Pro Bowl selection (1951 through 1955). Compiled a 17-22-3 record as coach of the Washington Redskins in three years from 1966 through 1968. . . . Played three seasons of varsity basketball, finishing second in the Big Ten in scoring as a sophomore (13.1 points per game) and as a junior (15.8). The 6-0 forward earned second-team All-Big Ten honors in 1941-42 and first five honors in 1942-43. Also played for Colgate as a senior. NCAA consensus first-team All-American in 1944 and second-team All-America in 1943. Left Northwestern with the highest scoring total in school history with more than 600 points. Played one season with the Rochester Royals in the National Basketball League, averaging 5.2 points per game for the 1945-46 squad that won the NBL title.

RALPH GRAHAM, Kansas State
Fullback was a starter in 1934 East-West Shrine Game and held K-State's career scoring record for 64 years. Football coach at Wichita State and his alma mater compiled a 21-39-1 record. . . . Three-year basketball letterman from 1932 through 1934 became the chief assistant for Branch McCracken's national championship basketball team at Indiana in 1940.

HARRY "BUD" GRANT, Minnesota
Former NFL and CFL end and coach. First-round choice by the Philadelphia Eagles in the 1950 NFL draft. Played with Philadelphia in 1951 and 1952 and Winnipeg of the CFL from 1953 through 1956. Caught 272 passes for 4,197 yards and 20 touchdowns in six pro seasons, leading the CFL in pass receptions in 1953 (with 68), 1954 (49) and 1956 (63). Coached Winnipeg in the CFL (1957-66) and Minnesota in the NFL (1967-85). Coach of four CFL champions and four NFL Super Bowl teams. . . . Third-leading scorer for the Gophers' basketball squad in 1948-49 (8.5 points per game) after being named team MVP the previous season over first-team All-American Jim McIntyre. Finished 13th in the Big Ten Conference in scoring in 1946-47 with a 9.3 average. Played two seasons in the NBA, including a rookie year when he was a member of the Lakers' 1950 championship team.

JACK GRAY, Texas
All-SWC end's recovery of a Notre Dame fumble on the opening kickoff set up the Longhorns' 7-6 victory in 1934. . . . NCAA consensus All-American as a senior averaged 13 ppg from 1932-33 through 1934-35. Coached his alma mater to a 194-97 record (.667) in 12 seasons from 1936-37 through 1941-42 and 1945-46 through 1950-51. The Longhorns finished third in the 1947 NCAA Tournament with a 26-2 mark.

DAVE GRAYBILL, Arizona State
Quarterback was an All-Border Conference selection as a junior in 1955 when he completed 60.6% of his passes, including nine touchdowns, and rushed for seven more TDs. The next year, he again led the team in passing. . . . Three-year letterman in basketball was a forward who led ASU in scoring average in 1954-55 (17.7 ppg) and 1955-56 (15 ppg).

MIKE GRAYBILL, Boston University
Offensive tackle was a seventh-round draft choice of the Cleveland Browns in 1989. . . . The 6-7, 270-pounder collected 26 points and 22 rebounds in 29 basketball games in 1984-85 and 1985-86.

CHARLIE GREEN, Wittenberg (Ohio)
Quarterback played briefly with the Oakland Raiders in 1966 after being chosen in the 13th round of the NFL draft the previous year by the Boston Patriots. . . . Averaged 3.7 points and two rebounds per game for Wittenberg's 26-2 team that finished runner-up to South Dakota State in the 1963 NCAA Division II Tournament. The next season, he averaged 7.6 points and 2.8 rebounds per game for a squad that compiled an 18-5 record.

CORNELL GREEN, Utah State
Intercepted 34 passes in 13 years as a defensive back with the Dallas Cowboys (1962 through 1974). Brother of Boston Red Sox infielder Pumpsie Green played in five Pro Bowl games and two Super Bowls (V and VI). . . . Finished his three-year varsity career as Utah State's all-time leading scorer with 1,890 points. The 6-4 forward led the Aggies in scoring with 21.2 points per game in 1959-60 (34th in the nation), 20.3 in 1960-61 (57th) and 25.6 in 1961-62 (13th). Held under 10 points only once in college career and scored 46 against New Mexico on March 3, 1962. The school's all-time leading rebounder set a single-season record with 403 boards in 1959-60. Helms Foundation second-team All-American as a senior, when he averaged 24.3 points per game in three NCAA Tournament contests and was named to the All-West Regional team. Review of his career in school guide: "He had an array of moves and shots that ranged from quick reverse pivots under the hoop to overpowering physical strength as a rebounder and tap shot artist."

TOM GREENFIELD, Arizona
Center-linebacker for three years from 1939 through 1941 with the Green Packers. The 13th-round draft choice recovered a fumble for a touchdown as a rookie. . . . Basketball letterman with the Wildcats in 1937 and 1938.

CHARLIE GREER, Colorado
Defensive back intercepted 17 passes, recovered six fumbles and returned 55 punts for 426 yards with the Denver Broncos in seven years from 1968 through 1974 after being their 13th-round draft choice. Led the Buffaloes in punt returns his last three seasons, including a 59-yard touchdown as a senior. Registered eight tackles in a 31-21 victory over Miami (Fla.) in the 1967 Bluebonnet Bowl. . . . The 6-0, 200-pound reserve guard collected 13 points and five rebounds in seven games for the Buffaloes in 1965-66 as a sophomore.

BOB GRIESE, Purdue
TV analyst and member of College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame. Quarterback played 14 seasons (1967 through 1980) with the Miami Dolphins, completing 1,926 of 3,429 passes for 25,093 yards and 192 touchdowns. The first-round draft choice was an eight-time Pro Bowl selection and played in three Super Bowls. . . . As a 6-1, 185-pound sophomore guard in 1964-65, he scored 22 points in 16 games in his only varsity basketball season with the Boilermakers. "I always loved basketball, but it was impossible to do justice to both sports," Griese said.

HAL GRIGGS, Butler
Back rushed for two touchdowns with Akron in 1926. . . . The 5-10, 170-pounder was a three-year basketball letterman who was captain as a senior in 1925.

GEORGE GRIMES, Virginia
Back-punter was sixth-round draft choice by the Los Angeles Rams in 1948. The 5-11, 190-pounder caught a 17-yard touchdown pass, intercepted one pass for 26 yards and punted for a 35.9-yard average with the Detroit Lions in 1948. . . . He was a basketball letterman in 1943.

JACK GROSSMAN, Rutgers
Back completed 21 passes for 374 yards and one touchdown, rushed for 646 yards and four TDs, caught 23 passes for 356 yards and four TDs, caught 23 passes for 356 yards and four TDs, and returned a punt for a TD with Brooklyn in three years from 1932 to 1935. . . . The 6-1, 190-pounder was a two-year basketball letterman in the early 1930s.

ROGER GROVE, Michigan State
Back rushed for 308 yards and one touchdown, caught 32 passes for 489 yards and six TDs and threw for two TDs with the Green Bay Packers in five years from 1931 through 1935. . . . The 6-0, 180-pound forward led the Spartans' basketball team in scoring in 1929-30 and 1930-31.

CHUCK GUARNIERI, Niagara
The 5-10, 175-pound end caught two touchdown passes for Buffalo in 1924. . . . Basketball letterman in the early 1920s.

GREGG GUENTHER, Southern California
Tight end with the Tennessee Titans in 2005. Seven-time starter on USC's 2003 national championship team had one reception in the Rose Bowl. In 2002, he caught a TD pass from Heisman Trophy winner Carson Palmer against UCLA. Rejoined Palmer with the Cincinnati Bengals in 2006. . . . Part-time starter averaged 6 ppg and 4.9 rpg in 2002-03 and 2003-04. The 6-8, 250-pounder started the second half of the Trojans' 2002 NCAA playoff first-round game against UNC Wilmington.

LORENZO GUESS, Michigan State
Assistant strength and conditioning coach for his alma mater after serving on staffs at Cincinnati, South Florida and Notre Dame. Safety recorded 111 career tackles and five interceptions. Helped MSU defeat Florida in 2000 Citrus Bowl and Fresno State in 2001 Silicon Valley Bowl. . . . Collected 19 points and 11 rebounds in 28 games in 1997-98 and 1998-99. Scored two points against Mount St. Mary's in opener of 1999 NCAA tourney for eventual Final Four squad after playing one minute in 1998 playoff opener against Eastern Michigan.

MERLE GULICK, Toledo/Hobart (N.Y.)
Inducted into College Football Hall of Fame in 1965. . . . Captain of both Hobart's football and basketball squads in the late 1920s.

HARRY GUNNER, Oregon State
Defensive end recorded a safety as a rookie with the Cincinnati Bengals in 1968 after being their eighth-round draft choice. The next year, he returned an interception for 70 yards and a touchdown with the Bengals. The 6-6, 250-pounder played for the Chicago Bears in 1970. . . . Junior college transfer averaged 4.4 ppg and 4.5 rpg with the Beavers. He shared OSU's Paul Valenti Award in 1966, given annually to the player who displays the most desire and determination. Grabbed a total of five rebounds in two NCAA playoff games in 1966 against Houston and Utah.

ED GUSTAFSON, Dartmouth/George Washington
Center-linebacker with Brooklyn (AAFC) for two years in 1947 and 1948. . . . The 6-3, 205-pounder was a three-year basketball letterman with GWU in the mid-1940s.

HARLAN GUSTAFSON, Penn
End scored three touchdowns in 1939 when he was team captain. Participated in Blue-Gray All-Star Classic. . . . Accounted for 109 points in basketball from 1937-38 through 1939-40.

FRANK GUSTINE JR., Pittsburgh
Part-time starting quarterback for the Panthers in the 1960s. . . . Son of All-Star infielder with the Pittsburgh Pirates three straight years in the late 1940s earned a basketball letter with Pitt in 1967-68 when he collected 13 points and 10 rebounds in 13 games.

DALE HACKBART, Wisconsin
Safety returned four of his 19 career interceptions for touchdowns in 12 NFL seasons (1960 through 1963 and 1966 through 1973) with the Green Bay Packers, Washington Redskins, Minnesota Vikings, St. Louis Cardinals and Denver Broncos. Fifth-round draft choice played in Super Bowl IV with Minnesota. College quarterback led the Badgers in passing and rushing as they competed in the 1960 Rose Bowl. . . . Averaged 4 points and 3.5 rebounds per game in 10 contests for Wisconsin's basketball team in the 1958-59 season.

RUDOLPH "SWEDE" HALBERG, West Virginia
Back caught three touchdown passes for Buffalo in 1929 and returned an interception for a TD with Brooklyn in 1930. . . . The 6-4, 215-pounder was a three-year basketball letterman in the late 1920s.

HINKEY HAINES, Penn State
Back returned two punts for touchdowns, passed for one TD, rushed for 14 TDs and had TD receptions with the New York Giants and Staten Island in six years from 1925 to 1931. . . . The 5-10, 170-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1920 and 1921.

GEORGE HALAS, Illinois
Member of Pro Football Hall of Fame compiled a 324-151-31 record as an NFL coach, guiding the Chicago Bears to seven NFL titles. His 40-year NFL coaching career also included stints with the Decatur/Chicago Staleys. MVP of the 1919 Rose Bowl as an end for Great Lakes. . . . The 6-0, 175-pound Halas, known for his gritty defense, was a starting guard for the Illini team that won the Big Ten basketball title in 1916-17 with a 10-2 record. He was captain of the squad the next season before entering the armed forces in mid-January. He was also an outfielder in 12 games for the New York Yankees in 1919.

ROSS HALES, Indiana
Tight end had 51 receptions for 580 yards and two touchdowns in 1992 and 1993, catching a 34-yard pass in the second quarter of a 45-20 loss against Virginia Tech in the 1993 Independence Bowl. . . . The 6-7 Hales collected 3 points and 4 rebounds in 13 basketball games under coach Bob Knight in 1993-94, making a token appearance in the Hoosiers' 67-58 second-round victory over Temple in the NCAA playoffs.

DALE HALL, Army
Successor to legendary Red Blaik as football coach at Army. Compiled 4-4-1, 6-3-1 and 6-4 records from 1959 through 1961. Also coached New Hampshire and was an assistant for Purdue and Florida. . . . Named college basketball player of the year by The Sporting News in 1943-44 when he was the leading scorer (18.2 points per game) for a Cadet team that compiled a 15-0 record and was ranked No. 1 in the nation by the Dick Dunkel rankings. The next season as a senior, he was the team scoring leader (14.2 ppg) for a 14-1 squad. NCAA consensus second-team All-American in 1944 and 1945. Recipient of the Army Athletic Association trophy presented annually to the man who renders "the most valuable service to athletics during his cadet career."

PETE HALL, Marquette
End was a 12th-round draft choice by the New York Giants in 1960. The 6-2, 200-pounder caught two passes for them the next year. . . . He collected a total of 20 points and 13 rebounds in 17 basketball games in 1957-58 and 1958-59.

STEVE HAMAS, Penn State
Back with the Orange Tornadoes in 1929. . . . The 6-0, 195-pounder was a three-year basketball letterman in the late 1920s.

RAY HAMILTON, Arkansas
End was a sixth-round draft choice of the Cleveland Browns in 1938. He caught 40 passes for 688 yards and two touchdowns with the Browns, Detroit Lions and Los Angeles Rams in six years from 1938 to 1947. . . . The 6-4, 210-pounder was a basketball letterman from 1936 through 1938, including two SWC champions.

CHUCK HANNEMAN, Eastern Michigan
End-placekicker caught 35 passes for 618 yards and four touchdowns with Detroit and Cleveland in five years from 1937 through 1941. The 6-0, 220-pounder also rushed for a TD as a rookie. . . . Hanneman was a basketball letterman for three years in the mid-1930s.

VIC HANSON, Syracuse
Consensus All-American end in 1926 served as head football coach at his alma mater from 1930 through 1936, compiling a 33-21-5 record, including a 7-1-1 mark in 1931. . . . Forward was named to Helms Athletic Foundation 10-man All-American basketball teams selected in 1943 for the 1924-25, 1925-26 and 1926-27 seasons. Naismith Memorial Hall of Famer was designated college basketball player of the year by Helms in his senior season.

WAYNE HARDIN, Pacific
Head football coach at U.S. Naval Academy (38-22-2 record from 1959 through 1964) and Temple (80-50-3 from 1970 through 1982) directed both schools to bowl games. Coached Heisman Trophy winner Roger Staubach in 1963 when Navy finished second in the nation in the final AP poll with a 9-2 record. . . . Letterman on four Pacific basketball teams scored a total of 78 points in his last two seasons in 1947-48 and 1948-49.

CHARLIE HARDY, San Jose State
Wide receiver caught 54 passes for seven touchdowns with the AFL's Oakland Raiders from 1960 through 1962. . . . He was a 6-0, 180-pound guard who collected six points and five rebounds in nine basketball games for the Spartans in 1954-55.

JAMES HARDY, Indiana
Second-round pick of the Buffalo Bills in 2008 NFL draft (41st pick overall) had two touchdown receptions among his nine catches in five games as a rookie. The only wide receiver in IU history to surpass 2,500 yards, 175 receptions and 35 touchdowns. Second-team All-Big Ten Conference selection as a freshman in 2005 when he caught 61 passes for 893 yards and 10 touchdowns, including a career-high 12 receptions for 203 yards at Iowa. First player in school history to catch at least one TD pass in six straight games. As a sophomore in 2006, he led IU with 51 catches for 722 yards and 10 TDs, including a school-record four TDs against Michigan State. In 2007, he set school season-records with 79 receptions for 1,125 yards and 16 receiving TDs (2nd in the nation). . . . The 6-6 Hardy started three basketball games for the Hoosiers in 2004-05 when he averaged 1.7 ppg and 1.8 rpg.

KEVIN HARDY, Notre Dame
Defensive end and tackle for four seasons (1968 through 1972) in the NFL with three different teams (San Francisco 49ers, Green Bay Packers and San Diego Chargers). First-round draft choice of the New Orleans Saints (7th pick overall). Two-time All-American with the Irish, including 1966 as a junior on the school's national championship football team. . . . The 6-5, 260-pound forward-center averaged 2.1 points and 2.3 rebounds per game in his lone basketball season (1964-65).

CHARLES "CHIC" HARLEY, Ohio State
Halfback passed for three touchdowns with the Chicago Staleys in 1921. . . . The 5-8, 165-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1920 with the Buckeyes.

TOM HARMON, Michigan
Two-time consensus All-American halfback won Heisman Trophy in 1940. First pick overall in the 1941 NFL draft by the Chicago Bears. Rushed for 542 yards and five touchdowns, including an 84-yard jaunt, in two seasons (1946 and 1947) with the Los Angeles Rams following World War II military service. . . . Averaged 7.6 points per game as a sophomore in 1938-39 and led the Wolverines in scoring in five contests. Posted 2.5-point average the next year as a junior. Michigan coach Bennie Oosterbaan said Harmon "had a great fake and cut, a great shot, and aggressiveness."

JAMES HARRIS, Temple
Defensive end played five years from 1993 through 1996 and 1998 with the Minnesota Vikings, St. Louis Rams and Oakland Raiders. The 6-6, 265-pounder recovered a fumble for a touchdown and intercepted a pass for 21 yards with the playoff-bound Vikings in 1994. . . . Went scoreless while playing 14 minutes in four games for the Owls' basketball squad in 1988-89 under coach John Chaney.

HOWARD HARTLEY, Duke
Defensive back intercepted 28 passes, recovered eight fumbles and returned 35 punts for a 9.7-yard average with the Washington Redskins and Pittsburgh Steelers in five years from 1948 through 1952. . . . The 6-0, 185-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1944.

JOEY HAWKINS, Texas Tech
Tight end with the Indianapolis Colts' practice squad in 2006 after playing in NFL Europe with Cologne. Also played in the Arena League. After transferring from Southeast Missouri State, he caught 17 passes for 214 yards under coach Mike Leach from 2002 through 2004. Had two receptions for 17 yards in Holiday Bowl victory over #4 California as a senior. . . . The 6-9 Hawkins collected 11 points and 6 rebounds, hitting five of eight field-goal attempts, in 15 games in 2004-05 under coach Bob Knight.

ROBERT HAYGOOD, Pittsburgh
Starting quarterback for 1976 national championship team until sustaining an early-season knee injury against Georgia Tech. Member of coach Johnny Majors' first recruiting class that included Hall of Famer Tony Dorsett and turned Pitt's program around. Offensive MVP in the 1975 Sun Bowl after leading the Panthers in passing. . . . The 6-0 Haygood scored 23 points in sixs games in 1974-75 (making 10 of 16 field-goal attempts and 3 of 4 free throws.

JOE HAYNES, Tulsa
Offensive lineman played with Buffalo (AAFC) in 1947. . . . The 6-3, 225-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1946 and 1947.

TODD HEAP, Arizona State
Two-time Pro Bowl tight end caught 467 passes for 5,492 yards and 41 touchdowns with the Baltimore Ravens in his first 10 seasons through 2010. Only TE in the NFL to lead his team in receptions in 2002 with 68. Managed even more catches in 2005 (75) and 2006 (73). First-round draft choice as an undergraduate (31st pick overall in 2001). ASU's career leader for tight ends (115 receptions and 1,685 yards) led the team in receiving in 1999 (55 catches) and 2000 (48) as an All-Pacific-10 Conference selection. . . . The 6-5, 250-pounder grabbed 14 rebounds in 11 games for the Sun Devils in 1999-2000.

CHARLES HEILEMAN, Iowa State
Fifth-round draft choice by the Chicago Bears in 1939. . . . The 6-2, 195-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1937.

MEL HEIN, Washington State
Hall of Fame charter member played with the New York Giants for 15 years from 1931 through 1945. In 1994, Hein was named to the NFL's all-time 75-year anniversary team. Eight-time All-NFL center scored a touchdown in 1938 when he was named the league's MVP. In college, he intercepted eight passes in a game against Idaho. . . . The 6-2, 220-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1930 after leading WSU to a Rose Bowl bid. He was supervisor of officials for the American Football Conference of the NFL until his retirement.

BOB HENDREN, Culver Stockton (Mo.)/Southern California
Tackle played with the Washington Redskins from 1949 through 1951. . . . The 6-8, 240-pounder was a basketball letterman for the Trojans in 1947.

MANNY HENDRIX, Utah
Defensive back had two interceptions with the Dallas Cowboys during his six seasons from 1986 through 1991. He had a safety in 1991 when the Cowboys were eliminated in the second round of the NFL playoffs by the Detroit Lions. . . . Utes letterman from 1983 through 1986 averaged 12.1 ppg and led them in assists with 5.1 per game as a sophomore. All-WAC second-team selection in 1986 along with Wyoming sophomores Fennis Dembo and Eric Leckner. The 5-10, 180-pound guard finished his career as the seventh-leading scorer in school history. Hendrix averaged 9.5 points in four NCAA Tournament games in 1983 and 1986.

GARNEY HENLEY, Huron (S.D.)
Canadian Football League Hall of Famer was an all-star selection for 10 consecutive years from 1963 through 1972. He was the CFL's Most Valuable Player in 1972 after switching from defensive back to flanker. Henley, who had 59 career interceptions, was a 15th-round choice by the Green Bay Packers in the 1960 NFL draft. . . . The 6-0, 180-pounder was an All-South Dakota Intercollegiate Conference selection in basketball while also excelling in track.

JOEY HENLEY, Sacred Heart (Conn.)
Caught a team-high 31 passes, including five touchdowns, as a sophomore in 2004. The 6-5, 210-pounder had three TDs and 76-yard reception in ankle injury-shortened 2005 campaign. Added 29 receptions with three TDs in 2006. Also ran on the outdoor track and field team competing in the jumps and hurdles. . . . Named to the Northeast Conference All-Rookie Team in 2003-04 before earning all-league second-team status the next season when he led the Pioneers in scoring (12.3 ppg) and rebounding (5.7 rpg). Second-leading scorer (11.1 ppg) and third-leading rebounder (4.5 rpg) as a junior in 2006-07. All-league first-team selection as a senior in 2008-09 when he led the conference in field-goal shooting (62.6%).

BOB HERWIG, California
All-American center played for Cal's "Thunder Teams," including the 1937 squad that finished 10-0-1 and claimed the national title after defeating Alabama, 13-0, in the Rose Bowl. He was inducted into the National Football Foundation Hall of Fame in 1964. . . . Captain of Cal's basketball team in the mid-1930s.

JESSE HIBBS, Southern California
Tackle played for the Chicago Bears in 1931. . . . The 6-0, 195-pounder was a two-year basketball letterman with the Trojans in 1926 and 1927.

HOWARD "RED" HICKEY, Arkansas
Coach of San Francisco 49ers (1959 through 1963) after playing end with the Pittsburgh Steelers and Cleveland/Los Angeles Rams for five years (1941 and 1945 through 1948). Sixth-round draft choice finished sixth in the NFL in pass receptions in 1941. Member of the Rams' 1945 NFL title team finished his pro career with 75 receptions for 1,378 yards and 16 touchdowns. . . . The 6-2, 195-pound guard was a second-team All-Southwest Conference choice as a sophomore and junior and a first-team selection as a senior. He was a member of the 1941 team that won the SWC title with a 12-0 record, finished 20-3 overall and reached the Final Four in its NCAA Tournament debut.

HARLON HILL, Florence State (Ala.)
Three-time Pro Bowl selection end caught 233 passes for 4,717 yards and 40 touchdowns with the Chicago Bears, Pittsburgh Steelers and Detroit Lions in nine years from 1954 through 1962. Fifteenth-round draft choice led the league in touchdown receptions (12) and average yards per reception (25) as a rookie with the Bears. . . . Basketball letterman in 1951 for a school that is now known as North Alabama.

KING HILL, Rice
All-American in 1957 when he led the SWC in total offense (1,244 yards; 798 passing and 446 rushing) and scoring (five touchdowns and 17-22 PATs), directing the Owls to the Cotton Bowl. Backup quarterback with the Chicago/St. Louis Cardinals, Philadelphia Eagles and Minnesota Vikings for 12 years from 1958 through 1969. First selection overall in the NFL draft as a bonus pick had a career-high 10 touchdown passes in 1963. . . . Basketball letterman in 1955-56 when he was fourth on the team in rebounds with 116. The 6-3 Hill averaged 5.4 ppg and 2.6 rpg the next season.

NICK HILL, Western Kentucky/Southern Illinois
Lefthanded quarterback threw four touchdown passes as the Division I-AA Salukis won at Indiana, 35-28, in 2006 to become the first Gateway Conference team to defeat a Big Ten Conference member. Became the first SIU QB to surpass 3,000 yards passing in a single season in 2007 when the Salukis reached the Football Championship Subdivision semifinals before bowing to Joe Flacco-led Delaware, 20-17. Signed as a free agent by the Chicago Bears but was released during training camp. . . . The 6-3 Hill averaged 1.7 ppg and 1 rpg for WKU in 2003-04 before transferring back to his home state.

SAM HIPA, Dayton
End played for the Dayton Triangles in 1927 and 1928. . . . The 5-11, 165-pounder was a basketball letterman for the Flyers in the mid-1920s.

ELROY "CRAZY LEGS" HIRSCH, Wisconsin/Michigan
Member of College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame. First-round draft choice by Cleveland in 1945 (5th pick overall). Played halfback, defensive back and offensive end as a pro with the Chicago Rockets of the All-America Football Conference from 1946 through 1948 and Los Angeles Rams of the NFL from 1949 through 1957. Caught 387 passes and scored 66 touchdowns as a pro. Played in four NFL championship games. Held the Rams' team record for most touchdown receptions for almost 40 years until it was broken by Isaac Bruce in 2001. . . . Starting center for the Wolverines' basketball team in 1944 while undergoing military training there. Sketch in Michigan guide: "Naval transfer from Wisconsin was a big aid, chiefly through his flaming competitive spirit."

CHARLIE HOAG, Kansas
Earned three letters in football with the Jayhawks before his career ended because of a severe knee injury. He was a running back and captain of the '52 football squad and 26th-round draft choice of the Cleveland Browns in 1953. . . . Swingman was one of seven Kansas players chosen for the 1952 U.S. Olympic basketball team that captured a gold medal in Helsinki after the Jayhawks won the NCAA title. Averaged 3.7 ppg and 2 rpg in 1950-51 and 4.7 ppg and 2.8 rpg in 1951-52.

BOBBY HODGES, East Carolina
The 6-6, 225-pounder was an NAIA All-American in both sports (football end and basketball center). Set a school single-season record with 10 touchdown receptions in football as a senior in 1953. . . . ECU's all-time leading scorer with 2,018 points was an eighth-round draft choice by the NBA's Philadelphia Warriors in 1954.

PAUL HOGAN, Niagara
Passed for three touchdowns with the Canton Bulldogs in 1925 and rushed for one TD with the Chicago Cardinals in 1927. . . . The 5-8, 170-pounder was a basketball letterman with Niagara in 1920 and 1921.

STEVE HOFUF, Nebraska
Back threw three touchdown passes, rushed for 179 yards and caught nine passes with Boston in three years from 1933 through 1935. . . . The 6-0, 195-pounder was a basketball letterman for three years the first half of the 1930s.

DON HOLLEDER, Army
All-American end for team that led the nation in total offense in 1954 (averaged 29.1 yards per catch; five of his 17 receptions were for touchdowns). Made a controversial switch to quarterback the next season when he threw six TD passes. College Football Hall of Famer was the consummate team player who graced the cover of SI the week after a vindicating victory over archrival Navy. . . . Three-year basketball letterman from 1953-54 through 1955-56. The 6-2 forward averaged 9.3 ppg as a junior and 6.8 ppg as a senior. . . . He was a major during the Vietnam War in October, 1967, when he was killed by a sniper's bullet in an ambush 40 miles from Saigon as he hurled himself into enemy fire attempting to rescue wounded comrades.

PAUL HORNUNG, Notre Dame
Member of College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame earned All-American honors as a quarterback in 1955 and 1956. Only Heisman Trophy winner to play for a losing team (2-8 as a senior). First pick overall in the NFL draft as a bonus selection. Played nine seasons as a halfback/placekicker with the Green Bay Packers, leading the NFL in scoring in 1959, 1960 and 1961. He rushed for 3,711 yards and 50 touchdowns and caught 130 passes for 1,480 yards and 12 touchdowns. Played in five NFL championship games and two Pro Bowls (1960 and 1961). . . . Played varsity basketball for the Irish as a sophomore, averaging 6.1 points per game in 10 contests. Wrote Hornung in his autobiography Golden Boy: "(Coach Johnny) Jordan liked to tip a few, and sometimes, on the road, he'd take me out drinking with him. He could do that because I wasn't on basketball scholarship."

JOE HOWARD, Notre Dame
Wide receiver hooked up with Blair Keil on a school-record 96-yard touchdown pass in a 35-3 victory over Georgia Tech in 1982. Caught 85 passes for 1,663 yards and seven TDs while returning 47 punts for 344 yards from 1981 through 1984. . . . Part-time starter for NIT runner-up in 1983-84 when he averaged 5.5 ppg and 3.3 apg.

PERCY HOWARD, Austin Peay State
Wide receiver failed to catch a pass in eight regular-season games for the Dallas Cowboys in 1975, but caught a 34-yard touchdown pass from Roger Staubach for their final TD in a 21-17 loss to the Pittsburgh Steelers in Super Bowl X. . . . All-Ohio Valley Conference selection as a senior averaged 12.4 points and 7.3 rebounds per game in three varsity seasons (1972-73 through 1974-75) for the Governors as a 6-4, 215-pound forward. He averaged seven points and seven rebounds per game in four NCAA Tournament contests in 1973 and 1974 as a teammate of the celebrated James "Fly" Williams.

RON HOWARD, Seattle
Tight end caught 72 passes for 850 yards and two TDs with the Dallas Cowboys, Seattle Seahawks and Buffalo Bills in six years from 1974 through 1979. The 6-4, 225-pound Howard played in Super Bowl X for the Cowboys before he was selected by the Seahawks in the 1976 expansion draft. Caught the TD pass that gave Seattle its first win, a three-yard reception from Jim Zorn with 13 seconds remaining to beat San Diego in a preseason contest. Howard caught 37 passes in the Seahawks' inaugural campaign, a team record for tight ends that wasn't broken until 2002. . . . Forward averaged 9.2 ppg and 6.5 rpg with the Chieftains from 1971-72 through 1973-74 when they competed at the NCAA Division I level. Co-captain of the team as a senior after ranking second in WCAC competition in free-throw shooting (83.9%) the previous season.

JIM LEE HOWELL, Arkansas
New York Giants end (1937 through 1942 and 1946 through 1948) and head coach (53-27-4 in seven years from 1954 through 1960). Started for them in four NFL championship games, including the 1938 titlist. Pro Bowl participant in 1939 caught 61 passes for 921 yards and seven touchdowns. Coach of Giants team that routed the Chicago Bears, 47-7, in 1956 NFL title game. Also guided New York to 1958 and 1959 NFL championship games. Vince Lombardi was his offensive coordinator and Tom Landry was his defensive coordinator. . . . A 6-5, 200-pounder, he was named to the first five on the All-Southwest Conference team in his senior season (1935-36) as a member of an Arkansas squad that won the league title, compiled a 24-3 record and participated in the U.S. Olympic basketball trials.

WESLEY "BUD" HUBBARD, San Jose State
End caught three passes for 99 yards and one touchdown with Brooklyn in 1935. . . . The 6-0, 190-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1934.

VERN HUFFMAN, Indiana
Quarterback-defensive back passed for 484 yards and rushed for 368 yards with the Detroit Lions in 1937 and 1938. Third-round draft choice (27th pick overall) scored one touchdown and passed for two touchdowns each season. . . . The 6-2, 215-pound guard was a two-time All-Big Ten Conference basketball selection (first-team pick in 1935-36 and second-team choice in 1936-37).

HARRY HUGASIAN, Stanford
Back was a 21st-round draft choice by the Dallas Texans in 1952. The 6-1, 190-pounder rushed 12 times for 34 yards and caught three passes for 32 yards with the Baltimore Colts in 1955. . . . He was a basketball letterman in 1950.

BILL HULL, Wake Forest
All-ACC defensive end was a third-round pick of the NFL's Chicago Bears in 1962 (35th pick overall), but chose to play with the AFL's Dallas Texans after being their fifth-round selection. In his only pro season, the 6-6, 245-pounder intercepted a pass and returned it 23 yards to help set up the game-winning field goal in overtime of a 20-17 victory over Houston in the AFL championship game. . . . Hull was a forward for the 1962 Wake Forest squad that finished third in the NCAA Tournament. The first athlete in ACC history to start in both football and basketball finished among the Demon Deacons' all-time leading rebounders and ranked 10th in the nation in field-goal shooting in 1961 (55.3 percent). He averaged 6.5 points and 7.3 rebounds per game in his two varsity seasons.

VIVIAN HULTMAN, Michigan State
End caught three touchdown passes with Detroit and Pottsville in three years from 1925 through 1927. . . . Basketball letterman in 1923.

DICK HUMBERT, Richmond
Offensive end-defensive back with the Philadelphia Eagles for six years in 1941 and from 1945 through 1949. All-Pro selection as a rookie. The 6-1, 180-pounder had six touchdowns among his 68 pass receptions and contributed 14 interceptions. . . . Three-year basketball starter captained the team as a senior when he averaged 7.4 points per game.

BERT INGWERSEN, Illinois
Tackle for Decatur Staleys in 1920. . . . The 5-11, 180-pounder was a three-year basketball letterman from 1918 through 1920.

BRAD JACKSON, Cincinnati
Third-round draft choice of the Miami Dolphins in 1998 played three years with the Baltimore Ravens before joining the Carolina Panthers in 2002. Linebacker led Conference USA in tackles as a senior. . . . Member of the Bearcats' basketball team for the first month of the 1997-98 campaign, collecting 10 points and 10 rebounds in 11 games.

VINCENT JACKSON, Northern Colorado
Wide receiver, a second-round draft choice (61st pick overall) by the San Diego Chargers in 2005, caught 212 passes for 3,648 yards and 28 TDs in his first six seasons. Named to his first Pro Bowl following the 2009 campaign when he ranked fourth in the league in yards per reception for the second straight year. . . . The 6-5, 230-pounder led UNC in scoring with 13.6 ppg in 2003-04 while also contributing 5.6 rpg and 3.1 apg. The previous year, he averaged 10.6 ppg and 3.8 rpg.

WILLIE JACKSON, Florida
Wide receiver-kick returner was a fourth-round draft choice by the Dallas Cowboys in 1994. The 6-1, 205-pounder caught 103 passes for 1,281 yards and 10 touchdowns with the Jacksonville Jaquars in three years from 1995 through 1997 before catching seven passes for 165 yards with the Cincinnati Bengals in 1998. . . . Started five basketball games for the Gators in 1989-90 when he averaged 2.9 ppg and 2.1 rpg.

JACK JENKINS, Vanderbilt
Fullback-linebacker rushed for one touchdown and intercepted four passes for the Washington Redskins in three years with them after being their first-round draft choice in 1943 (10th pick overall). SEC Most Valuable Player in 1941. . . . The 6-1, 205-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1941 and 1942.

8BERT JOHNSON, Kentucky
The halfback-punter, a fifth-round draft choice, scored five touchdowns (two rushing and three receiving) with Brooklyn, Chicago Bears, Chicago Cardinals and Philadelphia Eagles in six years from 1937 through 1942. Nicknamed "Man O' War" at UK, his personal college highlight came in 1934 when he scored two TDs against Alabama--one on a 69-yard run. The Crimson Tide allowed only three other TDs in an unbeaten season and went on to win the Rose Bowl. . . . The 6-0, 210-pounder scored two points for the Wildcats in one game in 1934-35 for coach Adolph Rupp.

BRAD JOHNSON, Florida State
Quarterback received a four-year, $15 million contract from the Minnesota Vikings in 1996 despite being their ninth-round draft choice in 1992. The 6-6, 215-pounder began his junior season in college as a starter and completed two-thirds of his passes in FSU's first five games. He became a pro starter when Warren Moon was injured and directed Minnesota to the NFL playoffs. Signed with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers as a free agent in 2001 before directing them to a Super Bowl championship. Returned to the Vikings in 2005 before becoming a backup for the Dallas Cowboys, finishing his 15-year NFL career with 29,054 yards passing, 166 TDs and 61.7% completion percentage. . . . Part-time starting forward as a freshman for the Seminoles' basketball squad in 1987-88 when he averaged 5.9 ppg and shot 89.1% from the free-throw line. Johnson hit all three of his three-point field-goal attempts in a 102-98 opening-round loss to Iowa in the 1988 NCAA Tournament. Played sparingly as a sophomore although he scored a career-high 13 points against Villanova when he canned three more treys.

CHARLEY JOHNSON, Schreiner Institute (Tex.)
Quarterback completed 51.2% of his passes, amassing 24,410 yards and 170 touchdowns, with the St. Louis Cardinals, Houston Oilers and Denver Broncos in 15 years from 1961 through 1975. Pro Bowl selection in 1964 was a 10th-round draft choice by the Cardinals in 1960. His college career with New Mexico State included back-to-back Sun Bowl MVP awards and an undefeated 11-0 record in 1960. One of only a handful of NFL players ever to earn a doctorate, he became a professor in the Chemical Engineering Department at NMSU. . . . The 6-1 Johnson also played basketball and golf in junior college. Transferred to NMSU to play basketball, but was promised the opportunity to try out for the football squad and promptly became the starting QB.

JOHNNY JOHNSON, San Jose State
Seventh-round draft choice rushed for 4,078 yards in five NFL seasons from 1990 through 1994. Played first three pro years with the Phoenix Cardinals before he was traded to the New York Jets and led the Jets in rushing in 1993 as their team MVP. Appeared in Pro Bowl following rookie season. As a junior at San Jose State in 1988, he was the first player in NCAA history to rush for more than 1,200 yards (1,219) and catch at least 60 passes (61) in a single season. . . . Averaged 11.2 ppg, 6.5 rpg and 3.2 apg as a 6-3, 210-pound forward in 1988-89 after a majority of basketball team members walked off and refused to play under Bill Berry. He led the Spartans in scoring (23 points) and rebounding (12) in a 95-66 loss to eventual West Regional runner-up UNLV.

KEN JOHNSON, Indiana
Defensive lineman with the Cincinnati Bengals for seven years from 1971 through 1977. . . . The 6-6 Johnson averaged 13.1 ppg and 9.8 rpg for the Hoosiers from 1967-68 through 1969-70. All-Big Ten Conference second-team selection as a junior led them in rebounding his last two seasons and grabbed a career-high 21 boards in a game at Minnesota.

TEYO JOHNSON, Stanford
Co-freshman of the year in Pacific-10 caught 38 passes in 2001 for 565 yards and seven touchdowns, including a TD in the 2001 Seattle Bowl against Georgia Tech. He had 41 receptions for 467 yards and eight TDs in 2002 when he declared for the NFL draft with two years of eligibility remaining (second-round choice of the Oakland Raiders in 2003 caught one TD pass as a rookie). Joined the Arizona Cardinals in 2005. His brother, Ahmani, played linebacker for Oregon State and the Chicago Bears. . . . The 6-7, 240-pounder was an occasional starting forward who had career averages of 4.9 ppg and 3 rpg. He scored eight points in 10 minutes in a second-round victory against St. Joseph's in 2001. It was one of four times in six playoff games that he scored eight points. Teammate of All-American Casey Jacobsen when the Cardinal was eliminated by NCAA champion-to-be Maryland in the 2001 West Regional final and eventual Final Four team Kansas in the second round of 2002 Midwest Regional.

LUKE JOHNSOS, Northwestern
End caught 58 passes for 985 yards and 20 touchdowns with the Chicago Bears in eight years from 1929 through 1936. . . . Basketball letterman in 1927 and 1928.

PAUL JOKISCH, Michigan
Fifth-round draft choice as a wide receiver by the San Francisco 49ers in 1987. Played briefly in the Arena Football League in 1992. Caught 37 of his Wolverine career 58 passes, many of them from Jim Harbaugh, as a junior. He had two touchdown receptions each year from 1984 through 1986, including a career-high 67-yarder against Minnesota as a sophomore. Caught one pass against Nebraska in the 1986 Fiesta Bowl and one against Arizona State in the 1987 Rose Bowl. . . . The 6-8 Jokisch averaged 3.9 points and 1.7 rebounds per game in 39 contests for the Wolverines in 1982-83 and 1983-84.

ART JONES, Richmond
Back-punter was second-round draft choice by the Philadelphia Eagles in 1941 (11th pick overall). Rushed for 303 yards and four touchdowns, caught one TD pass among nine receptions and returned kickoffs/punts for the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1941 and 1945. Tied for the NFL lead with seven interceptions as a rookie. . . . Averaged 4.9 ppg as a starting center for the Spiders in 1940-41.

ED "TOO TALL" JONES, Tennessee State
Defensive lineman with the Dallas Cowboys for 15 seasons (1974 through 1978 and 1980 through 1989). First-round draft pick appeared in three Super Bowls and three Pro Bowls (1982 through 1984). Jones also mixed in six bouts as a professional boxer. . . . He was a 6-8, 230-pound backup post player when he averaged 1.7 points and 2.6 rebounds for the Tigers in his freshman and sophomore seasons (1969-70 and 1970-71).

JACK JONES, Livingston (Ala.)
Played in Senior Bowl before being drafted by the Cleveland Browns as a back in 27th round of 1951 NFL draft. . . . Three-sport athlete with school now known as West Alabama.

JACOBY JONES, Lane (Tenn.)
Wide receiver/kick returner was a third-round NFL draft choice (73rd pick overall) by the Houston Texans in 2007 before earning Pro Bowl status with the Baltimore Ravens in 2012. Caught 194 passes for 2,602 yards and 14 TDs in first seven seasons through 2013. In that span, he returned four punts and four kickoffs for TDs. Involved in longest play in Super Bowl history with his 108-yard kickoff return for the Ravens in Super Bowl XLVII. . . . Southeastern Louisiana track transfer was part-time hoop starter as a Lane sophomore, averaging 3.4 ppg and 3.7 rpg in 2004-05 and 2005-06.

MATT JONES, Arkansas
First-round draft choice of the Jacksonville Jaquars in 2005 as a wide receiver (21st pick overall) immediately became a regular, catching 36 passes for 432 yards and five TDs as a rookie before notching a career-high 65 receptions in 2008. Amassed 166 catches for 2,153 yards and 15 TDs in four seasons before retiring as his skills eroded. Starting quarterback for the Razorbacks' bowl teams in 2002 and 2003 completed 55.6% of his passes for 49 TDs. Set school single-season record for rushing yards by a QB (707 in 2003). Set SEC career mark for rushing yardage by a QB that was broken by Heisman Trophy winner Tim Tebow of Florida in 2009. . . . The 6-6, 235-pounder started two of 11 basketball games he played in 2001-02 when he averaged 4.2 ppg and 2.3 rpg and 10 of 17 in 2003-04 when he averaged 5 ppg and 4.5 rpg.

RALPH JONES, Union (Tenn.)/Alabama
End caught three passes for the AAFC's Baltimore franchise in 1947. . . . The 6-3, 200-pounder was a basketball letterman for the Crimson Tide in 1945 as a center.

WALLACE "WAH WAH" JONES, Kentucky
Lettered as a two-way end on three college football teams coached by the legendary Bear Bryant. Seventh-round choice by the Chicago Bears in the 1949 NFL draft. . . . Starting forward for Kentucky's back-to-back national champions in basketball (1948 and 1949). Three-time All-SEC first-team selection averaged 10.2 points per game in three NBA seasons with the Indianapolis Olympians.

RALPH "SHUG" JORDAN, Auburn
Compiled a 176-83-6 record as head football coach for his alma mater from 1951-75. Led Auburn to berths in 12 bowl games and an AP national title in 1957 with a 10-0 record. . . . Three-year basketball letterman was captain of the team his junior season (1930-31). Coached Auburn basketball squad to a 95-75 record (.559) in 10 years from 1933-34 through 1941-42 and 1945-46 before assuming the same post at Georgia and compiling a 41-28 mark (.594) in four campaigns from 1946-47 to 1949-50.

GREG KAMPE, Bowling Green
Two-time All-Mid-American Conference defensive back had six interceptions from 1975 through 1977 and also punted for the Falcons (37.7-yard average). . . . Averaged 1.8 points and 1.6 assists per game for Bowling Green's basketball team in 64 contests. He went on to become Oakland's all-time winningest coach after it made the transition to Division I basketball.

JOE KAPP, California
Quarterback with Calgary (1959 and 1960) and Vancouver (1961 through 1966) in the Canadian Football League and Minnesota (1967 through 1969) and Boston (1970) in the NFL. Member of CFL Hall of Fame. Passed for 28,836 yards and 194 touchdowns in his pro career after being an 18th-round draft choice by the Washington Redskins in 1959. Pro Bowl selection following 1969 season. Finished fifth in Heisman Trophy voting in 1958 when he led Cal to a Rose Bowl berth. Starting QB for the Bears from 1956 through 1958 completed 50.8% of his passes for 2,022 yards. Only QB to start in the Rose Bowl, Grey Cup and Super Bowl. Last QB to throw seven TDs in an NFL game. College Football Hall of Famer coached his alma mater to a 20-34-1 record in five years from 1982 through 1986. . . . The Bears won Pacific Coast Conference titles both years (1956-57 and 1957-58) when the 6-3, 195-pound backup forward averaged 1.8 ppg and 1.2 rpg. Sketch in school guide: "Powerfully built player has an excellent long jump shot."

CHUCK KASSEL, Illinois
End caught seven touchdown passes with the Chicago Bears and Frankford in seven years from 1927 through 1933. . . . The 6-1, 190-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1925 and 1926.

ED KAWAL, Illinois
Linebacker-offensive lineman with the Chicago Bears and Washington Redskins for five years in the 1930s. The 6-2, 200-pounder intercepted a pass for a touchdown in 1935. . . . Basketball letterman in 1930.

DICK KAZMAIER, Princeton
Heisman Trophy and Maxwell Trophy winner in 1951 when he paced Princeton to its second straight 9-0 record. The single-wing tailback, who rushed for 1,950 yards in 368 carries (5.3 per carry) and completed 172 of 289 passes for 2,404 yards and 35 touchdowns, was named to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1966. Picked in the 15th round by Chicago in the 1952 NFL draft. Served three years active duty as an aviation ground officer with the U.S. Navy after graduating cum laude from Princeton in 1952 and receiving his M.B.A. from Harvard in 1954. President of Concord, Mass.-based Kazmaier Associates, Inc., a marketing and financial services business with investments in the sports and leisure industry. He established the firm in 1975. Kazmaier is a director of the National Football Foundation and College Hall of Fame and serves on the Knight Foundation Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics. He served as chairman of the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports under both Presidents Reagan and Bush. . . . Averaged 3.4 points per game for the Tigers' basketball squad as a sophomore and junior (earned letter) after leading Princeton's freshman team with 177 points in 12 games in 1948-49.

BILL KELLEY, Texas Tech
End caught 17 passes, including one for a touchdown, with the Green Bay Packers in 1949 after being their 23rd-round draft choice. . . . Basketball letterman in 1945 and 1946.

CHRIS KELLEY, Akron
Seventh-round draft choice of the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1987 played two games that year as a tight end with the Cleveland Browns. . . . The 6-4, 240-pounder averaged 1.5 ppg and 1.6 rpg in 1984-85 and 1985-86 with the Zips in 42 games under coach Bob Huggins.

FRANK KELLEY, South Dakota State
Back scored three touchdowns for Cleveland in 1927. . . . The 5-10, 165-pound basketball letterman was also a standout hurdler.

LARRY KELLEY, Yale
Heisman Trophy winner in 1936. End earned All-American football honors in 1934, 1935 and 1936. Selected by the Detroit Lions in the ninth round of the 1937 NFL draft. . . . The 6-1, 190-pound swingman finished 12th in the Eastern Intercollegiate League in scoring in 1935-36 and was seventh in the league in scoring the next season. Honorable mention on all-league team as a junior.

BILL KELLOGG, Indiana (Pa.)/Syracuse
Back rushed for four touchdowns and caught one TD pass with Frankfort and Rochester in 1924 and 1925. . . . The 5-10, 175-pounder was a basketball letterman with Syracuse in 1922.

BOB KELLY, New Mexico State
Tackle played four seasons with the Houston Oilers after being their 22nd-round draft choice in 1961. Member of the Kansas City Chiefs in 1967. . . . The 6-2, 260-pounder averaged 2.5 ppg and 1.3 rpg with the Aggies in 1958-59.

JOE KELLY SR., New Mexico State
Back was an 11th-round selection by the Los Angeles Rams in the 1959 NFL draft before playing in the Canadian Football League. Rushed for 2,143 yards and 16 touchdowns with the Aggies despite playing one season as a quarterback. His son, Joe Jr., a first-round draft choice in 1986 by the Cincinnati Bengals as a linebacker from Washington (11th pick overall), played 11 NFL seasons with six different teams. . . . Four-sport athlete averaged 7 ppg in three seasons, including 9.2 as a senior in 1958-59. The school's first African-American basketball player scored 13 points in a 62-61 opening-round defeat against Idaho State in the 1959 NCAA Tournament.

WILLIAM "WILD BILL" KELLY, Montana
Back passed for 23 touchdowns and rushed for six with the New York Yankees, Frankford and Brooklyn in four years from 1927 through 1930. . . . The 5-10, 180-pounder was a two-year basketball letterman in the mid-1920s.

DOUG KENNA, Army
College Football Hall of Famer quarterbacked the Cadets to their first-ever national title in 1944. . . . Instrumental in the Black Knights' 27-game winning streak in basketball spanning from the final contest of 1942-43 to late in the 1944-45 campaign. Also served as captain of the undefeated men's tennis squad (11-0) in 1945.

JORDAN KENT, Oregon
NFL sixth-round draft choice by the Seattle Seahawks in 2007 caught a five-yard pass with the St. Louis Rams in 2009. Caught a team-long 68-yard pass as a wide receiver in 2005 for the Ducks' 10-2 football squad that lost to Oklahoma in the Holiday Bowl. He became a starter the next year as a senior when he was the Ducks' second-leading receiver with 44 catches for 491 yards and four touchdowns. He had a team-high five receptions in a Las Vegas Bowl loss to BYU. . . . Part-time starter under his father Ernie Kent when the 6-4, 200-pounder averaged 3.1 ppg and 3.3 rpg from 2003-04 through 2005-06. He also anchored the 4x100 meter relay team that won Oregon's first-ever Pacific-10 Conference title in that event in 2006 and was the 2003 NCAA West Regional 200 meter champion.

RALPH KERCHEVAL, Kentucky
Back-kicker scored 10 touchdowns (four rushing, five receiving and one via interception) with Brooklyn in seven years from 1934 through 1940. . . . The 6-1, 190-pounder scored three points in four basketball games for the Wildcats in 1932-33.

REX KERN, Ohio State
Standout college quarterback played four years as a safety in the NFL with the Baltimore Colts and Buffalo Bills. Tenth-round draft choice in 1971 intercepted two passes in 1973. MVP of the 1969 Rose Bowl. . . . The 5-11, 190-pounder averaged 8.4 points per game as a guard for the Buckeyes' freshman basketball squad in 1968-69.

GEORGE KIICK, Bucknell
Third-round draft choice as a back caught four passes with the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1940 and 1945. His son, Jim, was a member of two Super Bowl champions as a running back for the Miami Dolphins. . . . The 6-0, 195-pounder was captain of both Bucknell's football and basketball teams as a senior in 1939-40.

ROGER KILEY, Notre Dame
End caught a touchdown pass for the Chicago Cardinals in 1923. . . . The 6-0, 180-pounder was a two-year starter in basketball for the Irish in the early 1920s.

GLENN KILLINGER, Penn State
Member of College Football Hall of Fame was a 1921 consensus All-American as a quarterback-halfback. The 5-9, 160-pound tailback played in the NFL with the Canton Bulldogs (1921) and New York Giants (1926). He passed for one touchdown with Canton. . . . Three-year basketball letterman on teams that compiled an overall record of 37-5. Captain of team as a senior in 1920-21.

BILLY KILMER, UCLA
Quarterback for 16 seasons with the San Francisco 49ers, New Orleans Saints and Washington Redskins (1961, 1962, 1964 and 1966 through 1978). The first-round draft choice completed 1,585 passes for 20,495 yards and 152 touchdowns. Kilmer, a Pro Bowl selection in 1973, started Super Bowl VII for Washington. Passed for 2,979 yards with the Bruins in 1959 and 1960. Registered six 100-yard rushing games, including career-high 180 against Utah in 1960 when he was also the team's punter. . . . He scored eight points in six games for coach John Wooden's 1959-60 UCLA basketball team. Excerpt from school guide: "Tried basketball, but his football ankle failed to allow him to perform at his best."

JEFF KING, Virginia Tech
Fifth-round NFL draft pick had 93 receptions for 802 yards and seven TDs with the Carolina Panthers and Arizona Cardinals in his first seven years from 2006 through 2012 before tight end was slowed by knee surgeries. Two-time All-ACC second-team selection caught 58 passes for 724 yards and 11 TDs (school record for TE) with the Hokies from 2002 through 2005. . . . The 6-3, 250-pounder collected 18 points and 23 rebounds in 16 basketball games as a freshman in 2004-05.

WAYNE KINGERY, Louisiana State/McNeese State
Defensive back intercepted a pass for Baltimore (AAFC) in 1949. . . . The 5-11, 170-pounder played basketball for LSU in the mid-1940s.

NILE KINNICK, Iowa
Heisman Trophy winner as a quarterback-halfback in 1939 when he rushed and passed for 1,012 yards, intercepted eight passes, punted for a 39.9-yard average and averaged 11.9 yards on punt returns and 25.1 yards on kickoff returns. Phi Beta Kappa graduate was selected by Brooklyn in the second round of the pro draft. After bypassing pro football to attend law school, he was killed in a plane crash in 1943 while serving in the Navy during World War II. . . . The 5-8, 165-pounder played basketball for Iowa during his sophomore year, averaging 6.1 points per game to finish as the team's second-leading scorer.

MARIO KINSEY, Kansas/Sam Houston State
Redshirt quarterback started seven games in 2001 after beginning the season under suspension. Dismissed from the Jayhawks' football squad after making a plea bargain in the wake of charges that he stole a student's unattended purse and used her credit cards to purchase gasoline and a pizza. . . . The 6-2 Kinsey averaged 1.9 ppg as a freshman in 2000-01 under coach Roy Williams. Averaged 5.1 ppg, 1.9 rpg and 1.5 apg with SHSU in 2002-03 before transferring to Texas College.

TERRY KIRBY, Virginia
Running back started as a rookie with the Miami Dolphins and was their leading pass receiver and second-leading rusher after being a third-round pick in the 1993 NFL draft. Led the Dolphins in pass receptions with 66 for 618 yards in 1995 and was again the team's second-leading rusher. Subsequently played with the San Francisco 49ers, Cleveland Browns and Oakland Raiders. Set Virginia career rushing record with 3,348 yards on 567 carries, including a total of 14 100-yard games. Averaged 4.8 yards per carry in three bowl games--Florida Citrus (vs. Illinois), Sugar Bowl (TD vs. Tennessee) and Gator Bowl (vs. Oklahoma). . . . Averaged 3.4 points per game as a freshman in 1989-90 and 2.1 as a sophomore in 1990-91. Scored 18 points in seven minutes of playing time (hitting 8 of 10 field-goal attempts) against North Carolina State on January 31, 1990. Appeared in NCAA playoffs against Notre Dame and Syracuse in 1990.

PAUL KITTREDGE, Holy Cross
Back scored two touchdowns with Boston in 1929. . . . The 5-10, 170-pounder was a four-year basketball letterman.

KARL KLUCKHOHN, Colgate
Selected by the Green Bay Packers as an end in 22nd round of 1952 NFL draft. . . . Three-year letterman in basketball averaged 2.3 ppg and 3 rpg in 1950-51.

LARRY KNORR, Alabama/Dayton
End played for the Detroit Lions in 1942 and 1945. . . . The 6-2, 190-pounder was a basketball letterman with Dayton in 1938.

BOB KOEHLER, Northwestern
Back rushed for nine touchdowns with the Chicago Cardinals in seven years from 1920 through 1926. . . . The 5-11, 185-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1918.

ELMER KOLBERG, Oregon State
End was a seventh-round draft choice by the Philadelphia Eagles in 1938. The 6-4, 195-pounder caught 10 passes and had one interception with the Eagles and Pittsburgh Steelers in three years from 1939 through 1941. . . . Basketball letterman for the Beavers in the late 1930s.

JOHN KONISZEWSKI, George Washington
Tackle with the Washington Redskins for three years from 1945 to 1948. . . . The 6-3, 240-pounder (insert text on hoop career).

NORMAN KRAGSETH, Northwestern
Three-year football letterman was an All-Big Ten honorable mention as a senior punter-placekicker. Officiated in the NFL for 15 years from the mid-1970s to the late-1980s, including Super Bowl XIV in Pasadena. . . . Made both of his free throws while playing five games in 1950-51.

RON KRAMER, Michigan
Offensive end for 10 seasons (1957 and 1959 through 1967) with the Green Bay Packers and Detroit Lions. First-round draft choice caught 229 passes for 3,272 yards and 16 touchdowns in the NFL. Pro Bowl selection in 1963. Had 53 receptions for 880 yards and eight TDs with the Wolverines, including a career-best 70-yarder against UCLA as a senior in 1956. . . . The 6-3, 220-pound forward-center led the Wolverines in scoring as a sophomore (16 points per game) and as a junior (20.4) before finishing second on the team as a senior (14.5). Three-time All-Big Ten Conference selection (second-team pick as a sophomore and junior and first-team choice as a senior) was named Michigan's team MVP all three seasons. Kramer was a second-team All-American selection by Converse and third-team pick by the National Association of Basketball Coaches as a senior captain in 1956-57. Selected in the fifth-round of the 1957 NBA draft by the Detroit Pistons. Excerpt from school guide: "Can leap and battle as well as shoot, and he's an inspirational type player who picks up his teammates when he's in there."

HENRY KRAUSE, St. Louis
Offensive lineman with Brooklyn and Washington for three years from 1936 through 1938. . . . The 6-1, 210-pounder was a basketball letterman from 1934 through 1936.

TOM KROPP, Kearney State (Neb.)
Earned NAIA All-American acclaim in football before being selected in the eighth round of 1975 NFL draft by the Pittsburgh Steelers as a linebacker. . . . An NAIA basketball All-American, he set the school career scoring record of 1,884 points that was subsequently broken. Kropp still holds the UNK marks for career scoring average (20.5 ppg) and single-game scoring (51 points vs. Central Missouri State). He played several years in the NBA before coaching his alma mater for an extended period.

RAY KUFFEL, Marquette
Three-year football letterman captained the team as a senior. End was a 20th-round draft choice by the Chicago Cardinals in 1944. . . . Leading scorer for the school's basketball squad in 1941-42 and 1942-43. Also earned a letter in 1946-47.

CLIFF KURRUS, Princeton
Scored four touchdowns as a sophomore, including a 61-yard pass reception against archrival Penn, before moving to defensive end as a junior and senior. The Tigers assembled a 28-game winning streak during the late 1940s and early 1950, including an unbeaten campaign in 1950. . . . Kurrus, a Springfield, Ill., native, averaged 3.4 ppg from 1948-49 through 1950-51, scoring a varsity career high of 17 points against Harvard as a sophomore. He set a school freshman single-game scoring record (32 against Columbia for the Tigers undefeated frosh squad) that was subsequently broken by unanimous All-American Bill Bradley.

MALCOLM "MAL" KUTNER, Texas
Two-time All-Pro halfback/defensive back caught 145 passes for 3,060 yards and 31 touchdowns plus 13 interceptions with the Chicago Cardinals in five years from 1946 through 1950. Led NFL receivers in total yardage and average per reception in 1947 and 1948. Paced the NFL in TDs in 1948 with 15. Fourth-round selection in 1942 NFL draft by the Pittsburgh Steelers (26th pick overall). First UT player chosen to compete in the Chicago Tribune's All-Star Game was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1974. . . . The 6-2, 195-pounder was a two-year basketball letterman in the early 1940s. The Longhorns got a lot of mileage out of him late in the 1941-42 campaign when he scored 14 points in a victory against SMU before leading them in scoring in back-to-back games at Arkansas.

GALEN LAACK, Pacific
Guard played eight games with the Philadelphia Eagles in 1958 after being a ninth-round draft choice the previous year by the Washington Redskins. . . . The 6-0, 220-pounder collected eight points and seven rebounds in eight games in 1954-55.

ERNIE "BIG CAT" LADD, Grambling
Four-time All-Star defensive tackle (6-9, 300-pound colossus) was the 15th pick overall in the 1961 AFL draft. Member of the 1963 AFL champion San Diego Chargers before playing for the Houston Oilers and Kansas City Chiefs. When Ladd completed his eight-year pro career, he had played in 112 consecutive AFL games and competed with the Chiefs when they reached the Super Bowl in 1967 and 1970. He subsequently found more lucrative success in professional wrestling and rivalries with Andre the Giant and Dusty Rhodes helped shape wrestling's 1970s image and propel Ladd to WWF Hall of Fame status. . . . Ladd and teammate Buck Buchanan both intended on only playing basketball for Grambling before legendary coach Eddie Robinson kept them from transferring by allegedly giving them a key to the school cafeteria's kitchen so they could go there and eat whenever the pair was hungry if they would come out for the football squad.

JIM LADD, Bowling Green State
End was a 20th-round draft choice of the Chicago Bears in 1954. The 6-4, 205-pounder caught 22 passes for 254 yards that year with the Chicago Cardinals. . . . Averaged 1.5 ppg in 17 basketball games in 1952-53 and 1953-54, shooting 52.9% from the floor and 33.3% from the free-throw line.

HARRY LANCASTER, Georgetown (Ky.)
Adolph Rupp's chief assistant for 24 years, including Kentucky's first four NCAA national championships. Also served as baseball coach for the Wildcats from 1948-65. . . . President of the student body was a three-time all-league selection and two-year captain of the football squad and the basketball team (class of '32).

TIM LANDIS, Randolph-Macon (Va.)
Compiled an 18-16 record as football coach at Saint Mary's (Calif.) in three seasons from 2000 through 2002 after serving in a similar capacity at Davidson (35-36-1 mark in seven years from 1993 through 1999). . . . (insert text on one season of college basketball).

RUSTY LaRUE, Wake Forest
Quarterback completed 60.1% percent of his passes for 5,016 yards and 23 touchdowns with the Demon Deacons. He set seven NCAA records in 1995 while passing for 1533 yards in his last three college games--against Duke, Georgia Tech and N.C. State. Five of those marks came at Duke when LaRue completed an NCAA-record 55 passes (on 78 attempts) for 478 yards. He also established standards for completions in one half (41), pass attempts in one half (56), plays in one half (57) and plays in one quarter (36). LaRue threw "only" 65 times against Tech, completing 41 for 501 yards. Then, he set ACC records with 545 yards passing (50 of 67) and 554 yards in total offense against N.C. State. His two-game total of 96 completions broke the NCAA record for most successful passes over a two-game span and his three-game total of 146 completions shattered the NCAA standard for most successful passes over a three-game stretch. . . . The 6-2, 195-pounder averaged 6.2 ppg and shot 43.3% from three-point range with the Demon Deacons before playing in the NBA with the Chicago Bulls and Utah Jazz. Also pitched three innings and picked up a save in the Deacons' 10-1 victory over Furman on May 10, 1995.

GREG LATTA, Morgan State
Tight end was an eighth-round draft choice by the Baltimore Colts in 1974. He caught 90 passes for 1,081 yards and seven touchdowns with the Chicago Bears in five years from 1975 through 1979. . . . The 6-3, 225-pounder was a two-year basketball letterman just before the Marvin Webster era. He averaged 9.3 ppg and 5.4 rpg in 15 games in 1970-71.

JOHNNY LATTNER, Notre Dame
Consensus All-American halfback won Heisman Trophy in 1953 after finishing fifth in the Heisman voting the previous year. Member of College Football Hall of Fame helped the Irish compile a 23-4-2 record in his three varsity football seasons (1951 through 1953). First-round draft pick of the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1954 rushed for 237 yards and five touchdowns before suffering a career-ending knee injury while in military service. . . . Scored 12 points in four games for the 1951-52 Notre Dame basketball team as a 6-2 forward. He supplied the game-winning basket with nine seconds left in overtime in a 75-74 victory over NYU at Madison Square Garden.

PAUL LATZKE, Pacific
Center with the San Diego Chargers for three years from 1966 through 1968. . . . The 6-4, 240-pound basketball center collected 10 points and 16 rebounds in nine games in 1963-64.

JOE LAVENDER, San Diego State
Cornerback intercepted 33 passes while playing 10 years in the NFL with the Philadelphia Eagles and Washington Redskins. He scored two of his four career touchdowns in 1974, the year after the Eagles chose him in the 12th round. The Super Bowl XVII participant was a Pro Bowl selection in 1980 and 1981. . . . Lavender, a 6-4, 190-pound forward, averaged 13.4 points and 6.6 rebounds per game for the Aztecs in 1969-70 and 1970-71 after transferring from junior college (Imperial Valley). He was their second-leading scorer (15.2 ppg) and rebounder (7.6 rpg) as a junior.

ELMER LAYDEN, Notre Dame
Member of College Football Hall of Fame was a fullback in the famed Four Horseman backfield of the 1920s. The 5-11, 180-pounder was a consensus All-American selection in 1924. Head football coach of the Irish from 1934 through 1940, compiling a 47-12-2 record. His 1938 Notre Dame team was named national champion by the Dickinson System. . . . NFL commissioner from 1941 to 1946. . . . Scored seven points in 10 games for the 1922-23 Notre Dame basketball squad.

BOBBY LAYNE, Texas
Six-time All-Pro quarterback passed for 26,768 yards and 196 touchdowns with the Chicago Bears, New York Bulldogs, Detroit Lions and Pittsburgh Steelers in 15 years from 1948 through 1962. Led the NFL in passing yardage in back-to-back seasons in 1950 and 1951, pacing the league in passing TDs with 26 in 1951. First-round draft choice in 1948 (3rd pick overall) helped the Lions capture three NFL championships (1952-53-57). Inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1967. Co-MVP of the 1946 Cotton Bowl before being named MVP of the 1948 Sugar Bowl. . . . The 6-1, 200-pound backup hoopster for the Longhorns in 1944-45 scored eight points in an annual charity game against Bergstrom Army Air Field.

BILL LAZETICH, Montana
Back scored three touchdowns with the Cleveland Browns in 1939 and 1942 after being the Detroit Lions' 14th-round draft choice in 1939. . . . The 6-0, 195-pounder was a three-year basketball letterman in the late 1930s.

BILL LECONBY, St. Lawrence (N.Y.)
Compiled an 78-51-5 coaching record with Lehigh in 15 years from 1947 through 1961. (insert text on pro career with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1941). Credited with the longest punt in the nation in 1938. . . . Basketball letterman for St. Lawrence (class of '39).

ALPHONSE "TUFFY" LEEMANS, Oregon/George Washington
Seven-time All-Pro was a second-round draft choice of the New York Giants in 1936 (18th pick overall). He passed for 25 touchdowns, rushed for 17 TDs and had three TD receptions in eight years through 1943. Leemans led the NFL in rushing as a rookie with 830 yards. The 6-0, 195-pounder also returned kicks and intercepted four passes. . . . He was a three-year basketball letterman in the mid-1930s.

WALLY LEMM, Carroll (Wis.)
Compiled a 64-64-7 record as coach of the Houston Oilers and St. Louis Cardinals for 10 years from 1961 through 1970. The Oilers were undefeated AFL champion in 1961. He won his first 10 NFL games. . . . Competed as a guard for Carroll's basketball team. Compiled a 69-56 coaching record (.552) with Lake Forest College in six seasons from 1949-50 through 1953-54 and 1958-59.

DARRELL LESTER, Texas Christian
Center-linebacker played for the Green Bay Packers in 1937 and 1938 after being their fifth-round draft choice in 1936. . . . The 6-3, 220-pounder was a starting center for TCU's basketball squad in 1934 (SWC champion) and 1935.

MARV LEVY, Coe (Iowa)
Hall of Famer (elected in 2001) compiled a 143-112 record as coach of the Kansas City Chiefs (1978-82) and Buffalo Bills (1986-97). He had a 17-5 mark against Don Shula, the winningest coach in NFL history. Posted an 11-8 postseason mark with the Bills en route to becoming the only NFL coach to win four consecutive league or conference championships. But he lost four straight Super Bowls. He was special teams coach of the Washington Redskins' 1972 Super Bowl entrant. Also served as head coach for three colleges--New Mexico (14-6 record in two years in 1958 and 1959), California (8-29-3 record in four years from 1960 through 1963) and William & Mary (23-25-2 in five years from 1964 through 1968). . . . Coached basketball one season for his alma mater in 1955-56. The team compiled a 20-5 record, won the Midwest Collegiate Conference with a 14-2 mark and lost to Stephen F. Austin, 74-62, in the first round of the NAIA Tournament. Levy earned a basketball letter with the 1949-50 Coe squad that posted a 3-14 mark.

CLIFF LEWIS, Duke
Defensive back-quarterback with Cleveland in the AAFC and NFL for six years from 1946 through 1951. Intercepted 24 passes in four seasons in the AAFC. . . . The 5-11, 165-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1945.

ADRIAN "AD" LINDSEY, Kansas
Head football coach for Oklahoma compiled a 19-19-6 record in five years from 1928 through 1932 before going 23-30-8 with Kansas in seven years from 1932 through 1938. Played for the Camp Funston baseball team during World War I with Hall of Famer Grover Cleveland Alexander. . . . Basketball letterman in 1917.

JIM LIPINSKI, Fairmont State (W. Va.)
Tackle played one game for the Chicago Cardinals in 1950 after being their 22nd-round draft choice. . . . Four-year basketball letterman.

OSCAR LOFTON, Southeastern Louisiana
End caught 19 passes for 360 yards and four touchdowns with the Boston Patriots in the AFL's inaugural season in 1960. . . . The 6-6, 215-pounder collected 31 points and 30 rebounds in 12 games in 1958-59.

DAVE LOGAN, Colorado
Wide receiver caught 263 passes for 4,250 yards and 24 touchdowns in nine seasons (1976 through 1984) with the Cleveland Browns and Denver Broncos. He was a third-round NFL draft choice after averaging at least 17 yards per reception in 1973 and 1975. Caught a TD pass against Texas in the 1975 Bluebonnet Bowl. . . . Averaged 14.1 points and 6.3 rebounds per game in 58 varsity basketball games for the Buffaloes from 1972-73 through 1975-76 (missed 1974-75 because of a football knee injury). Team's second-leading scorer as both a sophomore (All-Big Eight second-team selection) and senior. He was a ninth-round NBA draft choice by the Kansas City Kings.

BOB LONG, Wichita State
Wide receiver was a fourth-round draft choice by the Green Bay Packers in 1964 (44th pick overall). The 6-3, 200-pounder caught 98 passes for 1,539 yards and 10 touchdowns with the Packers, Atlanta Falcons, Washington Redskins and Los Angeles Rams in seven years through 1970. . . . Collected 25 points and 31 rebounds in 26 basketball games for the Shockers in 1960-61 and 1961-62 under coach Ralph Miller.

DANE LOOKER, Western Washington
Wide receiver for the playoff-bound St. Louis Rams in 2003, when he posted career highs of 47 receptions, 495 yards and three TDs. Accumulated 112 catches for 1,224 yards and 5 TDs in seven years from 2002 through 2008. . . . The 6-0, 190-pounder averaged 4.8 ppg as a freshman in 1995-96 and 10.2 ppg as a sophomore in 1996-97 before transferring to Washington and concentrating on football. Made one-third of his shots from beyond the three-point arc and almost three-fourths of his free-throw attempts.

RONNIE LOTT, Southern California
Unanimous All-American defensive back played 15 seasons in the NFL with the San Francisco 49ers, Los Angeles Raiders, New York Jets and Kansas City Chiefs (1981 through 1995). Intercepted 14 passes for the Trojans (two for touchdowns) before intercepting 63 passes in regular-season NFL competition and nine in the postseason. First-round draft choice played in 10 Pro Bowl games and four Super Bowls. . . . Collected nine assists, four points and three rebounds in six games for the Trojans' basketball squad as a junior in 1979-80.

REGGIE LOVE, Duke
Started 26 of 40 career games as a wide receiver, making 75 receptions for 895 yards and six touchdowns. Signed as a free-agent outside linebacker in the 3-4 scheme with the Dallas Cowboys after returning to the Blue Devils' basketball squad in 2004-05 as a fifth-year senior captain. Love became Barack Obama's "body man" from 2007 through 2011, acting as something of a traveling valet in the President's entourage, making sure his personal needs were met. A constant presence in the West Wing and by the President's side during every trip away from home, he was in the background of countless official photos. He played hoops with Obama whenever they could squeeze in a game on the campaign trail. "There is nothing worse than losing to Barack," Love said. "You never hear the end of it." . . . The 6-4 Love had significant playing time as a freshman after starting center Carlos Boozer sustained a foot injury. "My role is more or less to play defense and rebound--bringing some energy to the court." Collected 14 points and 18 rebounds in 16 games in 2001-02 under coach Mike Krzyzewski.

FRANK LOVUOLO, St. Bonaventure
End was a seventh-round draft choice by the New York Giants in 1949. The 6-2, 210-pounder caught two passes for 37 yards and recovered a fumble for a touchdown. . . . He was a three-year basketball letterman in the mid-1940s.

DON LUFT, Indiana
The 6-5, 225-pounder played one season (1954) as an end with the Philadelphia Eagles, catching three passes for 59 yards. . . . Backup center to All-American Bill Garrett for the Hoosiers' basketball team as a junior in 1950-51, scoring 15 points in 17 games. In the final contest of Garrett's career with the Hoosiers, Luft replaced IU's first African-American player.

JOHNNY LUJACK, Notre Dame
Heisman Trophy winner in 1947 after finishing third in voting the previous year. In his three years as quarterback, the member of the College Football Hall of Fame helped the Irish win a national championship each season and a 26-1-1 record overall. First-round draft choice of the Chicago Bears in 1946 played quarterback, defensive back and kicker for them from 1948 through 1951, leading them in scoring all four years. He intercepted a team-high eight passes as a rookie and holds the franchise record for most passing yards in a game with 468 in a 1949 contest. . . . Averaged 3.4 points per game as a starting guard for Notre Dame's basketball team in 1943-44.

JIM LUKENS, Washington & Lee (Va.)
Tight end caught 24 passes for 249 yards and two touchdowns with Buffalo (AAFC) in 1949 after finishing fourth in the nation in receiving as a senior captain. . . . The 6-4, 205-pounder was a basketball letterman.

JOHN LUMPKIN, Ohio State
Two-year starting tight end caught four touchdown passes as a senior in 1998. The previous season, he scored the Buckeyes' lone touchdown (50-yard pass reception) in the Sugar Bowl against Florida State. . . . The 6-7, 250-pounder collected 92 points and 120 rebounds in two seasons in the mid-1990s.

KAYO LUNDAY, Arkansas
Linebacker-offensive lineman played with the New York Giants for seven years from 1937 to 1947. He intercepted one pass in 1941. . . . The 6-3, 215-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1935 and 1936.

LAMAR LUNDY, Purdue
Member of the "Fearsome Foursome" as a defensive end for the Los Angeles Rams in his 13-year NFL career (1957 through 1969). Fourth-round draft choice participated in the 1960 Pro Bowl. Caught 35 passes for 584 yards and six touchdowns in his first three seasons. . . . He averaged 10.5 points and 8.5 rebounds per game in three varsity seasons, leading the Boilermakers in rebounding as a junior and senior. He finished 30th in the country in field-goal shooting (48.1 percent) in 1956-57 when he was Purdue's only All-Big Ten Conference selection (third-team). Sketch in school guide: "The most improved player in the Big Ten. The 6-6, 225-pound Lundy was more often than not the equal of or better than opposing centers reaching 6-8 or 6-9. His unusual speed and defensive ability make him a valuable asset."

BOB LURTSEMA, Michigan Tech
Defensive lineman with the New York Giants, Minnesota Vikings and Seattle Seahawks for 11 years from 1967 through 1977. Played in Super Bowl VIII in the Vikings' defeat against Miami. . . . The 6-6, 250-pounder averaged 12.5 ppg in 1962-63 before transferring to Western Michigan.

BILL LYNCH, Butler
Only head football coach in Indiana history to guide a Hoosiers squad to a bowl game in his debut season (Insight Bowl in 2007). Coached his alma mater for five seasons before serving in a similar capacity with Ball State. Quarterback was Indiana Collegiate Conference MVP his final three seasons, leading the nation in pass completion percentage in 1975. . . All-ICC second-team selection as a junior in 1975-76 when he led the Bulldogs with 4.5 assists per game while also aveeraging 8.9 ppg and 2.7 rpg. Averaged 5.4 ppg the next season.

BILLY LYNCH, Ball State
Indiana wide receivers coach under his father. Wide receiver led the Cardinals in receptions his senior year with 40. . . . Averaged 2.9 ppg, 2.1 rpg and 3.1 apg in 2000-01 and 2001-02. Scored 10 points as a senior in an opening-round victory against South Florida in the 2002 NIT before BSU was eliminated at South Carolina in the quarterfinals.

HERB MAACK, Columbia
Tackle played for Brooklyn (AAFC) in 1946. . . . The 6-2, 210-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1940 and 1942.

ART MACIOSZCZYK, Western Michigan
Fullback rushed 46 times for 159 yards and caught six passes for 48 yards with the Philadelphia Eagles in 1944 and 1947 after being their 27th-round draft choice in 1943. . . . The 5-9, 205-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1941 and 1942.

EARSELL MACKBEE, Utah State
Defensive back intercepted 15 passes for 280 yards and one touchdown with the Minnesota Vikings in five years from 1965 through 1969. He also recovered a fumble for a TD in 1967. The 6-1, 195-pounder participated in Super Bowl IV when the Vikes lost to the Kansas City Chiefs, 23-7. . . . Teammate of Aggies legend Wayne Estes averaged 3.4 ppg and 1.4 rpg in 1964-65.

DEE MACKEY, East Texas State
The 6-5 tight end, a 24th-round draft choice by the San Francisco 49ers in 1958, caught 94 passes for 1,352 yards and eight touchdowns with the 49ers, Baltimore Colts and New York Jets in six NFL/AFL seasons from 1960 through 1965. He had back-to-back games with a pair of TDs in 1962. . . . Junior college transfer (Tyler) was a basketball All-Lone Star Conference first-team selection and member of NAIA All-Tournament team as a senior.

JOHN MACKEY, Syracuse
Three-time All-Pro tight end became an NFL Hall of Famer after being a second-round draft choice by the Baltimore Colts in 1963. The 6-2, 220-pounder caught 331 passes for 5,236 yards and 38 touchdowns in 10 seasons. Six of his nine TD catches in 1966 came on plays of more than 50 yards. He grabbed a deflected pass from Johnny Unitas for a 75-yard TD in Super Bowl V after having three pass receptions in Super Bowl III. . . . Mackey collected 28 points and 28 rebounds in six basketball games with the Orangemen in 1960-61.

BILL MACKRIDES, Nevada-Reno
Quarterback was a second-round draft choice by the Philadelphia Eagles in 1947 (19th pick overall). The 5-11, 180-pounder threw 15 touchdown passes and rushed for three TDs with the Eagles, New York Giants and Pittsburgh Steelers in six years. . . . Basketball letterman in 1944.

BOB MacLEOD, Dartmouth
Member of College Football Hall of Fame was consensus All-American halfback in 1938 when he finished fourth in Heisman Trophy voting. Three-year letterman on Dartmouth football teams that compiled a 21-3-3 record under the legendary Red Blaik. Selected by Brooklyn in the first round of the 1939 NFL draft. Scored five touchdowns for Chicago in 1939 (3 receiving, 1 rushing, 1 interception). . . . Ranked among the Eastern Intercollegiate League's top 20 scorers all three years in college for Dartmouth teams that won the league championship his last two seasons. Named to first five on all-league team as a senior and second team as a junior. Played professionally for Chicago (NBL) in 1939-40.

BOB MADDOX, Frostburg State (Md.)
The defensive lineman, a seventh-round draft choice by the Cincinnati Bengals in 1973, was a member of the Bengals in 1974 before playing two years with the Kansas City Chiefs. . . . The 6-5, 235-pounder, a two-time MVP for the Bobcats, collected 850 points and 625 rebounds while shooting 60.7% from the floor in three seasons.

FRANK "IKE" MAHONEY, Creighton
Back scored three touchdowns and passed for another with the Chicago Cardinals in five years from 1925 through 1928 and 1931. . . . The 6-0, 170-pounder played multiple basketball seasons for Creighton in the early 1920s.

AL MAHRT, Dayton
Back passed for three touchdowns and had two TD receptions for the Dayton Triangles in three years from 1920 through 1922. . . . The 5-11, 165-pounder was a basketball letterman for the Flyers.

LOU MAHRT, Dayton
Tailback caught two touchdown passes for the Dayton Triangles in 1926. . . . The 5-11, 175-pounder was a basketball letterman for the Flyers in the mid-1920s.

O.C. "CORT" MAJORS, California
Captain of Cal's 1920 team that beat Ohio State in the Rose Bowl. . . . Three-year basketball letterman from 1920 through 1922.

WALT MANNON, Northern Arizona
The first athlete in Big Sky Conference history to be named all-league in both football and basketball. In 1971 and 1972, he caught 71 passes for 1,003 yards and seven touchdowns. . . . His 18.4-point scoring average for his career stood as a school record. He was NAU's leading scorer in its first two seasons as a Big Sky member.

FRANK MANUMALEUGA, San Jose State
Linebacker intercepted six passes, including one for a touchdown in 1980, after being a fourth-round draft choice by the Kansas City Chiefs in 1979. . . . The 6-2, 245-pound forward, who also used the last name Manumaleuna, collected two points, one rebound and three assists in three basketball games for the Spartans in 1978-79.

RUBE MARQUARDT, Northwestern
End caught a touchdown pass for the Chicago Cardinals in 1921. . . . The 5-9, 155-pounder was a basketball letterman from 1917 through 1919.

VINCE MARROW, Youngstown State/Toledo
Tight end caught five passes with the Buffalo Bills in 1994 after being their 11th-round draft choice in 1992. . . . The 6-3, 240-pounder averaged 7.4 ppg and 2.9 rpg for YSU in 1988-89 before transferring. He shot 51 percent from the floor (76 of 149) and 80.4 percent from the free-throw line (41 of 51). Marrow had a career-high 23 points against Houston Baptist.

GEORGE MARTIN, Oregon
Defensive end played with the New York Giants for 14 seasons from 1975 through 1988. Started for the 1986 Giants team that defeated Denver, 39-20, in the Super Bowl. The 11th-round draft pick scored six touchdowns in his NFL career (84-yard run with blocked field goal, three pass interception returns and two runs with fumble recoveries). . . . The 6-5, 225-pound forward-center averaged just over 10 points and 10 rebounds per game for the Ducks' freshman squad in 1971-72. He collected 14 points and 33 rebounds in 12 games the next season as a teammate of freshman sensation Ron Lee.

JAMES "PEPPER" MARTIN, Furman
QB was MVP of 1940 football squad that defeated North Carolina State and South Carolina. . . . Point guard for the Paladins in 1939-40 and 1940-41 was one of the top scorers in the Southern Conference. Standing 5-7, the fierce competitor was called the "biggest little man ever to attend Furman."

ZEKE MARTIN, North Texas State
Earned all-conference recognition three straight seasons as a quarterback in the late 1940s and 1950, passing for 2,522 yards. Played in 1948 Salad Bowl before competing one season in the Canadian Football League with the Hamilton Tigers. . . . Also played college basketball and tennis. Served as mayor of Denton, Tex., in the late 1960s.

MATT MATHENY, Davidson
Football letterman from 1989 through 1992. . . . Basketball letterman for multiple seasons before becoming an assistant coach for his alma mater under Bob McKillop. Named Elon's head coach prior to the 2009-10 campaign.

RILEY MATHESON, Cameron (Okla.)/Texas-El Paso
Linebacker-guard intercepted 14 passes with the Cleveland/Los Angeles Rams, Detroit Lions and San Francisco (AAFC) in 10 years from 1939 through 1948. Four of the interceptions came in 1946. Starter at guard for 1945 NFL champion Rams in his fifth of five straight years as an All-Pro selection. . . . The 6-2, 205-pounder was an All-Border Conference first-team selection as a basketball guard in 1938-39.

HAYDEN "LINDY" MAYHEW, Texas-El Paso
Lineman played with the Pittsburgh Steelers for three years from 1936 through 1938. . . . The 6-1, 220-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1931.

GENE MAYL, Notre Dame
The 6-2, 195-pound end caught two touchdown passes with the Dayton Triangles in 1926. . . . Three-year starting guard was captain of the Irish basketball team as a senior in 1923-24.

KEN McALISTER, San Francisco
He didn't play football in college, but was a linebacker/defensive back with the Seattle Seahawks, San Francisco 49ers and Kansas City Chiefs for five seasons in the mid-1980s. McAlister had two interceptions and four sacks for the Chiefs in 1984. . . . The 6-5, 220-pounder averaged 8.5 ppg and 3.2 rpg for the Dons from 1978-79 through 1981-82 (career highs of 12.1 ppg and 5.3 rpg as a senior). Teammate of All-American Quintin Dailey played in four NCAA playoff games, dishing out a team-high five assists against Kansas State in 1981.

CALVIN McCALL, Maryland
In 1999, finished No. 2 among Division I-A freshman quarterbacks (behind Virginia Tech's Michael Vick) in passing efficiency and total offense. The next year, he had 200-yard passing days against West Virginia, Wake Forest and Virginia. Completed 52.4% of his passes for 2,797 yards. . . . The 6-3, 200-pound basketball guard collected 27 points, 19 assists and 17 rebounds in 24 games as a freshman in 1999-2000 and sophomore in 2000-01. He hit all four of his field-goal attempts at Florida State, including a pair from three-point range, before playing in three of six playoff contests for the Terrapins' 2002 NCAA champion. McCall was a part-time starter in 2002-03, averaging 4.8 ppg and 3.4 rpg.

HOWARD McCANTS, Washington State
End selected by Detroit Lions in fourth round of 1954 draft (49th pick overall). . . . The 6-8, 235-pound multi-sport athlete averaged 3.9 ppg and 6.1 rpg in two seasons. He was the PCC's high jump outdoor champion in 1953.

JOHN McCARTHY, St. Francis (Pa.)
Quarterback-punter completed 20 passes and punted 24 times for a 33.4-yard average with the Chicago Cardinal-Pittsburgh merger squad in 1944. . . . The 5-8, 155-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1941.

MICKEY McCARTY, Texas Christian
Fourth-round draft choice by the Kansas City Chiefs in 1968 (90th pick overall) played in three games for the Super Bowl champion the next year as a tight end. . . . The 6-5, 255-pounder averaged 15.4 points and 10.7 rebounds per game from 1965-66 through 1967-68. Two-time All-SWC first-team selection left the Horned Frogs as the third-leading scorer in school history. He was also selected in the major league baseball draft.

JACK "CY" McCLAIREN, Bethune-Cookman
Split end caught 85 passes for 1,253 yards and three touchdowns in six years with the Pittsburgh Steelers (1955 through 1960). Selected in the 26th round of the 1953 NFL draft. Played in Pro Bowl after finishing third in the NFL in pass receptions with 46 in 1957. . . . A 6-4, 210-pound forward-center in basketball, he was a two-time All-Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference selection. In the championship game of the 1953 SIAC tourney, he scored 36 points to lead his team to victory over Xavier of New Orleans. Served as head basketball coach at his alma mater for 31 seasons before retiring following the 1992-93 campaign.

BOB McCLURE, Drake/Nevada-Reno
Guard played two years in the NFL after being a third-round draft choice by Boston in 1946 (17th pick overall). . . . The 6-1, 220-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1945.

FRANK McCORMICK, South Dakota
Fullback rushed for three touchdowns with Akron and Cincinnati in 1920 and 1921. . . . The 5-11, 190-pounder was a basketball letterman. Athletic director for Minnesota from 1933 to 1950.

ANGUS "MONK" McDONALD, North Carolina
QB from 1922 through 1924. . . . Played basketball for the Tar Heels from 1920-21 through 1923-24. Coached the Tar Heels to an 18-5 record in 1924-25.

JAMES McDONALD, Southern California
Tight end caught 14 passes for 168 yards and three touchdowns with the Los Angeles Rams and Detroit Lions in four years from 1983 to 1987. . . . Four-year basketball letterman in the early 1980s averaged 8.2 ppg and 4.8 rpg as a starting senior forward. The 6-5, 230-pound defensive specialist collected seven points and five rebounds in West Regional first-round loss against Wyoming in the 1982 NCAA playoffs.

JIM McDONALD, Ohio State
Back rushed 25 times for 80 yards and caught seven passes for 112 yards with the Detroit Lions in 1938 and 1939. First-round choice by the Philadelphia Eagles in the 1938 NFL draft (2nd pick overall). Coached Tennessee to a 5-5 record in 1963. . . . The 6-1, 190-pounder was a three-year basketball letterman with the Buckeyes, serving as their captain as a senior.

JACK McDOWELL, North Carolina State
School's first All-American football as a running back. Led State to a 9-1 mark and Southern Conference title in 1927. . . . Captain of 1927-28 basketball squad.

BANKS McFADDEN, Clemson
Member of College Football Hall of Fame became Clemson's first football All-American in 1939 when he was Cotton Bowl MVP in the Tigers' victory over Boston College in their initial bowl game. The halfback/defensive back had 22 punts of more than 50 yards en route to finishing eighth in the Heisman Trophy voting that year. He held the school punting average record (43.5 yards per punt) until 1979. McFadden, who had a 90-yard run against Presbyterian in 1938, was selected by the Brooklyn Dodgers in the first round (third player overall) of the 1940 NFL draft. Finished fourth in rushing in the NFL in his only pro season, averaging 6.3 yards per carry. He coached Clemson's defensive backs for one season before joining the Army Air Corps and spending four years in North Africa and Italy during World War II. . . . Led Clemson in scoring in each of his three seasons on his way to becoming the school's first All-American basketball player. The 6-3, 175-pound center compiled a career scoring average of 12.9 points per game en route to being named to the first five on the Southern Conference all-tournament team three times. Clemson captured the Southern Conference Tournament crown in 1939. McFadden, the only Clemson athlete to have both his football jersey (#66) and basketball jersey (#23) numbers retired, coached the school's basketball squad for 10 seasons from 1946-47 through 1955-56.

RICK McFADDEN, Ohio State/Akron
Began college career at OSU as a redshirt quarterback on the Buckeyes' 2001 scout team. . . . The 6-7 McFadden averaged 6.6 ppg for the Zips in 2003-04 and 2004-05. Set the school single-season record for three-point field-goal percentage, hitting 48 percent from beyond the arc in 2003-04.

KAY McFARLAND, Colorado State
Wide receiver caught 45 passes for 682 yards and four touchdowns in six years with the San Francisco 49ers after being their 18th-round draft choice in 1961. . . . The 6-2, 185-pounder was a three-year basketball letterman for CSU. He was an honorable mention UPI All-Skyline Conference selection in 1961 (6 ppg and 3.9 rpg) when the Rams competed in the NIT.

RICH McGEORGE, Elon
Tight end caught 175 passes for 2,370 yards and 13 touchdowns with the Green Bay Packers in nine years from 1970 through 1978. Selected in the first round of the 1970 NFL draft (16th pick overall). In three decades, McGeorge had three different assistant coaching stints at Duke. He was on the coaching staffs of the Miami Dolphins and Packers before rejoining college staffs at North Carolina Central and Shaw. College Hall of Famer rewrote Elon's receiving record book with 224 receptions for 3,486 yards and 31 TDs in four seasons. He set school single-game marks with 15 catches, 285 receiving yards and four TDs in his decorated junior year. . . . The 6-4 McGeorge said: "I went to Elon and hoped to play college basketball, but they ended up getting a two-for-one deal." He held his own in hoops, developing from a walk-on forward to all-conference performer in his secondary sport.

BOB McKEE, Monmouth (Ill.)
He was the Baltimore Colts' 22nd-round draft choice as an end in 1958. . . . Second-team all-conference basketball selection for Monmouth's league championship team in 1956-57.

KEITH McKELLER, Jacksonville (Ala.) State
Buffalo Bills tight end for seven years from 1987 through 1993. Ninth-round draft choice caught 124 passes for 1,464 yards and 11 touchdowns. He played in four Super Bowl games. . . . Starting center for Jacksonville State's 1985 NCAA Division II championship team. The 6-6, 240-pounder led the Gulf South Conference in rebounding each of his first three seasons and finished second as a senior. Four-time all-league pick averaged 12.5 points and 10.1 rebounds per game in his career (1982-83 through 1985-86).

HERB McMATH, Morningside (Iowa)
Defensive lineman was a fourth-round draft choice by the Oakland Raiders in 1976 before playing the next year with the Green Bay Packers. Participated in Super Bowl XI with the Raiders. . . . The 6-4, 245-pound junior college transfer played basketball for the Chiefs' team that advanced to the 1975 NAIA Tournament.

DONOVAN McNABB, Syracuse
Quarterback was the second pick overall in 1999 NFL draft by the Philadelphia Eagles. Pro Bowl participant five straight seasons from 2000 through 2004 with twice as many TDs as interceptions. Set an NFL record with 24 consecutive completions over a two-game span in 2004 when he had five games with at least four touchdown passes and established the Eagles' single-game record with 464 yards against Green Bay. After being traded to the Washington Redskins, he had completed 58.9% of his passes for 36,250 yards and 230 TDs through 2010. Completed 58.4% of his college passes with 77 TDs, including one for 96 yards to Marvin Harrison against West Virginia in 1995. Participated in bowl games all four years--Gator, Liberty, Fiesta and Orange. Finished fifth in the Heisman Trophy voting as a senior. . . . Averaged 2.3 points in 18 games in 1995-96 and 1996-97. Collected a career-high 10 points and six rebounds and made two clinching free throws with 2.7 seconds remaining in a 77-74 victory over Georgetown in 1997 before Syracuse appeared in the NIT. He scored two points in two 1996 NCAA Tournament games for the Orangemen's national runner-up. High school basketball teammate of former NBA star Antoine Walker with Mount Carmel (Ill.), an all-male Catholic institution on the Chicago southside.

TOM McNEILL, Stephen F. Austin State
Punter had a 41.1-yard average with the New Orleans Saints, Minnesota Vikings and Philadelphia Eagles during seven years from 1967 through 1973. . . . The 6-1, 195-pounder averaged 5 ppg and 2.3 rpg as a basketball letterman in 1965-66. His best game was a 12-point, 8-rebound effort against Prairie View A&M.

FRANK McPHEE, Princeton
Standout end on undefeated 1951 Princeton football team. Captain of squad in 1952 when he was a consensus All-American. Played in two NFL games with the Chicago Cardinals in 1955 after being their 13th-round draft choice two years earlier. . . . Leading scorer (119 points in 11 games) for Princeton's freshman basketball team in 1949-50. Scored 25 points in 17 games for the varsity in 1950-51.

ADRIAN McPHERSON, Florida State
Quarterback was a fifth-round NFL draft choice by the New Orleans Saints in 2005 after becoming Arena League Rookie of the Year by completing 59.4% of his passes with 56 touchdowns and only five interceptions. Replaced Chris Rix as starting QB for the Seminoles in 2002 before the sophomore was dismissed from the squad following charges of gambling on pro and college games plus stealing a blank check and receiving nearly $3,500 after it was cashed. Bradenton product was the first athlete ever to be named Florida Mr. Football and Mr. Basketball. . . . The 6-3, 215-pounder scored five points in five minutes in three FSU basketball games as a freshman.

MILT McPIKE, Northeast Missouri State
End was 12th-round NFL draft choice by the San Francisco 49ers in 1962. . . . Four-year basketball letterman posted team-high averages of 14.4 ppg and 10.7 rpg as a senior.

R.W. McQUARTERS, Oklahoma State
Part-time starter as a rookie returned a league-high 47 punts for 406 yards and a touchdown and 17 kickoffs for 399 yards with the San Francisco 49ers in 1998 after being one of an NFL-record seven cornerbacks selected in the first round of the draft. Became a starting left cornerback for the Chicago Bears and appeared with them in the 2001 NFL playoffs before playing for the Detroit Lions in 2005 and New York Giants from 2006 through 2008. Returned three of 14 interceptions for touchdowns through 2008. Member of Giants Super Bowl champion that upset the New England Patriots following the 2007 campaign. Averaged 23.9 yards per kickoff return with OSU as a freshman in 1995 and had an 82-yard punt return against Northeast Louisiana in 1997. . . . The 5-9, 195-pound McQuarters collected 66 points, 24 rebounds and 38 assists in 32 games (two starts) for Oklahoma State's basketball team in 1995-96 and 1996-97.

BRYANT "MEATBALL" MEEKS, South Carolina
Center played with the Pittsburgh Steelers for two years in 1947 and 1948 after being their fifth-round draft choice. He also attended Georgia. . . . Scored 19 points in 17 games for the Gamecocks' basketball squad in 1946.

KENNETH "MOCO" MERCER, Simpson (Iowa)
Scored 348 points in football for Simpson. Back passed for 12 touchdowns and scored 10 with Frankford in three NFL years from 1927 through 1929. . . . The 5-11, 180-pounder was a three-year basketball letterman as a forward.

MAX MESSNER, Cincinnati
Linebacker was a ninth-round draft choice of the Detroit Lions. The 6-3, 225-pounder intercepted two passes for 40 yards with the Lions, New York Giants and Pittsburgh Steelers in six years from 1960 through 1965. . . . Grabbed three rebounds in four games for the Bearcats as a sophomore in 1957-58.

PETE METZELAARS, Wabash (Ind.)
Played in more games at tight end than any player in NFL history. Participated in five AFC championship games and four Super Bowls in his first 15 seasons with the Seattle Seahawks, Buffalo Bills, Carolina Panthers and Detroit Lions. The 1982 third-round draft choice of the Seahawks led the Bills with 68 receptions in 1993. He had a career-high six touchdowns in 1992. . . . As a 6-7, 235-pound center at Wabash, he averaged 19.2 points and 11.4 rebounds per game in four varsity seasons. Set NCAA Division III field-goal shooting records for a single season (75.3 percent in 1981-82 as a senior) and career (72.4). Led Wabash to the 1982 Division III Tournament title, scoring a tourney record 129 points in five games and earning tourney outstanding player honors. Scored a DIII playoff-record 45 points in the championship game against Potsdam State.

PAUL MEYERS, Wisconsin-Milwaukee/Wisconsin
End caught one touchdown pass for Racine in 1923. . . . The 5-11, 170-pounder was a basketball letterman with the Badgers in 1916 and 1917.

DANNY MILES, Southern Oregon College
Set NCAA all-time record for passing accuracy (all divisions) by completing 77.9% of his passes as a sophomore in 1965 (190 of 247). As a freshman, he completed 77% of his passes and his career mark was a sparkling 66%. Led the nation in passing in 1964 and in total offense in 1965. . . . All-conference selection in basketball. Surpassed the 900-win plateau during the 2009-10 campaign, he ranked among the top five in coaching victories in the history of men's collegiate basketball for all levels. Won almost 80% of his games for Oregon Tech in a 12-year span after capturing the 2008 NAIA Division II Tournament title in his 37th campaign with Oregon Tech.

DON MILLER, Notre Dame
Halfback in Irish's famous "Four Horsemen" backfield. Member of College Football Hall of Fame earned All-American honors in 1923 and 1924. Former president of the U.S. Attorney's Association was a longtime judge and attorney in Ohio. . . . Played for Notre Dame's basketball team in 1922-23 and 1923-24.

MICHAEL MILLER, Lafayette
Two-time honorable mention Little All-America split end led Lafayette in receptions with 42 in 1968 and 60 in 1969. . . . The 6-1 forward averaged 12 ppg and 6.5 rpg from 1967-68 through 1969-70. He was the Leopards' leading scorer as a junior with 17.6 ppg.

R.F. "CANDY" MILLER, Purdue
Tackle played with Racine in 1922 and 1923. . . . The 6-3, 215-pounder was a basketball letterman from 1920 through 1922.

VERNE MILLER, Carleton (Minn.)/St. Mary's (Minn.)
Secured a distinction in Ripley's Believe It or Not by scoring nine touchdowns in 20 minutes against Dubuque in 1929. Back with Minnesota in 1930. . . . The 5-8, 150-pounder was one of the nation's leading scorers in 1929 with 131 points.

RYLAND MILNER, Northwest Missouri
Won six MIAA football titles while compiling a coaching record of 90-63-13 for his alma mater from 1937 to 1957. . . . Member of three MIAA basketball championhship teams in the early 1930s. Also coached the school's hoop squad to a 70-59 mark from 1943-44 through 1949-50.

CHARLIE MITCHELL, Southwest Missouri State
The 6-0, 185-pound defensive back was a 26th-round draft choice by the Chicago Bears in 1944. Played for the Bears in 1945 before intercepting one pass with the Green Bay Packers in 1946. He also attended Tulsa. . . . Basketball letterman for multiple years in the early 1940s for SWMS.

LEONARD MITCHELL, Houston
Defensive end was a first-round draft choice who played seven seasons (1981 through 1987) with the Philadelphia Eagles and Atlanta Falcons. Led the Cougars in QB sacks with eight in 1977. . . . Mitchell, a 6-7, 260-pound center in basketball, averaged 4.1 points and 4.2 rebounds per game as a freshman and sophomore in 1977-78 and 1978-79. He played briefly for the Cougars in their 100-77 opening-round setback to Notre Dame in the 1978 NCAA playoffs.

MACK MITCHELL, Houston
Defensive end was a first-round draft choice (5th pick overall) who played five seasons (1975 through 1979) with the Cleveland Browns and Cincinnati Bengals. Co-MVP of the 1974 Bluebonnet Bowl led the Cougars in QB sacks three consecutive years from 1972 through 1974 with a total of 33. . . . The 6-8, 230-pound forward collected 11 points and 23 rebounds in 11 basketball games in 1971-72 after averaging 11.7 points and 10.9 rebounds per game for the Cougars' freshman team the previous year.

BOBBY MOERS, Texas
Caught a touchdown pass during the 1938 football campaign. . . . Two-time All-SWC first-team selection in basketball.

KEITH MOLESWORTH, Monmouth (Ill.)
Passed for 1,486 yards and 18 touchdowns, rushed for 1,105 yards and eight TDs and caught 35 passes for 464 yards and two TDs with the Chicago Bears in seven years from 1931 through 1937. He was coach of the Baltimore Colts in 1953, the first season of that franchise's existence, before serving as their director of player personnel until 1966. . . . The 5-9, 165-pounder was a three-year basketball letterman in the late 1920s.

JOHN "MO" MONAHAN, Dartmouth
Football All-American as a defensive end. . . . He was in the regular rotation for the basketball team that lost in the 1944 NCAA championship game to Utah. Monahan averaged five points per game for Dartmouth's undefeated EIBL champion.

MARCUS MONK, Arkansas
Split end broke the school record for TD catches with 24 through his junior year, finishing with 27 (school single-season record of 11 in 2006). Caught 138 passes for 2,151 yards from 2004 through 2007. Had a good chance to break the SEC mark for receiving TDs before two preseason knee surgeries caused him to miss more than half of his senior campaign. Seventh-round pick of the Chicago Bears in the NFL draft. . . . The 6-6, 220-pound forward collected 10 points and 18 rebounds in 10 basketball games as a freshman in 2004-05. Briefly returned to hardwood with the Razorbacks in 2008-09, averaging 4.5 ppg and 3.1 rpg in eight contests.

RODRICK MONROE, Cincinnati
Tight end for the Atlanta Falcons in Super Bowl XXXIII. Playing college football after his basketball eligibility expired, he became a seventh-round draft choice by the Dallas Cowboys in 1998. . . . Reserve forward averaged 3.9 ppg and 2.7 rpg for the Bearcats in 1995-96 and 1996-97 after transferring from McLennan (Tex.) Junior College. Collected career highs of 17 points and eight rebounds against DePaul as a senior. Physical specimen bench-pressed more than 400 pounds and leg-pressed more than 1,100 pounds. Supplied two points and four rebounds against Butler in the opening round of the 1997 NCAA playoffs.

TOMMY MONT, Maryland
Back rushed for one touchdown, caught two TD passes, threw for two TDs and had three interceptions with the Washington Redskins in three years from 1947 through 1949 after being a 12th-round draft choice by the New York Giants in 1944. . . . The 6-0, 190-pounder was a three-year basketball letterman for the Terrapins in the mid-1940s.

EVAN MOORE, Stanford
Led all Cleveland Browns tight ends in receptions and yards in 2010. Wide receiver with Stanford caught 103 passes for 1,555 yards and 12 TDs from 2003 through 2007. Runner-up on the team in pass receptions with 39 in 2004 (led club with six TD catches) and 2007. Missed much of 2005 with a dislocated hip he suffered in season opener at Navy and was restricted to a part-time role in 2006 because of a stress fracture in his right foot. . . . The 6-7, 235-pounder collected 15 points and 11 rebounds in 14 games in 2003-04 and 2004-05. Made his only field-goal attempt in two minutes against Texas-San Antonio in the opening round of the 2004 NCAA playoffs.

WAYNE MOORE, Lamar
Offensive tackle with the Miami Dolphins for nine years from 1970 through 1978. Pro Bowl selection in 1974 participated in three consecutive Super Bowls. . . . The 6-6, 250-pounder averaged 5.7 ppg and 10.3 rpg in four basketball seasons in the late 1960s. He led the team in rebounding as a senior with 12.6 per game.

JACK MORLOCK, Marshall
Back played in four games with the Detroit Lions in 1940 after being their 12th-round draft choice. . . . The 5-10, 165-pounder was a three-year member of Marshall's basketball squad.

TONY "ZIPPY" MOROCCO, Georgia
Led Georgia in receiving in 1950 when he was Co-MVP in the Presidential Cup bowl game in College Park, Md. Paced the Bulldogs in scoring with six touchdowns in 1951 catching passes from Zeke Bratkowski. Team leader in punt and kickoff returns each year had a 90-yard punt return against Furman. Played in North-South Shrine game before becoming the Philadelphia Eagles' 29th-round draft choice in 1952. . . . Three-year letterman was basketball captain in 1952-53 when he earned All-SEC first-team acclaim (23.6 ppg, 7.7 rpg). Scored a career-high 38 points against Tennessee before being selected by the Minneapolis Lakers in the 1953 NBA draft.

GLEN MAX MORRIS, Northwestern
The 6-2, 200-pound end caught 53 passes for 677 yards and two touchdowns with the AAFC's Chicago Rockets and Brooklyn Dodgers in three years from 1946 through 1948. Selected by the Chicago Bears in 26th round of 1947 NFL draft. Earned letter in football at the University of Illinois before transferring. . . . NCAA basketball All-American in 1945 and 1946 when the two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection averaged 16.3 ppg.

HAL MORRISON, East Tennessee State
ETSU's first All-American in football recorded 11 of his school record 20 career touchdown catches in 1953. . . . Multi-sport athlete went on to coach golf with his alma mater for 25 years.

QUENTIN MOSES, Georgia
Defensive end was part of Georgia football squads that posted a 4-2-10 record from 2001 through 2004, three straight seasons of 10 or more wins, three straight bowl victories and three consecutive national top six finishes. . . . Played in three basketball games for the Bulldogs in 2002-03.

GEORGE MUNNS, Miami (Ohio)
Tailback passed for two touchdowns with Cincinnati in 1921. . . . The 5-9, 170-pounder was a four-year basketball letterman.

TOM MURPHY, Arkansas
All-SWC fullback in 1933/QB in 1934 Dixie Classic tie against Centenary. . . . Twice named All-SWC in basketball.

FRAN MURRAY, Penn
Played two seasons (1939 and 1940) with the Philadelphia Eagles as a back and end after participating in the 1937 East-West Shrine Game and becoming their second-round draft choice (11th pick overall). The 6-0, 200-pounder rushed 55 times for 144 yards and caught 25 passes for 269 yards, scoring two touchdowns. . . . He was a first-team All-Eastern Intercollegiate League guard as both a junior and senior. Led Penn to a 12-0 Ivy League-winning mark as a senior in 1936-37. Averaged 5.4 points per game in 34 conference contests in his three varsity seasons.

GEORGE MUSSO, Millikin (Ill.)
Member of Pro Football Hall of Fame played for seven divisional winners and four NFL title teams. The 6-2, 270-pound guard and tackle played for 12 seasons (1933 through 1944) with the Chicago Bears. As a collegian, he played against future President Ronald Reagan, who attended Eureka. As a member of the Bears in 1935, Musso played against future President Gerald Ford in the Bears-College All-Star Game in Chicago. . . . Three-year basketball letterman in college.

CHET MUTRYN, Xavier
Halfback was a 20th-round pick by the Philadelphia Eagles in the 1943 NFL draft. He was an All-AAFC selection three consecutive years in the late 1940s before rushing for two touchdowns and catching two touchdown passes for the Baltimore Colts in 1950. . . . The 5-9, 180-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1943.

WALLACE MYERS, Texas Christian
Football letterman for TCU from 1931 through 1933. . . . The 6-1 guard was a Helms Foundation All-American in 1934.

ROLAND NABORS, Texas Tech
Linebacker-center intercepted one pass for the AAFC's New York franchise in 1948. . . . The 6-2, 200-pounder was a three-year basketball letterman in the mid-1940s.

JOHN NAIOTI, St. Francis (Pa.)
Back caught two passes with Pittsburgh in 1945. . . . The 5-10, 180-pounder was a basketball letterman in the early 1940s.

JOHN NAPONICK, Virginia
Tackle was drafted by the Oakland Raiders in the 5th round of the 1968 NFL draft. . . . The 6-10, 260-pounder averaged 6.4 ppg and 6.1 rpg for the Cavaliers in 1965-66 and 1966-67. He led them in rebounding his first varsity season as a sophomore with 6.7 rpg.

BOB NASH, Cornell/Rutgers
Tackle played with Akron, Buffalo, Rochester and the New York Giants for six years from 1920 through 1925. . . . The 6-1, 205-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1915 and 1916.

CLEM NEACY, Wisconsin-Milwaukee/Colgate
End-tackle caught two touchdown passes and recovered a fumble for a TD with Milwaukee, Duluth, Chicago Bears and Chicago Cardinals in five years from 1924 through 1928. . . . The 6-3, 205-pounder was a basketball letterman for UWM in 1919 and 1920.

EARLE "GREASY" NEALE, West Virginia Wesleyan College
Pro Football Hall of Famer compiled a 63-43 record as coach of the Philadelphia Eagles for 10 years from 1941 through 1950, winning back-to-back NFL titles by shutting out their opponents in championship games in 1948 and 1949. Guided Washington and Jefferson (Pa.) to the 1922 Rose Bowl before coaching Virginia and West Virginia. He starred as an end on Jim Thorpe's pre-World War I Canton Bulldogs. Also played as a major league outfielder with the Cincinnati Reds for eight years from 1916 to 1924, hitting .357 in the infamous "Black Sox" 1919 World Series. . . . Class of 1915 at WVWC.

CHUCK NEINAS, Wisconsin-Stevens Point
Executive director of the College Football Association from 1980 to 1997 before starting his own consulting service. Commissioner of the Big Eight Conference from 1971 to 1980 after serving as assistant executive director of the NCAA from 1961 to 1971. . . . Basketball letterman for Stevens Point in 1953-54.

FRANK NELSON, Utah
Halfback rushed 26 times for 86 yards, completed eight of 17 passes, caught one pass for 10 yards and intercepted two passes with Boston after being an 18th-round draft choice in 1948. . . . The 5-9, 165-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1943.

ANDY NEMECEK, Ohio State
Lineman with the Columbus Tigers for three years from 1923 through 1925. . . . The 6-4, 215-pounder was a three-year basketball letterman with the Buckeyes.

KEITH NEUBERT, Nebraska
The 6-5, 250-pound tight end was an eighth-round draft choice by the New York Jets in 1988. The next year, he caught 28 passes for 302 yards and one touchdown. Huskers football letterman in 1987. . . . Forward scored in all five NIT games for third-place team in 1987 when he averaged 4.7 ppg.

ERNIE NEVERS, Stanford
Member of College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame. He was a consensus All-American selection as a senior fullback in 1925 before rushing for 37 touchdowns in five NFL seasons with the Duluth Eskimos (1926 and 1927) and Chicago Cardinals (1929 through 1931). Set NFL record with a 40-point game against the Chicago Bears in 1929. Co-MVP of the 1925 Rose Bowl. . . . Compiled a 6-12 pitching record in three seasons (1926 through 1928) with the St. Louis Browns. He yielded two of Babe Ruth's record-tying 60 home runs in 1927. . . . Lettered in basketball for Stanford as a sophomore and junior. Named to the All-Pacific Coast Conference second five as a junior in 1924-25. Historians say he was a fine shooter, an excellent dribbler, tough on defense, and generally a terrifying figure for the opposition. The Spalding Basketball Guide said: "He is almost as good a basketball player as he is a football star. With his speed, weight and general all-around ability, he was a stellar performer."

ELBIE NICKEL, Cincinnati
End was a 15th-round draft choice of the Pittsburgh Steelers. He caught 329 passes for 5,131 yards and 37 touchdowns with them in 11 years from 1947 through 1957. The 6-1, 195-pounder led the NFL in average yards per reception with 24.3 in 1949. . . . Nickel was the Bearcats' second-leading scorer in 1942 with 154 points. Also earned a hoop letter in 1947.

RALPH NIEHAUS, Dayton
Tackle played six games for the Cleveland Rams in 1939 after being the Detroit Lions' 15th-round draft choice. . . . The 6-4, 220-pounder was a basketball letterman with the Flyers.

GIFFORD NIELSEN, Brigham Young
Quarterback finished sixth in Heisman Trophy voting in 1976. In three seasons at BYU (1975 through 1977), he completed 415 of 708 passes for 5,833 yards and 55 touchdowns before an injury in a game against Oregon State his senior year ended his collegiate career. Third-round draft pick played six seasons in the NFL with the Houston Oilers (1978 through 1983), passing for 3,255 yards and 20 touchdowns. . . . The 6-5, 190-pound forward-guard averaged 6.5 points and 2.7 rebounds per game in 44 varsity contests during the 1973-74 and 1974-75 seasons. Nielsen was the fourth-leading scorer on BYU's 1974-75 squad with an 8.7 average.

JACK NIX, Mississippi State
Halfback was a three-year letterman from 1937 through 1939. Played in both the Blue-Gray Game and the College All-Star Game in Chicago. Third-team All-SEC selection was a 17th-round NFL draft choice by the Cleveland Browns in 1940. . . . The 6-0, 175-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1938.

RAY NOLTING, Cincinnati
Back rushed 508 times for 2,285 yards and 10 touchdowns while catching 30 passes for 508 yards and three TDS with the Chicago Bears in eight years from 1936 through 1943. . . . The 5-11, 185-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1936.

NELSON NORGREN, Chicago
End for UC's Big Ten title football squads in 1907 and 1908. . . . Guard on the Maroon conference champonship basketball teams from 1908 through 1910. Returned to his alma mater as basketball and baseball coach.

AL NORGARD, Stanford
End caught three passes for 29 yards with the Green Bay Packers in 1934. . . . The 6-1, 190-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1932.

HALDO NORMAN, Gustavus Adolphus (Minn.)
Receiver selected by San Francisco 49ers in 15th round of 1952 NFL draft. . . . Four-year letterman in basketball averaged 6.1 ppg as a senior.

CLINT NORMORE, Kansas
Defensive back had two interceptions in 1987. . . . Averaged 1.9 ppg for the Jayhawks' 1988 NCAA champion.

ULYSSES NORRIS, Georgia
Tight end for seven seasons in the NFL with the Detroit Lions (1979-83) and Buffalo Bills (1984 and 1985). The 6-4, 230-pounder was a fourth-round draft choice. Best season was his final one with the Lions in 1983 when he caught 26 passes for 291 yards and seven touchdowns. . . . Hit 8 of 14 field-goal attempts and grabbed 31 rebounds in nine games for the Bulldogs in 1975-76.

JOHN NORTH, Vanderbilt
End was a fourth-round draft choice for the Washington Redskins in 1945 (51st pick overall). Caught 33 passes for 694 yards and five touchdowns with the AAFC's Baltimore franchise in 1948 and 1949. . . . The 6-2, 195-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1943.

HOMER HILL NORTON, Birmingham-Southern
Compiled a 143-75-18 coaching record in 25 seasons from 1919 through 1947 with Centenary (11) and Texas A&M (14). Won the Sugar Bowl and Cotton Bowl with the Aggies in back-to-back years (1939 and 1940). . . . Played four sports in college, including basketball. Also coached basketball for Centenary in the early 1920s.

HOUSTON NUTT, Arkansas/Oklahoma State
Arkansas football coach for 10 years from 1998 through 2007 (75-48 record) after serving in a similar capacity at Murray State (31-16 from 1993 through 1996) and Boise State (5-6 in 1997). Aligned with Ole Miss in 2008, taking the Rebels to a bowl game in his first year with them (only team to defeat national champ Florida). Quarterback at Arkansas under Frank Broyles and Lou Holtz before transferring to Oklahoma State under Jimmy Johnson. . . . Collected six points and three rebounds in 1976-77 as a freshman under coach Eddie Sutton on Arkansas' team that included Sidney Moncrief and Ron Brewer before playing a couple of years with OSU under Paul Hansen.

MALLY NYDALL, Minnesota
Back rushed for four touchdowns with Minneapolis and Frankfort in three years from 1929 through 1931. . . . Basketball letterman in the late 1920s.

HARRY OCKERMAN, Eastern Michigan
Compiled a 19-19-9 record as Bowling Green's football coach in six years from 1935 through 1940. . . . EMU basketball letterman in 1925-26 and 1926-27.

RAYMOND ODUMS, Alabama
Three-time All-Canadian Football League defensive back in the early 1980s for the Calgary Stampeders after playing with two other CFL franchises. Also competed in the USFL with the Memphis Showboats in 1985. . . . One of the first African-American athletes for the Crimson Tide was a three-time All-SEC third-team guard from 1971-72 through 1973-74. Paced the league in assists his first season with 5.5 per game. He posted career highs of 14.6 ppg as a sophomore and 5.9 apg as a junior.

ELMER OLIPHANT, Purdue/Army
One of the legendary athletes in the history of college sports. Earned nine letters (three in football and two each in basketball, baseball and track) at Purdue before graduating in 1914. Two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection set a Boilermaker single-game football record with 43 points against Rose Poly on November 17, 1912. Won 12 letters at Army (U.S. Military Academy) in football, basketball, baseball, track, boxing and hockey before graduating in 1918. Consensus All-American halfback in 1916 and 1917 played pro football for Rochester and Buffalo in 1920 and 1921. . . . The 5-7, 175-pound Oliphant was named to the 10-man All-American basketball teams selected in 1957 by the Helms Foundation for the 1913-14 and 1914-15 seasons. Spalding's Official Basketball Guide called him "the fastest and most aggressive floor worker in the conference."

FENDI ONOBUM, Arizona/Houston
Tight end returned hom to play football for his final season of collegiate eligibility before becoming a sixth-round NFL draft choice by the St. Louis Rams in 2010 despite managing only two pass receptions with UH. Caught two passes for 15 yards in three games with the Rams before playing one contest with the Jacksonville Jaguars the next year. . . . The 6-6, 250-pounder averaged 1.8 ppg and 1.2 rpg while shooting 58.7% from the floor with the Wildcats from 2005-06 through 2008-09 under coaches Lute Olson and Kevin O'Neill. Collected 2 points and 2 rebounds vs. Rick Pitino-coached Louisville in 2009 regional semifinal setback.

BENNIE OOSTERBAAN, Michigan
Member of College Football Hall of Fame coached Michigan's football team to a 63-33-4 record in 11 seasons (1948 through 1958). His first team finished with a 9-0 record and was voted national champion in the AP poll. He won Big Ten Conference titles in 1948, 1949 and 1950. . . . In 1943, the Helms Athletic Foundation named him to its 10-man All-American basketball teams it selected for the 1926-27 and 1927-28 seasons. Finished third in Western Conference (forerunner of Big Ten) scoring in 1926-27 (9.3 points per game) and led the league as a senior the next year (10.8 ppg).

DAN ORLICH, Northwestern/Penn State/Nevada-Reno
The 6-5, 215-pound end caught five passes, made one interception and recovered a fumble for a touchdown in three years with the Green Bay Packers after being their eighth-round draft choice in 1949. . . . Basketball letterman with UNR in 1947-48 (154 points) and 1948-49 (166 points).

R.C. OWENS, College of Idaho
Split end caught 206 passes for 3,285 yards and 22 touchdowns in his eight seasons (1957 through 1964) with the San Francisco 49ers, Baltimore Colts and New York Giants. Selected in the 14th round of the 1956 NFL draft. Gained fame as the receiver on "Alley-Oop" pass play in which he made receptions by leaping high above pass defenders. Became the first 49er to have 1,000 yards on pass receptions in a season when he caught 55 passes for 1,032 yards in 1961. . . . The 6-3, 195-pound center had three standout basketball seasons. He averaged 23.5 points and 27.1 rebounds per game in 1952-53 and finished third in the nation among NCAA small college rebounders. Led in rebounding the next season with 27.1 per game while also averaging 23.5 points. In 1954-55 on a team that also included all-time great Elgin Baylor (31.3 ppg and 20.5 rpg), Owens averaged 18.1 ppg and 21.3 rpg. Owens was named to AAU All-American team in 1956-57 as a member of the Seattle Buchan Bakers.

TERRELL OWENS, Tennessee-Chattanooga
Caught 592 passes for 8,572 yards and 81 touchdowns in eight NFL seasons with the San Francisco 49ers after being their third-round draft choice in 1996. Heir apparent to Hall of Fame-bound Jerry Rice as the 49ers' go-to wide receiver after catching 15 touchdown passes in 1998, including at least one in each of the last eight regular-season games. Owens' dramatic 25-yard touchdown catch from Steve Young with three seconds remaining lifted the 49ers to a 30-27 victory against the defending Super Bowl champion Green Bay Packers in an NFC wild-card game following the 1998 season. Owens set an NFL single-game record with 20 receptions against the Chicago Bears in 2000, the first of three consecutive years when he caught more than 90 passes. His first year with the Philadelphia Eagles in 2004 resulted in him participating in the Super Bowl. Later, he set a Cowboys single-game record with four TD catches against the Washington Redskins. Including one-year stints with the Buffalo Bills and Cincinnati Bengals, the six-time Pro Bowler amassed 1,078 receptions for 15,934 yards and 153 TDs (all-time runner-up to Rice) through 2010, leading the league in TD receptions three times (2001, 2002 and 2006). Played in the Senior Bowl after becoming UTC's all-time leading receiver (143 catches for 2,320 yards and 19 TDs). . . . Collected 57 points and 49 rebounds in 38 games (five starts) for UTC's basketball squad in three seasons from 1993-94 through 1995-96. In his only NCAA playoff game, he was scoreless in one minute against No. 2 seed Connecticut in the 1995 West Regional after hitting 11 of 17 field-goal attempts during the regular season.

TERRY OWENS, Jacksonville State (Ala.)
Offensive tackle was an 11th-round draft choice by the San Diego Chargers in 1966 and played 10 seasons with them. . . . The 6-6, 260-pounder led JSU in rebounding in 1966-67 and 1967-68.

HARLAN "PAT" PAGE, Chicago
End on UC's Big Ten football title teams in 1907 and 1908. . . . Guard for the Maroon conference champinship basketball squads from 1908 through 1910. Returned to his alma mater as basketball and baseball coach.

CHUCK PALMER, Northwestern
Back played with Racine in 1924 and Louisville in 1926. . . . The 5-10, 185-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1921.

CLARENCE "ACE" PARKER, Duke
College Hall of Famer led the Blue Devils to a three-year record of 24-5 in the mid-1930s, serving as team captain in his final season in 1936 when they went 9-1. After playing a variety of positions (quarterback, tailback, defensive back and punter), was a second-round choice in the 1937 NFL draft (13th overall). Passed for 3,935 yards and 22 touchdowns, rushed for 1,108 yards and 10 TDs and punted for a 39.5-yard average with the Brooklyn Dodgers/Boston Yanks in six years from 1937 through 1941 and 1945. Three-time consensus All-Pro led the NFL in passing yards in 1938 with 865. He paced the league with six interceptions in 1940 when he was named NFL Most Valuable Player. . . . Basketball letterman for the Blue Devils in 1935-36. Also played major league baseball with the Philadelphia Athletics.

KENNY PARKER, Fordham
The 6-1, 190-pound defensive back, a 16th-round draft choice by the New York Giants in 1968, played 14 games with them in 1970. . . . Averaged 4.9 ppg and 5.4 rpg from 1965-66 through 1967-68 under coach John Bach.

ARA PARSEGHIAN, Miami (Ohio)
Member of College Football Hall of Fame compiled a 170-58-6 record as coach at Miami of Ohio (1951 through 1955), Northwestern (1956 through 1963) and Notre Dame (1964 through 1974). Guided Notre Dame to three national football titles (1964, 1966 and 1973). Directed the Fighting Irish to five bowl games during the first half of the 1970s. Rookie halfback on Cleveland Browns team that won All-America Football Conference title in 1948. Selected by the Pittsburgh Steelers in 13th round of 1947 NFL draft. . . . Played for Miami basketball squads in 1946-47 and 1947-48 (34 points, 31.3 FG%, 44.4 FT%). Teammate of future Tennessee coach Ray Mears.

JOE PATERNO, Brown
Penn State's head coach from 1966 to 2011 guided the Nittany Lions to national championships in 1982 and 1986, five undefeated/untied seasons (1968-69-73-86-94) and 29 finishes in Top 10 national rankings. Only major-college coach ever to reach the 400-win plateau (409-136-3 record) was 24-12-1 in bowl games. Paterno was fired by school trustees in mid-season 2011 after the arrest of his long-time assistant, Jerry Sandusky, on child sexual abuse charges. . . . He earned varsity basketball letters at Brown in 1947-48 and 1948-49. His 7.3-points-per-game scoring average in 1947-48 was second highest on the team.

HAL PATTERSON, Kansas
Member of Canadian Football League Hall of Fame averaged 20.6 yards per pass reception in his 14-year career with 460 catches for 9,473 yards and 64 touchdowns. He also played defensive back for Montreal and Hamilton. Selected by the Philadelphia Eagles in the 14th round of the 1954 NFL draft. . . . Named to NJCAA All-Tournament team in 1952 when he averaged 20 points per game for Garden City (Kan.) before enrolling at Kansas. The 6-1, 185-pound forward averaged 9.5 ppg in 1952-53 for the Jayhawks' NCAA runner-up and averaged 11.2 ppg the next season. Excerpt from school guide: "Fierce battler. Exceptionally high jumper under the backboards. Good close range shooter."

GREG PAULUS, Duke/Syracuse
Quarterback in his hometown for Syracuse in 2009 completed 193 of 285 passes for 2,024 yards and 13 touchdowns. Earned starter's spot for season debut in fifth year of college athletic eligibility despite not playing the sport since high school. . . . Averaged 8.6 ppg and 3.4 apg for the Blue Devils as their playmaker for four NCAA playoff teams from 2005-06 through 2008-09. Became an assistant coach with Navy right out of college.

JOHN PAYE, Stanford
Quarterback under Cardinal coach Jack Elway was a 10th-round draft choice of the San Francisco 49ers in 1987. Amassed 7,669 yards and 38 touchdowns while completing 59.7% of his passes during his college career. Injured and did not play in Gator Bowl against Clemson as a senior. . . . Part-time starter in basketball averaged 4 ppg and 1.9 rpg from 1983-84 through 1985-86. He posted career highs of 5.6 ppg and 3.4 rpg in 1984-85.

PRESTON PEARSON, Illinois
Did not play college football but rushed for 3,609 yards in 941 carries, caught 254 passes for 3,095 yards, returned 114 kickoffs for 2,801 yards, and scored 33 touchdowns in 14 NFL seasons (1967 through 1980) with the Baltimore Colts, Pittsburgh Steelers and Dallas Cowboys. Played in the Super Bowl with each team a total of five times (III, IX, X, XII, XIII). . . . Guard-forward averaged 8.7 points and six rebounds per game as a senior in 1966-67 to finish his three-year varsity career with 5.2 ppg and 3.6 rpg. Excerpt from school guide: "Aggressive, scrappy play made him a crowd favorite. Although he's not big (6-1, 190) by present basketball standards, Preston is one of the strongest men in any game."

JULIUS PEPPERS, North Carolina
First-team All-American as a defensive end led the nation in sacks with 15 in 2000. Second pick overall in 2002 NFL draft as an undergraduate won Lombardi Award as the nation's top lineman and Chuck Bednarik Trophy as nation's top defensive player. Named 2002 NFL defensive rookie of the year after recording 54 tackles and 12 sacks (including pair of three-sack games) in 12 contests for the Carolina Panthers. Appeared in the Super Bowl following the next season. Through 2009 with the Panthers, the Pro Bowler had 81 sacks, six interceptions (including one for a 97-yard touchdown in 2004) and 352 tackles. Then, he signed a six-year, $91.5 million free agent-contract with the Chicago Bears and helped them reach the NFC championship game following the 2010 campaign with eight sacks and two interceptions. . . . The 6-6, 290-pound power forward averaged 5.7 ppg and 3.7 rpg and shot 60.7% from the floor in 1999-00 and 2000-01. Made 13 of 15 shots from the floor in NCAA playoff competition en route to leading the Tar Heels in field-goal shooting in 2000-01 (64.3%). Member of 2000 Final Four squad started both NCAA Tournament games in 2001, including his first double-double (10 rebounds and career-high 21 points against Penn State).

MAC PERCIVAL, Texas Tech
Placekicker scored 466 points with the Chicago Bears and Dallas Cowboys in eight years from 1967 through 1974. Percival led the NFL with 25 field goals for the Bears in 1968 when he tied for third place in scoring with 100 points. . . . Three-year basketball letterman was part of a squad that won the Red Raiders' first SWC championship in a major sport when he averaged 12.1 ppg and 10.5 rpg as a junior in 1960-61. The next season, he averaged 11 ppg and 8.7 rpg. Swingman averaged eight ppg in five NCAA Tournament contests in 1961 and 1962.

FRED PETOSKEY, Michigan
All-American end for Michigan's 1932 national championship football team. . . . Averaged 3.2 ppg as a starting guard for the Wolverines' basketball squad in 1932-33 and 1933-34.

BOB PICARD, Eastern Washington
Two-time NAIA All-American still holds EWU's career receiving record with 166 catches, including a school-record 13 against Puget Sound. Sixth-round draft choice of the Philadelphia Eagles in 1973 played four years in the NFL. He was selected by the Seattle Seahawks in the 1976 expansion draft and attended training camp in EWU's hometown of Cheney, Wash., but didn't make the squad. The 6-1, 195-pound special teams standout spent most of his final pro campaign with the Detroit Lions. . . . Picard averaged 3 ppg and 3.4 rpg in 27 games in 1970-71 and 1972-73.

CLAY PICKERING, Maine
Wide receiver caught one pass for 10 yards while playing with the Cincinnati Bengals, Chicago Bears and New England Patriots in parts of four years from 1984 through 1987. . . . The 6-5, 215-pound forward was a basketball letterman in 1981-82 and 1982-83. He led the Black Bears in scoring as a junior with 15.6 ppg before averaging 8.4 ppg as a senior.

AL PIEROTTI, Washington & Lee
Lineman played for numerous pro football teams in seven years during the 1920s. The 5-10, 200-pounder also pitched for the Boston Braves in 1920 and 1921. . . . Basketball captain helped school's 1917 squad to an undefeated 17-0 record.

BOB PIFFERINI, San Jose State
Linebacker-center for one season with the Detroit Lions after being their 15th-round draft choice in 1949. . . . The 6-0, 210-pounder was a basketball letterman as a guard in 1947.

DICK PLASMAN, Vanderbilt
Member of three NFL championship teams - two with the Chicago Bears (1940 and 1941) and one with the Chicago Cardinals (1947). Third-round draft choice (28th pick overall) led the Bears in pass receptions in 1939 and 1941. Caught 56 passes for 1,083 yards and seven touchdowns in eight pro seasons (1937 through 1941, 1944, 1946 and 1947). . . . Starter as a 6-3 center for the Commodores' basketball team in 1934-35 and 1935-36. Named to the second five on the 1936 SEC All-Tournament team.

DICK POILLON, Canisius
Back-kicker scored four touchdowns by rushing and five by receiving with the Washington Redskins during five years in 1942 and from 1946 through 1949. The 6-0, 195-pounder appeared in the Pro Bowl as a rookie. . . . Played basketball for Canisius in the early 1940s.

JOE POIRIER, Loyola
Six-time Canadian Football League All-Star defensive back was one of leaders in the Ottawa Rough Riders' 1960 Grey Cup triumph. . . . Played college basketball in the mid-1950s for a school that is now known as Concordia University.

MARCUS POLLARD, Bradley
Starting tight end for the Indianapolis Colts from 1998 through 2004 had a career-high eight touchdown receptions in 2001 when he started a string of three consecutive seasons with at least 40 catches from Peyton Manning. Joined Detroit in 2005 and had three TDs in his first season with the Lions. Finished his 13-year NFL career with 349 receptions for 4,280 yards and 40 TDs (long of 86 yards in 2001). . . . J.C. transfer (Seward County, Kan.) averaged 7.3 points and five rebounds per game in two seasons with the Braves in 1992-93 and 1993-94. He was their leading rebounder as a junior (5.3 rpg). Participated with his wife in CBS show "Amazing Race" in 2011 episodes.

GEORGE BARNEY POOLE, Mississippi
The 6-2, 230-pound end caught six passes for 83 yards in 1949 with the AAFC's New York Yankees after being their 9th-round pick in 1948 (52nd choice overall). Marine also played for North Carolina and Army (made two consecutive goal line tackles to insure 21-18 victory over Navy in season finale). Catching passes from Rebels All-American QB Charley Conerly, he had 13 receptions for the SEC titlist against Chattanooga in 1947. Captain for the South team in the first North-South game in 1948 and captain of the College All-Stars for their 1949 contest. His end coach at Ole Miss was his brother Buster. Sixth-round NFL draft choice by the New York Giants in 1945 (53rd pick overall). Inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1974. . . . Guard was a basketball letterman for Ole Miss in 1943.

H.L. "IKE" POOLE, Arkansas
Three-year football letterman from 1933 through 1935. . . . NCAA consensus All-American in 1936 when he averaged 11.3 ppg. Alternatefor the 1936 U.S. Olympic basketball squad.

JAMES "BUSTER" POOLE, Mississippi
Seventh-round NFL draft pick (64th overall) was an end who caught 65 passes for 895 yards and 13 touchdowns and intercepted two passes for 44 yards with the New York Giants and Chicago Cardinals in seven years from 1937 through 1941, 1945 and 1946. . . . The 6-3, 215-pound forward, a three-year basketball letterman, was senior captain in 1936-37. His brother, Barney, was also a star two-way athlete for the Rebels.

OLLIE POOLE, Mississippi
End was a 15th-round NFL draft choice by the New York Giants in 1944. Caught two passes for 21 yards with New York and Baltimore in the AAFC in 1947 and 1948. . . . The 6-3, 200-pound center for the Rebels was a basketball letterman in 1943.

AL POSTUS, Villanova
Back played two games with the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1945 after being a 20th-round draft choice of the Philadelphia Eagles the previous year. . . . The 5-10, 180-pounder was a two-year basketball letterman in 1942-43 and 1943-44.

ART POWELL, San Jose State
Offensive end caught 512 passes for 8,699 yards and 85 touchdowns in 11 seasons (1957 and 1959 through 1968) in the Canadian Football League (Montreal Alouettes), AFL (New York Titans, Oakland Raiders and Buffalo Bills) and NFL (Philadelphia Eagles and Minnesota Vikings). Selected by the Eagles in the 11th round of the 1959 NFL draft. Led the AFL in pass reception yards in 1962 and 1963 and in touchdowns on pass receptions in 1960 (14) and 1963 (16). Played in four AFL All-Star Games (1964 through 1967). Paced the nation's major-college players in pass receptions as a sophomore in 1956 with 40 before signing a CFL contract the next year. . . . The 6-2, 190-pound forward averaged 10.5 ppg and 8.2 rpg in nine contests for the Spartans' varsity basketball team in 1956-57.

ERWIN PRASSE, Iowa
End was an All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection in football in 1938 and 1939. Team MVP in 1938 and senior captain the next year. Ninth-round pick by the Detroit Lions in 1940. . . . . Starting guard averaged 4.5 ppg in 1938-39 and 3.6 ppg in 1939-40.

GENE PREBOLA, Boston University
Tight end was picked by the AFL's Houston Oilers in 1960 while being chosen in the 19th round of the NFL draft by the Detroit Lions. The 6-3, 225-pounder caught 133 passes for 1,823 yards and six touchdowns with the Oakland Raiders and Denver Broncos in four years from 1960 through 1963. . . . He collected 20 points and 13 rebounds in 12 basketball games for BU in 1957-58.

TAVITA PRITCHARD, Stanford
QB completed 254 of 471 passes for 2,865 yards and 15 TDs in 2007 and 2008 before playing sparingly as a senior when giving way to freshman phenom Andrew Luck. Made a memorable first start in 2007, sparking the 41-point underdog Cardinal to a shocking 24-23 upset of USC. Competed against Oklahoma in 2009 Sun Bowl. His father, David, was a starting center for Washington State and played inthe 1981 Holiday Bowl. . . . Played two minutes of basketball for Stanford's basketball squad in 2009-10.

STEVE PRITKO, Villanova
End was a 28th-round choice by Cleveland in the 1943 NFL draft. He caught 93 passes for 1,114 yards and 13 touchdowns with the New York Giants, Cleveland/Los Angeles Rams, Boston/New York Yanks and Green Bay Packers in eight years from 1943 through 1950. . . . The 6-2, 205-pounder was a two-year basketball letterman.

GREG PRUITT, Oklahoma
Consensus All-American running back was third in the Heisman Trophy voting in 1971 and second in 1972. Co-MVP of the 1970 Bluebonnet Bowl. Second-round draft choice rushed for 5,672 yards in 12 seasons (1973 through 1984) with the Cleveland Browns and Los Angeles Raiders. Five-time Pro Bowl selection (1974-75-77-78-84) participated in Super Bowl XVIII with the Raiders. . . . A 5-10, 180-pound guard in basketball, he averaged 13.3 points per game in three contests for the 1969-70 Sooners freshman team before concentrating on football.

DERRICK RAMSEY, Kentucky
Tight end caught 188 passes for 2,364 yards and 21 touchdowns with the Oakland Raiders, New England Patriots and Detroit Lions in nine seasons from 1978 to 1987. Original fifth-round pick had career highs of 66 receptions with 792 yards and seven TDs in 1984 with the Patriots. The next year, Ramsey caught two passes in the Super Bowl in a 46-10 loss to the Chicago Bears. . . . The 6-4, 225-pounder grabbed three rebounds in two basketball games with the Wildcats in 1975-76.

RAY RAMSEY, Bradley
Offensive and defensive halfback in the All-America Football Conference from 1947 through 1949 with three different franchises (Chicago Rockets, Brooklyn Dodgers and Chicago Hornets) before playing in the NFL for four seasons from 1950 through 1953 with the Chicago Cardinals. Eighth-round draft choice by the Chicago Cardinals in 1947. Led the Rockets in pass receptions, punt returns, kickoff returns and scoring and finished second in rushing as a rookie in 1947. Tied for second in the NFL in pass interceptions with 10 in his final season. . . . Led Bradley's basketball team in scoring in 1941-42 (12.3 ppg) and 1942-43 (13.3 ppg) before having his career interrupted by World War II. He was captain of the Braves' 1946-47 squad that compiled a 25-7 record.

ANTWAAN RANDLE EL, Indiana
Big Ten Conference freshman of the year in 1998 became the first conference player to accumulate 5,000 total yards as a sophomore. The 5-11 quarterback compiled 3,000 passing yards and 1,500 yards rushing through his 19th game, faster than anyone in NCAA Division I-A history. His brother, defensive back Curtis, played with him his first two seasons with the Hoosiers. Second-round draft choice by the Pittsburgh Steelers as a wide receiver. Key kick returner caught more than 30 passes each of his first four years in the NFL, including a career-high 47 as a rookie in 2002. Signed seven-year, $31 million contract with the Washington Redskins as an unrestricted free agent after throwing a flea flicker touchdown pass in Super Bowl XX. Returned to the Steelers and played in Super Bowl XXV in Dallas. . . . Collected 16 points and 11 assists in 11 games for IU's 1999 NCAA Tournament team, including two points in each of the Hoosiers' playoff contests (against George Washington and St. John's). He scored 69 points in a single basketball game for Thornton High School in Harvey, Ill.

KEITH RANSPOT, Southern Methodist
End caught 35 passes for 491 yards and four touchdowns in five seasons with five different NFL teams the first half of the 1940s. . . . The 6-3, 205-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1936 and 1937.

MANNY RAPP, St. Louis
Back passed for one touchdown and rushed 15 times for 67 yards in three games with St. Louis in 1934 before playing one game with Cleveland in 1942. . . . The 6-0, 215-pounder was a basketball letterman for SLU in 1932.

WAYNE RASMUSSEN, South Dakota State
Defensive back intercepted 16 passes for 189 yards in nine seasons (1964 through 1972) with the Detroit Lions after becoming their ninth-round draft pick. . . . A guard in basketball, he averaged 11.6 points per game in three varsity seasons. He was named MVP in the eight-team 1963 NCAA College Division Tournament after scoring a tourney-high 56 points in three games to lead the Jackrabbits to the national title. Excerpt from school guide: "An intense competitor, he's at his best when the chips are down and the going is toughest. Ability to start quickly and shift immediately into full speed are assets that make him a strong driver. He plays tall for his height (6-1)."

GEORGE RATTERMAN, Notre Dame
Quarterback passed for 10,473 yards and 91 touchdowns in 10 years (1947 through 1956) with Buffalo in the All-America Football Conference and the New York Yankees and Cleveland Browns in the NFL before playing for the Montreal Alouettes in the CFL. Played in AAFC championship game in 1948 and NFL championship games in 1953, 1954 and 1955. Selected by Boston in the 16th round of the 1948 NFL draft. Second-team QB for Notre Dame's 1946 national championship football team. . . . Third-leading scorer with 11.7 points per game as 6-0 forward on 1944-45 Irish basketball team that compiled a 15-5 record and 8.6 ppg on 1945-46 squad that went 17-4. Scored 4.9 ppg as a senior reserve. In 1945-46, he scored Notre Dame's last 11 points in a 56-47 upset of a Kentucky club that finished with a 28-2 mark and NIT title. Sketch in school guide: "Considered one of the 'slickest' players in college ball."

FRED RAYHLE, Tennessee-Chattanooga
Tight end played two games with the Seattle Seahawks in 1977. . . . The 6-5, 215-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1976-77 when he averaged 9.5 ppg and 7.4 rpg while shooting 47.7% from the floor and 82.9% from the free-throw line.

GIL REICH, Army/Kansas
Two-way back and kicking specialist for the Jayhawks' football squad. He was selected by the Green Bay Packers in the second round of the 1953 draft (19th pick overall) after being named an All-American defensive back by the football writers, but did not play in the NFL. Reich was a QB at Army. . . . Starting guard who averaged 8 ppg and 3.6 rpg for KU's 1953 NCAA Tournament runner-up after transferring from Army for violating West Point's honor code in a cribbing scandal (knew guys were cheating and didn't rat on them). Teammate of Dean Smith was selected by the Boston Celtics in the NBA draft. In 1950-51, he averaged 9.9 ppg and 7.8 rpg with the Cadets where he ranked third in a class of 800.

GARET "JERRY" REICHOW, Iowa
Quarterback broke school records for passing and total offense in 1955 before being named MVP in the East-West Shrine Game and becoming the Detroit Lions' fourth-round draft choice. He was a flanker and tight end for eight seasons (1956, 1957 and 1959 through 1964) with the Lions, Philadelphia Eagles and Minnesota Vikings. Caught 172 passes for 2,589 yards and 24 touchdowns in his NFL career. . . . The 6-2, 195-pounder played in three games for the Hawkeyes' basketball team that finished in fourth place in the 1955 NCAA Tournament.

JOE REITZ, Western Michigan
Starting left offensive guard for the Indianapolis Colts' 2012 NFL playoff team did not play football in college. Rookie free agent sat out the 2008 campaign with the Baltimore Ravens because of a shoulder injury. Practice squad member with the Colts after being claimed off waivers from the Miami Dolphins. . . . The 6-7 Reitz averaged 13.4 ppg and 7.3 rpg from 2004-05 through 2007-08, finishing his career as WMU's all-time third-leading rebounder and fourth-leading scorer. He was a three-time All-MAC selection when among the Broncos' top two in scoringb, reboounding and field-goal shooting each of his last three seasons. Appeared in 2005 NIT as a freshman against Marquette and TCU.

PAUL RIBLETT, Penn
End caught 40 passes for three touchdowns with Brooklyn in five years from 1932 through 1936. . . . The 5-10, 180-pounder was a basketball letterman in the early 1930s.

HERB RICH, Vanderbilt
Defensive back intercepted 29 passes for three touchdowns and recovered five fumbles with the Baltimore Colts, Los Angeles Rams and New York Giants in seven years from 1950 through 1956. All-Pro selection in 1952. He returned a punt for a TD as a rookie with the Colts after being their sixth-round draft choice. . . . The 5-11, 180-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1947.

RICHIE RICHMAN, Villanova
QB counterpart was Heisman Trophy winner Terry Baker of Oregon State in the 1962 Liberty Bowl. Richman led Villanova in passing three straight years from 1960 through 1962. Led the Wildcats in rushing with 371 yards as a sophomore. . . . Basketball letterman in 1960-61.

PAT RICHTER, Wisconsin
Tight end with the Washington Redskins for nine seasons after being their first-round selection in 1962 NFL draft (7th pick overall). Caught 99 passes for 1,315 yards and 14 touchdowns while averaging 41.9 yards per punt on 338 punts for the Redskins. Consensus football All-American in 1962 at Wisconsin, where he is presently the athletic director. Led school's baseball team in hits, home runs and RBI for three consecutive seasons. . . . Three-year letterman in basketball collected 103 points and 145 rebounds in 38 games as a 6-5, 230-pound center.

MIKHAEL RICKS, Stephen F. Austin State
Wide receiver-tight end was a second-round draft choice by the San Diego Chargers in 1998 (59th pick overall) who caught 70 passes for 879 yards in his first two years with them. Pro Bowl alterate had 155 pass receptions for 1,939 yards and eight TDs with the Chargers, Kansas City Chiefs and Detroit Lions in six NFL seasons through 2003. . . . The 6-5, 235-pounder grabbed two rebounds in three games in 1995-96.

ANDRE RISON, Michigan State
Wide receiver caught 743 passes for 10,205 yards and 84 touchdowns with seven different NFL teams in 12 seasons from 1989 through 2000. The Indianapolis Colts' first-round draft choice caught more than 80 passes five straight years from 1990 through 1994 with the Atlanta Falcons. Four-time Pro Bowler caught a 54-yard pass for the first touchdown in Super Bowl XXXI for the Green Bay Packers. Also caught a TD pass in the 1998 AFC-NFC Pro Bowl after being named most outstanding player in the 1994 Pro Bowl. With MSU, he caught 146 passes for 2,992 yards and 20 TDs, including 252 yards against Georgia in the 1989 Gator Bowl. . . . The 6-1, 185-pounder was a backup guard in basketball for the Spartans in 1987-88, collecting 24 points and 42 assists in 18 games. Played for same high school team as Michigan All-American Glen Rice.

JACK ROBBINS, Arkansas
Quarterback completed 88 of 182 passes for 1,076 yards and six touchdowns while rushing for 310 yards in 101 carries with the Chicago Cardinals in 1938 and 1939. All-SWC in 1936 was the first-round draft choice of the Cardinals in 1938 (5th pick overall). . . . The 6-2, 180-pounder repeated as an All-SWC first-team selection in 1938, leading the Razorbacks to the conference title in basketball by averaging 12.4 ppg.

ARTHUR "ARCHIE" ROBERTS, Columbia
Quarterback was a fifth-round draft choice of the New York Jets in 1965. He played briefly for the Miami Dolphins in 1967. . . . The 6-0, 190-pounder averaged 2.2 ppg and 1.3 rpg in 14 contests as a junior in 1963-64.

FRANK ROBINSON, Boise State
Fifth-round draft choice of the Denver Broncos in 1992 played two years with the franchise. The 5-11, 175-pound defensive back returned four kickoffs as a rookie and intercepted one pass in 1993. . . . Two-year basketball letterman collected 28 points and 24 assists in 26 games for Boise State in 1988-89 and 1989-90. He hit two-thirds of his field-goal attempts (10 of 15 including three of four from three-point range) but converted only 5 of 19 from the free-throw line (26.3 percent).

LARRY ROBINSON, Tennessee
Running back and kickoff returner in four games with the Dallas Cowboys in 1973. . . . J.C. transfer averaged 10.9 ppg and 8.8 rpg while shooting 60% from the floor in 1971-72 and 1972-73. He was an All-SEC third-team selection as a senior. Led the Volunteers in rebounding and field-goal shooting both years. Forward paced the Ferrum (Va.) basketball squad to two consecutive berths in the NJCAA Tournament.

NATE ROBINSON, Washington
Started the last half of his freshman season (2002) with the Huskies as a cornerback, intercepting two passes for their Sun Bowl team. Son of Jacque Robinson, a tailback for UW who earned MVP honors in both the Rose Bowl (1982) and Orange Bowl (1985). . . . Led Washington's basketball team in scoring as a freshman with 13 ppg. Went on to play in the 2010 NBA Finals with the Boston Celtics after beginning his career with the New York Knicks.

PATRICK ROBINSON, Tennessee State
Wide receiver-kick returner was a seventh-round draft choice by the Houston Oilers in 1993. The 5-8, 175-pounder caught nine passes for 77 yards with the Cincinnati Bengals (1993) and Arizona Cardinals (1994). He led the NFL in punt returns with 43 as a rookie. . . . Starting basketball guard for the Tigers in 1990-91 when he averaged 6.7 ppg and 2.9 apg.

BURLE ROBISON, Brigham Young
End caught one pass for 18 yards with the Philadelphia Eagles in 1935. . . . The 6-4, 195-pounder was a basketball letterman in the early 1930s.

JOHNNY ROEPKE, Penn State
Back passed for one touchdown and rushed for another with Frankford in 1928. . . . The 5-11, 175-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1926.

BILL "BUD" ROFFLER, Washington State
Defensive back played in three games with the Philadelphia Eagles in 1954 after being a 10th-round draft choice by the Green Bay Packers in 1952. He led WSU in pass interceptions in 1950 with four and rushed for 414 yards in 1951. . . . The 6-1, 200-pounder scored one point in three games for the school's basketball team in 1950-51.

REGGIE ROGERS, Washington
First-team All-American defensive lineman was a first-round draft choice of the Detroit Lions in 1987 (7th pick overall). He also played with the Buffalo Bills and Tampa Bay Buccaneers in a six-year NFL career. His older brother, Don, an outstanding safety at UCLA, was a starter for the Cleveland Browns when he died tragically. . . . Averaged 5.7 ppg and 3.9 rpg in three varsity basketball seasons for the Huskies (1982-83 through 1984-85). The 6-6, 260-pounder hit four of five field-goal attempts in their 80-78 second-round victory over Duke in 1984 in Blue Devils coach Mike Krzyzewski's first NCAA playoff game. Rogers' best year was his first when he averaged 8.4 ppg and 5.3 rpg, including a 22-point, 12-rebound outing against UCLA. Excerpt from school guide: "Many of his points come on thunderous sky-walking dunks."

GEORGE ROGGE, Iowa
End caught seven passes for 100 yards and one touchdown with the Chicago Cardinals in four years from 1931 through 1934. . . . The 6-0, 185-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1929.

STAN ROME, Clemson
He caught 22 passes for 286 yards and one touchdown in four seasons with the Kansas City Chiefs (1979 through 1982) after being their 11th-round draft choice. Clemson participated in back-to-back Gator Bowls in 1977 and 1978. . . . Averaged from 10.4 to 15.3 points per game while shooting 53 percent from the floor in his four-year career from 1974-75 through 1977-78. The 6-5, 205-pound forward was a second-team All-ACC Tournament selection in 1976 after scoring team highs of 20 points against Wake Forest (76-63 victory) and 18 against North Carolina (82-74 defeat). He was an All-ACC second-team choice the next season as a junior.

ALTON "MONK" ROMINE, Florence State (Ala.)
Defensive back played two seasons with the Chicago Bears and Green Bay Packers before intercepting three passes with the AFL's Denver Broncos in 1960. Also played three years in the Canadian Football League. . . . Four-year basketball letterman from 1951-52 through 1954-55 for a school that is now known as North Alabama. Averaged 7.4 ppg as a freshman, 6.2 ppg as a junior and 10.7 ppg as a senior.

MILT ROMNEY, Utah/University of Chicago
Back rushed for five touchdowns and caught four TD passes with Racine and the Chicago Bears in six years from 1923 through 1928. . . . The 5-8, 165-pounder was a basketball letterman with Utah in 1919 and 1920.

GENE RONZANI, Marquette
Halfback-quarterback with the Chicago Bears for eight seasons and coach of the Green Bay Packers for four years from 1950 through 1953. Played in three NFL championship games (1933, 1934 and 1937). Led the Bears in passing in 1934 and in rushing in 1935. . . . A 5-9 guard in basketball, he was the Warriors' fourth-leading scorer in 1931-32 (3.8 points per game) and third-leading scorer in 1932-33 (3.5 ppg).

AL ROSE, Texas
End caught 21 passes for 317 yards and five touchdowns with Providence and Green Bay in seven years from 1930 through 1936. . . . The 6-3, 205-pounder was a basketball letterman from 1928 through 1930.

BOBBY ROSS, Virginia Military Institute
Compiled a 39-25 record in his first four seasons as coach of the San Diego Chargers (1992-95), leading them to AFC Western Division titles in 1992 and 1994 with 11-5 marks and a spot in the Super Bowl following the 1994 campaign (49-26 loss to the San Francisco 49ers). Hired as coach of the Detroit Lions in 1997. Registered a 103-101-2 record in 18 seasons as a college head coach for The Citadel (24-31), Maryland (39-19-1), Georgia Tech (31-26-1) and Army (9-25). His 1990 Georgia Tech squad won the UPI national title by finishing with a 11-0-1 mark after defeating Nebraska, 45-21, in the Florida Citrus Bowl. . . . The 5-10, 160-pound Ross averaged three points per game as a freshman for the 1955-56 VMI varsity basketball team.

MICAH ROSS, Jacksonville
Wide receiver returned eight kickoffs for his hometown Jacksonville Jaquars as a rookie in 2001 before also playing on special teams with the San Diego Chargers and Carolina Panthers through 2004. . . . The 6-2, 220-pounder was JU's leading scorer (12.6 ppg), rebounder (7.5 rpg) and field-goal marksman (58.7%) as a senior in 1997-98. He also paced the Dolphins in rebounding (6.6 rpg) and field-goal shooting (48.8%) as a junior. Averged 9.9 ppg and 5.8 rpg while shooting 51.8% from the floor during his four-year career.

FRANK "TUBBY" ROUSCH, Toledo
Back rushed for one touchdown with Toledo's professional franchise in 1922. . . . The 5-7, 170-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1920.

HARMON ROWE, Baylor/San Francisco
Back rushed eight times for 18 yards with the AAFC's New York Yankees in 1948 and 1949. Selected out of USF by the Pittsburgh Steelers in the third round of the 1946 NFL draft (18th pick overall). . . . The 6-0, 180-pounder earned a basketball letter with Baylor in 1943.

REGGIE RUCKER, Boston University
Wide receiver caught 447 passes for 7,065 yards and 44 TDs with the Dallas Cowboys, New England Patriots, New York Giants and Cleveland Browns in 12 years from 1970 through 1981. Tied for second in the NFL in receptions in 1975 with 60 for the Browns. The 6-2 Rucker appeared in Super Bowl V as a rookie after being signed as a free agent. . . . Four-sport athlete averaged 6.8 ppg and 3.8 rpg for BU's basketball squad in 1966-67.

MARION RUSHING, Southern Illinois
The 6-2, 223-pound linebacker had four interceptions in a nine-year career (1959 and 1962 through 1968) with the Chicago/St. Louis Cardinals, Atlanta Falcons and Houston Oilers. . . . Scored 92 points for the Salukis in 46 varsity games from 1954-55 through 1956-57.

ERSKINE "ERK" RUSSELL, Auburn
Coach of Georgia Southern's three NCAA Division I-AA football champions (1985, 1986 and 1989) compiled a remarkable 83-22-1 record (.788) with the Eagles during the decade. His final GSU team gained distinction as the only 15-0 college football squad of the 20th Century. Russell developed a reputation as one of college football's great defensive coordinators during his 17 years at Georgia. . . . The last four-sport letterman in Auburn history earned basketball letters in 1946-47 and 1947-48 (46 points). Head coach of his alma mater's baseball team from 1959 through 1962 (59-37-1 mark).

KENT "RIP" RYAN, Utah State
Halfback with the Detroit Lions for three seasons from 1938 through 1940. Three-time All-Rocky Mountain Conference selection in football participated in the East-West Shrine Classic in 1937 after helping the Aggies to a 7-0-1 record in 1936. . . . Two-time All-Rocky Mountain first-team choice in basketball averaged 8.1 ppg in league play in 1933-34, 9.9 ppg in 1934-35, 9.3 ppg in 1935-36 and 7.6 ppg in 1936-37.

ELTON RYNEARSON, Eastern Michigan
Alma mater's football stadium is named after the individual who coached the then-Hurons for 26 years (114-58-15 record in 1919 and 1920 plus from 1925 to 1948). . . . Four-year basketball letterman (class of '14).

FRANCIS "FRANK" SACHSE, Texas Tech
Back passed for 501 yards and three touchdowns and added two interceptions with Brooklyn and Boston in three years from 1943 through 1945. One of his passes went for 80 yards in 1945. . . . The 6-0, 195-pounder was an All-Border Conference second-team forward in 1937-38 with 16.8 ppg. Played professionally for Oshkosh (NBL) in 1943-44 and 1944-45.

NORB SACKSTEDER, Dayton
Back scored four touchdowns and passed for one with Dayton, Detroit and Canton in four years from 1920 to 1925. . . . The 5-9, 170-pounder was a basketball letterman with the Flyers.

SAINT "S.T." SAFFOLD, San Jose State
Flanker caught 30 passes for 420 yards and four touchdowns with the Spartans in 1966 and 16 passes for 172 yards in one season (1968) with the Cincinnati Bengals. Selected by the San Diego Chargers as a redshirt in the seventh round of the 1966 NFL draft. . . . The 6-4, 200-pound forward was an All-WCAC second team pick as a sophomore before earning All-WCAC first-team honors as a junior and senior. Saffold led the Spartans in scoring and rebounding all three varsity seasons from 1963-64 through 1965-66, averaging 14.6 ppg and 9.8 rpg. . . . He later became Vice President for Student Affairs at his alma mater.

FLOYD SAGELY, Arkansas
Defensive back was a sixth-round draft choice of the San Francisco 49ers in 1954. Played two years with the 49ers before intercepting a pass for the Chicago Cardinals in 1957. As a senior, he led the Razorbacks in receiving (30 catches for 542 yards and three touchdowns) and interceptions (three). . . . The 6-1, 190-pounder averaged 5.9 ppg from 1951-52 through 1953-54.

JOHNNY SAMPLE JR., Maryland-Eastern Shore
All-Pro defensive back/kick return, a seventh-round selection in the 1958 NFL draft (79th overall), amassed 41 interceptions with the Baltimore Colts, Pittsburgh Steelers, Washington Redskins and New York Jets in 11 years through 1968. He scored touchdowns on a kickoff return with the Colts and punt return with the Steelers. As a rookie, he participated in what became known "The Greatest Game Ever Played," the NFL championship between Baltimore and the New York Giants. He is best remembered for his interception with the Jets in Super Bowl III, when they defeated the Colts, 16-7, in Joe Namath's guaranteed-victory contest. . . . Played basketball his freshman year with school known at the time as Maryland State. He was also a second baseman on baseball teams that captured CIAA championships in each of his four seasons. Sample is reportedly the first player from a historically black university to participate in the College All-Star game, an annual exhibition played in those days between pro rookies and reigning NFL champion.

DON SAMUEL, Oregon State
Back was a second-round draft choice by the Los Angeles Rams in 1946 (25th pick overall). The 5-11, 190-pounder rushed for 163 yards and one touchdown and intercepted one pass with the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1949. . . . Played sparingly in two basketball seasons, scoring a total of 48 points (18 of 37 from the floor and 12 of 34 from the free-throw line). Appeared in the 1947 NCAA Tournament against eventual runner-up Oklahoma.

DICK SANDERS, Wichita
QB and DB in college. . . . Averaged 4.1 ppg in 17 games as a forward for coach Ralph Miller's initial basketball squad with the Shockers in 1951-52 after averaging 3.2 ppg the previous season. The 6-1 shortstop played in the farm systems of the New York Yankees and Brooklyn Dodgers for eight seasons.

LONNIE SANDERS, Michigan State
Defensive back was a second-round draft choice of the Washington Redskins in 1963. The 6-3, 205-pounder intercepted 12 passes with the 'Skins and St. Louis Cardinals in seven years from 1963 through 1969. . . . Averaged 10.9 ppg and 5.7 rpg as a forward for the Spartans in 1961-62.

PATRICK SAPP, Clemson
Linebacker was a second-round draft choice by the San Diego Chargers in 1996. . . . He grabbed one rebound in four games for the Tigers during the 1994-95 campaign.

GEORGE SAUER, Nebraska
College Football Hall of Famer. Back rushed for 656 yards and six touchdowns with the Green Bay Packers in three years from 1935 through 1937. . . . The 6-2, 205-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1932 and 1933.

BILL SAUL, Penn State
Linebacker intercepted four passes with the Baltimore Colts, Pittsburgh Steelers, New Orleans Saints and Detroit Lions in eight years from 1962 to 1970. The 6-4, 220-pounder recorded a safety as a rookie with the Colts after being their second-round draft choice (23rd pick overall). . . . Averaged 6.1 ppg for the Nittany Lions in 1959-60.

JOHN SAUNDERS, Toledo
Defensive back played briefly with the Buffalo Bills and San Francisco 49ers after being a fourth-round draft choice by the Los Angeles Rams in 1972. . . . The 6-3, 195-pounder collected 14 points and 10 rebounds in 11 basketball games with the Rockets in 1970-71.

JIM MACK SAWYER, Henderson State (Ark.)
Head football coach of his alma mater from 1962-66. NAIA Hall of Famer guided school to AIC championship in 1963. . . . All-AIC in basketball in 1948 and 1949.

ELMER SCHAAKE, Kansas
Back rushed for 412 yards and caught a touchdown pass for Portland in 1933. . . . Two-year basketball letterman as a guard in 1932 and 1933.

JOE SCHEIN, Brown
Tackle played with Providence's professional football franchise in 1931. . . . The 5-10, 210-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1930 and 1931.

ART SCHLICHTER, Ohio State
Quarterback was a first-round draft choice of the Baltimore Colts in 1982 (4th pick overall), but had only three touchdown passes in three years before his career was curtailed by gambling-related problems. He wound up in a couple dozen different jails and prisons. Finished fourth in Heisman Trophy voting in 1979 after leading OSU to the brink of a national title. OSU's career (7,547) and single game (458 vs. Florida State as senior) leader in passing yards was instrumental in the offensive diversification of Buckeye football after the program previously was known as "three yards and a cloud of dust" under coach Woody Hayes. Lost three straight bowl games (Gator, Rose and Fiesta) before throwing his 49th and 50th college career TD passes in a 31-28 Liberty Bowl win over Navy. . . . Scored 18 points in 11 basketball games for the Buckeyes in 1978-79 and 1980-81. The 6-2, 210-pounder converted all six of his free-throw attempts.

OTTO SCHNELLBACHER, Kansas
Defensive back intercepted 34 passes in four pro seasons after being selected by the Chicago Cardinals in 23rd round of 1947 NFL draft. Led AAFC with 11 interceptions for the New York Yankees in 1948 and paced NFL with 11 in 1951 for the New York Giants. Named to All-NFL team in 1951 by AP and UPI. Co-captain of the 1948 Orange Bowl team. His KU career records for receptions and receiving yards stood for more than 20 years. . . . Averaged 11 points per game in four-year basketball career at Kansas, earning All-Big Six/Seven Conference honors each season. The 6-3, 180-pound forward ranked second on the school's career scoring list when his career ended at the conclusion of the 1947-48 campaign. Averaged 6.4 ppg in 43 games for the Providence Steamrollers and St. Louis Bombers as a rookie in the Basketball Association of America the next season.

BOB SCHOONMAKER, Missouri
Selected by the Baltimore Colts in 10th round draft choice of 1954 NFL draft after the back served as two-year captain of the Tigers' football squad. Led Mizzou in scoring (six touchdowns) and interceptions (three) in 1953. . . . Averaged 6.4 ppg in 1952-53 and 1953-54. His brother, Jerry Schoonmaker, was a bonus baby outfielder who hit .130 with the Washington Senators in 1955 and 1957. Hoop teammate Norm Stewart, the dominant offensive player for the Tigers' 1954 NCAA baseball champion, went on to become their alma mater's all-time winningest basketball coach.

WEAR SCHOONOVER, Arkansas
End was Arkansas' initial football first-team All-American (Grantland Rice in 1929). . . . All-SWC basketball selection in 1928, 1929 and 1930 when the Razorbacks extended their streak of league titles to five in a row. Selected as a senior to the second five on College Humor Magazine's All-American team.

TOM SCOTT, Virginia
Linebacker-defensive end was a fifth-round draft choice of the Los Angeles Rams in 1953. He intercepted eight passes for 137 yards and two touchdowns with the Philadelphia Eagles and New York Giants in 12 years from 1953 through 1964. The 6-2, 215-pounder recovered a fumble for a TD as a rookie with the Eagles. . . . Scott was a basketball letterman as a forward in 1951.

AUSTIN SEFERIAN-JENKINS, Washington
Tight end started most of freshman season in 2011, posting two-TD games against California and Oregon State before catching five passes for 59 yards in Alamo Bowl against RGIII-led Baylor in the highest-scoring regulation bowl game in history. Amassed 538 receiving yards that ranked #2 in UW single-season history for a true freshman (any position). Upon completing his sophomore season, he already held school tight end career standards for receptions, receiving yards and touchdowns. Following UW's win in the 2013 Fight Hunger Bowl, the 6-6 Seferian-Jenkins announced he would leave school early and enter the 2014 NFL draft. . . . Averaged 1.1 ppg and 2.1 rpg in 17 games as a freshman in 2011-12, collecting seven points and nine rebounds in four NIT contests with the Huskies' semifinalist.

JOE SENSER, West Chester (Pa.) State
Tight end caught 165 passes for 1,822 yards and 16 touchdowns in a four-year career (1980 through 1982 and 1984) with the Minnesota Vikings after being their sixth-round draft choice in 1979. Selected for the Pro Bowl following the 1981 season after catching 79 passes for 1,004 yards and eight TDs. . . . Averaged 11.4 ppg and 7.4 rpg while shooting 66.2% from the floor in his four-year college basketball career as a 6-4, 230-pound center. Led NCAA Division I in field-goal shooting in 1976-77 (69.9%) and 1977-78 (68.5%).

ART SHELL, Maryland-Eastern Shore
Member of Pro Football Hall of Fame was head coach of the Los Angeles Raiders for six years from 1989 through 1994. Offensive tackle for the Raiders from 1968 through 1982 played in eight Pro Bowls (1973 through 1979 and 1981) after being picked in the third round. Participated in Super Bowls XI and XV. . . . Two-year basketball letterman as a 6-5, 265-pound center at school that was then known as Maryland State College. Sketch from school guide: "Pure muscle. Amazing agility. Uncompromising under the boards, nobody pushes big Art without a battle."

MURRAY SHELTON, Cornell
End played for Buffalo in 1920. . . . The 6-1, 175-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1916.

BILL SHEPHERD, Western Maryland
Four-time All-Pro back passed for 938 yards and four touchdowns, rushed for 1,984 yards and 12 TDs, caught 20 passes for 188 yards and one TD and returned an interception for a TD with the Boston Redskins and Detroit
Lions in six years from 1935 through 1940. . . . Also excelled in basketball on "the Hill" (now known as McDaniel College).

JOHN "JACK" SHERRY, Penn State
Led PSU with then school-record eight interceptions in 1952 and tied for team lead in pass receptions two years later. "Most of the interceptions came because I was a good basketball player," Sherry said. "I could follow the ball. They didn't pass that well in those days." . . . Averaged 6.8 ppg as a sophomore, 10.3 ppg as a junior and 11.6 ppg as a senior from 1951-52 through 1953-54. Led the Nittany Lions in free-throw percentage as senior captain when they reached the Final Four. Also appeared in 1952 NCAA playoffs. All-Navy in basketball two times, captain of the Navy Olympic team and captain of the Navy AAU squad.

DEL SHOFNER, Baylor
End caught 349 passes for 6,470 yards and 51 touchdowns in 11 years from 1957 through 1967 with the Los Angeles Rams and New York Giants. First-round draft choice (11th pick overall) led the NFL in receiving yardage in 1958 with 1,097. Five-time Pro Bowler was on the losing ends of three consecutive NFL championship games with the Giants from 1961 through 1963. Led the Bears in all-purpose yards, touchdowns and punting from 1954 through 1956. MVP of the 1957 Sugar Bowl after becoming an All-SWC halfback. . . . The 6-3, 185-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1956.

RICH SHRIGLEY, Boston College
Tight end for the Eagles' first bowl team in 40 years in 1982 (lost to Auburn 33-26 in Tangerine). Teammate of quarterback Doug Flutie. . . . The 6-5 forward started from day one in helping BC average 21 victories per year during his career (6.5 ppg and 3.9 rpg from 1978-79 through 1981-82). As senior captain when Shrigley shot 62.3% from the floor, he contributed 12 points in an NCAA playoff game victory over San Francisco. Shrigley earned all-star accolades in the 1980 NIT.

JOHN SIMKO, Augustana (S.D.)
The 6-1, 185-pounder was one of the nation's leading small-college receivers each of his three varsity seasons, leading the Vikings to the NCC championship his junior year. Drafted by the Pittsburgh Steelers in the 18th round in 1961. . . . Averaged 5.8 ppg and 1.9 rpg in 1959-60 and 1960-61.

JOE SIMMONS, Baylor
Part-time starting defensive end finished his career with 110 tackles. . . . Played in five games as a fifth-year senior in 2003-04 before leaving the team in order to prepare for a potential pro football career.

CHAUNCEY SIMPSON, Northeast Missouri State
Directed Missouri to a Big Six Conference title and a Cotton Bowl date with Texas in 1945. . . . Multi-sport athlete graduated in 1928.

FLETCHER SIMS, Georgia Tech
Back was an All-SEC first-team selection before becoming an eighth-round selection by the Chicago Bears (70th pick overall) in the 1938 NFL draft. . . . Three-year basketball letterman from 1935-36 through 1937-38 was an All-SEC Tournament second-team choice as a senior forward.

DAVE SMITH, Indiana (Pa.)
Eighth-round draft choice as a wide receiver in 1970 caught 109 passes for seven touchdowns in four years with the Pittsburgh Steelers, Houston Oilers and Kansas City Chiefs and Oilers. He caught 68 passes for 1,101 yards and eight TDs in college. . . . Smith averaged 15.6 ppg and 11.6 rpg while shooting 51.1% from the floor in 34 basketball games in 1968-69 and 1969-70.

JIMMY SMITH, Utah State
Defensive back was a 10th-round draft choice of the Denver Broncos in 1969. . . . The 6-3, 190-pound forward averaged 16.8 ppg and 4.2 rpg in 1966-67 and 1967-68. Teammate of Aggies star forward Shaler Halimon scored a total of 72 points in back-to-back outings against Wichita State and San Jose State.

PAUL EUGENE "GENE" SMITH, McPherson (Kan.)
Two-time NAIA All-American was the nation's small-college rushing leader in 1953. Held the school single-season mark for more than 40 years. . . . Averaged career-high 14.4 ppg as a senior in 1953-54, finishing his four-year career with mark of 9.1 ppg.

RODNEY SMITH, Baylor
Safety/linebacker led the Bears in tackles in 1997 and 1998. . . . Averaged 6.3 ppg and 3.9 rpg as a freshman in 1995-96 when he started 19 of 27 games. Returned to basketball team in 1998-99, averaging 6.2 ppg and 2.2 rpg. He married Stacey Bowers, Baylor's NCAA and USA triple-jump champion in 1999.

VERNON "CATFISH" SMITH, Georgia
Member of College Football Hall of Fame was a consensus All-American end as a senior in 1931. Scored all of Georgia's points and was a standout on defense in a shocking 15-0 upset of Yale in his sophomore season. . . . Three-year basketball letterman was senior captain and starting center on Bulldogs team that defeated Duke in the semifinals and North Carolina in the final to win the 1932 Southern Conference Tournament. Named to second five on the all-tourney team.

WILLIE "BUDDY" SMITH, West Virginia State
Halfback was on two CIAA football championship teams, including an undefeated squad in 1949. . . . Basketball swingman was a teammate of Earl Lloyd, the first African-American to compete in the NBA. Smith averaged 4.6 ppg in 1949-50.

TRENT SMOCK, Indiana
Caught 36 passes for five touchdowns as a sophomore when he was an AP All-Big Ten Conference second-team selection. Split end was a 15th-round draft choice by the Detroit Lions in 1976 after leading IU in pass receptions three straight years. . . . Collected 51 points and 49 rebounds in 34 games in coach Bob Knight's first two 20-win seasons with the Hoosiers. Played briefly as a freshman forward at the 1973 Final Four. His teammates included All-Americans Quinn Buckner, Steve Downing and Steve Green.

NORMAN SNEAD, Wake Forest
The first-round draft choice played for five NFL teams (Washington Redskins, Philadelphia Eagles, Minnesota Vikings, New York Giants and San Francisco 49ers) during a 16-year career (1961 through 1976) that saw him play in three Pro Bowl games. Three-time Pro Bowl selection (1964-66-73) completed 2,276 of 4,353 passes for 30,797 yards and 196 touchdowns. Snead led the NFL in pass completion percentage in 1972 (60.3%). The only Wake Forest quarterback to earn All-American honors was first team All-ACC in 1959 and 1960 as a junior and senior when he led the league in passing and total offense. Snead passed for a career-high 424 yards for Washington against Pittsburgh in 1963. He led the NFL in passing for the Giants in 1972 with 2,307 yards. . . . Played in four basketball games as a senior, averaging 7.8 points and three rebounds per game. He shot 61.8 percent from the floor (13 of 21). Two of his teammates were All-American Len Chappell and CBS announcer-to-be Billy Packer.

DICK SOERGEL, Oklahoma State
Quarterback for the Pokes in 1958 when he completed 6 of 12 passes for 77 yards and a two-point conversion in a 15-6 win over Florida State in Bluegrass Bowl. He finished 10th in the nation in passing the next year with 1,102 yards. . . . The 6-2 swingman was a hoop teammate of Jerry Adair and Eddie Sutton in 1957-58 before averaging 8.5 ppg and 4.9 rpg with OSU in 1958-59 plus posting an 8-1 pitching record and winning the national championship baseball game.

J. NEIL "SKIP" STAHLEY, Penn State
Head football coach for Delaware (1934), Brown (1941 through 1943), George Washington (1946 and 1947), Toledo (1948 and 1949) and Idaho (1954 through 1960). Backfield coach of the NFL's Chicago Cardinals in 1953. . . . Leading scorer for Penn State's basketball team in 1928-29 and captain of the squad the next season.

GEORGE STARKE, Columbia
The 6-5, 260-pound offensive tackle, an 11th-round draft choice of the Washington Redskins, played 12 years for them from 1973 through 1984. He was a member of the Super Bowl XVII champion after the strike-shortened 1982 campaign. . . . Averaged 2.9 ppg and 3.7 rpg and shot 50.5% from the floor in 1968-69 and 1969-70.

ROGER STAUBACH, Navy
Member of College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame won Heisman Trophy in 1963. Passed for 3,571 yards and rushed for 682 in his career at Navy (1962 through 1964). Quarterback in four Super Bowls during his 11 seasons with the Dallas Cowboys. Six-time Pro Bowl selection passed for 22,700 yards and 153 touchdowns after being a 10th-round draft choice in 1964. . . . Averaged 9.3 points per game for the 1961-62 Navy plebe (freshman) basketball team. The 6-2, 190-pound forward scored five points in four games for Midshipmen varsity squad the next season.

FRANK STEEN, Rice
End played three games for the Green Bay Packers in 1939. . . . The 6-1, 190-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1937 and 1938.

DON STEINBRUNNER, Washington State
Sixth-round draft choice played tackle for the Cleveland Browns in 1953. He was WSU's second-leading pass receiver in 1950 and 1951. . . . The 6-3, 220-pounder was a backup center who averaged 3.9 ppg for the Cougars' basketball team in 1951-52. Steinbrunner, an Air Force navigator, was shot down and killed over Vietnam in mid-July 1967.

PAUL STENN, Villanova
Tackle played with the New York Giants, Washington Redskins, Pittsburgh Steelers and Chicago Bears for seven years in 1942 and from 1946 through 1951. . . . The 6-2, 240-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1941-42.

JOHNNY STEPHENS, Marshall
End caught six passes for 75 yards with Cleveland in 1938. . . . The 6-1, 190-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1935.

DAVE STIEF, Portland State
Wide receiver was a seventh-round draft choice in 1978. He caught 67 passes for 1,043 yards and five touchdowns with the St. Louis Cardinals in his first four years before playing sparingly for the Big Red and Washington Redskins the next two seasons. Caught 141 passes at PSU, mainly from QB Neil Lomax, for 2,581 yards and 22 TDs. . . . Hoop teammate of All-American Freeman Williams scored three points in seven games in 1977-78.

JOHN STOFA, Buffalo
Quarterback threw 12 touchdown passes for the Miami Dolphins and Cincinnati Bengals in five years from 1966 through 1970. . . . The 6-3, 210-pounder averaged 5.8 ppg and 5.4 rpg in 17 basketball games in 1961-62.

ED STOFKO, St. Francis (Pa.)
Back was a ninth-round draft choice by the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1944. He threw 17 passes in two games in 1945. . . . The 6-1, 190-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1946.

JOE STYDAHAR, West Virginia
Member of College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame. Earned All-American honors as a 6-4, 230-pound tackle in 1935. Played nine seasons (1936 through 1942, 1945, and 1946) with the Chicago Bears after being their first-round pick in the first NFL draft. Named to All-NFL team four times from 1937 through 1940. Coached Los Angeles Rams (1950-51) and Chicago Cardinals (1953-54), leading Rams to 1951 NFL title. In 1934, he he set a school record with seven blocked punts, including three for touchdowns. Participated in both the East-West Shrine Game and College Football All-Star Game in Chicago. . . . Three-year basketball letterman was captain of the Mountaineers' 1934-35 team that compiled a 16-6 record. Selected as a center to the first five on West Virginia's Pre-World War II team that was named as part of the university's all-time basketball squad.

SHAFER SUGGS, Ball State
The Mid-American Conference's Defensive Player of the Year was selected in the second round of the 1976 NFL draft by the New York Jets (33rd pick overall). He had eight of his school career record of 14 interceptions in 1974. The defensive back started 53 of 56 games with the Jets from 1976 through 1980, leading them in tackles in 1978. Suggs also played with the Cincinnati Bengals in 1980, Montreal Alouettes of the Canadian Football League in 1981 and New Jersey Generals of the United States Football League in 1983. He scored his only NFL touchdown on October 15, 1979, in a nationally-televised Monday Night game against the Minnesota Vikings when he returned an interception 37 yards to lift the Jets to a 14-7 victory. . . . Suggs averaged 10.7 points and 7.9 rebounds per game in his three-year basketball career, setting a school record with nine consecutive field goals without a miss versus Butler and Kent State. After leading the Cardinals in rebounding with 8.2 rpg in 1974-75, he skipped his senior basketball season to play in three college all-star football games. In the College All-Star Game, Suggs intercepted a pass thrown by Terry Hanratty of the Pittsburgh Steelers.

GEORGE SULLIVAN, Penn
Back rushed for seven touchdowns and had one TD reception with Frankford in 1924 and 1925. . . . The 5-9, 170-pounder was a three-year basketball letterman in the early 1920s.

DON SUMMERS, Oregon Institute of Technology
Tight end played for Denver Broncos in 1984 and 1985 before catching a touchdown pass for the Green Bay Packers in 1987. . . . The 6-4, 230-pound forward averaged 2.6 ppg and 3.7 rpg in 1979-80 and 13.4 ppg and 7.9 rpg in 1980-81 for OIT squads that won 19 games each season.

RICK SUND, Northwestern
Wide receiver/tight end earned a football letter in 1972 before breaking his foot. . . . Longtime NBA executive averaged 9.6 ppg and 6.2 rpg from 1970-71 through 1972-73. The 6-4 forward was named team MVP as a sophomore and co-captain as a senior.

LEN SUPULSKI, Dickinson (Pa.)
Caught eight passes for 194 yards and one TD with the Philadelphia Eagles in 1942 after catching 48 passes for 586 yards as a senior (school mark stood for 43 years). . . . Also played basketball in college. Killed in the crash of a B-17 bomber during a routine Army Air Corps training flight near Kearney, Neb., in late August 1943.

ED SUTTON, North Carolina
Halfback was selected in the third round of the 1957 draft by the Washington Redskins (33rd pick overall). He played three years for them before finishing his pro career with one season with the New York Giants (rushed for 1,109 yards and nine touchdowns). Sutton's 6.9-yard rushing average his senior season is still a Carolina record. . . . The 6-1, 190-pounder collected four points and four rebounds in seven games for the Tar Heels' basketball team as a sophomore in 1954-55.

BILL SWIACKI JR., Amherst (Mass.)
Tight end was a ninth-round draft choice of the New York Giants in 1978. . . . Finished his college basketball career as Amherst's sixth-leading all-time leading scorer with 763 points. The 6-6 pitcher was chosen by the Chicago White Sox in the 16th round of the June, 1974, major league baseball draft.

JIM SWINK, Texas Christian
Unanimous All-American selection as a halfback in 1955 when he led the nation's major-college players with an average of 8.2 yards per carry (1,284 yards in 157 carries) while sparking TCU to a 9-1 record. College Football Hall of Famer finished second in Heisman Trophy voting while pacing the nation in scoring with 125 points. Second-round draft choice by the NFL's Chicago Bears in 1957 (25th pick overall) played in five games for the AFL's Dallas Texans in 1960. . . . The 6-1, 180-pounder averaged 5.8 points per game in 12 basketball contests in the 1955-56 season. Excerpt from school media guide: "Very quick, deceptive and likes to drive to the bucket."

MATT SZYKOWNY, Iowa
Quarterback was selected by the Pittsburgh Steelers in 15th round of 1963 NFL draft. Led Iowa in passing in 1961 and 1962, completing 59% of his passes for a total of 1,815 yards those two years. Threw an 80-yard touchdown pass against Wisconsin as a senior. . . . Teammate of Don Nelson averaged 9.9 ppg as a sophomore starter for the Hawkeyes' 1960-61 basketball squad that went 18-6 before averaging 7.5 ppg the next season.

BOB TANNER, Minnesota
Offensive end-tackle scored two touchdowns for Frankfort in 1930. . . . The 6-0, 190-pounder was a basketball letterman in the late 1920s.

GEORGE TARASOVIC, Boston College/Louisiana State
Linebacker was a second-round draft choice by the Pittsburgh Steelers (18th pick overall). The 6-4, 245-pounder intercepted 12 passes for 200 yards with the Steelers, Philadelphia Eagles and Denver Broncos in 13 years from 1952 to 1966. He scored two defensive touchdowns for the Eagles in 1965. All-SEC center in 1951. J.C. transfer's career was interrupted by military service during the Korean War. . . . Tarasovic was a forward for LSU in 1951 and 1952.

HUGH "BONES" TAYLOR, Tulane/Oklahoma City
Offensive end caught 272 passes for 5,233 yards and 58 touchdowns in eight seasons (1947 through 1954) with the Washington Redskins. Two-time Pro Bowl selection (1953 and 1955) led the NFL in average per reception in 1950 (21.4 yards) and 1952 (23.4) and in touchdown receptions (nine) in 1949. Led the Redskins in pass receptions from 1949 through 1954. Coach of Houston Oilers in the AFL in 1965. . . . Lettered in basketball for Tulane and Oklahoma City, leading OCU in scoring as a senior with 11.4 points per game.

JASON TAYLOR, Akron
All-Pro defensive end was a third-round draft choice of the Miami Dolphins in 1997 (73rd pick overall) after the first-team All-Mid-American Conference linebacker was named North Defensive MVP at the Senior Bowl. He managed more sacks than anyone in a six-year span from 2000 through 2007, including a league-high 18.5 in 2002. His five fumble returns for touchdowns is a Dolphins' team record. Also returned three interceptions for TDs. Also played with the Washington Redskins and New York Jets. Through 2010, he had 132.5 sacks and 387 individual tackles. . . . The 6-6, 250-pounder played 22 basketball games for the Zips in 1994-95, averaging 8 ppg and 5.4 rpg while shooting 46.8% percent from the floor.

KITRICK TAYLOR, Washington State
Wide receiver-punt returner was a fifth-round draft choice by the Kansas City Chiefs in 1987. The 5-11, 185-pounder caught 36 passes for 414 yards and one touchdown with the Chiefs, New England Patriots, San Diego Chargers, Green Bay Packers and Denver Broncos in six years from 1988 through 1993. He returned a punt for a TD in 1990 for the Chargers before catching a career-high 24 passes with them the next year. All-conference first-team selection in the Pacific-10 as a junior in 1985. The next year, he had nine touchdowns, including an 80-yard pass against Oregon State. . . . Taylor played for WSU's basketball team in 1984-85 (2.7 ppg in 23 games) and 1986-87 (4.5 ppg in 12 games). He scored 14 points in a victory over California during the 1984-85 campaign.

LIONEL TAYLOR, New Mexico Highlands
First player in pro football history to catch 100 passes in a season holds the AFL record for most pass receptions in a career with 587 as a wide receiver for the Denver Broncos (1960 through 1966) and Houston Oilers (1967 and 1968). Led the AFL in pass receptions in 1960 (92), 1961 (100), 1962 (77), 1963 (78) and 1965 (85). Three-time Pro Bowl selection caught 13 passes in a single game in 1964. . . . The 6-2, 205-pounder averaged 16 points per game during his basketball career, leading the team in scoring average with 13.6 ppg in 1955-56 and 20.3 in 1956-57.

OTIS TAYLOR, Prairie View
Wide receiver caught 410 passes for 7,306 yards and 57 touchdowns in 11 seasons (1965 through 1975) with the Kansas City Chiefs. The fourth-round draft choice also rushed 30 times for a 5.4-yard average and three touchdowns. Taylor, a three-time Pro Bowl selection, led the AFL in average per reception in 1966 (22.4 yards) and led the NFL in pass reception yardage in 1971 (1,110). Played in two Super Bowl games and caught 10 passes for 128 yards and a touchdown. . . . He was a backup small forward in the Prairie View era after the school's glory years with Zelmo Beaty. Former Prairie View coach Leroy Moore remembers Taylor for his "all-around great athletic ability."

GUS TEBELL, Wisconsin
End-placekicker had two touchdown receptions with Columbus in 1923 and 1924. . . . The 5-10, 175-pounder was a basketball letterman from 1921 through 1923.

JOHN THOMAS, Pacific
Offensive lineman with the San Francisco 49ers for 10 years from 1958 through 1967 after being a 23rd-round draft choice in 1957. . . . The 6-4, 240-pound forward averaged 15.5 ppg and 10.6 rpg as a four-year basketball letterman in the mid-1950s. He was an All-California Basketball Association first-team selection in 1956 and second-team choice in 1954 and 1957. Thomas scored a career-high 34 points against Chico State on 12-9-55.

JULIUS THOMAS, Portland State
Starting season opener as a rookie, the tight end caught one pass for five yards with the Denver Broncos in 2011. Fourth-round draft choice (129th jpick overall) was an All-Big Sky first-team selection in his only college football campaign (29 receptions for 453 yards and two touchdowns). caught a TD pass in East-West Shrine Game. . . . The 6-5, 245-pounder averaged 6.8 ppg and 4.3 rpg while shooting 66.3% from the floor with Portland State from 2006-07 through 2009-10 under eventual Washington State coach Ken Bone. Thomas was the Vikings' second-leading rebounder as a junior and senior. Made both of his field-goal attempts against NCAA-kingpin-to-be Kansas in 2008 NCAA playoff opening-round loss.

LAMAR THOMAS, Miami (Fla.)
Wide receiver drafted in the third round (60th pick overall) caught 106 passes for 1,558 yards and 10 touchdowns in six NFL seasons with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers (1993 through 1995) and Miami Dolphins (1996 through 1998). His best year was his final one when he had 43 receptions and five TDs. . . . The 6-1, 175-pound Thomas collected 16 points and four rebounds in four games for the Hurricanes' basketball squad in 1990-91.

WILSON THOMAS, Nebraska
Led the Huskers in receptions and receiving yardage in 2001 and 2002. Set school split end receiving yardage record with 616 in 2001. Had a career-best 78-yard reception at Colorado and two touchdowns in a game against Texas Tech. Participated in the 2003 Hula Bowl. . . . The 6-2, 215-pounder averaged 4.6 ppg and 3.8 rpg in 16 games, starting three of them, for the Huskers in 2001-02. He played in 17 contests the previous season.

FRED "FUZZY" THURSTON, Valparaiso
Played 10 seasons in the NFL with the Baltimore Colts (1958) and Green Bay Packers (1959-67), teaming with the Packers' Jerry Kramer to form one of the standout offensive guard tandems in NFL history. Selected by the Philadelphia Eagles in the fifth round of the 1956 NFL draft. The 6-1, 245-pounder appeared in seven NFL championship games while with the Packers and was a member of six NFL championship teams. Participated in first two Super Bowls. . . . Thurston said he originally enrolled at Valpo on a basketball scholarship. He averaged 1.5 points per game in eight contests as a freshman in 1951-52 before concentrating on football.

JOSHUA TINCH, Louisville
Wide receiver led the Cardinals in 2005 with 67 receptions and 855 yards, including 10 catches against Rutgers. He appeared in the Libery Bowl and Gator Bowl (TD catch vs. Virginia Tech) his last two seasons. . . . The 6-3, 220-pounder joined the 2002-03 basketball team after appearing in the GMAC Bowl. Appeared in the opening round of the 2003 NCAA playoffs against Austin Peay. Made 6 of 11 field-goal attempts in 11 games in 2003-04.

BOB TITCHENAL, San Jose State
End-linebacker intercepted three passes with the Washington Redskins in three years from 1940 through 1942 before catching 14 passes for two touchdowns in the AAFC with San Francisco and Los Angeles in 1946 and 1947. . . . The 6-2, 190-pounder was a basketball letterman as a center in 1939.

JACK TORRANCE, Louisiana State
Broke world shot put record five times in the 1930s. Mark of 57'1" set in 1934 stood as the world record until 1948. Helped LSU win NCAA track title in 1933 with a first-place finish in the shot put and third-place finish in the discus throw. All-SEC lineman in 1933 when he captained the Tigers' undefeated football team (7-0-3). Played tackle with the Chicago Bears in 1939 and 1940. . . . A 6-4, 240-pound center in basketball, he finished third in the SEC in scoring in 1931-32 and 10th in 1933-34.

MIKE TOWNSEND, Notre Dame
Defensive back was a consensus All-American as one of three captains for the 1973 national championship football team. He led the nation in pass interceptions the previous season with a school-record 10. Fourth-round draft choice by the Minnesota Vikings in 1974 opted to play in World Football League with Florida Sharks. . . . Averaged 2.9 points and 2.8 rebounds per game for the Fighting Irish basketball squad in 1971-72 (coach Digger Phelps' first team) and 1972-73 as a walk-on with his brother (WR Willie)..

WILLIE TOWNSEND, Notre Dame
Final wide receiver selected in 1974 NFL draft (440th pick by Los Angeles Rams in 17th round). Notre Dame's leading receiver in 1972 with 25 receptions for 369 yards and four touchdowns, including a 62-yard TD pass against Purdue. . . . Averaged 9.3 points and 6.9 rebounds per game for the Fighting Irish basketball squad in 1971-72 (coach Digger Phelps' first team) and 1972-73 as a walk-on with his brother (DB Mike).

MATT TRANNON, Michigan State
Undrafted by the NFL despite breaking MSU's record for career receptions with 148 (mark previously held by Andre Rison). Caught two of his four TD passes in 2005 in a 44-41 upset victory at Notre Dame. Played in 2003 Alamo Bowl. Member of practice squads for the Arizona Cardinals and Kansas City Chiefs in 2007. . . . The 6-6 Trannon scored four points against NCAA champion North Carolina at the 2005 Final Four in St. Louis. He started 10 of his 22 basketball games in 2005-06, averaging 4.6 ppg and 4.3 rpg.

ARNOLD TUCKER, Army
Quarterback on the great Army football teams that compiled a 27-0-1 record from 1944 through 1946, winning national titles the first two years. Earned All-American honors as a junior and senior. Won the Sullivan Award in 1946 as the nation's outstanding amateur athlete. Tied for the national lead in pass interceptions with eight in 1946 and finished fifth in the Heisman Trophy voting. Selected in the 10th round by the Chicago Bears in the 1947 NFL draft (also picked by Miami in the AAFC). . . . Played basketball as a Navy V-12 trainee at Miami (Fla.) and Florida prior to entering West Point. Played three seasons of basketball for Army and was captain of the team as a senior.

DICK TUCKEY, Manhattan
Tailback played in seven games with Washington and Cleveland in 1938. Threw one touchdown pass, rushed for 76 yards and caught one pass. . . . The 6-2, 205-pounder was a basketball letterman in the mid-1930s.

EMLEN TUNNELL, Toledo
Member of Pro Football Hall of Fame played in nine Pro Bowl games (1951 through 1958 and 1960). Defensive back established career records for interceptions (79), yards gained on interceptions (1,282) and yards gained on punt returns (2,209) in 14 seasons (1948 through 1961) with the New York Giants and Green Bay Packers. . . . The 6-1, 180-pound forward was a top reserve for the 1942-43 Toledo basketball team that compiled a 22-4 record and finished second in the NIT.

HUB ULRICH, Kansas
End caught a touchdown pass for Miami (AAFC) in 1946. . . . Basketball letterman in 1942.

SAM VACANTI, Iowa/Purdue/Nebraska
Quarterback completed 154 passes for 2,338 yards and 18 touchdowns with Chicago and Baltimore in the AAFC in three years from 1947 through 1949. . . . The 5-11, 200-pounder averaged 2.8 ppg as a backup swingman for Iowa in 1942-43.

JOE VANCE, Southwest Texas State/Texas
Back rushed for two touchdowns with Brooklyn in 1931. . . . The 6-1, 180-pounder was a basketball letterman with SW Texas in 1928 and 1929.

AL VANDEWEGHE, William & Mary
End caught a touchdown pass for Buffalo (AAFC) in 1946. . . . The 5-11, 200-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1942 and 1943.

BRAD VAN PELT, Michigan State
Five-time Pro Bowl middle linebacker (1977 through 1981) in 11 seasons with the New York Giants before being traded to the Los Angeles Raiders, where he played two years. Second-round draft choice had 20 interceptions in a pro career that ended with the Cleveland Browns in 1987. Van Pelt, a two-time All-American safety with the Spartans, was the first defensive back ever to receive the 1972 Maxwell Award, given annually to the nation's best collegiate football player. He finished 13th in the Heisman Trophy balloting before being drafted in the second round by the Giants. . . . Forward averaged 4.5 points and 2.9 rebounds per game and shot 61.7 percent from the floor with a high-scoring game of 16 points as a sophomore in 1970-71. He played in just eight contests the next season.

GENE VIDAL, Army/South Dakota
The 5-10, 170-pounder played one game with the Washington Redskins in 1921. . . . Leading scorer for Army basketball team in 1917-18 with 8.3 points per game. The father of left-wing author Gore Vidal, he was a pioneer in the commercial aviation field, helping form both TWA and Northeast Airlines. Worked for the Roosevelt administration. Gene Vidal also was a veteran of the Olympics, placing seventh in the 1920 decathlon and coaching the U.S. pentathlon teams in 1924. He participated in four sports with South Dakota (class of '22).

BOB VOIGTS, Northwestern
All-American tackle in 1938 and head football coach for his alma mater from 1946 through 1954. Starter on 1936 Northwestern team that won the only Big Ten football title in school history (6-0 in league play and 7-1 overall). Selected in the 15th round by the Chicago Bears in the 1939 NFL draft. Coach of the only Northwestern team ever to play in the Rose Bowl. The Wildcats, ranked seventh in the final AP poll in 1946, finished second in the Big Ten behind national champion Michigan, compiled an 8-2 overall record and defeated California, 20-14, in the Rose Bowl. . . . The 5-11, 205-pound Voigts was a three-year letterman in basketball and captain of the team his senior season.

BOB VOSKUHL, Georgetown (Ky.)
First Georgetown College athlete picked by the NFL was selected in the 13th round of the 1951 draft by the Cleveland Browns. . . . Led school to three straight KIAC basketball titles from 1948 through 1950 while earning all-league and Little All-American honors.

CHARLES WADDELL, North Carolina
Tight end played with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in 1977 after winning recognition as an All-ACC tight end. Waddell also lettered in track, capturing the ACC shotput title. . . . The 6-6, 228-pounder played 11 basketball games for the Tar Heels in back-to-back seasons (1972-73 and 1973-74), collecting 37 points and 18 rebounds under coach Dean Smith.

CLINT WAGER, St. Mary's (Minn.)
End caught seven passes for 116 yards with Chicago professional teams in four years from 1942 through 1945. . . . Two-time all-conference basketball center (6-6, 210) participated in the 1941 NAIB Tournament in Kansas City. Played professionally with Oshkosh and Hammond in the NBL before playing for the NBA's Fort Wayne Pistons in 1949-50.

VIRGIL WAGNER, Millikin (Ill.)
Member of Canadian Football League Hall of Fame played halfback for the Montreal Alouettes from 1946 through 1954. Led CFL in scoring in 1947, 1948 and 1949 and tied for scoring title in 1946. Scored two touchdowns for the Alouettes in their 28-15 victory over Calgary in the 1949 Grey Cup game (CFL championship). . . . Second-leading scorer for Millikin's basketball team in 1941-42 and 1942-43.

DOAK WALKER, Southern Methodist
Member of both the College Football and Pro Football Hall of Fame. SMU legend was a three-time All-American halfback and the school's only Heisman Trophy winner (as a junior in 1948). Finished third in Heisman voting in 1947 and 1949. Scored 38 touchdowns in his four-year SMU career, including two kickoff returns in 1947. Walker rushed for 1,928 yards in college, passed for 1,654, caught passes for 454 and returned eight interceptions for 176. He was also a punter and placekicker for the Mustangs. Co-MVP in back-to-back Cotton Bowls (1948 and 1949). First-round choice by the New York Bulldogs in the 1949 NFL draft (3rd pick overall). Walker rushed for 1,520 yards and 12 touchdowns in six years with the Detroit Lions (1950 through 1955), leading the NFL in scoring as a rookie (128 points) and in his final season (96). Member of NFL championship teams in 1952 and 1953 scored on a 62-yard run in the '52 title game. Five-time Pro Bowl selection (1951-52-54-55-56). . . . Walker was a basketball letterman in 1945-46 with SMU as a freshman.

JACKIE WALKER, Jackson State
Linebacker played four years (1986 through 1989) with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers after he was the first selection in the second round of NFL draft (28th pick overall). . . . After playing sparingly as a freshman in 1982-83, the 6-5 Walker was the Tigers' second-leading scorer and rebounder in 1983-84 (10.5 ppg and 7.6 rpg) and 1984-85 (10.5 ppg and 6 rpg).

PAUL WALKER, Yale
Defensive back-offensive end was a 10th-round draft choice by the Detroit Lions in 1945. He caught one pass and had an interception with the New York Giants in 1948. . . . The 6-3, 210-pounder was a three-year basketball letterman in the mid-1940s. Walker was captain of the hoop squad in 1945.

WILL WALLS, Texas Christian
End caught 35 passes for 596 yards and four touchdowns with the New York Giants in six years from 1937 to 1943. Football letterman at TCU from 1934 through 1936. Football/basketball teammate of legendary quarterback Sammy Baugh received one pass from him for 25 yards in the 1936 Sugar Bowl. . . . The 6-4, 210-pounder was a starting forward with TCU's basketball squad for three years from 1935 through 1937.

JIMMY WALTHALL, West Virginia
Quarterback of the Mountaineers' Sun Bowl team in 1949 was selected by two teams in 1948 pro football drafts--Philadelphia (NFL) in 13th round and Buffalo (AAFC) in 16th. . . . Member of NIT basketball squads in 1945 and 1947.

LAURIE WALQUIST, Illinois
Back passed for seven touchdowns, rushed for 10 TDs and had three TD receptions with the Chicago Bears in nine years from 1922 to 1931. . . . The 5-8, 165-pounder was a three-year basketball letterman in the early 1920s.

CHARLIE WARD, Florida State
Heisman Trophy winner and consensus All-American quarterback captured the 1993 Sullivan Award as the nation's premier amateur athlete. Led the Seminoles to 1993 national title by passing for 3,032 yards and 27 touchdowns and rushing for 339 yards and four touchdowns. Passed and rushed for 6,636 yards in his college football career. Orange Bowl MVP in back-to-back victories over Nebraska. . . . Averaged 8.1 ppg, 3.1 rpg, 4.4 apg and 2.6 spg in four-year basketball career from 1990-91 through 1993-94. Played against Bob Knight-coached Indiana in the 1992 NCAA playoffs before averaging 8.3 ppg, 3.5 rpg, 5.5 apg and 3.3 spg in fur tourney games for the 1993 Southeast Regional runner-up. The 6-2 guard set a school career record with 238 steals. Excerpt from school guide: "Lightning quick defender excels in every facet of the game. Great decision maker and poised leader."

BUIST WARREN, Tennessee
Back completed 39.1% of his passes, rushed for 285 yards and two touchdowns, and intercepted one pass with the Philadelphia Eagles and Pittsburgh Steelers in 1945. Three-year letterman as a QB for the Volunteers from 1938 through 1940. . . . The 5-11, 175-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1938 and 1940.

CLIFF WASHBURN, The Citadel
The Chicago Bears signed him to their practice squad in 2003. Later, he made the conversion from defensive to the offensive line in NFL Europe after finishing his sole year of collegiate football with a school-record 12 sacks and a Southern Conference-high 20 tackles for losses. . . . The 6-5, 270-pounder led the Bulldogs in rebounding three consecutive years, averaging 9.2 ppg and 5.7 rpg from 1998-99 through 2001-02.

SID WATSON, Northeastern
Halfback rushed for four touchdowns and caught two TD passes with the Pittsburgh Steelers and Washington Redskins in four years from 1955 through 1958. The 5-11, 185-pounder led the NFL in kickoff returns (27 for 716 yards) as a rookie. . . . Averaged 4.1 ppg in 1951-52 when freshmen were allowed to play varsity during the Korean War.

GEORGE WEBB, Texas Tech
End caught seven passes for 60 yards with Brooklyn in 1943. . . . The 6-1, 180-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1938.

JAMES WHATLEY, Alabama
Tackle and end for the NFL's Brooklyn Dodgers from 1936 through 1938. Starting tackle for 1934 Alabama football team that compiled a 10-0 record and defeated Stanford, 29-13, in the Rose Bowl. All-SEC first-team selection and All-American second-team pick in football in 1935. . . . The 6-4 1/2 center in basketball was a sophomore starter and fourth-leading scorer in the league for the 1933-34 squad that won the school's first SEC title and compiled a 16-2 record. He was a first-team selection on the All-SEC Tournament team in 1934 and 1936. Whatley served as head basketball coach with Western Carolina, Mississippi (1946-47 through 1948-49) and Georgia (1949-50 and 1950-51).

CRESTON WHITAKER, North Texas State
Wide receiver won a Missouri Valley title in the triple jump before catching one pass for the New Orleans Saints in 1972. . . . Led the MVC in field-goal shooting (55.2%) as a junior in 1968-69 when the 6-2 guard averaged 20 ppg and 6 rpg. The next season, he averaged 17.8 ppg and 6.4 rpg.

MARKEE WHITE, Texas State
All-SLC wide receiver played in the 2005 I-AA playoff semifinals. As a senior, the J.C. transfer had a team-high 56 pass receptions for 786 yards and five TDs. Went to training camp with the St. Louis Rams. . . . The 6-6, 205-pounder averaged 7 ppg and 3.2 rpg as a part-time starter in 2004-05.

WILBUR WHITE, Colorado State
Back passed for two touchdowns, rushed for 62 yards and caught two passes with Brooklyn and Detroit in 1935 and 1936. . . . The 6-0, 165-pounder was a basketball letterman from 1932 to 1935.

RUBEN "BUD" WHITEHEAD, Florida State
Defensive back intercepted 15 passes for the San Diego Chargers in eight years from 1961 through 1968 after being their 16th-round draft choice. The 6-0, 185-pounder had seven of his picks, including one for a touchdown, in 1965. In 1959, he led FSU in pass receptions and interceptions. . . . Averaged 2.8 ppg in 15 games for the Seminoles in 1959-60.

S.J. WHITMAN, Tulsa
Defensive back was a 22nd-round draft choice by the Chicago Cardinals in 1951. The 5-11, 185-pounder intercepted 18 passes (7 as a rookie) for 285 yards and one touchdown with the Cards and Chicago Bears in four years through 1954. . . . Basketball letterman in 1949-50 (96 points).

RON WIDBY, Tennessee
Averaged 42 yards per punt in six seasons (1968 through 1973) with the Dallas Cowboys and Green Bay Packers after being a fourth-round draft choice by the New Orleans Saints in 1967. Notched the NFL's longest punt (84 yards) as a rookie in 1968. Played in the Pro Bowl following the 1971 season and appeared in two Super Bowls with the Cowboys (V and VI). Led the NCAA in punting average in 1966 with 43.8. . . . Three-time All-SEC selection averaged 14.5 points and 8.3 rebounds as a sophomore, 17.3 points and eight rebounds as a junior and 22.1 points and 8.7 rebounds as a senior. The 6-4, 210-pound forward scored 50 points vs. LSU as a senior on his way to becoming SEC player of the year in 1966-67 when he was named to the second five on the AP All-American team and third five on UPI All-America team. Widby, an All-Mideast Regional selection in 1967, played briefly with New Orleans in the ABA in 1967-68. He was a 12th-round choice of the Chicago Bulls in the 1967 NBA draft.

JOHN "SOCKO" WIETHE, Xavier
Two-time All-Pro guard-linebacker intercepted three passes for the Detroit Lions in four years from 1939 through 1942. . . . The 6-0, 195-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1934. Compiled a 106-47 record (.693) as Cincinnati's basketball coach in six seasons from 1946-47 through 1951-52 (best season was a 23-5 mark in 1948-49). The Bearcats led the nation in scoring in 1950-51 with 77 ppg.

DICK WILKINS, Oregon
Standout end caught 68 passes for 1,050 yards and seven touchdowns in his pro career with the Los Angeles Dons of the All-America Football Conference (1949) and Dallas Texans (1952) and New York Giants (1954) of the NFL. Selected in the 25th round by the New York Giants in the 1948 NFL draft. Wilkins led the Texans with 32 catches in 1952. He was the leading pass receiver (27 catches for 520 yards and five touchdowns) on 1948 Oregon team that featured quarterback Norm Van Brocklin, compiled a 9-2 mark and won the Pacific Coast Conference championship. The Ducks lost to SMU, 21-13, in the Cotton Bowl that season despite his four receptions for 57 yards, including a 24-yard touchdown pass from Van Brocklin. . . . The 6-2, 185-pound swingman was the leading scorer (12.6-point average) for the Ducks in 1944-45 when they compiled a 30-13 record and participated in the NCAA Tournament. He posted the highest scoring average in the 1945 playoffs (22 ppg) on his way to becoming the first Oregon player to crack the 1,000-point plateau. The next season, he was an All-PCC North Division first-team selection.

NORM WILLEY, Marshall
Lineman was a 13th-round draft choice by the Philadelphia Eagles in 1950 and played eight years with them. He returned an interception for a touchdown as a rookie. Recovered a fumble for a TD in 1954 when he also caught a pass for 37 yards. . . . The 6-2, 220-pounder was a basketball center who scored 51 points in 1947-48 and averaged 3.5 ppg in 1948-49.

A.D. WILLIAMS, Pacific
Flanker was a third-round draft choice by the Los Angeles Rams in 1956 (32nd pick overall). The 6-2, 210-pounder caught a total of 15 passes with the Green Bay Packers (1959), Cleveland Browns (1960) and Minnesota Vikings (1961). One of his receptions with the Vikings was for a touchdown. . . . He was a basketball letterman in the mid-1950s.

ALFRED WILLIAMS, Colorado
Defensive end was a first-round draft choice in 1991 by the Cincinnati Bengals (18th pick overall). The 6-6, 260-pounder registered 55 1/2 quarterback sacks with the Bengals and Denver Broncos in his first eight years. All-Pro selection in 1996 was a member of the Broncos' back-to-back Super Bowl champions (XXXII and XXXIII). Led the Buffaloes in QB sacks all four years, finishing with a total of 35. . . . Registered one steal while playing in one minute of one Big Eight Conference game for the Buffaloes in 1989-90.

DERWIN WILLIAMS, New Mexico
The seventh-round draft choice by the New England Patriots in 1984 caught 14 passes for 228 yards as a wide receiver in three NFL seasons. . . . The 6-0, 180-pounder hit three of five field-goal attempts in five basketball games for the Lobos in 1979-80.

REX WILLIAMS, Texas Tech
Center-linebacker played briefly for the Chicago Cardinals and Detroit Lions in 1940 and 1945 after being a fifth-round draft choice of the New York Giants in 1940. . . . Basketball letterman in 1939.

ROLLIE WILLIAMS, Wisconsin
Back rushed for one touchdown with Racine in 1923. . . . The 5-8, 170-pounder was a basketball letterman from 1921 through 1923.

WANDY WILLIAMS, Hofstra
Running back was a sixth-round draft choice of the Denver Broncos in 1969. He rushed 10 times for one touchdown, caught five passes and returned 23 kickoffs for a 25-yard average. . . . The 6-1, 185-pounder led Hofstra in scoring with 19.9 ppg in 1967-68.

BILLY WILSON, San Jose State
Split end caught 407 passes for 5,902 yards in 10 seasons (1951 through 1960) with the San Francisco 49ers. The 22nd-round choice in the 1950 draft was a Pro Bowl selection six consecutive years (1955 through 1960) and was named to wire-service All-Pro teams in 1955 and 1957. Wilson led the NFL in receptions three consecutive years--1954 (60 catches), 1956 (60) and 1957 (52)--and was named player of the game in the 1955 Pro Bowl after catching 11 passes for 157 yards and a TD. He caught 10 touchdown passes his last three years at San Jose State after spending 19 months in the Pacific with the Navy. . . . The 6-3, 175-pound forward-center averaged 3.3 points per game and grabbed a total of 80 rebounds as a senior letterman for the basketball Spartans in 1950-51 after playing sparingly the previous two years. He scored 107 points in 44 games during three varsity seasons. Wilson collected two points and seven rebounds in a 68-61 opening-round loss to Brigham Young in the NCAA Tournament.

JACK WILSON, Baylor
Halfback rushed for 123 yards in 22 carries, caught a touchdown pass and intercepted one pass in 10 games with the Los Angeles Rams in 1946 and 1947. He was a first-round choice (2nd pick overall) by the Cleveland Browns in the 1942 draft. . . . The 6-0, 200-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1942.

JOE WINDBIEL, Dayton
Center played five games with Evansville in 1921. . . . The 6-1, 220-pounder was a basketball letterman with the Flyers.

BOB WINDSOR, Kentucky
Tight end was a second-round draft choice in 1966 (26th pick overall). He caught 185 passes for 2,307 yards and 14 touchdowns with the San Francisco 49ers and New England Patriots in nine years from 1967 through 1975. Windsor's best season was 1969 when he managed career highs of 49 receptions and 597 yards. . . . The 6-4, 230-pounder collected two points and three rebounds in two basketball games for the Wildcats in 1965-66 under coach Adolph Rupp.

JOHN WINTERHOLLER, Wyoming
Selected to SI's Silver Anniversary All-American Football Team in 1964. . . . Leading basketball scorer for the Cowboys in 1937 with 8.2 points per game. Also competed in track and field as a sprinter.

EARL WITTE, Gustavus Adolphus (Minn.)
Running back-defensive back with the Green Bay Packers for five games in 1934. . . . Two-year letterman in basketball in the late 1920s.

LARRY RAYFIELD WRIGHT, Fort Valley State (Ga.)
Seventh-round draft choice played with the Dallas Cowboys for 13 years from 1967 through 1979. All-Pro offensive tackle six straight seasons from 1971 through 1976. Caught a touchdown pass as a tight end in 1968. Played in five Super Bowls (following 1970, 1971, 1975, 1977 and 1978 campaigns). . . . The 6-6, 245-pounder, an All-SIAC basketball player, averaged 17 ppg and 15 rpg as a junior and 21 ppg and 17.4 rpg as a senior.

LAWRENCE "LONNIE" WRIGHT, Colorado State
Cornerback had a total of five interceptions in two seasons (1966 and 1967) with the AFL's Denver Broncos although he never played a down of college football. He became the first player in professional sports history to compete in football and basketball (Denver Rockets) simultaneously. Wright posted a pro best scoring average of 16.4 points per game in 1968-69 during his five-year ABA career. . . . The 6-2, 205-pound swingman averaged 17.9 points per game in three varsity seasons (1963-64 through 1965-66), pacing CSU in scoring all three seasons (14.1 ppg as a sophomore, 19.7 as a junior and 20.9 as a senior). He collected 25 points and 10 rebounds in two NCAA Tournament games in 1965 and 1966.

WELDON "TED" WRIGHT, North Texas State
Grantland Rice All-American QB led the nation in scoring with 87 points in 1932). The 6-0, 185-pound back rushed for 166 yards and one touchdown with the NFL's Boston Redskins and Brooklyn Dodgers in 1934 and 1935. . . . Letterman on basketball squad in 1932.

DOUG WYCOFF, Georgia Tech
Back threw eight touchdown passes, rushed for 11 TDs and returned two interceptions for TDs with the New York Giants, Staten Island and Boston in six years from 1927 to 1934. . . . The 6-0, 205-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1926.

HARRY CLAYTON WYNNE, Arkansas
End caught 12 passes for 230 yards with Boston and the New York Giants in 1944 and 1945. He was a 22nd-round draft choice of the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1943. . . . The 6-4, 200-pounder was a basketball letterman from 1941 through 1943. He was scoreless in two NCAA Tournament games in 1941.

HARRY "CY" YOUNG, Washington & Lee (Va.)
Football Hall of Famer led his college team in scoring four consecutive years and served as captain in 1916. Coached at William & Mary. . . . Led basketball team in scoring in three of his four years and served as captain in 1915.

WALTER YOUNG, Illinois
Wide receiver was seventh-round draft choice of the Charlotte Panthers in 2003. Practice squad addition to the Pittsburgh Steelers in 2005 was activated by them the next year and caught one pass for 17 yards. Second-leading receiver for the Illini as a junior and senior with at least 50 catches each year. Finished his college career ranking among the top five in school history in each category with 147 receptions for 2,382 yards and 15 touchdowns. Played in the Sugar Bowl against LSU following the 2001 season after contributing a 31-yard catch against Virginia as a redshirt freshman in the Micronpc.com Bowl. . . . The 6-4, 220-pounder collected one field goal, one rebound and one assist in two games as a junior in 2001-02.

JOE ZAPUSTAS, Fordham
End caught one pass for 26 yards with the New York Giants in 1933. . . . The 6-0, 195-pounder was a basketball letterman with the Rams.

JOE ZELLER, Indiana
End scored two touchdowns for the Chicago Bears during his six years with them from 1933 through 1938 after playing one season with the Green Bay Packers. . . . The 6-1, 200-pounder averaged 4.1 ppg as a three-year basketball letterman from 1929-30 through 1931-32.

GIFF ZIMMERMAN, Syracuse
Back rushed for one touchdown and caught one TD pass with Canton in 1925. . . . The 5-10, 180-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1922.

ROY ZIMMERMAN, San Jose State
Quarterback-kicker was a seventh-round draft choice by the Washington Redskins in 1940 before becoming a consensus All-Pro with the Philadelphia Eagles in 1944. The 6-2, 200-pounder completed 299 passes for 4,801 yards and 44 touchdowns, rushed for six TDs, punted 278 times for a 39.8-yard average, kicked 18 field goals and made 91.7% of his extra points (133 of 145) with the Redskins, Eagles, Detroit Lions and Boston Yankees in nine years through 1948. . . . He earned a basketball letter as a center in 1938 and 1939.

WALT ZIRINSKY, Lafayette
Halfback played five games with the Cleveland Browns in 1945 after being their 12th-round draft choice in 1942. . . . The 5-11, 185-pounder led the basketball team in scoring in 1940-41 before becoming captain of the squad the next season.

BOB ZUPPKE, Wisconsin
Member of College Football Hall of Fame compiled a 131-81-13 record as head football coach at Illinois from 1913 through 1941. Directed the Illini to four national titles (1914, 1919, 1923 and 1927) and seven Big Ten championships. . . . Two-year letterman on Wisconsin's basketball team. The seven-man 1904-05 squad was called the "Western intercollegiate champions" by Spalding's Official Basketball Guide.